Page 1

Auction N°5 5th Apr 2017


Graham Wall Real Estate 2 Tole Street Ponsonby PO Box 998 Shortland St Auckland 1140 New Zealand

Graham Wall +64 21 951 368 graham@grahamwall.com

Ollie Wall +64 21 520 514 ollie@grahamwall.com

Andrew Wall +64 21 520 508 andrew@grahamwall.com


everyday-needs.com | 270 Ponsonby Rd, Auckland | studio@everyday-needs.com | 09 378 7988


S E L E C T N Z P H OTO B O O K S

A L L A N M C D O N A L D, A N N S H E LTO N , ANNE NOBLE , BECK Y NUNES, BEN C L E M E N T, B L A I R K I TC H E N E R , B R U C E CO N N E W, DA R R E N G L A S S , DAV I D CO O K , H A R U H I KO S A M E S H I M A , HARVE Y BENGE , M ARK PURDOM , M AT T H E W COWA N , M I C H A E L KRZ ANICH, MICKE Y SMITH, SIMON D E V I T T, S O LO M O N M O R T I M E R , T I M WH IT E , Y VO N N E TO D D

remotephotobooks.com


Published by Turner PhotoBooks with PhotoForum Inc as PhotoForum issue 86 A5, 124 pages, 99 photographs, softcover RRP $25, hardcover $35 (+P&H) Available from Rim Books: info@rimbooks.com


Season 2017

silotheatre.co.nz


te uru

Ry David Bradley, Offworld 1, 2015 (detail)

WATCHING WINDOWS 29 April – 9 July 2017 Opening Saturday 29 April, 4pm Featuring: Ry David Bradley, Catherine Clayton-Smith, Andre Hemer, Biljana Jancic and Céline Struger.

teuru.org.nz


ISSUE 17 OUT NOW

SUBSCRIBE NOW AND RECEIVE YOUR COPY OF VAULT MAGAZINE FIRST MICHEL BLAZY, LOUISE HEARMAN, NICK CAVE, JONATHAN JONES, PHILIPPE PARRENO, CHIHARU SHIOTA, VIKTOR AND ROLF, FFIXXED STUDIOS, PATRIZIA MOROSO, ANTONI MIRALDA, ART COLLECTORS, CATS OF THE ART WORLD, NUDES: ART FROM THE TATE COLLECTION & MORE NICK CAVE Soundsuit mixed media Photo: James Prinz Courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

SUBSCRIBE NOW VAULTART.COM.AU


“Make it tasty! Make it snappy!”

Present your bidding card on the night of the auction for a free drink. Taptails and snacks. “Who dares, gins!

309 Karangahape Rd

lovebucket.co.nz


11 MARCH– 23 JULY FREE ENTRY

Shannon Te Ao tēnei ao kawa nei Walters Prize-winning artist Shannon Te Ao’s sensual cinematic experience reveals and responds to human tenderness and longing through colour, sound and performance.

Supported by our contemporary art partner

christchurchartgallery.org.nz

#chchartgallery

Shannon Te Ao Untitled (malady) (video still) 2016. HD video, single-channel, 13:16 min, colour. Courtesy of the artist and Robert Heald Gallery, Wellington


Issue 2 availbale online at stemme.co.nz


Ann Shelton – Dark Matter traces the 20-year career of a leading New Zealand photographer. Ann Shelton’s evolution as a camera artist with a unique, penetrating vision into the culture and history of New Zealand is beautifully illustrated in this book, which includes multiple examples from all her important bodies of work. Available now at shop.aucklandartgallery.com


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°5 5th April 2017 Opening

Wednesday 29th March, 2017 Viewing

Thursday 30th March – Tuesday 4th April 2017 10am – 5pm Wednesday 5th 2017 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 5th April 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 17.5% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°5 April 5th, 2017 Catalogue of works Edition of 3000 ISSN 2537-6594 Design Direction Editor Design Photography

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Elliot Ferguson Paul Nathan, Sam Hartnett

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon


auction n°5 — april 2017

Contents Plates

24

Essays

121

Murray Cammick untitled

122

Max Coolahan Pit-sawn log

123

Eric Lee-Johnson Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (#48)

124

Feature Yvonne Todd: Early Works

125

Peter Peryer Erika 1979

128

Ans Westra Hikurangi, 1982

129

Marti Friedlander Eglinton Valley

130

Laurence Aberhart Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February, 1999

131

Interview Rhondda Bosworth & Andrew Clark

133

Cindy Sherman Mrs. Claus

136

Harvey Benge Tokyo Girl Number 3, 2005

137

Feature Personal Contact: Tom Hutchins in China

139

Interview Jane Zusters & Andrew Paul Wood

143

Index

146

How to participate in the Auction

158

Conditions of Sale

159


P

L

bowerbank ninow

A

T

E

S


auction n°5 — april 2017


auction n°5 — april 2017

27


bowerbank ninow

Lot 1

Peter Peryer Bluebells 2012 C-type print, edition 11/50 115mm Ă— 155mm

est

$300 - $600

28


bowerbank ninow

Lot 2

John B. Turner Waldorf Tea and Coffee Shop 1969 gelatin silver print signed John B. Turner and inscribed [69-136?] 39-136 PRW 9s 3w, photograph by John B. Turner 18 Lynda Avenue, Paparangi, Wellington in graphite verso 160mm Ă— 200mm

est

$400 - $600

29


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 3

Murray Cammick Pontiac photographed late 1975 1975 gelatin silver print 154mm × 235mm

est

$800 - $1,200

30


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 4

Gary Blackman Edinburgh 1976 1976 gelatin silver print signed Gary Blackman, dated 1976 and inscribed Edinburgh, 76/72a/5 and 2+8 14s + edges in graphite verso 166mm × 241mm

est

$400 - $800

31


bowerbank ninow

Lot 5

Max Oettli Ponsonby Road 1972. Printed 1974. gelatin silver print signed M C Oettli, dated 1972/4 and inscribed Ponsonby Road in ink verso; photographer's stamp applied verso 239mm Ă— 169mm

est

$600 - $900

32


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 6

Jae Hoon Lee Yellow Cloud 2007 C-type print, edition 54/250 signed Lee Jae Hoon, inscribed #54 and dated 2007 in ink verso 200mm × 250mm

est

$700 - $1,200

33


bowerbank ninow

Lot 7

Brian Brake Milford Sound, Fiordland, 1960 1960 chromogenic print 400mm Ă— 600mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

34


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 8

Max Coolahan Pit-sawn log 1959-60 gelatin silver print 392mm × 495mm

est

$600 - $800

Lot 9

Max Coolahan untitled c. 1960s gelatin silver print 405mm × 480mm

est

$600 - $800

35


bowerbank ninow

Lot 10

Max Coolahan untitled c. 1960s gelatin silver print 505mm Ă— 405mm

est

$600 - $800

36


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 11

Peter Peryer untitled c. 1976 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer and dated 26/7/03 New Plymouth in graphite verso 253mm × 204mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

37


bowerbank ninow

Lot 12

Peter Peryer untitled c. 1976 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer and dated 26/7/03 New Plymouth in graphite verso 253mm Ă— 204mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

38


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 13

Gordon H. Burt, Ltd. untitled c. 1939 gelatin silver print 300mm × 380mm

est

$300 - $500

Lot 14

Gordon H. Burt, Ltd. untitled c. 1939 gelatin silver print 300mm × 380mm

est

$300 - $500

39


bowerbank ninow

Lot 15

Les Cleveland Dredge Buckets, Greenstone Valley 1959 gelatin silver print dated 1959 and inscribed Dredge Buckets, Greenstone Valley in graphite lower right; dated 1959 inscribed Dredge Buckets Greenstone Valley, Westland and Les Cleveland Photograph (11-396) on printed label affixed lower right verso 270mm Ă— 373mm

est

$400 - $700

40


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 16

John Johns untitled c. 1960 gelatin silver print 243mm × 297mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

41


bowerbank ninow

Lot 17

Len Wesney Rabbits, Moke Lake, Otago 1971 gelatin silver print 195mm Ă— 295mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

42


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 18

Gordon Walters untitled 1968 silver gelatin print, documentation of Mahuika, 1968, PVA and acrylic on canvas, 1520mm × 1145mm (formerly in the collection of Tim and Shera Francis) inscribed Top^ Painting 1968, Acrylic on canvas 60" × 45" and Black on Blue in graphite verso 215mm × 167mm

est

$500 - $700

43


bowerbank ninow

Lot 19

Richard Killeen Destruction of the Circle 1990 silver gelatin print from a computer-generated negative signed Killeen in graphite verso 475mm Ă— 590mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

44


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 20

Eric Lee Johnson Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (#48) 1955 gelatin silver print inscribed 6368 5. and 13x11 in graphite verso 243mm × 194mm

est

$400 - $600

45


bowerbank ninow

Lot 21

Henry Winkelmann untitled c. 1905 gelatin silver print signed H Winkelmann in ink lower left 540mm Ă— 380mm

est

$500 - $700

Lot 22

Henry Winkelmann untitled c. 1905 gelatin silver print signed H Winkelmann in ink lower left 375mm Ă— 300mm

est

$500 - $700

46


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 23

Allan McDonald untitled 1975 gelatin silver print 77mm × 79mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 24

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 85mm × 83mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 25

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 112mm × 100mm

est

$300 - $600

47


bowerbank ninow

Lot 26

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 74mm Ă— 120mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 27

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 110mm Ă— 160mm

est

$400 - $700

48


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 28

Allan McDonald untitled 1975 gelatin silver print 105mm × 160mm

est

$400 - $700

Lot 29

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 124mm × 184mm

est

$500 - $800

49


bowerbank ninow

Lot 30

Gavin Hipkins untitled 1996 C-type print, edition of 5 490mm Ă— 490mm

est

$400 - $600

Lot 31

Minerva Betts untitled c. 1970 620mm silver bromide selenium toned contact print 63mm Ă— 90mm

est

$300 - $600

50


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 32

Fiona Pardington Dying Freesia in a Silver Water Jug with Two Conus Marmoreus and a Shotgun Shell Ripiro 2014 archival inkjet print, 6/25 signed Fiona Pardington and dated 2014 in graphite lower right verso 385mm × 289mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

51


bowerbank ninow

Lot 33

Yvonne Todd untitled 1998 gelatin silver print 140mm Ă— 105mm

est

$600 - $900

52


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 34

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 chromogenic print 244mm × 192mm

est

$500 - $1,000

53


bowerbank ninow

Lot 35

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 72mm × 94mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 36

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 chromogenic print 72mm × 112mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 37

Yvonne Todd Michelle St. Clair 2001 C-type print from 4" x 5" transparency, artist's proof 165mm × 120mm

est

$600 - $900

54


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 38

Yvonne Todd Sheri-Ann Roller Slut c. 1995 gelatin silver print inscribed Dear Michelle Sheri-Ann Roller Slut in ink lower edge 125mm × 100mm

est

$600 - $900

Lot 39

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 125mm × 100mm

est

$400 - $700

55


bowerbank ninow

Lot 40

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm Ă— 185mm

est

$500 - $1,000

Lot 41

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm Ă— 185mm

est

$500 - $1,000

56


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 42

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

est

$500 - $1,000

Lot 43

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 235mm × 175mm

est

$500 - $1,000

57


bowerbank ninow

Lot 44

Yvonne Todd 'motel' Cheri Champagne, Sweet Carolina & Princess the maid 1995 gelatin silver print signed Yvonne, dated september 1995 and inscribed 'motel' Cheri Champagne, Sweet Carolina & Princess the Maid in ink verso 162mm Ă— 228mm

est

$500 - $1,000

58


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 45

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 110mm × 140mm

est

$400 - $700

Lot 46

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 110mm × 124mm

est

$400 - $700

59


bowerbank ninow

Lot 47

Yvonne Todd Ramona c. 1995 A4 spiral-bound sketchbook (36 pp.), 15 gelatin silver prints, 15 printed labels inscribed Ramona in Letraset; signed Yvonne Todd in ink 297mm Ă— 210mm

est

$500 - $1,000

60


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 48

Glenn Busch Charlie Roughton; Foreman, Metal Foundry (Wellington, 1982) 1982 gelatin silver print 190mm × 190mm

est

$800 - $1,600

61


bowerbank ninow

Lot 49

Glenn Busch Man with a transistor radio, Auckland 1973 gelatin silver print 186mm Ă— 126mm

est

$600 - $800

62


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 50

Michael Parekowhai Lou Lombardi 2000 C-type print, edition of 10 535mm × 438mm

est

$7,000 - $9,000

63


bowerbank ninow

Lot 51

Fiona Pardington Fontanelle 1993 gelatin silver print 350mm Ă— 275mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

64


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 52

Murray Cammick Kerry and Violet chic, Queen St 1975 gelatin silver print 235mm × 154mm

est

$800 - $1,200

65


bowerbank ninow

Lot 53

Murray Cammick The overflow crowd from Bill Rowling's Labour election meeting in the foyer of the Mt Eden War Memorial Hall 1975 gelatin silver print 161mm Ă— 240mm

est

$600 - $900

Lot 54

Murray Cammick Gary Glitter, Auckland Town Hall 1975 gelatin silver print 242mm Ă— 260mm

est

$800 - $1,200

66


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 55

Glenn Busch untitled c. 1973-4 gelatin silver print inscribed Work Proof/Not for Repro and Do not Crop in ink upper edge verso; signed Glenn Busch and inscribed 79 Ardmore Road Ponsonby Auckland Photo Marylands School CH.CH (run by)/ Brothers/ St John of God in ink lower edge verso 170mm × 170mm

est

$600 - $900

67


bowerbank ninow

Lot 56

Joe Deal Untitled (Los Angeles) 1973 gelatin silver print signed J. Deal and dated '73 in graphite lower edge; dated 1973 and inscribed University: Institute of Design, IIT, Photo Title: Untitled (Los Angeles) on printed label affixed verso 250mm Ă— 250mm

est

$800 - $1,600

68


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 57

Fiona Pardington Rifleman 2006 gelatin silver print 595mm × 445mm

est

$4,000 - $6,000

69


bowerbank ninow

Lot 58

Ben Cauchi Loaded Palm 2002 gold toned printing out paper print signed B Cauchi, dated 2002 and inscribed 'Loaded Palm', P.O.P. print, gold toned and Print N4 (2002) in graphite lower edge verso 195mm Ă— 245mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

70


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 59

Peter Peryer Erika c 1979 1979. Printed 1988. gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, inscribed Erika c 1979, This print was made 25/2/88, No final prints made prior to this date and [brooch] in graphite verso; Dunedin Public Art Gallery Label affixed upper right verso 405mm × 268mm

est

$6,000 - $9,000

71


bowerbank ninow

Lot 60

Marti Friedlander Louise Henderson 1972 1972 gelatin silver print 240mm Ă— 185mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

72


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 61

Henri Cartier-Bresson Beijing 1948-9 gelatin silver print photographer's/copyright stamp applied and numbered 276_23 in ink verso 171mm × 251mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

73


bowerbank ninow

Lot 62

Gil Hanly Hamilton 81 1981 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly in graphite verso; inscribed Hamilton 81 in graphite in another hand verso 142mm Ă— 204mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 63

Gil Hanly Marlborough Street 3rd Test Auckland 12 September 1981 1981 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly, inscribed Marlborough Street 3rd Test Auckland and dated 12 September 1981 in graphite verso; inscribed 1/18 in ink lower edge verso 140mm Ă— 205mm

est

$300 - $600

74


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 64

Ans Westra Ruatoria, 1963 1963 gelatin silver print signed Ans in graphite lower right 187mm × 187mm

est

$4,000 - $6,000

75


bowerbank ninow

Lot 65

Ans Westra Hikurangi, 1982 1982 gelatin silver print signed Ans W in ink verso 292mm Ă— 238mm

est

$4,000 - $7,000

76


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 66

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey 2001 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, dated 27/09/2001 and inscribed Peter McLeavey in graphite lower edge verso 185mm × 235mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 67

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey Gallery (with Toss Woolaston painting) 2000 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, dated 23/9/2000 and inscribed Peter McLeavey Gallery (with Toss Woolaston painting) in graphite lower edge verso 185mm × 235mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 68

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey Gallery 2001 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, inscribed Peter McLeavey Gallery and dated 26/6/2001 in graphite lower edge verso 185mm × 235mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 69

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey Gallery (last day before clearout) 2001 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, dated 20/10/2001 and inscribed Peter McLeavey gallery (last day before clearout) in graphite lower edge verso 185mm × 235mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

77


bowerbank ninow

Lot 70

Anne Noble Wanganui River 1975 gelatin silver print signed Ann Shelton, dated 1975 and inscribed Wanganui River in graphite verso 171mm Ă— 260mm

est

$300 - $500

Lot 71

Anne Noble Water I c. 1975 gelatin silver print dated 1974 in graphite in another hand verso 142mm Ă— 215mm

est

$300 - $500

78


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 72

Marti Friedlander Eglinton Valley 1970 gelatin silver print 195mm × 285mm

est

$5,000 - $8,000

79


bowerbank ninow

Lot 73

Bruce Connew Muttonbirds—Part of a Story #5 2002. Printed 2003. gelatin silver print signed Bruce Connew, dated November 2002/2003/5 and inscribed #5 in graphite verso 204mm × 253mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

80


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 74

Laurence Aberhart Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February 1999. 1999 gold and selenium-toned gelatin silver print signed L. Aberhart, dated 11/1999 and inscribed Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February 1999. in ink lower edge 198mm × 245mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

81


bowerbank ninow

Lot 75

Laurence Aberhart The Wellington Chinese Masonic Society Inc, Frederick Street, 2 January 1992 1992 gelatin silver print signed L. Aberhart, dated 1992 and inscribed The Wellington Chinese Masonic Society Inc, Frederick Street, 2 January 1992, For Kerry: "An Implied 23." and #1. ink lower edge 195mm Ă— 246mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

82


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 76

Anne Noble Rimu Tapu. Kaikoura. From the series Te hikoi ö Kati Kuri. 1992-1994 gelatin silver print dated 1992 - 94 and inscribed Rimu Tapu. Kaikoura. From the series Te hikoi ö Kati Kuri and (NO 49) in graphite lower edge verso 350mm × 700mm

est

$2,400 - $3,200

83


bowerbank ninow

Lot 77

Theo Schoon untitled c. 1950. Printed later by Ans Westra. gelatin silver print 178mm Ă— 178mm

est

$500 - $1,000

84


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 78

Peter Peryer Engine Leaving Glen Innes Tunnel 1992 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, inscribed Engine Leaving, Glen Innes Tunnel and dated 1992 in graphite verso 350mm × 350mm

est

$4,000 - $6,000

85


bowerbank ninow

Lot 79

Edward Nellis 329 1972 gelatin silver print dated November 1972 and inscribed University: U. of Iowa, Photo Title: 329, C-14 on printed label affixed verso 145mm Ă— 215mm

est

$200 - $400

Lot 80

John R. Grimes Chicago 1974 gelatin silver print signed J Grimes and dated 74 in graphite lower edge; dated 1974 and inscribed University: Institute of Design, IIT, Photo Title: Chicago, C-11 on printed label affixed verso 180mm Ă— 330mm

est

$200 - $400

86


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 81

Laurence Aberhart David Bowie 1978 gelatin silver print 245mm × 165mm

est

$2,000 - $4,000

87


bowerbank ninow

Lot 82

George Silk Bobby & Ted Kennedy at Bob's Home at death of Pres. John Kennedy 1963 gelatin silver print 496mm Ă— 350mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

88


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 83

Laurence Aberhart Ramones 1980 gelatin silver print signed Aberhart, dated 80 and inscribed Ramones in ink lower left 336mm × 485mm

est

$2,500 - $4,500

89


bowerbank ninow

Lot 84

Laurence Aberhart Ramones 1980 gelatin silver print signed Aberhart, dated 80 and inscribed Ramones in ink lower left 336mm Ă— 485mm

est

$2,500 - $4,500

90


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 85

Rhondda Bosworth C. M.—portrait/close up 1977 gelatin silver print 170mm × 253mm

est

$700 - $1,200

91


bowerbank ninow

Lot 86

Rhondda Bosworth Mother goes upside-down 1984 gelatin silver print dated 1984 and inscribed Mother goes upside-down in ink on label affixed verso 110mm Ă— 170mm

est

$600 - $800

Lot 87

Rhondda Bosworth Self-Portrait 2 1985 gelatin silver print dated 1985 and inscribed self-portrait 2 in ink verso 200mm Ă— 250mm

est

$700 - $1,200

92


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 88

Rhondda Bosworth ‘Moana Taha’ 1978 gelatin silver print 250mm × 202mm

est

$700 - $1,200

93


bowerbank ninow

Lot 89

Marie Shannon In the TV lounge of the Marlin Hotel 1984 gelatin silver print, edition 2/10 signed Marie Shannon and inscribed In the TV lounge of the Marlin Hotel 1984' in graphite verso 124mm Ă— 818mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

94


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 90

Cindy Sherman Mrs. Claus 1990 C-type print, edition of 125 signed Cindy Sherman and dated 1990 in ink verso 330mm × 254mm

est

$2,500 - $3,500

95


bowerbank ninow

Lot 91

Harvey Benge Tokyo Girl Number 3, 2005 2005 pigment inkjet print, edition 1/5 signed Harvey Benge and inscribed Tokyo 2005 in indian ink verso 750mm Ă— 500mm

est

$3,500 - $5,500

96


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 92

Paul Johns untitled c. 1980s Polaroid SX:70 instant film 75mm × 75mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 93

Paul Johns untitled c. 1970-79 gelatin silver print 88mm × 140mm

est

$300 - $600

97


bowerbank ninow

Lot 94

Minerva Betts untitled c. 1970 silver bromide fibre-based 35mm print 134mm Ă— 90mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 95

Minerva Betts untitled c. 1970 silver bromide fibre-based 35mm print Moller's Gallery label affixed verso 145mm Ă— 100mm

est

$400 - $800

98


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 96

Laurence Aberhart Hau Hau Flag #2 1983 gelatin silver print inscribed Hau Hau Flag #2 in ink lower left; inscribed Hau Hau Flag 2, Laurence Aberhart, 1983 in graphite in another hand verso 100mm × 240mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

Lot 97

Laurence Aberhart Hau Hau Flag #3 1983 gelatin silver print inscribed Hau Hau Flag #3 in ink lower left; inscribed Hau Hau Flag 3, Laurence Aberhart, 1983 in graphite in another hand verso 90mm × 230cm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

99


bowerbank ninow

Lot 98

Brian Brake Woven Comb, Solomon Islands, c. 1925-1930 c. 1980 gelatin silver print 295mm Ă— 200mm

est

$400 - $600

Lot 99

Brian Brake Woven Comb, Solomon Islands, c. 1925-1930 c. 1980 gelatin silver print 295mm Ă— 200mm

est

$400 - $600

100


bowerbank auction n°5ninow — april 2017

Lot 100

Tom Hutchins Coolies pulling a cart past a government's Buick car, Peking (Beijing), China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and inscribed 'COOLIES PULLING A CART PAST A GOVERMENT'S BUICK CAR, PEKING, CHINA, 1956' and C160/22 in graphite verso 155mm × 235mm

est

$400 - $700

Lot 101

Tom Hutchins Wheat harvesting on 'Red Star' farm, Peking (Beijing), China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and inscribed [R6-8: WHEAT HARVESTING ON "RED STAR" FARM, PEKING, CHINA, 1956] in graphite verso 172mm × 243mm

est

$400 - $700

101


bowerbank ninow

Lot 102

Tom Hutchins Working Party on Railway Water Channel in Desert, Yumen, China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and [R21-8: WORKING PARTY ON RAILWAY WATER CHANNEL IN DESRT, YUMEN, CHINA, 1956] in graphite verso 211mm × 191mm

est

$400 - $700

Lot 103

Tom Hutchins Lanchow, China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and inscribed [R25-12. LANCHOW, CHINA, 1956. PRINTED 2003.] in graphite verso 178mm × 240mm

est

$400 - $700

102


bowerbank ninow

Lot 104

Jane Zusters Laurence Aberhart, Kamala and the Hammond Boys - Lyttleton 1976 1976 gelatin silver print signed Zusters and inscribed "AP" Laurence Aberhart, Kamala and the Hammond Boys—Lyttleton 1976 in graphite on label affixed verso 150mm × 230mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

103


bowerbank ninow

Lot 105

Jane Zusters Life Drawing North Beach, Christchurch 1978 1978 gelatin silver print signed Zusters and inscribed AP " Life Drawing North Beach, Christchurch 1976 in graphite on label affixed verso 140mm Ă— 225mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

104


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 106

Estate of L Budd Lorne St studio c. 1980s silver bromide fibre-based print (section), documentation of works from category Chattels, Series 200 & 900, The Estate of L. Budd: Catalogue of Extant Works, (Auckland: Michael Lett, 2008) 120mm × 260mm

est

$400 - $800

105


bowerbank ninow

Lot 107

Peter Peryer AEPB 1975 gelatin silver print 176mm Ă— 177mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

106


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 108

Ian MacDonald Colin McCahon Studio #4 1977 C-type print signed Ian Macdonald in pencil verso 391mm × 382mm

est

$800 - $1,600

107


bowerbank ninow

Lot 109

Steve Rumsey Barry Brickell, Mormon Pots 1958 gelatin silver print signed Steve Rumsey, dated Photo taken 1958 and inscribed Barry Brickell, Mormon Pots, Suiter St, Newmarket and SAR 35mm Neg. No 359/22 in graphite verso 203mm Ă— 154mm

est

$200 - $300

Lot 110

Steve Rumsey Barry Brickell coiling pot at Suiter Street, Newmarket, Auckland 1958 gelatin silver print signed Steve Rumsey, dated Photo taken 1958 and inscribed Suiter St, Newmarket, X Negative damaged X, and Copy Neg in graphite verso; inscribed Copy Neg. 96-4/14 in ink verso 203mm Ă— 155mm

est

$200 - $300

108


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 111

George Valentine Pink Terrace, Lake Rotomahana 1885 albumen silver print signed G.V. and inscribed PINK TERRACE, L. ROTOMAHANA. 2e. on negative lower left 185mm × 287mm

est

$400 - $600

Lot 112

Josiah Martin View of the White Terrace c. 1880s carbon print blind stamped Martin Auckland N.Z. lower right 395mm × 535mm

est

$600 - $1,200

109


bowerbank ninow

Lot 113

Burton Brothers Maori Land 1885 albumen silver print inscribed IMP 1885 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed B in graphite upper right verso 254mm Ă— 196mm

est

$100 - $200

Lot 114

Samuel Heath Head untitled c. 1906 albumen silver print 387mm Ă— 315mm

est

$150 - $250

110


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 115

Henry Lock Lower Incline W.G.G. Works 1880 albumen silver print signed H.T.L. and inscribed LOWER INCLINE W.G.G. WORKS on negative lower right 195mm × 239mm

est

$100 - $200

Lot 116

Henry Lock View from top of upper incline, looking towards sea 1880 albumen silver print signed H.T.L. and inscribed TOP OF INCLINE TRAMWAY W.G.G. WOR'S on negative lower right 202mm × 276mm

est

$100 - $200

111


bowerbank ninow

Lot 117

Henry Gaze Eventide 1920 gelatin silver print signed H ' E Gaze and inscribed "Eventide" and Hamilton 1920 in ink lower edge; inscribed Gaze Hamilton "Eventide", Dr Douglas G " Oak and 539 in graphite verso 150mm × 226mm

est

$200 - $300

Lot 118

George Chance Spring Morning, Avon, Christchurch c. 1940 gelatin silver print signed Geo. Chance. F.R.P.S. and inscribed Spring Morning—Avon—Christchurch—NZ.in ink lower edge 230mm × 280mm

est

$100 - $200

112


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 119

Peter Butler Police Force 1981 gelatin silver print signed Peter Butler, dated 1.8.81 and inscribed 'Police Force' and Palmerston North in ink lower edge verso 210mm × 145mm

est

$300 - $600

113


bowerbank ninow

Lot 120

Anthony Phelps Shields protect front liners at barricade, Royal TCE/Sandringham RD Corner, after Biko March had passed 1981 gelatin silver print 168mm Ă— 140mm

est

$100 - $200

Lot 121

Gil Hanly Tim Shadbolt Domain 81 1981 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly in graphite verso; inscribed Tim Shadbolt Domain 81 in another hand in graphite verso 142mm Ă— 206mm

est

$300 - $600

114


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 122

Marti Friedlander untitled gelatin silver print signed Marti Friedlander in ink lower left verso 180mm × 295mm

est

$1,200 - $1,800

115


bowerbank ninow

Lot 123

Arthur Northwood In The Far North, Jolly Maori school children of Te Hapua school Parenga c. 1910s gelatin silver print inscribed In The Far North Jolly Maori school children of Te Hapua school Parenga in graphite verso 151mm Ă— 205mm

est

$200 - $300

Lot 124

Marie Shannon Self-Portrait with Sister 1979 gelatin silver print inscribed Self-Portrait with Sister and dated c. 1979 in another hand verso 260mm Ă— 385mm

est

$800 - $1,600

116


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 125

Justin Boroughs untitled 1974 gelatin silver print signed Just Boroughs and dated 1974 in graphite lower right 195mm × 240mm

est

$300 - $600

117


bowerbank ninow

Lot 126

Ivan Rogers Memorial Store, Auckland, 1983 1983 gelatin silver print 255mm Ă— 385mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 127

Do Van Toan untitled c. 1972 gelatin silver print signed Photograph by Do Van Toan in ink verso 200mm Ă— 290mm

est

$200 - $300

118


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 128

Spencer Bigby Michael Joseph Savage 1935 gelatin silver print 285mm × 225mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 129

Murray Cammick Robert Muldoon at National Party Convention, Wellington Town Hall 1975 gelatin silver print 175mm × 116mm

est

$600 - $900

119


bowerbank ninow

Lot 130

Margaret Dawson Dog (Hobbyhorse series) 2005 C-type print from medium format negative in custom frame, edition of 3 560mm × 480mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

Lot 131

Harvey Benge Two Blue Buckets—After Fraser—Rome 12/1994 1994 chromogenic print signed Harvey Benge, dated 12/1994 and inscribed Two blue buckets—after fraser—Rome in ink lower edge 114mm × 190mm

est

$400 - $600

120


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 132

James Bragge Manawatu Gorge Bridge 1878 albumen silver print inscribed Manawatu Gorge Bridge in ink lower edge; inscribed gBRA003-00 and Bragge, Manawatu Gorge Bridge 1878 in graphite verso 220mm × 291mm

est

$400 - $600

Lot 133

James Bragge Taupo Road/Ruapehu c.1876 albumen silver print inscribed Taupo. Road. N. Z. 4th. February. 1880. in ink lower edge; inscribed Ruapehu. N.Z. 5th. February. 1880. in ink lower edge verso 212mm × 288mm/183mm × 280mm

est

$350 - $450

121


E

S

auction n°5 — april 2017

S

A

Murray Cammick untitled

122

Max Coolahan Pit-sawn log

123

Eric Lee-Johnson Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (#48)

124

Feature Yvonne Todd: Early Works

125

Peter Peryer Erika c 1979

128

Ans Westra Hikurangi, 1982

129

Marti Friedlander Eglinton Valley

130

Laurence Aberhart Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February, 1999

131

Interview Rhondda Bosworth & Andrew Clark

133

Cindy Sherman Mrs. Claus

136

Harvey Benge Tokyo Girl Number 3, 2005

137

Feature Personal Contact: Tom Hutchins in China

139

Interview Jane Zusters & Andrew Paul Wood

143

Y

S


Lot 3

bowerbank ninow

Murray Cammick untitled 1975 gelatin silver print 154mm × 235mm

founded two music labels: Southside Records in 1989, an early incubator for Pacific hip hop, and Wildside Labels, which fostered the New Zealand rock revival of the 1990s. Part of what gives Cammick’s pictures their charge is their holistic, sensitive, non-judgemental embrace of the subcultures he was documenting. This aesthetic shows the influence of the movie American Graffiti, which had come out in 1973, but also a kind of shy deference that perhaps stems from Cammick being a somewhat inexperienced born-again Christian when he began recording these slices of an edgier, more primal side of life with his SLR Minolta. It was a time when professional cameras were still far from ubiquitous, and to have a stranger ask to take your picture was glamorous and flattering, especially for people consciously putting themselves on display. One of the works available, an untitled transparency, has a certain cachet of notoriety. This image is one of the last photographs taken of a young trans woman, Violet Pratt, who died of a presumed drug overdose in police custody in 1980. The image became familiar to a broader public when it was subsequently used in newspaper reports of the incident that suggested her death was due to police neglect. It’s a remarkably empathetic image that unfortunately ended up teamed with a lot of less-sympathetic media in a less-than-sympathetic era.

p.29

Murray Cammick emerged in the mid-1970s alongside other New Zealand documentary photographers like Glenn Busch, Fiona Clark and Clive Stone, seeking communities and identities that were on the margins of the bland mainstream culture of the times. Through his love for soul music and Americana, Cammick was drawn to a nocturnal and youthful urban demimonde of Auckland’s Queen Street. Between 1974 (while still a student at the Elam School of Fine Art) and 1981, he documented an early manifestation of boy racer culture: the young men (and a few women), mainly out of West Auckland, who paraded their restored classic American V8 cars up Queen Street on a Saturday night, and the entourages that followed them.

Somewhere along the way, around 3200 negatives of Flash Cars went missing, but these were rediscovered after a chance meeting in 2014, in turn leading to a survey retrospective at Darren Knight Gallery in Sydney and Black Asterisk in Auckland, in 2014. Cammick’s photos are represented in the collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington, which also published examples in the books Art of Te Papa (2009) and New Zealand Photography Collected (2015). Cammick’s work also appears in David Eggleton’s Into the Light: A History of New Zealand Photography (Craig Potton Press, 2006).

This became the series Flash Cars, to which the present images belong. This series typifies Cammick’s approach to the problematic relationship between photographer and subject. Despite being slightly older than his subjects (although he still lived with his parents in Glendowie when he started), Cammick achieved his subjects’ trust by being part flattering courtier and enthusiastic supporter who ingratiated himself with attention and free prints, and part social anthropologist, observing, perhaps slightly enviously, from the outside.

Selections from Flash Cars were exhibited at Snaps Gallery in Auckland in 1976 and 1977, and were included in a number of group exhibitions: The Active Eye at Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, in 1975; Drive at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth in 2000; and the touring exhibition History in the Taking: 40 Years of PhotoForum which appeared at Auckland’s Gus Fisher Gallery in 2014 and City Gallery, Wellington in 2015.

Other aspects of Cammick’s work touched on sex work and the emergence of punk in New Zealand, chiming with the work of Fiona Clark, and the working man, paralleling Glenn Busch. Cammick’s easy relationship with outsider youth culture eventually led in 1977 to the founding of Rip It Up magazine with Alastair Dougal, and what became a career in rock journalism. In the 1980s Cammick launched other publications: the short-lived Extra, street fashion magazine Cha-Cha, and pop magazine Shake. He also

andrew paul wood

123


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 8

Max Coolahan Pit-sawn log 1959/60 gelatin silver print 392mm × 495mm

and Imogen Cunningham raises a high bar for Coolahan’s photographs, but the comparison is not unwarranted. Coolahan’s practice was founded on the kind of tight, technical photography endorsed by Weston and his disciples, which at the time was referred to as “pure” photography—reflecting Weston’s concern that to be a viable art form, photography needed to develop an identity divorced from that of the arts which had come before it, such as painting and drawing. Group f.64 was essentially a modernist movement in terms of its goals and outlook, but it also emphasised the role of the camera as a direct, impartial means of documenting the world. In this sense, the photographer’s “eye,” their ability to selectively isolate elements of the natural world and imbue them with pattern and meaning, took priority over their ability to manipulate the materials of photography in the darkroom. Turning to Coolahan’s own work, it is clear that his photographs fit many of the criteria of “pure” photography, as set out by f.64. In Pit-sawn log (1959-60), Coolahan turns his camera on a section of tree trunk, documenting each crack and fissure in the wood, as well as the toothmarks of the saw which criss-cross the surface. All parts of the object are in focus, encouraging the viewer to look closely at each detail. The simple design of the image emphasises its formal qualities, transforming the found object into a modernist composition. In its simplicity, this photograph brings to mind Weston’s assertion that photography should capture “the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself.”

p.34

After a limited formal education, Max Coolahan served in the signals division during World War Two, where he was trained as a photographer for the purposes of gathering military intelligence. He was seriously injured in New Guinea and was discharged as a result, subsequently experiencing what would now be considered post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but was then diagnosed as “shell-shock.” Coolahan moved to New Zealand with his wife Kate in 1952, settling in Wellington. Coolahan purchased a hut in the Orongorongo Valley, a stretch of dense bush south of Lower Hutt, which became a refuge from his struggle with PTSD and also a source of inspiration.

For Weston, the photograph should not be a mere recording or facsimile, but something which looks beyond the physical object, capturing the meaning of its subject in a typically modernist search for an essential truth or reality. Coolahan’s photograph brings to mind f.64 images like Edward Weston’s photographs of vegetables— cabbages, peppers and onions—or Imogen Cunningham’s botanical studies. In these works, biological forms become modernist emblems, patterns of light whose stark formal qualities are their primary feature: tone, contrast, texture, shadow and structure.

Coolahan took all of his photographs in Orongorongo, documenting the landscape as well as details of the bush: plants, trees, stones and creeks. He exhibited two shows of his work in Wellington: Images from Nature in 1962 and Images and Abstracts in 1963. Some of these photographs were selected for a UNESCO travelling exhibition which toured internationally, including to Japan and Israel. However, Coolahan did not pursue an art career, instead working as a teacher at Onslow College from 1962 until ill-health forced him to retire in 1983. Coolahan’s photography was a part of his pedagogy as a teacher; his works were intended to demonstrate the fundamentals of modernist design and composition, a function at which they excel.1

Although Coolahan’s mature works were created long after f.64 had disbanded (the group was all but defunct by the early 1940s), he followed their precepts and the modernist ideals which motivated them. In Coolahan’s works, the details of New Zealand’s natural environment are wedded to the artist’s rich understanding of the modernist project, but are also imbued with an order and tranquillity that speaks of a deep love for the bush, and is a reflection of the peace and comfort that he found there.

In Mark Derby’s essay on Max Coolahan, one of the very few published sources about this reclusive artist, the author cites Eymard Bradley’s observation that Coolahan’s crisply focused black and white nature studies echo the style of the Californian Group f.64.2 Invoking the names of Edward Weston, Ansel Adams

Andrew clark

124

1

Mark Derby, “Going Bush: Photographer Max Coolahan,” Art New Zealand 98, Autumn 2001, 78.

2

Ibid., 80.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 20

Eric Lee-Johnson Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (#48) 1955 gelatin silver print inscribed 6368 5. and 13×11 in graphite verso 243mm × 194mm

afterwards worked in advertising, before spending eight years in London where he worked in radio and journalism. Upon returning to New Zealand, Lee-Johnson prioritised his painting practice, imbuing it with a regionalism that he felt was essential if New Zealand painting was to develop its own identity. However, photography was woven throughout both Lee-Johnson's commercial and personal practice, continuing a passion he'd discovered aged eleven upon borrowing his mother's box Brownie. By the late 1930s, he was freelancing for a range of publications while continuing to take photographs as a “creative outlet.”5 And yet, Lee-Johnson was reticent about signing his name to his photo-documentary work: he felt, as John B. Turner suggests, an “ambivalence” toward this significant part of his creative practice.6 This is no surprise: the battle to have photography accepted as an art form was far from over, almost 100 years after English photographers Julia Margaret Cameron and Henry Peach Robinson had led the charge. Lee-Johnson noted wryly in his autobiography, "in [the] New Zealand of the mid-fifties, photography was not an art, and I had no wish to be downgraded as a painter who dabbled in this somewhat despised field."7 Unrestrained by the need to develop a consistent photographic “style,” his photography demonstrates the eclecticism of an artist exploring photography's many possibilities. Lee-Johnson’s documentary practice often manifested the modernist aesthetic he was exposed to in London, yet much of his photographic practice would remain unknown until after his death.

p.44

Eric Lee-Johnson's Opo series documents a particular moment in New Zealand's social history, one that we can look back on with a certain nostalgia, but it's also another kind of document: a record of photography’s struggle to be accepted as a creative rather than technical practice, and Lee-Johnson's response to that struggle. Had he pursued this aspect of his practice further, his insightful documentary photographs of mid-century New Zealand might play a more significant role in New Zealand’s visual history, so comfortably do they sit alongside the work of Ans Westra or Les Cleveland.

During the summer of 1955-6, the Hokianga Harbour town of Opononi was inundated with tourists eager to see an unexpected visitor: a bottlenose dolphin who sought out human interaction and performed tricks for enchanted observers. Named Opo by locals, the dolphin had first approached local fishing boats early in 1955, and later that year came closer to the shore, encountering smaller vessels and swimmers.1 By Christmas she was a daily attraction, allowing small children short rides on her back, playing with a beach ball and flipping beer bottles in the air, to the delight of those watching.2 Opo became a national, then an international celebrity. Given the publicity, locals became concerned for Opo’s safety. Their fears were realised in early March 1956 when Opo was found dead in a shallow rock pool, the cause of her death unknown.3

deidra sullivan

Most photographs of Opo were unattributed, or attributed to a photographer named “Spencer Hill.”4 However, with the Auckland Art Gallery's 1994 exhibition Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin, it became apparent New Zealand artist Eric Lee-Johnson had taken most of the unattributed photographs as well as those by “Spencer Hill,” Lee’s pseudonym. Lee-Johnson had attended the Elam School of Fine Art from 1924, and

1

"Opo," in An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, ed. A. H. McLintock, (1966). Reproduced at "Te Ara: the Encyclopedia of New Zealand," accessed February 22, 2017, http://www. teara.govt.nz/en/1966/opo

2

Eric Lee-Johnson and Elizabeth Lee-Johnson, Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (Auckland: David Ling Publishing, 1994).

3

Ibid., 44.

4

John B. Turner, Eric Lee-Johnson: Artist With a Camera (Auckland: PhotoForum, 1999), 72.

5

Eric Lee-Johnson, No Road to Follow: Autobiography of a New Zealand Artist (Auckland: Godwit Press, 1994), 34.

6 Turner, Artist With a Camera, 7. 7 Lee-Johnson, No Road to Follow, 158.

125


Lots 34-36, 38-47

auction n°5 — april 2017

feature Yvonne Todd: Early Works

p.58

By now, the narrative surrounding Yvonne Todd’s career has become part of the enduring mythology of New Zealand art. As Megan Dunn notes, Todd’s surprise win at the inaugural Walters Prize was positioned at the time as a shocking, upset win for a “shore girl” made good, an ex- wig-shop attendant, receptionist and strip club waitress who won a major art award.1 Coupled to this tendency to emphasise Todd’s biography is a similar tendency to elide the practice which gives rise to the images themselves; it sometimes seems as though her oeuvre sprang onto the scene as a fullyformed entity, complete and self-sufficient. However, this is far from being the case, as is demonstrated by this selection of her early work. Here, many of the ideas and themes explored in Todd’s mature practice can be seen, although in their formative stages.

these scenarios: they are designed to highlight their own performativity, their excessive nature becoming a fragility that hides an emptiness, a mask that conceals not the face, but another mask. These works directly prefigure Todd’s 1998 Thrombosis work, which similarly enacts a deliberately performed aura of seediness, presenting a series of vignettes as though they were snapshots dredged from the bottom of a cluttered drawer. Like Thrombosis, most of these early works are silver gelatin prints, a marked contrast to the lush colour she would employ later. However, Todd never entirely abandoned monochrome, returning to black and white for a number of works including Tide (2003) and Roba (2004). Todd’s persistent interest in challenging or discomforting her viewer can be seen in these early works. In later images such as Frenzy (2006) or Hazel the Forbidden (2007) the threat is implicit, encoded in the awkwardness of the body language of the sitter and the strange scenario in which they are placed. Here, the threat is explicit: a girl emerges from a darkened stairwell, menacing the camera with a rake;

These photographs initially present themselves as candid, voyeuristic snaps, relics of boozy weekends or perhaps tawdry, voyeuristic magazine shoots. However, like Cindy Sherman’s seminal Untitled Film Stills series (1977-80), closer inspection reveals the artificiality of 126


Lots 34-36, 38-47

bowerbank ninow

elsewhere, Todd herself poses with a fetishist’s whip draped over her shoulder; in a third image, Todd pulls another woman’s hair, brandishing her fake nails like talons. As Todd’s practice matured, she discarded such overt provocations, recognising that, in many cases, the things that are the most threatening are those that appear the most normal. The uncanny is, in many cases, a more powerful source of discomfort, or even disgust, than the merely shocking. However, here Todd revels in the burlesque and the perverse, her campy threats a challenge to the sensibilities of an imagined audience who, probably, aren’t all that offended. Anthony Byrt notes the ritual dimension of Todd’s interest in costume, citing her Cousin Diptych (1989), which later reappeared as part of Thrombosis.2 In this pair of images, Todd and her cousin appear as teenagers, dressing for a night on the town which, in fact, never happened. The two images from the present collection that depict a group of young women snorting cocaine could be read as a kind of sequel or coda to the Cousin Diptych, performances of glamour and excitement whose veracity remains opaque. These images, with their turbocharged parody of 80s excess, present themselves as paparazzi snapshots, but as we read the image, deciphering the details of the girls’ clothes, jewellery and facial expressions, a sense of artifice begins to emerge: the costume jewels, the impossibly feathered bangs, the comical rhinestone coke straws. Todd isn’t really interested in the party, or the act of drug-taking, but in the rituals which surround them. These images are about inhabiting a posture of glamour and coolness, and the way this behaviour can both prop up a sense of self and simultaneously obscure and marginalise it.

Lot 38, p.54 Yvonne Todd Sheri-Ann Roller Slut c. 1995 gelatin silver print 125mm × 100mm

Drug taking crops up again in Todd’s work in the form of Homage to Doctor Spackman (2004), in which a single “diet pill” (in reality a capsule of Phentermine, an amphetamine-analogue) rests on a mirror alongside seven dripping black candles in a demented product shot. Rather than the red-blooded world of coke-taking party girls, we are here in the paranoid, highly strung milieu of pill popping socialites. In January (2006), the gaunt model’s red-rimmed eyes and quilted dressing gown speak of addiction, illness and alienation; the title of the work references the character January Wayne in Jacqueline Susann’s 1973 novel Once is Not Enough, whose drug-taking ultimately leads to her death. In Empire (2005), Todd presents an array of attractively designed inhalers, commenting on the status of drugs and medicines as part of the matrix of consumer culture. These works collectively represent a distinct strand in Todd’s practice, which gestures towards the seedier side of the pharmaceutical industry: the potential for abuse encoded in even the most innocuous of cures.

Lot 34, p.52 Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 chromogenic print 244mm × 192mm

Another aspect of Todd’s practice which has not changed from her early work onwards is her persistent interest in popular culture: soap operas, advertisements, pulp novels, The

Lot 41, p.55 Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

127


Lots 34-36, 38-47

auction n°5 — april 2017

Reader’s Digest. Whereas in works such as the Sets and Subsets series Todd emulates the airless pastel wasteland of 1970s daytime TV, in this early phase Todd cast her sights back further, to the 50s and 60s: the heyday of exploitation movies and softcore porn. There is a distinct sexploitation vibe to Motel: Cheri Champagne, Sweet Carolina & Princess the Maid (1995), a campy self-awareness that both undermines and celebrates the prurient potential of the image. The shabby motel backdrop, complete with quintessentially ‘90s CRT TV and white plastic phone, becomes the setting for a grainy black and white tableau that reads like a parodic blackmail attempt. This tendency towards kitsch persists to some extent in Todd’s later work, but is tempered by a genuine love of period fashion; Todd’s use of Bob Mackie dresses and antique Victorian gowns in her later work is not necessarily meant to be ironic.

Lot 44, p.57 Yvonne Todd 'motel' Cheri Champagne, Sweet Carolina & Princess the maid 1995 gelatin silver print 162mm × 228mm

Out of all these images, the one which points the most directly towards the avenue which Todd would later pursue is her formal portrait of a young woman wearing a tiara and strange, almost reptilian leather gloves. One finger rests against her cheek, while she gazes off into the distance with the glazed, semi-paralysed expression familiar to anyone who has ever had to endure “picture day” at school. However, the veneer of apparent normalcy is shattered by one detail: the prosthetic scars on her face, which stretch from the corners of her mouth halfway up her cheeks, in the infamous “Chelsea smile.” By injecting the spectre of violent disfigurement into this seemingly banal photo, Todd begins to explore the possibilities of the uncanny, as discussed above, and also prefigures the false teeth with which she equips her subjects in images such as Drexel and Frottex (2008), artificial blemishes that bizarrely parallel Todd’s microscopic attention to hair and makeup.

Lot 36, p.53 Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 chromogenic print 72mm × 112mm

In her early work, Todd was already exploring the themes which became her trademarks: a concern with costume and performance; cults, subcultures and fetishes; illness, addiction and death; and transgression or confrontation with the viewer. At this stage in her artistic development, Todd was pushing the boundaries, making broad gestures and testing out ideas, to see what worked and what didn’t. While they may lack the laser-focused precision and tightly controlled expression of her later works, these early studies make up for it with their sheer creative energy. andrew clark

Lot 42, p.56 Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

128

1

Megan Dunn, “Close to You: the Yvonne Todd Story,” in Creamy Psychology (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2014), 45.

2

Anthony Byrt, “Sons and Lovers: Yvonne Todd’s Gilbert Melrose Project,” in Creamy Psychology, 92.


Lot 59

bowerbank ninow

Peter Peryer Erika c 1979 1979 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, inscribed Erika c1979, This print was made 25/2/88, No final prints made prior to this date and [brooch] in graphite verso; DPAG label affixed upper right verso 405mm × 268mm

snapshot photographs. Peryer directed and often dressed his sitters, assembling an image in his head for weeks, even months, before finally picking up his camera. Accordingly, Peryer has referred to these carefully composed portraits as film stills, an appropriate observation when considering the meticulous preparation involved in each “shoot.” Peryer’s grainy, brooding black and white photographs were described by the artist as “heavy on the moody blues,” and Erika c 1979 is no exception. Dressed smartly in a crisp white shirt and blazer with one large, blinking jewel on the lapel, Parkinson stares directly into the camera. Her gaze is unwavering, yet defensive. What exchange has occurred between photographer and sitter to provoke this reaction? Parkinson is a chameleon: in some cases, she is barely recognisable from one Peryer photograph to the next. Erika with Knives (1977), for instance, features Parkinson’s face obscured by shadow and framed by a dark black bob, emphasising her full, dark lips. It is a deliberately blurry, sensuous shot, in contrast to the prim wariness that pervades Parkinson’s body language in Erika c 1979. This portrait reveals the highly charged yet ultimately enigmatic emotional exchanges that infused much of the artist’s work at this time (Erika, Winter 1979 and the female protagonist from Peryer’s 1976 Gone Home series are two other notable examples). Erika c 1979 has been exhibited publicly just once. In 2001 it was included in the touring exhibition Erika: A Portrait, curated by Justin Paton, then curator at Dunedin Public Art Gallery (the show also travelled to City Gallery Wellington and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki). Erika: A Portrait brought together the majority of Peryer’s photographs of Parkinson—of which there are over twenty—just as Peryer and Parkinson separated after 35 years together. What is so compelling about these portraits is the slippage between fact and fiction they display, an ambiguity enhanced by Peryer’s deliberately neutral titles. The photographs record a latent exchange between husband and wife in which the artist’s presence is undeniable. However, peering through the lens, we too as viewers become implicated in these psychodramas.

p.70

When Peter Peryer first began taking photographs in the early 1970s, his practice centred on portraiture. His pool of sitters was relatively small and consisted largely of friends, acquaintances and the artist himself. One subject Peryer continued to revisit was his then-wife, Erika Parkinson, who features in some of his most noteworthy early works. From the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s Peryer photographed his wife repeatedly. This focus on a single sitter was not unlike that of his American contemporaries Nicholas Nixon, Harry Callaghan and Emmet Gowan, whose work Peryer admired.

Peryer’s photographs of Parkinson are particularly significant because they reflect his intense (and ultimately short lived) interest in human portraiture. From the mid-1980s onwards Peryer began to adopt a more formalist approach, reacting against the emotive content that characterised the work he was making at the beginning of his career. Accordingly, Erika c 1979 is iconic. It is part of a contained body of portraits that were central to Peryer’s early work and to his subsequent artistic development. More than that, Erika c 1979 is a line in a bittersweet love song that will never lose its potency.

Peryer’s early photographs reveal his interest in exploring the expressive potential of the medium. They are the antithesis of “smile for the camera”

serena bentley

129


Lot 65

auction n°5 — april 2017

Ans Westra Hikurangi, 1982 1982 gelatin silver print signed Ans W ink verso 292mm × 238mm

individual photographs; an analysis that follows paths suggested by the features sketched above and moves beyond obvious documentary denotations into more oblique areas. Yet, it is important to note that like the majority of her pictures, Hikurangi was made for possible inclusion in a larger project. And, four year later, it found its way onto page 53 of Whaiora—the Pursuit of Life (1986), Westra’s second major photographic book completely devoted to images of Maori. The photograph occupies a full page, with the other half of the double-page spread left mostly blank, except for a small area of text in the bottom right corner. Its inclusion in Whaiora, amongst related photographs, most of which were made in the first half of the 1980s, serves to amplify the range of its potential readings by placing it within a context that encompasses the broader public themes of a significant historical moment, a moment of political and social ferment in Te Ao Maori. However, at the same time as this context enables the possible expansion of potential meanings, the juxtaposed text on the facing page works to arrest it. This brief text, written by Katerina Mataira, reads: “Hey Dad/Take it easy/I’m not a sheep/in the shearing shed.” It resembles a speech bubble and acts as a caption for the photograph, performing the function of anchorage. What this means is that the range of possible signification is closed down and the reader is directed to fixate on a human interest anecdote. Just as the potential polysemy of this photograph was compromised by the presence of an intrusive “caption” in the published book, so too was its visual appearance, because of the poor quality of the reproductions. However, this is not the case with the individual fine print of the photograph. Westra’s 1980s photography has not received the same degree of attention and celebration that her 1960s and 1970s work has. Whaiora attracted mixed reviews and one notable criticism claimed that it was an unsuccessful attempt to repeat the formula of Maori (1967) within changed times. But, while it could be argued that the subject matter of Hikurangi has a latter-day resemblance to some of the rural images in the earlier book, this would be misleading. The photograph should be seen within its wider context, which encompasses both the larger project it is a part of (Whaiora) and the emerging socio-political moment of both Te Ao Maori and Aotearoa New Zealand as a whole. Thus, rather than being seen as a repetition of the past or an attempt at timeless significance, Hikurangi is more profitably located on the cusp of what Mason Durie (in a book that shares a title with Westra’s) referred to as “the decade of Maori development (1984-1994).”

p.75

Hikurangi is the plain descriptive title of a black and white documentary photograph made by Ans Westra in 1982. Its basic denotation is straightforward: a man (a backblocks barber) is cutting a boy’s hair. The boy may not be enjoying the experience. The two figures (father and son we presume) are tightly framed within a mid shot and occupy almost all the picture space, while the background is rendered in soft focus. The most striking compositional feature of the photograph is its strong verticality. The rough garment wrapped around the boy’s shoulders and torso merges seamlessly with the man’s trousers and serves effectively to blend the two figures into one human column. The man’s downward posture and gaze are accentuated by the directional pull of the cigarette in his mouth and the scissors in his right hand, but are counterbalanced by the upward pressure exerted by his left hand that compresses the boy’s face, which is already somewhat distorted as a result of his tightly closed eyes. Tonally, the image has an overall bleached quality, with only the boy’s coalblack hair and the man’s belt providing areas of strong contrast.

lawrence mcdonald

We could leave it that and rest content with a formal analysis of another accomplished documentary image from Ans Westra’s vast corpus of 130


bowerbank ninow

Lot 72

Marti Friedlander Eglinton Valley 1970 gelatin silver print 195mm × 285mm

bottle offsetting the grand mountains behind. But Friedlander’s unflinching eye was at times too revealing for some, causing one reviewer to note that “[Larks] tells us much that is not comfortable . . . the book disturbs not so much by the direct challenge of the images and words as through an insidious nibbling at the edges of unconsciousness.” Perhaps New Zealanders were not ready to be seen as Friedlander saw us: at times lonely, joyful, discontented, or sparsely scattered across a storied landscape. Even her photographs of children are without sentiment, but powerful in their raw emotion and spontaneity. Nevertheless, Friedlander’s photographs of New Zealand captured a changing society and landscape, and through her lens we may reflect on our shared history with fresh eyes. Friedander’s extensive travels within New Zealand enabled her to probe aspects of our culture and tell a dizzying range of stories. Her celebrated portraits of kuia for Moko: Maori Tattooing in the 20th Century (with Michael King, 1972) have become an invaluable record not only of moko, but also of whakapapa. Her affinity for diasporic peoples informed her photographs of vineyards for Pioneers of New Zealand Wine (with Dick Scott, 2002), many of which were owned by immigrants seeking a new and better life. Friedlander also photographed many artists for Contemporary New Zealand Painters, Volume One A – M (with Jim and Mary Barr, 1980), creating some of our most iconic portraits of artists, including her photographs of Rita Angus and Ralph Hotere.

p.78

Eglinton Valley is one of Marti Friedlander’s most iconic images, and justifiably so: it encapsulates her ability to represent the familiar with a refreshing wit and arresting clarity. A straightforward description of Eglinton Valley—sheep in the countryside—may conjure up a stereotypical image of “godzone,” but in Friedlander’s hands the sheep take on an almost mystical appearance, emerging out of a timeless fog. They seem uncannily drawn to Friedlander’s camera, creating a moment of unexpected exchange. We look at them, and they look at us. This suspended moment of mutual curiosity is something that runs through Friedlander’s extensive oeuvre: she was always curious, and always looking.

Friedlander’s career was celebrated in a retrospective exhibition at the Auckland Art Gallery in 2001, curated by Ron Brownson. Eglinton Valley was selected as the flagship image for the exhibition marketing, with the words “What are you looking at?” emblazoned across the foreground. Suddenly, Friedlander’s sheep confronted us on Auckland buses and billboards, bringing these timeless, rural creatures into our urban present.

As a Jewish immigrant who moved to New Zealand with her husband in 1958, Friedlander was suddenly displaced from a vibrant, independent London life to a quiet, semi-rural Henderson existence. This was an isolating and challenging experience, and she would later regard her first three years in New Zealand as the most difficult of her life. However, it was her adjustment to a foreign land that catalysed her to use photography as a way to explore her new surroundings, and find her own place in them.

During a summer holiday on Waiheke Island in 2012, Friedlander encountered sheep again, gathered on a grassy knoll. Reminded of Eglinton Valley, she hurried to photograph them. But, as she recalls in her memoir, “it just wasn’t the same and I cannot explain why.”¹ Though the moment may have changed, Friedlander’s need to photograph had not.

It is perhaps Friedlander’s perspective as an outsider that lends her images a sharp insightfulness. When her photo-book Larks in a Paradise: New Zealand Portraits (1974) was published (in which Eglinton Valley was included), her photographs were widely praised for what they revealed about New Zealand and New Zealanders. The images in Larks range from up and down New Zealand, from city to country, from the young to the old. In one photograph, weathered faces creased by the sun raise glasses in a pub. In another, criss-crossing clotheslines flutter in an Arrowtown campsite, a discarded beer

linda yang

131

1

Leonard Bell, Marti Friedlander (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2009), 4.

2

Roger Oppenheim, “Paradise Lost,” New Argot, 3, I, March 1975, 5.

3

Marti Friedlander, Self-Portrait (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2013), 250.


Lot 74

auction n°5 — april 2017

Laurence Aberhart Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February, 1999 1999 gelatin silver print 198mm × 245mm

one image from the seventies, eleven from the eighties, eight from the nineties, and five from the 2000s, demonstrating Aberhart’s propensity to return again and again to favourite themes. Most other sections of the book show a similar temporal range. Aberhart’s oeuvre is cumulative and circular, not linear and uni-directional. Aberhart has documented graveyard imagery not only through time but also through space. The 2007 monograph includes examples of work from Northland, Auckland, Hawke’s Bay, Taranaki, Whanganui, Wellington, Amberley, Christchurch, Dunedin, Balclutha and Southland, as well as Australia, Hong Kong, Macau, France, and Louisiana. Apirama Estuary is not included in the 2007 exhibition or the accompanying book, though another photograph taken the same day at the cemetery in Riverton, Southland, is included. Comparing the two works is fascinating. Riverton, Southland, (plate 112 in Aberhart) is dominated by an enormous, oddly-shaped yew tree, a solid dark mass which almost fills the right half of the picture. To the left, dwarfed by the giant inkblot of the yew, is a row of gravestones, one of which is surmounted by a tiny winged angel in discoloured white marble, no more than a centimetre high in the photograph. It is this very same statue which dominates the picture in Aparima Estuary. What seemed so puny and vulnerable in face of the brute facts of death (as symbolised by the giant black yew) is here almost triumphal, as it rises above the quiet fields, ragged fences, calm waters and low hills of the estuarine Southland landscape into the huge, cloud-filled sky. “In Loving Memory of Margaret” reads the headstone, while the short-skirted, bare-footed, curly headed angel takes command of the scene, with eyes cast downwards and hands placed piously together, her modest wings stretched wide.

p.80

This distinguished Laurence Aberhart photograph dates from 1999, as its title meticulously records, although chronology matters less for his photography than for most other artists’. One reason for this is Aberhart’s fidelity to the same antiquated equipment for nearly half a century, an Antique Korona Largeformat—8-inch by 10-inch—view camera, a veritable museum piece surviving into the digital age. With this camera what you see inverted on the ground glass screen is exactly what gets onto the exposed film, as there is no enlargement involved. Virtually as old as photography itself, the view camera has persisted because it allows for exceptional control over focus and depth of field. Another reason why chronology matters little in Aberhart’s work is that his photographs do not display much change or development in their method and technique. This photograph of a stone angel in a cemetery might have been taken at any time since the 1970s. Furthermore, Aberhart was an expert from the word go and achieved sustained excellence throughout his long career.

Viewers will no doubt bring different sentiments to the image and take different things from it. In David Eggleton’s history of New Zealand photography Into the Light (2006), the author positions Aberhart’s statues as surrogate presences: “Though charged with human presence, his scenes are mostly empty of people. Statues, though, can become substitutes: angels hold their marble postures, weathered and mournful in sepulchral light.” (p. 146) Justin Paton remarks on the “time-tarnished stone angels that seem to grieve for their own neglect,” (Aberhart, p. 287) while for Greg O’Brien “there is often beauty in the way natural processes distort and dissolve the things humanity venerates.” (p. 264) For me, despite its pathos, this transcendent image brings to mind the proud defiance of John Donne: “Death be not proud; though some have called thee/Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so.”

This consistency was well illustrated in the retrospective exhibition Aberhart, mounted by Dunedin Public Art Gallery and City Gallery, Wellington in 2007 and fully documented in the superb Victoria University Press publication of the same year. In this book, the photographs are grouped not chronologically but according to subject matter: churches, lodges, marae, museum collections, people, landscapes and so forth. A whole section is devoted to graveyard monuments and statuary. Of the twenty-five photographs in this section, the earliest dates from 1971, while the most recent (the book is already a decade old) is from 2005. There is

However we view it, it’s a marvellous image (as Marti Friedlander might say), not easy to forget. Peter Simpson

132


lots 85-88

Rhondda Bosworth has been making photographs since the 1970s, and has developed an extensive practice, which began in modernism but has evolved into a process of experimentation, deconstruction and montage. Her work deals with issues of gender, identity, and the body, through the creation of atmospheric images which obliquely hint at hidden, private narratives. Bosworth is particularly notable for her adoption of a post-modern approach to image-making, especially given the documentary and modernist mode favoured by many of her peers. The following interview was conducted with the artist in March 2017.

auction n°5 — april 2017

Interview Rhondda Bosworth & Andrew Clark AC You began your career at an interesting time for photography. What was the discourse around art photography when you were a student? As a young artist, who were you looking to for inspiration? RB I hadn’t thought about photography as a creative medium until after I graduated in painting from Ilam, in Christchurch. That year (1973), I got a good deal on a new Pentax. I struggled big-time, and didn’t have a clue as to how it all worked technically, but I began photographing, and it felt right. I processed my films in borrowed darkrooms—I couldn’t tell what negatives meant, or how to get the effects I wanted. But my initial deep ignorance proved a good thing in the long run, because ten years later, I really understood photography.

Once I saw photographs that were works of art (this had not been part of my education) I was challenged by them. I felt surprise, and slight consternation, when I saw Edward Weston’s photographs of peppers, because I didn’t know how to comprehend such images. There was no discourse on photography at Ilam when I was a student—zilch, nada. The key to my eventual passion for the medium was the feeling of power I had with a camera in my hands. Photography is very direct, and that is the way I like it.

Inspiration came (and comes) from the world within me; it is an emotional valve, as I am intense, and it is too much in real life. It also comes from my besotted response to the work of many of the great modernist photographers, and earlier, a photographic genius—Julia Margaret Cameron. I have been influenced by many photographers, but not in a literal way. I learnt that photographs that were ‘strong’ were about light itself, and having a particular and individual way of ‘seeing.’ AC I’ve read that you first attended art school in Christchurch in the early ‘70s, and later studied at Elam in 1978-9. In 1974-5, you were also involved with PhotoForum, which brought New Zealand art photography into the mainstream. At the time, was there a noticeable difference in the status of photography between your two periods of study?

RB My first period of study began in 1964, and later resumed 1969-72. Back then, the status of photography as a creative medium couldn’t have been lower. Its critics were somehow distracted by the camera itself, as if it was so easy to ‘take’ a photograph that it couldn’t be ‘art.’

Some years later at Elam, while faffing about with a later discredited colour process, I learnt the history of photography. It seemed immediate. I felt a strong, connected relationship with the medium. AC In the text you wrote for the book Photoforum at Forty, you discuss the difficulties you had with receiving technical instruction in photography when you were at art school. How does this early frustration relate to your later move towards experimentation and photographic manipulation?

Left: Lot 88, p.92 Rhondda Bosworth ‘Moana Taha’ 1978 gelatin silver print 202mm × 250mm

RB The emphasis at Elam was on the finished product—there was a lack of assistance or interest in the process. I knew that if I looked at great photographs from the canon, these magnificent photographers would teach me what I needed to know. Once I had figured it out technically, I no longer needed to adhere to strict principles, and post-modernism had given the green light to sacrilegious technical practices. 134


lots 85-88

bowerbank ninow

My own quirks as a photographer have often stemmed from not wanting to waste time or materials, and a decision to accept images that were less-than-perfect, and a far cry from modernism’s one perfect image, beautifully crafted according to an esoteric system. AC You’ve shown a strong preference for monochrome photography throughout your career. Clearly, in the early days, colour photography was less ubiquitous. When colour film, and the means to develop it, became more readily available, what were the reasons behind your decision to continue making black and white photographs?

Lot 87, p.91 Rhondda Bosworth Self-Portrait 2 1985 gelatin silver print 200mm × 250mm

RB Black and white photography—old school film and chemical processing—has a pure, austere, take-no-prisoners beauty, a tonal simplicity. It is ironic that black and white photos are considered ‘real,’ when the ‘real’ world is in colour.

Lot 88, p.92 Rhondda Bosworth ‘Moana Taha’ 1978 gelatin silver print 202mm × 250mm

Colour processes are untested in terms of longevity—only time will tell, and the gelatin silver print has already been tried and tested. However, photography has undergone a radical, astounding technical change, and sumptuous colour is one of its qualities.

From the daguerreotype to the digital selfie—it’s all one thing. The most intriguing part is the photographic urge itself, regardless of specific technique or process. Times change, it’s as simple as that— we do digital now, we did hands-on mechanical back then. To use the digital version of black and white is an option—but an affectation. AC You mention digital photography—it’s become a cliché to talk about the ubiquity of digital cameras and the rise of smartphone culture, but as you say, photography is in a period of rapid change and expansion. As an artist, what effects do the technical differences between the digital and chemical processes have on your work?

RB The writing was on the wall, so to speak, for analogue photography decades ago. We knew it would end but had no idea how—perhaps the world would run out of silver.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both analogue and digital methods. I was forced to go digital because the materials for DIY processing were being phased out. Also, after thirty-odd years I developed a phobia about being shut in, so it was no longer pleasant to be in the darkroom.

However, no matter how powerful and occasionally beautiful digital photography is, it has a very different vibe from the knock-out aesthetic of the ‘pure’ photograph. Julia Margaret Cameron’s images glow with an inner light. Ansel Adams’ photographs of Yosemite are stunning, and his Moonrise at Hernandez is one of the great photographs.

Whatever capacities and qualities a medium has will generally be exploited by artists. Digital photography is not rule-bound. I find the technicalities difficult, but plod on regardless. Characteristics of the image are certainly framed, literally, by the format of the camera. AC Some of your photographs feel very tightly composed and controlled, while others are looser and more expressive. Can you talk a little about your darkroom process, and how you arrive at your final images?

RB I no longer use a darkroom. A lot of it is hard labour. As in all creativity, whatever the medium, the aleatoric element—chance, accident—determines the outcome. I don’t ever have a ‘final’ image— there is no end, you can extrapolate on an image indefinitely, both in darkroom printing or by clicking on whatever you need in a digital camera. 135


lots 85-88

auction n°5 — april 2017

AC Looking at your work, the thing which stands out to me is your interest in time and language. You often make photographs of photographs, such as Mother goes upsidedown (1984) or, as in the case of works like Rowley’s text (1992) and I beat you at 3a.m. (2006), photographs of writing. This is an interesting dynamic: the photograph not simply as a recording, but as a mediating force, in which the artist stands between the viewer and the archive. Can you talk about the decision-making behind these images? RB I follow the siren-call of my emotional self. I do have a personal credo that the photograph is close at hand, not over the rainbow.

I photograph photos because I have a lot of them—I have cannibalized them—they have devoured themselves. All photographs are imbued with the human ache, a need to stave off the chill of mortality.

As for texts (both my own and ‘found’ texts), I am a loquacious person, and words are it. But, ultimately, images for me are even more compelling, because they express what words can’t say.

Whether these images are a ‘mediating force,’ I don’t know. I don’t analyse my own work intellectually. It’s a way of siphoning off energy and anxiety. I am preoccupied, in the process, with visual aspects like vantage-point and depth of field—that’s what I am thinking about when I am photographing. . . Every moment is ‘decisive.’ Light does it for me: times of day, the evocations of light. If I were a musician it would be rhythm and melody that preoccupied me. AC You’ve expressed your admiration in the past for pioneer post-modernists such as Laszlo Moholy-Nagy and Kurt Schwitters. Are there any contemporary practitioners whose work you find interesting, or whom you see as carrying on in this tradition?

RB I prefer artists to be dead before I admire their work. I learn about photography looking at paintings! It is so easy to be intimidated by other people’s work. Initially, I was not aware of any other photographic tradition except family photographs. AC It’s tempting to read your work as autobiographical or personal in nature, particularly because you have often used yourself as a model. However, your work seems to me to be as much about the atmosphere of introspection and recollection itself, as it is about any specific memory or event. Is it possible to read your work as being about the process of memory, as well as a reflection of your own personal story? RB My work is autobiographical and personal. I don’t subscribe to some male-notion of universality. I did not and do not photograph myself as a ‘model,’ but as subject matter. I don’t speculate about meaning— I live it. That is why a visual artist needs the viewer(s) to find the meaning, a meaning they feel in themselves.

Photography is uniquely about memory—that is its fundamental raison d’etre.

136

Lot 86, p.91 Rhondda Bosworth Mother Goes Upside-Down 1984 gelatin silver print 110mm x 170mm

Lot 85, p.90 Rhondda Bosworth C. M.—portrait/close up 1977 gelatin silver print 170mm × 253mm


bowerbank ninow

Lot 90

Cindy Sherman Mrs. Claus 1990 C-type print, edition of 125 signed Cindy Sherman and dated 1990 verso 330mm × 254mm

fore. Mrs. Claus is more stunned than smiling, her ghostly pallor contrasting with the vivid reds that surround her. This image is characteristic of Sherman’s early colour works, using drastically variant, high key hues to accentuate the lurid, surreal qualities of a scene. The props here are also classic Sherman: a white wig, a plush toy, garments and lace that look so right but terribly wrong, reminiscent of country singer Dolly Parton’s quip that: “It costs a lot of money to look this cheap.” Sherman’s use of a popular folk tale figure such as Mrs. Claus, a referent that cannot be traced back to an original, authentic source, is typical of her photographic approach. Critic Andy Grundberg writes that: “her pictures are not so much specific borrowings from the past as they are distillations of cultural types. The masks Sherman creates are neither mere parodies of cultural roles nor are they layers like the skin of an onion, which, peeled back, might reveal some inner essence.”¹ This approach recalls Warhol’s comment that “if you want to know all about Andy Warhol, just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me, and there I am. There's nothing behind it.” The incessant play between surfaces and artifice in Cindy Sherman’s work is all we get. Sherman modeled the look of her earliest works on Hollywood cinema. In her ground-breaking series Untitled Film Stills (1977-80) the artist used simple settings and everyday props and costumes to assist in shooting (self-)portraits of familiar personae: librarians, secretaries, housewives. This set of seventy-some images became an important contribution to the field, and in the estimation of many, a feminist manifesto. Sherman’s subsequent photographs, shifting to colour, became more grandiose in their scale, production values, and psychological undercurrents. Sherman was equally at home portraying a gorgon or a waif, a predator or the preyed upon. And in her frontal, highly stylized portraits she increasingly used makeup and prostheses to portray male as well as female characters.

p.95

We all love Mrs. Claus, don’t we? I mean what more benevolent figure could you cite? Although, we don’t see much of her: she’s a Mrs. Columbo to Peter Falk, an Alice B. Toklas to Gertrude Stein. This depiction is a mash-up of Norman Rockwell and David Lynch: a lumpy, pale protagonist within a cozy, cluttered environment. The myth of Santa Claus has begotten “bad” versions and slasher ones, in comedy and horror films respectively, but Cindy Sherman here creates a Mrs. Claus who is a distorted, funhouse inversion of everyday holiday propaganda.

Sherman is an enduringly fascinating figure, in the way that, while we have seen her in many “self-portraits,” the very same photographs give a sense of distancing, disguise, and diffusion. Is this image more interesting because it is Sherman? For many aficionados of her work, that would definitely be the case, although another reading would say that “hers are perfectly poststructuralist portraits, for they admit to the ultimate, unknowable-ness of the ‘I.’ They challenge the essential assumption of a discrete, identifiable, recognizable author.”²

Sherman explores themes relating to horror and the grotesque on a regular basis, and the darker side of the imaginary is never far away, particularly in late 1980s-early 1990s works such as the Fairy Tales, Horror, and Sex series. For Sherman, fairy tales are always grim, and this attitude infuses her depiction of Mrs. Claus, more contradictory than cuddly in its implications. Is Mrs. Claus’ decrepitude due to the cold climate? Perhaps her psoriasis is worsened by the heating inside “Santa central”? Maybe she suffers from geriatric ailments requiring 24/7 nursing?

martin patrick

1

Cindy Sherman’s postmodern Mrs. Claus brings a previously hidden or diminished figure to the

Andy Grundberg, Crisis of the Real: Writings on Photography (New York: Aperture Foundation, 1999) 8-9.

2 Ibid.

137


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 91

Harvey Benge Tokyo Girl Number 3, 2005 2005 pigment inkjet print signed Harvey Benge and inscribed Tokyo 2005 1/5 in indian ink verso 750mm × 500mm

flags and iconography as a transgressive act, not dissimilar to the use of Nazi imagery as a shock tactic by biker gangs from the 1960s onwards. Unlike the more common gyaru (“gal”) fashions worn around Harajuku, shironuri is an outlier or underground style, not a commonly worn street fashion.³ Like goths in the West, wearers of shironuri are consciously setting themselves apart, advertising their allegiance to a subculture whose values and priorities do not necessarily line up with those of society as a whole. All fashion is to some extent a performance of identity, but in the case of an extreme look such as shironuri, clothing and makeup can become, instead, costume and mask, accoutrements which completely transform the wearer into a wholly artificial being. Tokyo Girl Number 3 wears a bald wig that matches her powdered face, with crimson hair extensions attached, accentuated by her dark, almost black, eyeshadow and lipstick. Her clothes—black latex gloves and lace bodice— place her somewhere between goth and fetishist. Overall, her appearance is reminiscent of the corpselike demons who inhabit the 1987 Clive Barker horror film Hellraiser. Benge’s camera captures her posing to show her carefully constructed outfit to best effect, mouth open and eyes closed in an expression which is at once ghoulish and alluring. The wallet she clutches, with a subway ticket or identification card protruding, is the one indication that this is a street scene, and that after the photo was taken, the woman did not disappear into some crypt, space craft or netherworld, but instead walked off into a contemporary cityscape. The Tokyo Girls series fits into Benge’s broader exploration of the possibilities of travel as a catalyst for photographic “seeing.” By becoming a tourist, Benge also unmoors himself, configuring his practice as a floating entity detached from the specifics of any one parochial point of view. In the case of the Tokyo Girls, Benge encounters a group who are likewise interested in deliberately alienating themselves, creating moments of the strange and uncanny within the broader context of the metropolitan scene.

p.95

Harvey Benge’s Tokyo Girls series is part of the artist’s ongoing street photography practice. In 2005, Benge produced a series of images of women in Tokyo’s Harajuku district, known for its status as a hub of Japanese street fashion, which is composed of a seemingly endless number of constantly shifting styles and sub-styles. The woman depicted in Tokyo Girl Number 3 has her face made up in the shironuri (painted white) style, which is derived from the pale makeup historically worn by geisha and actors in traditional Japanese theatre.¹

andrew clark

The shironuri look can also incorporate elements of other niche Japanese fashion trends, such as “lolita” fashion, cyberpunk, and “visual kei” (think ‘80s glam on steroids), but the common factor which sets a shironuri apart is their whitepainted, ghostly face.² In the past, shironuri style has included the wearing of military uniforms, as seen in Benge’s other photos from this series, and the display of World War Two-era Japanese 138

1

“Japanese Shironuri ‘White Face Monster Party’ in Harajuku – Pics & Video,” Tokyofashion.com, accessed March 9, 2017, http://tokyofashion.com/japanese-shironuri-harajuku-picsvideo

2

“SHIRONURI fashion and ANGURA culture,” POPKakumei, accessed March 9, 2017, http://pop-kakumei.blogspot. co.nz/2013/02/shironuri-fashion-and-angura-culture_3. html

3

“'White Face Monster Party’ in Harajuku”


Lots 100-103

auction n°5 — april 2017

feature Personal Contact: Tom Hutchins in China Tom Hutchins, critic, educator and journalist, is an important figure in the history of New Zealand photography practice and teaching, though his work is only now gaining broader recognition. Lanchow, China 1956; Wheat Harvesting on ‘Red Star’ Farm, Peking [Beijing], China, 1956; Working Party on Railway Water Channel in Desert, Yumen, China 1956; and Coolies Pulling a Cart Past Government Buick Car, Peking, China, 1956, all signed by and printed under the supervision of Hutchins in the early 2000s, are from a much larger body of work consisting of the thousands of photographs that Hutchins took during a four-month journey through China in the summer of 1956. Although China was at the time in a period of tentative opening-up, Americans remained unable to gain entry, and even for a New Zealander—a supposedly permissible variety of Westerner—getting a visa was difficult and far from guaranteed. When Hutchins eventually was issued a visa and crossed from Hong Kong into China in May 1956, he became the first Western photojournalist since Cartier-Bresson to visit China and do significant work there. Despite the merit and timeliness of Hutchins’ 1956 China work, it has remained hidden for decades. Hutchins’ friend and former colleague at the University of Auckland, John B. Turner, has been coordinating efforts to print, research and show Hutchins’ China images for almost thirty years, and last year was able to arrange for the work to be publicly exhibited for the first time.¹ Turner’s efforts in bringing these images to light constitute the first substantive opportunity for a broader public to see the photographs since Life magazine published a selection of them in 1957. According to Hutchins, in a 1975 interview with Terry O’Connor, Life magazine’s interest in the work was focused primarily on three areas: industrial development, agricultural development, and development into “new areas” further inland, westward.² This focus can be seen in the images selected for publication in January of 1957 and in the copy, which was supplied by Life’s own writers. The magazine’s cover heralds Hutchins’ work as “‘Off Limits’ China—Exclusive Pictures of Red Industry” and the text introducing Hutchins’ photo essay oscillates between condescension and fear: China is both a place where “everywhere are serious people, harnessed to work and norms and slogans” and yet also somewhere engaged in a “desperate but impressive effort to make itself modern.”³ Hutchins, again in conversation with Terry O’Connor, commented that the fate of the photojournalist was that of “gradually having to reconcile yourself to the fact that you weren’t in control of the magazines.”⁴ Life’s approach to Hutchins’ China work was, sadly, no exception. 140

Lot 103, p.101 Tom Hutchins Lanchow, China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print 178mm × 240mm

Lot 101, p.100 Tom Hutchins Wheat harvesting on 'Red Star' farm, Peking (Beijing), China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print 172mm x 243mm

Lot 102, p.101 Tom Hutchins Working Party on Railway Water Channel in Desert, Yumen, China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print 191mm × 211mm


Lots 100-103

bowerbank ninow

waiting on crowded railway platforms. The last of the images included here, Lanchow, [Lanzhou, Gansu Province] China, 1956, offers an example of this personal vision and contact, while at the same time being part of the broader historical story. Although it might be grouped into the third of Life’s three areas of interest, that of westward expansion, it seems reductive to describe it so. A group of young women, clothed in variously patterned short-sleeved shirts and matching light-coloured pants and basketball trainers, stride two-abreast down a town street, some of them looking directly at Hutchins’ camera, others more engaged in talking with each other. The women are led by a particularly cheery-looking lady in pigtail buns, sweatpants and a sweatshirt that reads in hand-written-style traditional Chinese characters “Xinjiang Post Office 19” and an upper line of text that looks to be written in Uyghur. Behind the women, a shop sign declares itself a seller of men’s and women’s clothing, a cyclist hovers, and a man tends to his wares in two giant baskets by the kerb-side. As much as the image could be linked to historical trends of westward expansion and social change, its primary appeal to me remains in its human engagement, the feeling of open “personal contact” and shared communal feeling which Hutchins was able to make and record at such an unlikely time and in a then unlikelyseeming place.

The image chosen for the first page of the Life piece, from the same series as Working Party on Railway Water Channel in Desert, suits Life’s characterisation of China as consisting of people “harnessed to work” under a slogan, and speaks to the interests Hutchins enumerates: it is an image of the development of industry, and of the expansion westward. In this series of images, two men labour to construct irrigation along a railway line in the desert, moving dirt by loading it into baskets and dumping it amid clouds of dust, while a train sits in the background and a flag (conveniently tied to a nearby telegraph pole) flies above them. There certainly was an aspect of truth in Life’s characterisation of the work, even if it was only partial: these images show two men toiling to construct the infrastructure for westward expansion and modernisation, and doing so literally under a flag emblazoned with a slogan imploring the youth of the nation to “dedicate themselves and their best years to the motherland.” And, leaving Life’s condescending tone aside, much of Hutchins’ work does record dramatic but selective technological modernisation. The two men pulling an unseen load in Coolies do so wearing cloth collars and layered cotton slip-on shoes indistinguishable from those of earlier decades or even centuries, while behind the men is a spectacular, shining government Buick, a relic of an earlier period of modernisation, leftover from pre-war trade with the United States. Similarly, the Hungarian-made wheat harvester in the photographs taken on Red Star farm is both impressive and grounded by the reality that most of Hutchins’ images of rural people working would feature no such machinery, or would, like this one, include at least some people whose work seemed largely unchanged by the presence of this prized token of industrialised farming.

francEs clark

Beyond what Life was looking for, Hutchins brought to his work a determination to find a personal vision of a people who were at that time, if represented at all in Western media, presented mostly as an exotic, vaguely threatening mass. Within and alongside images of steel workers, coal miners, and farmers, Hutchins brought to his subjects an interest and “identification” with Chinese people, which he explained as coming partly from the fact that as a working-class kid growing up in central Auckland, many people he knew and socialised with were Chinese.⁵ As well as this “long personal contact” with Chinese New Zealanders, his open and balanced approach seems to have been informed by his socialist values, his interest in people, and his willingness, later tempered by what he learned of the repressions and violence of subsequent decades,⁶ to see in China not a looming Communist menace but a place with “the beginning of a communal spirit and a communal feeling.”⁷ This communal feeling was something that Hutchins was able to capture not just in the images of people at work, but in a variety of other modes as well: elderly men banding together around chess games, children at play, crowds admiring shop windows, people chatting in the streets and

1

John B. Turner, Tom Hutchins Seen in China 1956, or, Photoforum 86 (Auckland/Beijing: Photoforum, 2016) was published on the occasion of the international debut of the exhibition Tom Hutchins Seen in China 1956 as part of the 2016 Pingyao International Photography Festival in Shanxi, China. An online gallery with a growing selection of Hutchins’ China photographs is available at www.jbt. photoshelter.com

2

“Tom Hutchins Interviewed by Terry O’Connor,” Photoforum Supplement, ed. John B. Turner, Summer 1977-78, 19. Noted at the end of the interview is that it took place in 1975, two years before publication. “Red China on the March,” Life, Vol. 42, No. 3. 21 January 1957, 107-115.

3

141

4

"Tom Hutchins Interviewed," 18.

5

Ibid., 19.

6

Turner, 5; see also John B. Turner "Tom Hutchins in China, 1956" Art New Zealand 160, Summer 2016-17, 110-115.

7

"Tom Hutchins Interviewed," 19.


Lot 33


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 104, 105

jane zusters' body of work encompasses both painting and sculpture, and explores themes of feminism, personal narrative, postcolonial New Zealand history, environmentalism, and more recently, responses to the Canterbury earthquake of 2011. Her photographic practice includes both intimate, documentary portraiture and more experimental, deconstructive approaches. The following interview was conducted with the artist in March 2017.

Interview Jane Zusters & Andrew Paul Wood Apw What first drew you to photography as a medium? When you were studying at Ilam in Christchurch in the 1970s, it was still considered a somewhat ambiguous art form. jz Photography was a compulsory part of first year at Ilam. I spent my first year resisting becoming fascinated by it because I thought it would be very expensive. We had to have our own single-lens reflex camera. Then my sister Susan and my brother-in-law, professional photographer Harry Ruffell, waltzed up the stairs to my flat in Rhodes Street, Christchurch, with an enlarger and a developing tank. I set up a darkroom in my bathroom. While my class were dropping their films in freezing communal tanks and getting unexposed negatives, I was getting perfect results. Harry was very supportive, giving  me access to his  Time-Life  books and boxes of dated Agfa paper.

Lawrence Shustak was my photography teacher. He taught by example, which could be very frustrating for his students, but he was always out taking photographs. I was a bit of a rebel and never did the assignments, but it didn’t matter as long as I was taking photographs. That’s when I first saw the work of Diane Arbus, and it changed my world. I began a painting major the following year. I was only there for a week before the painting department burned down. It was traumatic as we didn’t have any studios, and we had to go out painting landscapes with Bill Sutton. I didn’t want to do that and stayed at home in my darkroom. Allie Eagle invited me to be in Women’s Art: An Exhibition of Six Women Artists at the Robert McDougall Gallery in 1975. I exhibited my photographs. I don’t think the painters liked it very much. In retrospect I’m very proud of that work; it was quite edgy and brave.

Lawrence was my referee for my first successful Arts Council grant application in 1977. I was in shows with him when I dropped out of art school. He was in his Polaroid phase and photographed everyone and everything, including me. I was part of a community of passionate photographers; Rhondda Bosworth, Allan McDonald, Jae Renault, Terry Austin, and Laurence Aberhart. Apw How did Arbus influence you?

jz From Arbus I learned that the ordinary could be extraordinary, and that making public what was normally considered private was a legitimate aim for the artist. Her work made me seek out situations that were foreign to my own experience.

Left: Lot 104, p.102 Jane Zusters Laurence Aberhart, Kamala and the Hammond Boys - Lyttleton 1976 gelatin silver print 150mm × 230mm

I was objectifying my subjects, which is something Susan Sontag criticised Arbus for, though I think it’s a big oversimplification to see Arbus as an exploitative outsider. She wasn’t stalking her subjects from afar, she was actively engaged with them, which is what you have to do to make a portrait. Five of the twelve photographs in  Six Women Artists  were about adult nudity. Like Arbus I photographed in the nude to put my subjects at ease. I had a romantic view of it, thanks to her, I suppose; I saw myself as sanctifying the private worlds I was entering. I’d also learned from Judy Chicago that my life, experiences and sexuality were legitimate subject matter. Apw Your earliest subjects seem to have been your friends in Christchurch. Were you consciously making a document of that place and time? 144


bowerbank ninow

Lot 104, 105

Lot 105, p.103 Jane Zusters Life Drawing North Beach, Christchurch 1978 1978 gelatin silver print 140mm × 225mm

No. I didn’t see myself as a documentary photographer, but I took some documentary photographs because I went to a lot of protests with my friends—abortion rights protests for example—and I took photos because I was there.

I made portraits of my friends, but I also propositioned people I was fascinated by. I’d make dates with people and photograph them. Some of them became friends. I was on a mission.

I loved Ralph Eugene Meatyard. What I found exciting about him was his wonderful, dramatic, spooky lighting. I was drawn to extremes of light. I was abstracting people and using them as a metaphor for unease, actors in a drama like he did. . . Whereas now, I’m much more empathetic when making a portrait. A lot of photography, for me, is made just because I am there. Apw The second-wave feminism is quite overt in your work from that period.

jz I was part of that generation that abandoned their bras, peered at their cervixes and all that, looking to discover forgotten and unknown herstories. I was one of the original members of Christchurch Women’s Liberation in 1971.

I didn’t realise it but my ‘70s feminism was already disrupting and subverting the mainstream modernist way I was expressing myself. There was also a lot of gender blurring in that work. When I exhibited it in the ‘90s, a portrait of my friend Richard was mistaken for a lesbian woman because he had long hair and was knitting. A heterosexual couple were read as a lesbian because the man had long hair and not much visible body hair.

The one female nude in Six Women Artists  was considered very transgressive in the ‘70s because it showed a hairy armpit. “Nice girls” didn’t have hair under their arms in those days Apw Did much change in the ‘80s?

jz In the ‘80s I became a painter. I’d failed “Visual Studies” and dropped out of art school because I had taken and shown photographs instead of drawing landscapes.

I became a lesbian in the ‘80s. I wasn’t in the ‘70s, but I was on the way. In the lesbian feminist circle in Auckland some of the people I was photographing vehemently didn’t want their images shown. I had a pile of paintings under my bed and I found them starting to sell. I was very fortunate to crest that first wave of young artists with dealer galleries. I was still taking photos, and Kerry Aberhart showed them on a number of occasions. However, I found more opportunities as a painter than as a photographer. I was very lucky and privileged to have had the creative opportunities I did in the ‘80s, making  community murals, winning a few prizes, having an audience.

To an extent, in the ‘80s my photography got derailed by postmodern feminist critiques which made the body off-limits. In the ‘70s I was depicting both male and female nudes, under the adage “the personal is political.” I was exploring the nature of desire. Then, in the ‘80s, that became problematic because French feminists like Luce Irigaray were saying women could only talk in riddles because men had a monopoly on the gaze. By this time I'd largely switched from black and white photography to shooting with Fuji colour transparency, which I filed away in folders mostly unprinted. I  did analogue photography until 2011 and have a big archive I’ve built up and can dip into because I’ve been taking photos for forty years. I’d like my next book to be the colour work. I’ve self-published four books now.

145


auction n°5 — april 2017

Lot 104, 105

Apw And of course in 2011, back in Christchurch the earthquake changed everything, including your work. You started creating those striking digital montages. jz In the ‘90s I’d already started experimenting with sandwiching together two transparencies to make one image. You can see these types of images in the book Charts and Soundings  where my photos illustrate Sue Fitchett’s poems. With the quake I had the brainwave to digitally knock out the wall of an interior room and put an earthquake image in. I had a “eureka” moment when I saw a bathroom suspended without any walls on it. I remember the Community of the  Sacred Name convent on Barbadoes Street. . . All of the nuns’ toilets hanging in the air. . . Apw In the forty years since you began taking photographs, you have revisited those images from the 1970s twice, re-photographing the same subjects decades later, once as part of your MFA, and again in the book Where did you go to my lovelies in 2015. In that time, what had changed? How do you think your approach has evolved? jz My personal ‘70s archive was my starting point. Between 1975 and 1982, photography was my main means of creative expression. Then I was abstracting reality, whereas now I acknowledge the local, the specific and the particular.

In the ‘70s a part of the social revolution was about nudity and being without clothes. In the twenty-first century there is an anxiety about nudity, displaying the body and the female body, the older female body and children, especially. The naked body became problematic in the politics of representation that came out of the feminist discourse of the ‘80s. The first thing most of my subjects that I photographed in the ‘70s say now is, “I want to keep my clothes on.”

Back then it was about my friends and me. I made us all into abstractions. . . Actors in a theatre of light and dark shadows. In between taking photographs and obsessing about my love life, I was lying around drawing, listening to the Grateful Dead and Emmylou Harris. In 1976 I made my own photographic tarot pack and cast my friends as symbols in it. I didn’t usually photograph my friends in the context of their own lives. I wasn’t interested in the local, the specific or the particular, though I often used the natural world as a backdrop. I never thought about where I was geographically.

When I started revisiting that work, I worried it was dated. Often I’m reversing the order of past and present. The Māori concept is that the past lies in front, rather than behind you. I was challenging the Western notion of putting the past behind you. Starting with the present interrupts the nostalgia with which we tend to see the past.

I don’t have a formula for what I do. I always stuck to the camera’s viewfinder. I’ve stopped worrying about whether I’m postmodern enough or not. Fashioning the past, rather than the fashion, is where it’s at for me. The new contradiction is that I approach the snapshot in the language of modernist aesthetics. And the scale of the print has increased three hundred percent from the precious archival prints I made in the ‘70s. Apw Do you see it as a continuation, or as something new?

jz It’s part of an ongoing dialogue; a chance to stand in the present and look back at the past, and now that I have a past, I can do that. I don’t make any claims beyond my own subjectivity. Take it as you find it.

146

Lot 104, p.102 Jane Zusters Laurence Aberhart, Kamala and the Hammond Boys Lyttleton 1976 gelatin silver print 150mm × 230mmCV


I

N

D

E

X

#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

1

Peter Peryer Bluebells 2012 C-type print, edition 11/50 115mm × 155mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Starkwhite, Auckland, 2013.

p.27

$300 - $600

2

John B. Turner Waldorf Tea and Coffee Shop 1969 gelatin silver print signed John B. Turner and inscribed [69-136?] 39-136 PRW 9s 3w, photograph by John B. Turner 18 Lynda Avenue, Paparangi, Wellington in graphite verso 160mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.28

$400 - $600

3

Murray Cammick Pontiac photographed late 1975 1975 gelatin silver print 154mm × 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Nina Seja, PhotoForum at 40: Counterculture, Clusters, and Debates in New Zealand (Auckland: Rim Books, 2014), 27.; PhotoForum 39, August/September 1977, cover. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

p.29/p.122

$800 - $1,200

4

Gary Blackman Edinburgh 1976 1976 gelatin silver print signed Gary Blackman, dated 1976 and inscribed Edinburgh, 76/72a/5 and 2+8 14s + edges in graphite verso 166mm × 241mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.30

$400 - $800

5

Max Oettli Ponsonby Road 1972. Printed 1974. gelatin silver print signed M C Oettli, dated 1972/4 and inscribed Ponsonby Road in ink verso; photographer's stamp applied verso 239mm × 169mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.31

$600 - $900

6

Jae Hoon Lee Yellow Cloud 2007 C-type print, edition 54/250 signed Lee Jae Hoon, inscribed #54 and dated 2007 in ink verso 200mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.32

$700 - $1,200

7

Brian Brake Milford Sound, Fiordland, 1960 1960 chromogenic print 400mm × 600mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Athol McCredie ed., Brian Brake: Lens on the World (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2010), 256.

p.33

$2,000 - $3,000

8

Max Coolahan Pit-sawn log 1959-60 gelatin silver print 392mm × 495mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Art New Zealand 98, Autumn 2001, 80.

p.34/p.123

$600 - $800

9

Max Coolahan untitled c. 1960s gelatin silver print 405mm × 480mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.34/p.123

$600 - $800

10

Max Coolahan untitled c. 1960s gelatin silver print 505mm × 405mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.35/p.123

$600 - $800

11

Peter Peryer untitled c. 1976 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer and dated 26/7/03 New Plymouth in graphite verso 253mm × 204mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.36

$1,000 - $2,000

12

Peter Peryer untitled c. 1976 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer and dated 26/7/03 New Plymouth in graphite verso 253mm × 204mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.37

$1,000 - $2,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

13

Gordon H. Burt, Ltd. untitled c. 1939 gelatin silver print 300mm × 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.38

$300 - $500

14

Gordon H. Burt, Ltd. untitled c. 1939 gelatin silver print 300mm × 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.38

$300 - $500

15

Les Cleveland Dredge Buckets, Greenstone Valley 1959 gelatin silver print dated 1959 and inscribed Dredge Buckets, Greenstone Valley in graphite lower right; dated 1959 and inscribed Dredge Buckets Greenstone Valley, Westland and Les Cleveland Photograph (11-396) on printed label affixed lower right verso 270mm × 373mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.39

$400 - $700

16

John Johns untitled c. 1960 gelatin silver print 243mm × 297mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.40

$1,000 - $2,000

17

Len Wesney Rabbits, Moke Lake, Otago 1971 gelatin silver print 195mm × 295mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from McNamara Gallery, Whanganui, 2004. exhibited Len Wesney: 34 Photographs, 1967 - 1975, McNamara Gallery, Whanganui, 2004. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 1975).

p.41

$1,500 - $2,500

18

Gordon Walters untitled 1968 silver gelatin print, documentation of Mahuika, 1968, PVA and acrylic on canvas, 1520mm x 1145mm (formerly in the collection of Tim and Shera Francis) inscribed Top^ Painting 1968, Acrylic on canvas 60" × 45" and Black on Blue in graphite verso 215mm × 167mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.42

$500 - $700

19

Richard Killeen Destruction of the Circle 1990 silver gelatin print from a computer-generated negative signed Killeen in graphite verso 475mm × 590mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1990.

p.43

$2,500 - $3,500

20

Eric Lee Johnson Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (#48) 1955 gelatin silver print inscribed 6368 5. and 13x11 in graphite verso 243mm × 194mm

Provenance Private collection, Waikato. literature Eric Lee-Johnson and Elizabeth Lee-Johnson, Opo: The Hokianga Dolphin (Auckland: David Ling Publishing, 1994), 32. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 1994).

p./p.124

$400 - $600

21

Henry Winkelmann untitled c. 1905 gelatin silver print signed H Winkelmann in ink lower left 540mm × 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Waikato.

p.44

$500 - $700

22

Henry Winkelmann untitled c. 1905 gelatin silver print signed H Winkelmann in ink lower left 375mm × 300mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.45

$500 - $700

23

Allan McDonald Untitled 1975 gelatin silver print 79mm × 77mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.45

$300 - $600

24

Allan McDonald Untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 85mm × 83mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.46

$300 - $600


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

25

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 112mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.46

$300 - $600

26

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 74mm × 120mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.47

$300 - $600

27

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 110mm × 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.47

$400 - $700

28

Allan McDonald untitled 1975 gelatin silver print 105mm × 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.48

$400 - $700

29

Allan McDonald untitled c. 1970s gelatin silver print 124mm × 184mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.48

$500 - $800

30

Gavin Hipkins untitled 1996 C-type print, edition of 5 490mm × 490mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington. exhibited Gavin Hipkins: The Blue Light, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 1997. collections Previously on long-term loan to Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth.

p.49

$400 - $600

31

Minerva Betts untitled c. 1970 620mm silver bromide selenium toned contact print 63mm × 90mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.49

$300 - $600

32

Fiona Pardington Dying Freesia in a Silver Water Jug with Two Conus Marmoreus and a Shotgun Shell Ripiro 2014 archival inkjet print, edition 6/25 signed Fiona Pardington and dated 2014 in graphite lower right verso 385mm × 289mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.50

$2,000 - $3,000

33

Yvonne Todd untitled 1998 gelatin silver print 140mm × 105mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.51/p.125

$600 - $900

34

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 chromogenic print 244mm × 192mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.52/p.125

$500 - $1,000

35

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 72mm × 94mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.53/p.125

$300 - $600

36

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 chromogenic print 72mm × 112mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.53/p.125

$300 - $600

37

Yvonne Todd Michelle St. Clair 2001 C-type print from 4" x 5" transparency, artist proof 165mm × 120mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.53/p.125

$600 - $900

38

Yvonne Todd Sheri-Ann Roller Slut c. 1995 gelatin silver print inscribed Dear Michelle Sheri-Ann Roller Slut in ink lower edge 125mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.54/p.125

$600 - $900


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

39

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 125mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.54/p.125

$400 - $700

40

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.55/p.125

$500 - $1,000

41

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.55/p.125

$500 - $1,000

42

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.56/p.125

$500 - $1,000

43

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 235mm × 175mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.56/p.125

$500 - $1,000

44

Yvonne Todd 'motel' Cheri Champagne, Sweet Carolina & Princess the maid 1995 gelatin silver print signed Yvonne, dated september 1995 and inscribed 'motel' Cheri Champagne, Sweet Carolina & Princess the Maid in ink verso 162mm × 228mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.57/p.125

$500 - $1,000

45

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 110mm × 140mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.58/p.125

$400 - $700

46

Yvonne Todd untitled c. 1995 gelatin silver print 110mm × 124mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.58

$400 - $700

47

Yvonne Todd Ramona c. 1995 A4 spiral-bound sketchbook (36 pp.), 15 silver gelatin prints, 15 printed labels inscribed Ramona in Letraset; signed Yvonne Todd in ink 297mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist to the present owner.

p.59

$500 - $1,000

48

Glenn Busch Charlie Roughton; Foreman, Metal Foundry (Wellington, 1982) 1982 gelatin silver print 190mm × 190mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Art+Object, 2013. exhibited Working Men: Glenn Busch, National Art Gallery, Wellington, 1984. literature Glenn Busch, Working Men (Wellington: National Art Gallery, 1984), 89. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 1982); Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1983).

p.60

$800 - $1,600

49

Glenn Busch Man with a transistor radio, Auckland 1973 gelatin silver print 186mm × 126mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu (acquired 1974); Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 1973); Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1983).

p.61

$600 - $800

50

Michael Parekowhai Lou Lombardi 2000 C-type print, edition of 10 535mm × 438mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.62

$7,000 - $9,000

51

Fiona Pardington Fontanelle 1993 gelatin silver print 350mm × 275mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. literature Fiona Pardington, Fiona Pardington: A Beautiful Hesitation, Kriselle Baker and Aaron Lister ed. (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2016), 87.

p.63

$3,000 - $5,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

52

Murray Cammick Kerry and Violet chic, Queen St 1975 gelatin silver print 235mm × 154mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Another from the edition included in Flash Cars, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney, 2015; Black Asterisk Gallery, Auckland, 2016. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

p.64/p.122

$800 - $1,200

53

Murray Cammick The overflow crowd from Bill Rowling's Labour election meeting in the foyer of the Mt Eden War Memorial Hall 1975 gelatin silver print 161mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.65/p.122

$600 - $900

54

Murray Cammick Gary Glitter, Auckland Town Hall 1975 gelatin silver print 242mm × 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki. exhibited Another from the edition included in Flash Cars, Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney, 2015; Black Asterisk Gallery, Auckland, 2016.

p.65/p.122

$800 - $1,200

55

Glenn Busch untitled c. 1973-4 gelatin silver print inscribed Work Proof/Not for Repro and Do not Crop in ink upper edge verso; signed Glenn Busch and inscribed 79 Ardmore Road Ponsonby Auckland Photo Marylands School CH.CH (run by)/ Brothers/ St John of God in ink lower edge verso 170mm × 170mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Another from the edition included in The Active Eye: Contemporary New Zealand Photography, toured by Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, 1975 - 1976. notes This image appeared on the poster for the above exhibition.

p.66

$600 - $900

56

Joe Deal Untitled (Los Angeles) 1973 gelatin silver print signed J. Deal and dated '73 in graphite lower edge; dated 1973 and inscribed University: Institute of Design, IIT, Photo Title: Untitled (Los Angeles) on printed label affixed verso 250mm × 250mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington. Purchased from David N White Gallery, Wellington, 2011.

p.67

$800 - $1,600

57

Fiona Pardington Rifleman 2006 gelatin silver print 595mm × 445mm

Provenance Private collection, Rangitikei. literature Fiona Pardington, The Heart Derelict (Dunedin: Otago Polytechnic, 2006), 15.; Fiona Pardington, Fiona Pardington: A Beautiful Hesitation, Kriselle Baker and Aaron Lister ed. (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2016), 160.

p.68

$4,000 - $6,000

58

Ben Cauchi Loaded Palm 2002 gold toned printing out paper print signed B Cauchi, dated 2002 and inscribed 'Loaded Palm', P.O.P. print, gold toned and Print N4 (2002) in graphite lower edge verso 195mm × 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki. exhibited New Ambrotypes & Building the Empire, McNamara Gallery, Whanganui, March 2003. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 2006).

p.69

$2,000 - $3,000

59

Peter Peryer Erika c 1979 1979. Printed 1988. gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, inscribed Erika c 1979, This print was made 25/2/88, No final prints made prior to this date and [brooch] in graphite verso; Dunedin Public Art Gallery Label affixed upper right verso 405mm × 268mm

Provenance Private collection, New Plymouth. exhibited Erika: A Portrait by Peter Peryer, curated by Justin Paton, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 20 January - 1 April 2001; City Gallery Wellington, 13 July - 16 September 2001; Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki, 10 November 2001 - 27 January 2002.

p.70

$6,000 - $9,000

60

Marti Friedlander Louise Henderson 1972 1972 gelatin silver print 240mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 2000).

p.71

$1,200 - $1,800

61

Henri Cartier-Bresson Beijing 1948-9 gelatin silver print photographer's/copyright stamp applied and inscribed 276_23 in ink verso 171mm × 251mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.72

$3,000 - $5,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

62

Gil Hanly Hamilton 81 1981 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly in graphite verso; inscribed Hamilton 81 in graphite in another hand verso 142mm × 204mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.73

$300 - $600

63

Gil Hanly Marlborough Street 3rd Test Auckland 12 September 1981 1981 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly, inscribed Marlborough Street 3rd Test Auckland and dated 12 September 1981 in graphite verso; inscribed 1/18 in ink lower edge verso 140mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.73

$300 - $600

64

Ans Westra Ruatoria, 1963 1963 gelatin silver print signed Ans in graphite lower right 187mm × 187mm

Provenance Private collection, Rangitikei. literature Ans Westra and Mark Amery, Washday at the pa (Christchurch: Caxton Press, 1964), u. p.; Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 256.; Fogarty Hojsgaard Entwistle Galleries, Ans Westra: To the Pleasure Garden (Auckland: Fogarty Hojsgaard Entwistle Galleries, 2005), 14.; Ans Westra and Mark Amery, Washday at the Pa (Wellington: Suite Publishing, 2011), 13. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1999).

p.74

$4,000 - $6,000

65

Ans Westra Hikurangi, 1982 1982 gelatin silver print signed Ans W in ink verso 292mm × 238mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. literature Ans Westra and Katerina Mataira, Whaiora: The Pursuit of Life (Wellington: Allen & Unwin, 1985), 53. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 1997).

p.75/p.129

$4,000 - $7,000

66

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey 2001 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, dated 27/09/2001 and inscribed Peter McLeavey in graphite lower edge verso 235mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.76

$1,000 - $2,000

67

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey Gallery (with Toss Woolaston painting) 2000 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, dated 23/9/2000 and inscribed Peter McLeavey Gallery (with Toss Woolaston painting) in graphite lower edge verso 235mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.76

$1,000 - $2,000

68

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey Gallery 2001 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, inscribed Peter McLeavey Gallery and dated 26/6/2001 in graphite lower edge verso 235mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.76

$1,000 - $2,000

69

Andrew Ross Peter McLeavey Gallery (last day before clearout) 2001 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross, dated 20/10/2001 and inscribed Peter McLeavey gallery (last day before clearout) in graphite lower edge verso 235mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.76

$1,000 - $2,000

70

Anne Noble Wanganui River 1975 gelatin silver print signed Ann Shelton, dated 1975 and inscribed Wanganui River in graphite verso 171mm × 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Justin Paton ed., Anne Noble: States of Grace (Dunedin: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2001), 35.

p.77

$300 - $500

71

Anne Noble Water I c. 1975 gelatin silver print dated 1974 in graphite in another hand verso 215mm × 142mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Justin Paton ed., Anne Noble: States of Grace (Dunedin: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2001), 26. [In Photoforum 1975 or 1976]

p.77

$300 - $500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

72

Marti Friedlander Eglinton Valley 1970 gelatin silver print 195mm × 285mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Marti Friedlander and Hugo Manson, Self Portrait (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2013), 249.; Leonard Bell, Marti Friedlander (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2009), 8. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 1976).

p.78/p.130

$5,000 - $8,000

73

Bruce Connew Muttonbirds—Part of a Story #5 2002. Printed 2003. gelatin silver print signed Bruce Connew, dated November 2002/2003/5 and inscribed #5 in graphite verso 204mm × 253mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Muttonbirds—part of a story, McNamara Gallery, Whanganui, 2004; Lopdell House, Auckland, 2004 ; City Gallery Wellington, Wellington, 2005. literature Bruce Connew and Dean Tiemi Te Au, Muttonbirds—part of a story (Wellington: Vapour Momenta, 2004), up. "Of Flight and Death: The fate of seabirds and the men who hunt them inspires a mysterious and majestic photo series," Time, November 21, 2005, 62-3.

p.79

$1,000 - $2,000

74

Laurence Aberhart Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February 1999. 1999 gold and selenium-toned gelatin silver print signed L. Aberhart, dated 11/1999 and inscribed Aparima Estuary, Riverton, Southland, 25 February 1999. in ink lower edge 198mm × 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited The Shadows Dream of Light, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 1999

p.80/p.131

$3,000 - $5,000

75

Laurence Aberhart The Wellington Chinese Masonic Society Inc, Frederick Street, 2 January 1992 1992 gelatin silver print signed L. Aberhart, dated 1992 and inscribed The Wellington Chinese Masonic Society Inc, Frederick Street, 2 January 1992, For Kerry: "An Implied 23." and #1. ink lower edge 195mm × 246mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 27 July 2002.

p.81

$2,000 - $3,000

76

Anne Noble Rimu Tapu. Kaikoura. From the series Te hikoi ö Kati Kuri. 1992-1994 gelatin silver print dated 1992 - 94 and inscribed Rimu Tapu. Kaikoura. From the series Te hikoi ö Kati Kuri and (NO 49) in graphite lower edge verso 350mm × 700mm

Provenance Private collection, Amberley. literature Justin Paton ed., Anne Noble: States of Grace (Dunedin: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2001), 93. collections Another from the edition in the collection of Te Papa Tongarewa (catalogued as Untitled VI. From: Te hikoi ö Kati Kuri | The journey of Kati Kuri - Kaikoura).

p.82

$2,400 - $3,200

77

Theo Schoon untitled c. 1950. Printed later by Ans Westra. gelatin silver print 178mm × 178mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.83

$500 - $1,000

78

Peter Peryer Engine Leaving Glen Innes Tunnel 1992 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, inscribed Engine Leaving, Glen Innes Tunnel and dated 1992 in graphite verso 350mm × 350mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Second Nature: Peter Peryer Photographs, Kunstverein, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 1995; Peter Peryer: A Careful Eye, Dowse Art Museum, Lower Hutt, 2014. literature Sian van Dyk, Courtney Johnston, Jim Barr and Mary Barr, Peter Peryer: A Careful Eye (Lower Hutt: Dowse Art Museum, 2014), 66.; Peter Peryer, Gregory Burke and Peter Weiermair, Second Nature (Zurich: Edition Stemmle, 1995), 115. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 1994); the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1998).

p.84

$4,000 - $6,000

79

Edward Nellis 329 1972 gelatin silver print dated November 1972 and inscribed University: U. of Iowa, Photo Title: 329, C-14 on printed label affixed verso 145mm × 215mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington. Purchased from David N White Gallery, Wellington, 2011.

p.85

$200 - $400

80

John R. Grimes Chicago 1974 gelatin silver print signed J Grimes and dated 74 in graphite lower edge; dated 1974 and inscribed University: Institute of Design, IIT, Photo Title: Chicago, C-11 on printed label affixed verso 180mm × 330mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington. Purchased from David N White Gallery, Wellington, 2011.

p.85

$200 - $400


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

81

Laurence Aberhart David Bowie 1978 gelatin silver print 245mm × 165mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. literature Rip It Up, December 1978.

p.86

$2,000 - $4,000

82

George Silk Bobby & Ted Kennedy at Bob's Home at death of Pres. John Kennedy 1963 gelatin silver print 496mm × 350mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.87

$2,000 - $3,000

83

Laurence Aberhart Ramones 1980 gelatin silver print signed Aberhart, dated 80 and inscribed Ramones in ink lower left 336mm × 485mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. literature XTRA, October 1980.

p.88

$2,500 - $4,500

84

Laurence Aberhart Ramones 1980 gelatin silver print signed Aberhart, dated 80 and inscribed Ramones in ink lower left 336mm × 485mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. literature XTRA, October 1980.

p.89

$2,500 - $4,500

85

Rhondda Bosworth C. M.—portrait/close up 1977 gelatin silver print 170mm × 253mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki. literature Nina Seja, PhotoForum at 40: Counterculture, Clusters, and Debates in New Zealand (Auckland: Rim Books, 2014), 200.; PhotoForum 42, June 1978, cover.; Rhondda Bosworth, 44 Photographs 1974-1999 (Wanganui: McNamara Gallery, 2002), 23.

p.90/p.132

$700 - $1,200

86

Rhondda Bosworth Mother goes upside-down 1984 gelatin silver print dated 1984 and inscribed Mother goes upside-down in ink on label affixed verso 110mm × 170mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Merilyn Tweedie ed., Six Women Photographers (Auckland: PhotoForum, Inc., 1987), 32.; Rhondda Bosworth, 44 Photographs 1974-1999 (Wanganui: McNamara Gallery, 2002), 27.

p.91/p.132

$600 - $800

87

Rhondda Bosworth Self-Portrait 2 1985 gelatin silver print dated 1985 and inscribed self-portrait 2 in ink verso 200mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Fragments of A World, curated by Sandy Callister, Adam Art Gallery, Wellington, 3 October - 18 December 2015; Michael Lett Gallery, Auckland, 20 January - 20 February 2016.

p.91/p.132

$700 - $1,200

88

Rhondda Bosworth ‘Moana Taha’ 1978 gelatin silver print 250mm × 202mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.92/p.132

$700 - $1,200

89

Marie Shannon In the TV lounge of the Marlin Hotel 1984 gelatin silver print, edition 2/10 signed Marie Shannon and inscribed In the TV lounge of the Marlin Hotel 1984' in graphite verso 124mm × 818mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.93

$1,500 - $2,500

90

Cindy Sherman Mrs. Claus 1990 C-type print, edition of 125 signed Cindy Sherman and dated 1990 in ink verso 330mm × 254mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.94/p.136

$2,500 - $3,500

91

Harvey Benge Tokyo Girl Number 3, 2005 2005 pigment inkjet print, edition 1/5 signed Harvey Benge and inscribed Tokyo 2005 in indian ink verso 750mm × 500mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Harvey Benge, You Are Here (Cologne: Schaden.com, 2006), u. p.

p.95/p.137

$3,500 - $5,500

92

Paul Johns untitled c. 1980s Polaroid SX:70 instant film 75mm × 75mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.96

$300 - $600


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

93

Paul Johns untitled c. 1970-79 gelatin silver print 88mm × 140mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.96

$300 - $600

94

Minerva Betts untitled c. 1970 silver bromide fibre-based 35mm print 134mm × 90mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.97

$300 - $600

95

Minerva Betts untitled c. 1970 silver bromide fibre-based 35mm print Moller's Gallery label affixed verso 145mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.97

$400 - $800

96

Laurence Aberhart Hau Hau Flag #2 1983 gelatin silver print inscribed Hau Hau Flag #2 in ink lower left; inscribed Hau Hau Flag 2, Laurence Aberhart, 1983 in graphite in another hand verso 100mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Lyttelton.

p.98

$2,000 - $3,000

97

Laurence Aberhart Hau Hau Flag #3 1983 gelatin silver print inscribed Hau Hau Flag #3 in ink lower left; inscribed Hau Hau Flag 3, Laurence Aberhart, 1983 in graphite in another hand verso 90mm × 230cm

Provenance Private collection, Lyttelton.

p.98

$2,000 - $3,000

98

Brain Brake Woven Comb, Solomon Island, c. 1925-1930 c. 1980 gelatin silver print 295mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. literature James McNeish, David Simmons and Brian Brake, Art of the Pacific (New York: H. N. Abrams, 1980), u. p.

p.99

$400 - $600

99

Brian Brake Woven Comb, Solomon Island, c. 1925-1930 c. 1980 gelatin silver print 295mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. literature James McNeish, David Simmons and Brian Brake, Art of the Pacific (New York: H. N. Abrams, 1980), u. p.

p.99

$400 - $600

100 Tom Hutchins Coolies pulling a cart past a government's Buick car, Peking (Beijing), China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and inscribed 'COOLIES PULLING A CART PAST A GOVERMENT'S BUICK CAR, PEKING, CHINA, 1956' and C160/22 in graphite verso 155mm × 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature John B. Turner, "Tom Hutchins in China, 1956," Art New Zealand 160, Summer 2016-17, 112.; John B. Turner ed., Tom Hutchins: Seen in China 1956 (Auckland/Beijing: Turner PhotoBooks, 2016), 29.

p.100/p.138

$400 - $700

101 Tom Hutchins Wheat harvesting on 'Red Star' farm, Peking (Beijing), China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and inscribed [R6-8: WHEAT HARVESTING ON "RED STAR" FARM, PEKING, CHINA, 1956] in graphite verso 172mm × 243mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature John B. Turner ed., Tom Hutchins: Seen in China 1956 (Auckland/Beijing: Turner PhotoBooks, 2016), 15.

p.100/p.138

$400 - $700

102 Tom Hutchins Working Party on Railway Water Channel in Desert, Yumen, China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and [R21-8: WORKING PARTY ON RAILWAY WATER CHANNEL IN DESRT, YUMEN, CHINA, 1956] in graphite verso 211mm × 191mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.101/p.138

$400 - $700

103 Tom Hutchins Lanchow, China, 1956 1956 gelatin silver print signed Tom Hutchins and inscribed [R25-12. LANCHOW, CHINA, 1956. PRINTED 2003.] in graphite verso 178mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.101/p.138

$400 - $700


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

104 Jane Zusters Laurence Aberhart, Kamala and the Hammond Boys - Lyttleton 1976 1976 gelatin silver print signed Zusters and inscribed "AP" Laurence Aberhart, Kamala and the Hammond Boys— Lyttleton 1976 in graphite on label affixed verso 150mm × 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.102/p.112

$1,000 - $2,000

105 Jane Zusters Life Drawing North Beach, Christchurch 1978 1978 gelatin silver print signed Zusters and inscribed AP " Life Drawing North Beach, Christchurch 1976 in graphite on label affixed verso 140mm × 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.103/p.112

$1,000 - $2,000

106 Estate of L Budd Lorne St studio c. 1980s silver bromide fibre-based print (section), documentation of works from category Chattels, Series 200 & 900, The Estate of L. Budd: Catalogue of Extant Works, (Auckland: Michael Lett, 2008) 120mm × 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.104

$400 - $800

107 Peter Peryer AEPB 1975 gelatin silver print 176mm × 177mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki; the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

p.105

$1,000 - $2,000

108 Ian MacDonald Colin McCahon Studio #4 1977 C-type print signed Ian MacDonald in pencil verso 391mm × 382mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Gordon H. Brown, Towards a Promised Land: on the life and art of Colin McCahon (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2010), 30.

p.106

$800 - $1,600

109 Steve Rumsey Barry Brickell, Mormon Pots 1958 gelatin silver print signed Steve Rumsey, dated Photo taken 1958 and inscribed Barry Brickell, Mormon Pots, Suiter St, Newmarket and SAR 35mm Neg. No 359/22 in graphite verso 203mm × 154mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.107

$200 - $300

110 Steve Rumsey Barry Brickell coiling pot at Suiter Street, Newmarket, Auckland 1958 gelatin silver print signed Steve Rumsey, dated Photo taken 1958 and inscribed Suiter St, Newmarket, X Negative damaged X, and Copy Neg in graphite verso; inscribed Copy Neg. 96-4/14 in ink verso 203mm × 155mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature David Craig and Gregory O'Brien, His Own Steam: The Work of Barry Brickell (Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2013), 15. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki; the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1998).

p.107

$200 - $300

111 George Valentine Pink Terrace, Lake Rotomahana 1885 albumen silver print signed G.V. and inscribed PINK TERRACE, L. ROTOMAHANA. 2e. on negative lower left 185mm × 287mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. collections Another from the edition in the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki; the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

p.108

$400 - $600

112 Josiah Martin View of the White Terrace c. 1880s carbon print blind stamped Martin Auckland N.Z. lower right 395mm × 535mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.108

$600 - $1,200

113 Burton Brothers Maori Land 1885 albumen silver print inscribed IMP 1885 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed B in graphite upper right verso 254mm × 196mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Museum voor Volkenkunde, Burton Brothers: Fotografen in Nieuw-Zeeland, 1866-1898 (Amsterdam: Fragment Uitgeverij, 1987), 82.

p.109

$100 - $200


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

114 Samuel Heath Head untitled c. 1906 albumen silver print 387mm × 315mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.109

$150 - $250

115 Henry Lock Lower Incline W.G.G. Works 1880 albumen silver print signed H.T.L. and inscribed LOWER INCLINE W.G.G. WORKS on negative lower right 195mm × 239mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.110

$100 - $200

116 Henry Lock View from top of upper incline, looking towards sea 1880 albumen silver print signed H.T.L. and inscribed TOP OF INCLINE TRAMWAY W.G.G. WOR'S on negative lower right 202mm × 276mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 87. notes From the album Views of the Westport Colliery Co, Westport.

p.110

$100 - $200

117 Henry Gaze Eventide 1920 gelatin silver print signed H ' E Gaze and inscribed "Eventide" and Hamilton 1920 in ink lower edge; inscribed Gaze Hamilton "Eventide", Dr Douglas G " Oak and 539 in graphite verso 150mm × 226mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.111

$200 - $300

118 George Chance Spring Morning, Avon, Christchurch c. 1940 gelatin silver print Inscribed Spring Morning—Avon—Christchurch—NZ. and signed Geo. Chance. F.R.P.S. 230mm × 280mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.111

$100 - $200

119 Peter Butler Police Force 1981 gelatin silver print signed Peter Butler, dated 1.8.81 and inscribed 'Police Force' and Palmerston North in ink lower edge verso 210mm × 145mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.112

$300 - $600

120 Anthony Phelps Shields protect front liners at barricade, Royal TCE/ Sandringham RD Corner, after Biko March had passed 1981 gelatin silver print 168mm x 140mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki. literature Tom Newnham, By Batons and Barbed Wire (Auckland: Real Pictures Gallery, 1983), 85.

p.113

$100 - $200

121 Gil Hanly Tim Shadbolt Domain 81 1981 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly in graphite verso; inscribed Tim Shadbolt Domain 81 in another hand in graphite verso 142mm x 206mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.113

$300 - $600

122 Marti Friedlander untitled gelatin silver print signed Marti Friedlander in ink lower left verso 180mm × 295mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.114

$1,200 - $1,800

123 Arthur Northwood In The Far North, Jolly Maori school children of Te Hapua school Parenga c. 1910s gelatin silver print Inscribed In The Far North Jolly Maori school children of Te Hapua school Parenga in graphite verso 151mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.115

$200 - $300

124 Marie Shannon Self-Portrait with Sister 1979 gelatin silver print inscribed Self-Portrait with Sister and dated c. 1979 in another hand verso 260mm × 385mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.115

$800 - $1,600


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

125 Justin Boroughs untitled 1974 gelatin silver print signed Justin Boroughs and dated 1974 195mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki.

p.116

$300 - $600

126 Ivan Rogers Memorial Store, Auckland, 1983 1983 gelatin silver print 255mm × 385mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.117

$300 - $600

127 Do Van Toan untitled c. 1972 gelatin silver print signed Photograph by Do Van Toan in ink verso 200mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.117

$200 - $300

128 Spencer Bigby Michael Joseph Savage 1935 gelatin silver print 285mm × 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.118

$300 - $600

129 Murray Cammick Robert Muldoon at National Party Convention, Wellington Town Hall 1975 gelatin silver print 175mm × 116mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.118/p.122

$600 - $900

130 Margaret Dawson Dog (Hobbyhorse series) 2005 C-type print from medium format negative in custom frame, edition of 3 560mm × 480mm

Provenance Private collection, Rangitikei.

p.119

$2,000 - $3,000

131 Harvey Benge Two Blue Buckets—After Fraser—Rome 12/1994 1994 chromogenic print signed Harvey Benge and inscribed Two blue buckets—after fraser—Rome and dated 12/1994 114mm × 190mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.119

$400 - $600

132 James Bragge Manawatu Gorge Bridge 1878 albumen silver print Inscribed Manawatu Gorge Bridge in ink lower edge; inscribed gBRA003-00 and Bragge, Manawatu Gorge Bridge 1878 in graphite on mat board verso 220mm × 291mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. notes This item is a page from an album, with photographs on both sides. Ruapehu is affixed verso. The inscriptions refer to the dates when the compiler of the album visited these locations, not when the photographs were taken.

p.120

$400 - $600


bowerbank ninow

How to participate in the Auction

Attending in person Auction N˚5 will take place on Wednesday 5th April 2017 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they may do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will endeavour to contact the artist and pay the artist a resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. The steps taken to contact the artist will be at Bowerbank Ninow’s sole discretion and Bowerbank Ninow will under no circumstances be liable for failure to make payment to an artist under this clause. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Artists are invited to submit their contact details to Bowerbank Ninow to facilitate payment. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

159


auction n°5 — april 2017

Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. If there is an unsatisfied  debt  then the applicant agrees that they be liable for and pay for all costs of recovery of the contract, which costs shall be collected by a debt collection agency. Costs payable by the applicant shall include, legal fees, commissions, fee’s and disbursements, and /or court fees and disbursements.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent.

COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 17.5% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

160


Auction N°6 August 2017 Entries invited


Auction N˚5  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you