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Auction N°4 30th Nov 2016


ISSUE 16 NOVEMBER 2016 ATONG ATEM JOHN BOOTH ASGER CARLSEN JULIAN HOOPER DAVID HORVITZ CARY KWOK

ISSUE 16 OUT NOW SUBSCRIBE NOW AND RECEIVE YOUR COPY OF VAULT MAGAZINE FIRST ATONG ATEM, JOHN BOOTH, ASGER CARLSEN, OSCAR ENBERG, JULIAN HOOPER, DAVID HORVITZ, JEFF KOONS, CARY KWOK & MORE

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ROGER BALLEN & ASGER CARLSEN Prancing, 2016 archival pigment print 60 x 40 cm Courtesy the artist and Dittrich & Schlechtriem, Berlin


[FRAMES] by Daniel custom art freight boxes mobile: 021 660 599 email: daniel@framesbydaniel.co.nz www.framesbydaniel.co.nz


Newell Harry, Louise Menzies, Dan Nash, Fatima Al Qadiri & Khalid Al Gharaballi, Mika Rottenberg, Sorawit Songsataya, Martine Syms

Curated by Tendai John Mutambu

Potentially Yours, The Coming Community 1 / 3 0 0 K a r a n g a h a p e R d N e w t o n 1 0 1 0 Auckland N e w Z e a l a n d A o t e a r o a W W W . A R T S P ACE.ORG.NZ

NOV 10 — DEC 22


Kim Pieters the mallarmÊ suite 26 October— 19 November


Jem Noble Dream Dialects 12 November 2016 – 19 March 2017

tetuhi.org.nz

Jem Noble, Sleeping Dogs Azzuro Home Video Release (2016). VHS video cassette and case (studio view). Commissioned by Te Tuhi

Principal Funders

Supported by


PETER STICHBURY ANATOMY OF A PHENOMENON November 5, 2016 - May 28, 2017

Peter Stichbury, Mona Stafford, 1976, 2014. Oil on linen, 23.6 x 19.7 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Tracy Williams Ltd., New York.


e v e r yd ay - n e e d s.c o m | 2 7 0 Po n s o n by Rd , Au c k l a n d | s t u d i o @ e v e r yd a y - n e e d s.c o m | 0 9 3 7 8 7 9 8 8


auction n°4 — november 2016


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°4 3oth November 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23rd November, 2016 Viewing

Thursday 24th November – Tuesday 29th November 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30th 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30th November 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°4 November 30th, 2016 Catalogue of works Edition of 2000 ISSN 2537-6594 Design Direction DDMMYY Editor Andrew Clark Design Elliot Ferguson Photography Paul Nathan, Sam Hartnett Haru Sameshima 312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon


auction n°4 — november 2016

Contents Plates

18

Index

75

Essays

82

Martin Thompson untitled

84

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds I Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds VII

85

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 92

86

Richard Killeen untitled

87

Agnes Martin On a Clear Day

88

Robert Ellis Motorway Journey

89

Julian Dashper Untitled Blue Circles #4 Untitled (2006)

90

Peter Robinson Boy Am I Scared Eh!

92

Don Peebles Painting 1969—No. 1

94

Karl Maughan Lee Road

95

Bill Hammond Flight Recorder

96

Paul Hartigan Spring

98

Julian Hooper Count Gideon Vecsey

99

Tony de Lautour Conspiracy Plan

100

How to participate in the Auction

102

Conditions of Sale

103


P

L

A

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auction n°4 — november 2016


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20


auction n°4 — november 2016

lot 1 p.84

Martin Thompson Untitled c. 1990 fibre-tip pen on graph paper 210mm × 295mm

est

$1,000 – $2,000

21


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Lot 2 p.85

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds I 1981 watercolour on paper inscribed Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds 1 in graphite lower edge; Govett-Brewster Art Gallery label affixed verso 597mm Ă— 795mm

est

$500 – $1,000

22


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 3 p.85

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds VII 1981 watercolour on paper signed JMP and dated 81 in graphite; Govett-Brewster Art Gallery label affixed verso 597mm × 795mm

est

$500 – $1000

23


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Lot 4 p.86

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 92 1982 oil on canvas inscribed 168, 18" × 18" and "SMALL LATTICE, NO. 92" in ink on upper edge verso; signed Ian Scott and dated February 1982 in ink on lower edge verso; signed Ian Scott and dated 82 in ink verso 460mm × 460mm

est

$2,500 – $3,500

24


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 5

Mervyn Williams Horus Series VII 1980 screenprint on paper, 16/25 signed Mervyn Williams and dated 80 in graphite lower right; inscribed Horus series VII and AP in graphite lower left 453mm × 456mm

est

$200 – $300

25


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Lot 6

Greer Twiss Frame 1970 lacquer on cast bronze inscribed Frame 7 in ink underside 180mm × 560mm × 245mm (widest points)

est

$3,000 – $5,000

26


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 7 p.87

est

Richard Killeen untitled 1969 ink on paper signed Killeen in graphite and dated 20/4/69 in brushpoint lower left 500mm × 500mm $2,500 – $3,500

27


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Lot 8

John Reynolds Personals (cont.) 2008 oilstick on screenprinted paper signed REYNOLDS and dated 2008 in graphite lower right; inscribed PERSONALS (CONT.) in graphite lower left 315mm × 245mm

est

$500 – $1,000

28


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 9

Michael Harrison Priestess 1996 – 1997 acrylic on paper signed Michael Harrison in graphite upper right 410mm × 290mm

est

$4,000 – $6,000

29


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Lot 10

Stella Corkery S.S.100 2012 oil and spraypaint on pre-made canvas stretcher 910mm Ă— 610mm

est

$4,000 – $6,000

30


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Lot 11

Stella Corkery Untitled 110 2013 oil and spraypaint on pre-made canvas stretcher 910mm Ă— 610mm

est

$4,000 – $6,000

31


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Lot 12 p.88

Agnes Martin On a Clear Day 1973 screenprint on Japanese rag paper, 29/50 signed a martin and inscribed 29/50 in graphite lower edge 304mm Ă— 304mm

est

$5,000 – $7,000

32


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 13 p.90

Julian Dashper Blue Circles #4 2002 polycarbonate clear 12" lathe-cut disc, cardboard cover and insert in plastic sleeve, from edition of 20 325mm × 300mm

est

$500 – $1,000

33


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lot 14 p.90

Julian Dashper untitled (2006) 2006 rabbit skin size on Belgian linen 300mm × 300mm × 45mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

34


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 15 p.90

Julian Dashper untitled 2005 hardboard and MDF signed JD, dated 05 and inscribed AP in graphite on masking tape affixed verso 304mm × 304mm × 44mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

35


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lot 16

Tony de Lautour Landscape 2001 acrylic and colour pencil on canvas board signed Tony De Lautour in coloured pencil upper right; inscribed Landscape in coloured pencil upper left; signed TDL, dated 2001 and inscribed Landscape in brushpoint verso 305mm Ă— 406mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

36


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 17

Shane Cotton Matiu 1999 oil on canvas inscribed Matiu in brushpoint lower left 200mm × 200mm

est

$5,000 – $7,000

37


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Lot 18 p.89

Robert Ellis Motorway Journey 1970 oil on board signed Robert Ellis and dated 1970 in brushpoint lower right; signed ROBERT ELLIS, dated 1970 and inscribed 'MOTORWAY/CITY' WELL. EX N⁰7. 'MOTORWAY JOURNEY' B.L. EX. N⁰3. in brushpoint upper left verso 890mm × 890mm

est

$18,000 – $24,000

38


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 19

Richard Lewer Something so Wonderful 2006 permanent marker on found venetian blind inscribed Something so Wonderful in ink lower right; signed R. Lewer in ink upper right verso 1520mm × 1095mm × 60mm

est

$3,500 – $4,500

39


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Lot 20

Jason Greig The Cleaners 2001 monoprint signed JG, dated 2001 and inscribed "THE CLEANERS" and 1/1 Monoprint in graphite upper edge verso 200mm Ă— 265mm

est

$800 – $1,200

40


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 21

Francisco Goya Chiton from a plate made c. 1797 – 98 etching and aquatint on paper inscribed Francisco Goya, Chiton, D. 65 iii, original etching & aquatint from Los Caprichos. on label affixed to frame verso 225mm × 160mm

est

$1,600 – $2,600

41


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Lot 22 p.92

Peter Robinson Boy Am I Scared Eh! 1997 acrylic and oilstick on paper signed P R Robinson and dated '97 in graphite lower right 935mm Ă— 670mm

est

$20,000 – $30,000

42


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 23

Michael Parekowhai The Bosom of Abraham 1999 screenprinted vinyl, fluorescent light fitting 1310mm × 220mm × 70mm

est

$8,000 – $12,000

43


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Lot 24

Rohan Wealleans Study for a Brainy Painting 2009 acrylic on paper signed Rohan Wealleans, dated 2009 and inscribed "STUDY FOR A BRAINY PAINTING" in graphite lower edge 290mm × 205mm

est

$1,800 – $2,500

44


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 25

Allen Maddox untitled (⊠ 53) 1976 oil on canvas signed am, dated 3. 76 and inscribed ⊠ 53. in graphite lower right 945mm x 920mm

est

$10,000 – $15,000

45


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Lot 26 p.94

Don Peebles Painting 1969—No. 1 1969 acrylic on canvas signed Don Peebles, dated 1969 and inscribed "Painting 1969—No. 1" ACRYLIC/CANVAS TOP ↑ 60 1/4" × 64 1/4" in graphite upper edge verso 1530mm × 1630mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

46


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 27 p.95

Karl Maughan Lee Road 2012 oil on canvas signed KM, dated 15/03/2012 and inscribed "LEE ROAD" in brushpoint verso 1010mm × 840mm

est

$10,000 – $15,000

47


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lot 28 p.96

Bill Hammond Flight Recorder 1998 acrylic on six unstretched canvas panels signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1998 and inscribed Flight Recorder in brushpoint (each) 1800mm Ă— 2500m (overall)

est

$50,000 – $70,000

48


auction n°4 — november 2016

lot 29 p.98

Paul Hartigan Spring 1970 liquitex on canvas 2400mm × 1200mm

est

$7,000 – $12,000

49


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Lot 30 p.99

Julian Hooper Count Gideon Vecsey 2007 acrylic on paper signed Julian Hooper and dated 2007 in graphite lower right 640mm Ă— 495mm

est

$2,000 – $4,000

50


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 31

Don Driver Uniform 1996 acrylic, film poster, newspaper, Xerox copies and rubberised canvas signed Don Driver and dated 1996 lower right; signed Don Driver, dated 1996 and inscribed "Uniform" in ink verso 890mm × 940mm

est

$3,000 – $5,000

51


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Lot 32

Shane Cotton Rangi Heke Tini 1999 oil on canvas signed Cotton and dated 99 in brushpoint lower right 760mm Ă— 1000mm

est

$30,000 – $40,000

52


auction n°4 — november 2016

lot 33 p.100

Tony de Lautour Conspiracy Plan 2002 oil on canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper right; inscribed CONSPIRACY PLAN in brushpoint upper left 275mm × 250mm

est

$5,000 – $8,000

53


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Lot 34

Gretchen Albrecht Geomorphology 1974 watercolour on paper signed Albrecht and dated 74 in ink lower right; Barry Lett Galleries label affixed verso 1110mm Ă— 735mm

est

$9,000 – $12,000

54


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 35

Richard McWhannell A Power in the Land 1990 oil on linen on board in artist-made frame signed R McWhannell, dated 1990 and inscribed A POWER IN THE LAND in brushpoint verso 480mm × 910mm (widest points)

est

$5,000 – $7,000

55


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Lot 36

Don Driver Technic 1982 canvas, rubberised canvas, webbing, tarpaulin and dowel signed Don Driver, dated 1982 and inscribed "Technic" in ink lower left verso 1680mm Ă— 1200mm

est

$12,000 – $18,000

56


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 37

Allen Maddox a hole in the head 1996 oil on canvas signed am, dated 96 and inscribed 'a hole in the head.' in brushpoint verso 610mm x 610mm

est

$10,000 – $15,000

57


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Lot 38

Seung Yul Oh untitled 2007 cast resin 305mm × 310mm × 200mm (widest points)

est

$1,000 – $2,000

58


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 39

Martin Poppelwell Blank (5 Piece Suite) 2002 acrylic and glaze on slip cast ceramic (five pieces) signed with artist's monogram, dated mmii and inscribed 1/5, Green Patch (twice) and Fantasyland Study 2001 in brushpoint underside (first piece); signed with artist's monogram, dated MMII and inscribed 2/5 in brushpoint underside (second piece); signed with artist's monogram, dated mmii and inscribed 3/5, PATCH and Fantasyland study 2001 in brushpoint underside (third piece); signed with artist's monogram and inscribed ATCH (partially obscured) and 4/5 in brushpoint underside (fourth piece); signed with artist's monogram, dated mmii and inscribed GREEN PATCH and 5/5 in brushpoint underside (fifth piece) 360mm × 200mm × 250mm; 270mm × 115mm × 90mm; 100mm × 170mm × 120mm; 190mm × 110mm × 90mm; 130mm × 130mm × 120mm

est

$3,000 – $4,000

59


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Lot 40

Miao Xiaochun B-2 2006 c-print on alu-dibond signed MIAOXIAOCHUN 缪晓春, dated 2006 and inscribed B-2 and 11/19 in ink lower edge 1175mm × 450 mm

est

$4,000 – $6,000

60


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 41

Cao Fei RMB City 2009 giclée on paper, 26/120 signed Cao Fei and inscribed 26/120 in graphite lower right 355mm × 480mm

est

$1,200 – $1,800

61


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Lot 42

Bill Hammond untitled 2006 lithograph, 41/100 signed WD Hammond, dated 2006 and inscribed 41/100 in graphite lower right 760mm Ă— 600mm

est

$3,500 – $4,500

62


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 43

Liz Maw Lady Kathryn and I 2011 giclée on paper, 4/10 signed E Maw, dated 2011 and inscribed 'Lady Kathryn and I' and 4/10 in graphite lower edge 820mm × 595mm

est

$2,200 – $3,200

63


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Lot 44

Colin McCahon North Otago 1973 relief print from a cardboard plate, 39/50 signed Colin McCahon, dated '73 and inscribed North Otago and Ed 50. No. 39 in graphite lower edge 755mm Ă— 565mm

est

$3,500 – $5,500

64


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 45

Don Binney Grackle, Veracruz 1970 screenprint on paper 620mm × 455mm

est

$2,500 – $3,500

65


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Lot 46

Bill Hammond Proto 4 2012 lithograph on paper, artist's proof signed WD Hammond and dated 2012 in graphite lower right; inscribed Proto 4 and AP in graphite lower left 605mm Ă— 415mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

66


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 47

Bill Hammond Proto 3 2012 lithograph on paper, artist's proof signed WD Hammond, dated 2012 and inscribed Proto 3 and AP in graphite lower left 605mm × 415mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

67


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lot 48

Billy Apple Red Apple 1997 screenprint on paper, 14/35 signed Billy in graphite; dated 1997 and inscribed 14/35 in embossed text lower right 389mm x 573mm

est

$800 – $1,200

lot 49

Billy Apple Forty Years: 1962 – 2002 2002 screenprint, from an edition of 40 signed Billy and inscribed '76 in graphite 380mm × 572mm

est

$800 – $1,200

68


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 50

Tony de Lautour Firewater 1993 hand coloured etching, 2/2 signed Tony de Lautour, dated 1993 and inscribed 2/2 in graphite lower edge 275mm x 250mm

est

$900 – $1,200

69


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Lot 51

Max Gimblett Tribute 2007 silkscreen, gold foil, libragloss ink on fabriano paper, artist's proof signed Max Gimblett and dated 2007 in graphite lower left; inscribed A/P in graphite lower right 1210mm Ă— 800mm

est

$2,500 – $3,500

70


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 52

Ralph Hotere A Union, Jack? 1990 lithograph, 9/50 signed Hotere and dated '90 in ink lower right; inscribed 9/50 in ink lower left 760mm × 560mm

est

$4,000 – $7,000

71


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Lot 53

Liz Maw The Citizens 2011 giclée on paper, 2/10 signed E Maw, dated 2011 and inscribed 'The Citizens' (1999) and 2/10 in graphite lower edge 520mm × 400mm

est

$500 – $1,000

72


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 54

Dane Mitchell untitled 2007 screenprint on newsprint 390mm × 290mm

est

$200 – $400

73


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Lot 55

Mark Braunias untitled 2009 mixed media on paper 220mm Ă— 160mm

est

$300 – $600

74


I

N

D

E

X


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

1

Martin Thompson untitled c. 1990 fibre-tip pen on graph paper 210mm × 295mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Brett McDowell Gallery, Dunedin, 2011. exhibited Procedure, rm 103, Auckland, 25 October – 10 November, 2012. literature Simon Bowerbank, Procedure (Auckland: Self-published, 2013), 28.

p.21/p.84

$1,000 – $2,000

2

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds I 1981 watercolour on paper inscribed Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds 1 in graphite lower edge; Govett-Brewster Art Gallery label affixed verso 597mm × 795mm

Provenance Collection of Helene Quilter, Wellington. exhibited The Helene Quilter and Tony Chamberlain Collection, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1998. collections Previously on long term loan to the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1998 – 2014.

p.22/p.85

$500 – $1,000

3

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds VII 1981 watercolour on paper signed JMP and dated 81 in graphite; Govett-Brewster Art Gallery label affixed verso 597mm × 795mm

Provenance Collection of Helene Quilter, Wellington. exhibited The Helene Quilter and Tony Chamberlain Collection, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1998. collections Previously on long term loan to the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth 1998 – 2014.

p.23/p.85

$500 – $1,000

4

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 92 1982 oil on canvas inscribed 168, 18" x 18" and "SMALL LATTICE, NO. 92" in ink upper edge verso; signed Ian Scott and dated February 1982 in ink lower edge verso; signed Ian Scott and dated 82 in ink verso 460mm × 460mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin. Acquired from Watson's Auctioneers, Christchurch, 2009.

p.24/p.86

$2,500 – $3,500

5

Mervyn Williams Horus Series VII 1980 screenprint on paper, 16/25 signed Mervyn Williams and dated 80 in graphite lower right; inscribed Horus series VII and AP in graphite lower left 453mm × 456mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist. collections Another from the edition held by Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland (acquired 1981).

p.25

$200 – $300

6

Greer Twiss Frame 1970 lacquer on cast bronze inscribed Frame 7 in ink underside 180mm × 560mm × 245mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited Frozen Frames, Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1970.

p.26

$3,000 – $5,000

7

Richard Killeen untitled 1969 ink on paper signed Killeen in graphite and dated 20/4/69 in brushpoint lower left 500mm × 500mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.27/p.87

$2,500 – $3,500

8

John Reynolds Personals (cont.) 2008 oilstick on screenprinted paper signed REYNOLDS and dated 2008 in graphite lower right; inscribed PERSONALS (CONT.) in graphite lower left 315mm × 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.28

$500 – $1,000

9

Michael Harrison Priestess 1996-1997 acrylic on paper signed Michael Harrison in graphite upper right 410mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Vavasour Godkin, Auckland, 1997. exhibited Eternal Return, Vavasour Godkin Gallery, 3 April – 26 April, 1997

p.29

$4,000 – $6,000

10

Stella Corkery S.S.100 2013 oil and spraypaint on pre-made canvas stretcher 910mm × 610mm

Provenance Acquired from Station Gallery, Melbourne, 2014. exhibited Caravan, Station Gallery, Melbourne, 15 March – 17 April, 2014. Freedom Farmers, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland, 26 October 2013 – 14 March 2014. literature Stella Corkery (Auckland: DDMMYY: 2005), n.p.

p.30

$4,000 – $6,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

11

Stella Corkery Untitled 110 2012 oil and spraypaint on pre-made canvas stretcher 910mm × 610mm

Provenance Acquired from Station Gallery, Melbourne, 2014. exhibited Caravan, Station Gallery, Melbourne, 15 March – 17 April, 2014. Freedom Farmers, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland, 26 October 2013 – 14 March 2014.

p.31

$4,000 – $6,000

12

Agnes Martin On a Clear Day 1973 screenprint on Japanese rag paper, 29/50 signed a martin and inscribed 29/50 in graphite lower edge 304mm × 304mm

Provenance Private collection, New York. Acquired from Philips, New York, 2006. literature Another from the edition held by the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles; Tate Americas Foundation, New York; Walker Art Centre, Minneapolis (acquired 2000); Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas.

p.32/p.88

$5,000 – $7,000

13

Julian Dashper Blue Circles #4 2002 polycarbonate clear 12" lathe-cut disc, cardboard cover and insert in plastic sleeve, edition of 20 325mm × 317mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. exhibited the j.d. show, rm 401, Auckland, 20th November – 30th November, 2002. literature Julian Dashper, Blue Circles (Auckland: Art School Press, 2002). Christopher Cook and David Raskin, Midwestern Unlike You and Me: New Zealand's Julian Dashper (Sioux City: Sioux City Art Center, 2005), 17, 51. collections Another from the edition held by Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu.

p.33/p.90

$500 – $1,000

14

Julian Dashper Untitled (2006) 2006 rabbit skin size on Belgian linen 300mm × 300mm × 45mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. literature Christopher Cook and David Raskin, Midwestern Unlike You and Me: New Zealand's Julian Dashper (Sioux City: Sioux City Art Center, 2005), 29. collections Another from the edition held by Chartwell Collection, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland (acquired 2007).

p.34/p.90

$2,000 – $3,000

15

Julian Dashper Untitled 2005 hardboard and MDF signed JD, dated 05 and inscribed AP in graphite on masking tape affixed verso 304mm × 304mm × 44mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.35/p.90

$2,000 – $3,000

16

Tony de Lautour Landscape 2001 acrylic and colour pencil on canvas board signed Tony De Lautour in coloured pencil upper right; inscribed Landscape in coloured pencil upper left; signed TDL, dated 2001 and inscribed Landscape in brushpoint verso 305mm × 406mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.36

$2,000 – $3,000

17

Shane Cotton Matiu 2000 oil on canvas inscribed Matiu in brushpoint lower left 200mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Art + Object, Auckland, 2013.

p.37

$5,000 – $7,000

18

Robert Ellis Motorway Journey 1970 oil on board signed Robert Ellis and dated 1970 in brushpoint lower right; signed ROBERT ELLIS, dated 1970 and inscribed 'MOTORWAY/CITY' WELL. EX N˚7. 'MOTORWAY JOURNEY' B.L. EX. N˚3. in brushpoint upper left verso 890mm × 890mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Dunbar Sloane, Wellington, 2003.

p.38/p.89

$18,000 – $24,000

19

Richard Lewer Something so Wonderful 2006 permanent marker on found venetian blind inscribed Something so Wonderful in ink lower right; signed R. Lewer in ink upper right verso 1520mm × 1095mm × 60mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired from Oedipus Rex Gallery, 2006. note This artwork was the the joint-winner of the two-dimensional category of the Norsewear Art Award, Hawkes Bay, 2006.

p.39

$3,500 – $4,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

20

Jason Greig The Cleaners 2001 monoprint signed JG, dated 2001 and inscribed "THE CLEANERS" and 1/1 Monoprint in graphite upper edge verso 200mm × 265mm

Provenance Collection of Helene Quilter, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington. collections Previously on long term loan to the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1998 – 2014.

p.40

$800 – $1,200

21

Francisco Goya Chiton from a plate made c. 1797 – 98 etching and aquatint on paper inscribed Francisco Goya, Chiton, D. 65 iii, original etching & aquatint from Los Caprichos. on label affixed to frame verso 225mm × 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Art + Object, Auckland, 2014. literature Alfonso E Perez Sanchez and Julian Gallego, Goya: The Complete Etchings and Lithographs (Munich: Prestel, 1995), 50.

p.41

$1,600 – $2,600

22

Peter Robinson Boy Am I Scared Eh! 1997 acrylic and oilstick on paper signed P R Robinson and dated '97 in graphite lower right 935mm × 670mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 1999.

p.42/p.92

$20,000 – $30,000

23

Michael Parekowhai The Bosom of Abraham 1999 screenprinted vinyl, fluorescent light fitting 1310mm × 220mm × 70mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 2011.

p.42

$8,000 – $12,000

24

Rohan Wealleans Study for a Brainy Painting 2009 acrylic on paper signed Rohan Wealleans, dated 2009 and inscribed "STUDY FOR A BRAINY PAINTING" in graphite lower edge 290mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.44

$1,800 – $2,500

25

Allen Maddox untitled (⊠ 53) 1976 oil on canvas signed am, dated 3. 76 and inscribed ⊠ 53. in graphite lower right 945mm × 920mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.45

$10,000 – $15,000

26

Don Peebles Painting 1969—No. 1 1969 acrylic on canvas signed Don Peebles, dated 1969 and inscribed "Painting 1969—No. 1" ACRYLIC/CANVAS TOP ↑ 60 1/4" × 64 1/4" in graphite upper edge verso 1530mm × 1630mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 2010.

p.46/p.94

$1,500 – $2,500

27

Karl Maughan Lee Road 2012 oil on canvas signed KM, dated 15/03/2012 and inscribed "LEE ROAD" in brushpoint verso 1010mm × 840mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Commissioned by the present owner in 2012.

p.47/p.95

$10,000 – $15,000

28

Bill Hammond Flight Recorder 1998 acrylic on six unstretched canvas panels signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1998 and inscribed Flight Recorder in brushpoint (each) 1800mm × 2500m (overall)

Provenance Collection of Helene Quilter, Wellington. Acquired from Brooke Gifford Gallery, Christchurch. exhibited Jingle Jangle Morning, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, 20th July – 22nd October, 2007; City Gallery Wellington Te Whare Toi, 16th November – 10th February, 2008. The Helene Quilter and Tony Chamberlain Collection, GovettBrewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1998. literature Jennifer Hay, Bill Hammond, Laurence Aberhart, Chris Knox, and Ron Brownson, Bill Hammond: Jingle Jangle Morning (Christchurch: Christchurch Art Gallery, 2007), 118 – 19. collections Previously on long term loan to the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1998 – 2014.

p.48/p.96

$50,000 – $70,000


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29

Paul Hartigan Spring 1970 liquitex on canvas 2400mm × 1200mm

Provenance Collection of Clare and Mervyn Wrathall, Whakatane. Acquired from Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1970. exhibited Taranaki Review, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1970. literature "Picture of a Spring." Taranaki Daily News, July 11, 1970. Don Abbott, Vivid: The Paul Hartigan Story (Auckland: RF Books, 2015), 29. notes This work was executed on the reverse side of an unfinished painting by Tom Kreisler, from his Coat series. The unfinished painting carries the inscription IT'S ALL A LOAD OF FUCKING CRAP, written in brushpoint by Tom Kreisler. Tom Kreisler gifted the unfinished canvas to Paul Hartigan so that it could be used to make a new painting.

p.49/p.98

$7,000 – $12,000

30

Julian Hooper Count Gideon Vecsey 2007 watercolour and collage signed Julian Hooper and dated 2007 in graphite lower right 640mm × 495mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2007. exhibited Liliu, Turbulence: 3rd Auckland Triennial, Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland, 2007; Liliu, Monash Faculty Gallery, Melbourne, 2007; Liliu, Whangarei Art Museum, New Zealand, 2007.

p.50/p.99

$2,000 – $4,000

31

Don Driver Uniform 1996 acrylic, film poster, newspaper, Xerox copies and rubberised canvas signed Don Driver and dated 1996 lower right; signed Don Driver, dated 1996 and inscribed "Uniform" in ink verso 890mm × 940mm

Provenance Private collection, Palmerston North.

p.51

$3,000 – $5,000

32

Shane Cotton Rangi Heke Tini 1999 oil on canvas signed Cotton and dated 99 in brushpoint lower right 760mm × 1000mm

Provenance Private collection, Hawkes Bay. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington. exhibited New Paintings, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 1999.

p.52

$30,000 – $40,000

33

Tony de Lautour Conspiracy Plan 2002 oil on canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper right; inscribed CONSPIRACY PLAN in brushpoint upper left 1210mm × 810mm

Provenance Private collection, Fielding. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2002. exhibited New & Recent Paintings, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 31st July – 17th August, 2002. LandsCaper, Te Manawa Museum of Art, Science and History, Palmerston North, 20 September – 30 November, 2003.

p.53/p.100

$5,000 – $8,000

34

Gretchen Albrecht Geomorphology 1974 watercolour on paper signed Albrecht and dated 74 in ink lower right; Barry Lett Galleries label affixed verso 1110mm × 735mm

Provenance Private collection, Dunedin. Acquired from Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1977. exhibited Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 1975.

p.54

$9,000 – $12,000

35

Richard McWhannell A Power in the Land 1990 oil on linen on board in artist-made frame signed R McWhannell, dated 1990 and inscribed A POWER IN THE LAND in brushpoint verso 480mm × 910mm (widest points)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired from Aberhart North Gallery, Auckland, 1990. exhibited Aberhart North Gallery, Auckland, 1990.

p.55

$5,000 – $7,000

36

Don Driver Technic 1982 canvas, rubberised canvas, webbing, tarpaulin and dowel signed Don Driver, dated 1982 and inscribed "Technic" in ink lower left verso 1680mm × 1200mm

Provenance Private collection, Palmerston North.

p.56

$12,000 – $18,000


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37

Allen Maddox a hole in the head 1996 oil on canvas signed am, dated 96 and inscribed 'a hole in the head.' in brushpoint verso 610mm × 610mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.57

$10,000 – $15,000

38

Seung Yul Oh untitled 2007 cast resin 305mm × 310mm × 200mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist. exhibited Break: Construct, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 2007.

p.58

$1,000 – $2,000

39

Martin Poppelwell Blank (5 Piece Suite) 2002 acrylic and glaze on slip cast ceramic (five pieces) signed with artist's monogram, dated mmii and inscribed 1/5, Green Patch (twice) and Fantasyland Study 2001 in brushpoint underside (first piece); signed with artist's monogram, dated MMII and inscribed 2/5 in brushpoint underside (second piece); signed with artist's monogram, dated mmii and inscribed 3/5, PATCH and Fantasyland study 2001 in brushpoint underside (third piece); signed with artist's monogram and inscribed ATCH (partially obscured) and 4/5 in brushpoint underside (fourth piece); signed with artist's monogram, dated mmii and inscribed GREEN PATCH and 5/5 in brushpoint underside (fifth piece) 360mm × 200mm × 250mm; 270mm × 115mm × 90mm; 100mm × 170mm × 120mm; 190mm × 110mm × 90mm; 130mm × 130mm × 120mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 2002.

p.59

$3,000 – $4,000

40

Miao Xiaochun B-2 2006 c-print on alu-dibond signed MIAOXIAOCHUN 缪晓春, dated 2006 and inscribed B-2 and 11/19 in ink lower edge 1175mm × 450mm

Provenance Private collection, Napier.

p.60

$4,000 – $6,000

41

Cao Fei RMB City 2009 giclée on paper, 26/120 signed Cao Fei and inscribed 26/120 in graphite lower right 355mm × 480mm

Provenance Private collection, Napier. Acquired from Serpentine Gallery, London, 2009. exhibited Published on the occasion of the artist's exhibition Cao Fei: RMB City at Serpentine Gallery, London, 2009.

p.61

$1,200 – $1,800

42

Bill Hammond untitled 2006 lithograph, 41/100 signed WD Hammond, dated 2006 and inscribed 41/100 in graphite lower right 760mm × 600mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.62

$3,500 – $4,500

43

Liz Maw Lady Kathryn and I 2011 giclée on paper, 4/10 signed E Maw, dated 2011 and inscribed 'Lady Kathryn and I' and 4/10 in graphite lower edge 820mm × 595mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.63

$2,200 – $3,200

44

Colin McCahon North Otago 1973 relief print from a cardboard plate, 39/50 signed Colin McCahon, dated '73 and inscribed North Otago and Ed 50. No. 39 in graphite lower edge 110mm × 117mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington collections Another from the edition held in the pictorial collections of the Hocken Library, University of Otago, Dunedin (acquired 1995).

p.64

$3,500 – $5,500

45

Don Binney Grackle, Veracruz 1970 screenprint on paper 620mm × 455mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.65

$2,500 – $3,500


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46

Bill Hammond Proto 4 2012 lithograph on paper, artist's proof signed WD Hammond and dated 2012 in graphite lower right; inscribed Proto 4 and AP in graphite lower left 605mm × 415mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.66

$2,000 – $3,000

47

Bill Hammond Proto 3 2012 lithograph on paper, artist's proof signed WD Hammond, dated 2012 and inscribed Proto 3 and AP in graphite lower left 605mm × 415mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.67

$2,000 – $3,000

48

Billy Apple Red Apple 1997 screenprint on paper, 14/35 signed Billy in graphite; dated 1997 and inscribed 14/35 in embossed text lower right 389mm × 573mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Holloway Press, 1997. collections Another from the edition held by The University of Auckland Art Collection, Auckland; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland (acquired 1997).

p.68

$800 – $1,200

49

Billy Apple Forty Years: 1962 – 2002 2002 screenprint, from an edition of 40 signed Billy and inscribed '76 in graphite 380mm × 572mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist, 2002.

p.68

$800 – $1,200

50

Tony de Lautour Firewater 1993 hand coloured etching, 2/2 signed Tony de Lautour, dated 1993 and inscribed 2/2 in graphite lower edge 275mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland.

p.69

$900 – $1,200

51

Max Gimblett Tribute 2007 silkscreen, gold foil, libragloss ink on fabriano paper, artist's proof signed Max Gimblett and dated 2007 in graphite lower left; inscribed A/P in graphite lower right 1210mm × 800mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland.

p.70

$2,500 – $3,500

52

Ralph Hotere A Union, Jack? 1990 lithograph, 9/50 signed Hotere and dated '90 in ink lower right; inscribed 9/50 in ink lower left 760mm × 560mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 2014. exhibited Peter Vangioni and Jillian Cassidy, Empty of Shadows and Making a Shadow: Lithographs by Ralph Hotere (Christchurch: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, 2005), 89. Cilla McQueen et. al., ed. Ralph Hotere: Black Light (Christchurch, Dunedin: Te Papa Press, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2000), 52.

p.71

$4,000 – $7,000

53

Liz Maw The Citizens 2011 giclée on paper, 2/10 signed E Maw, dated 2011 and inscribed 'The Citizens' (1999) and 2/10 in graphite lower edge 520mm × 400mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.72

$500 – $1,000

54

Dane Mitchell untitled 2007 screenprint on newsprint 390mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Starkwhite, 2007. note Published on the occasion of the artist's exhibition The Barricades, Starkwhite, Auckland, 2007.

p.73

$200 – $400

55

Mark Braunias untitled 2009 mixed media on paper 220mm × 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, August 2009. exhibited A message from Planet Zonked, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, 8 August – 19 September, 2009.

p.74

$300 – $600


E

S

S

bowerbank ninow

Martin Thompson untitled

84

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds I Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds VII

85

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 92

86

Richard Killeen untitled

87

Agnes Martin On a Clear Day

88

Robert Ellis Motorway Journey

89

Julian Dashper Untitled Blue Circles #4 Untitled (2006)

90

Peter Robinson Boy Am I Scared Eh!

92

Don Peebles Painting 1969—No. 1

94

Karl Maughan Lee Road

95

Bill Hammond Flight Recorder

96

Paul Hartigan Spring

98

Julian Hooper Count Gideon Vecsey

99

Tony de Lautour Conspiracy Plan

100

A

Y

S


auction n°4 — november 2016


bowerbank ninow

Lot 1

Martin Thompson untitled c. 1990 fibre-tip pen on graph paper 210mm × 295mm

grid as either “alive” or “dead” according to the state of the neighbouring cells. The rules of the Game read: 1. Any live cell with fewer than two live neighbours dies, as if caused by underpopulation. 2. Any live cell with more than three live neighbours dies, as if by overcrowding. 3. Any live cell with two or three live neighbours lives on to the next generation. 4. Any dead cell with exactly three live neighbours becomes a live cell. Run indefinitely, the rules for The Game of Life can produce different self-sustaining patterns that grow, evolve, and move across the screen in a manner similar to bacteria growing in a petri dish. The patterns in Thompson’s drawings also give the impression that they are in the process of autonomously propagating across the surface of the paper on which they “live.” However, the growth of less-virtual organisms, such as mould, gradually spot and discolour the surface of the paper over the years, their presence underlining the impossibility of Thompson’s patterns ever existing independently from their gridded substrate.

p.21

While the autonomy of the patterns produced by Conway’s Game of Life is provided by a computer, the proliferation of Thompson’s patterns remains inextricably linked to his very human actions. Evidence of Thompson’s role in the creation of these patterns is present all over the decrepit surface of the paper on which they thrive: in the margins, Thompson has scribbled as one might if attempting to get a pen to work, and, outside the areas in which his patterns are rendered, groups of individually carved, rectangular sections have been cut from the paper. These holes are the result of a process by which Thompson farms unused areas of graph paper for material to replace the areas that he has incorrectly rendered. Integral to this process is the careful use of strips of adhesive tape to completely cover the reverse side of the graph paper. Once Thompson removes the offending areas with a scalpel and discards them, this tape is then used as an adhesive surface on which the replacement pieces can be placed in order to correct the work.

Since the early 1980s, Martin Thompson has produced hundreds of intricately rendered, single-colour drawings according to his own algorithms. While these algorithms, which apparently dictate every property of each drawing, including size, composition, and colour, have never been formally recorded, Thompson can often be heard reciting them to himself as he labours over his drawings, repeatedly executing their instructions with a single felt-tip pen onto the surface of his graph paper. Working row-by-row like a dot matrix printer, Thompson individually fills in whichever one of the grid’s one-millimetre-wide cells that his algorithms dictate. In this way, Thompson makes use of the orthogonal grid’s uniform division of the paper’s surface in order to populate it with a host of controllable elements. The square cells on the paper are treated by Thompson as pixels in either one of two binary states, coloured or uncoloured and on or off.

Thompson’s mistakes, then, belie the autonomous and disinterested method of production that he shares with Conway’s Game of Life. So, too, does the inherent physicality of his materials betray his treatment of them as an intangible framework. Thompson produces drawings that manage to exist as ephemeral manifestations of the artist’s gesture, in spite of the analytical method by which they are constructed.

In this respect, the surface of Thompson’s paper is treated in a similar manner to the pixelated display of a computer screen. Like a monitor, Thompson’s grid is an array—a systematic arrangement of entities, over which the rules that govern his patterns also enable them to spread like bacteria. In 1970, British mathematician John Conway invented The Game of Life, a series of instructions meant to simulate the behaviour of simple life forms, in effect creating an ecosystem of “cellular” automata. Computer program versions of The Game of Life have a visual structure similar to that of Thompson’s drawings, and are also in some respects constructed according to a similar logic. Following four simple rules, a computer running The Game of Life will set the cells of a

simon bowerbank

84


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 262 & 3 Lots

Joanna Margaret Paul Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds I 1981 watercolour on paper 597mm × 795mm Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds VII 1981 watercolour on paper 597mm × 795mm

we see what we see . . . the subtle changes of colour or linear direction yielded to an intent gaze, and then what happens when one turns one’s head—never cease to interest me. The visual world is inexhaustible.”4 Paul was drawn to the ordinary and the everyday, finding a poetry and beauty in things that anyone else might overlook. It is this radiant attention to her surroundings that is Paul’s most defining quality. Each work is a new beginning, a fresh take on even the most familiar subject. In recent years there has been a flurry of activity as a new generation of artists and curators discovers Paul’s work. There have been exhibitions of drawings, paintings, photographs and film in public galleries (the Adam Art Gallery, the Dowse, the Govett-Brewster and the Hocken Library, among others), and at leading dealer galleries from Auckland to Dunedin. In 2015, her short films were shown at the London Film Festival. As a result of this exposure, we are increasingly able to appreciate the subtlety and originality of Paul’s art across a range of media, and perceive her relevance to contemporary practice. These two watercolours were painted in 1981, a time when Paul’s marriage to the artist Jeffrey Harris was under severe strain. She and their three children spent extended periods away from the family home in Dunedin, staying in Auckland and the Marlborough Sounds. It was there that she made these two spare, enigmatic sketches. The subject matter is that typically found on a beach walk, a floral vine, foliage and driftwood, but it is not immediately clear what is depicted. Is that a gleaming oyster shell in the first image? And the knife used to shuck it in the second? The objects are very deliberately placed on the page, surrounded by an expanse of white paper. They are depicted with great economy and restraint, using only a few lines and patches of deftly controlled wash.

p.22

When Joanna Margaret Paul died in an accident in 2003, she had been working for nearly four decades as an artist and poet. Her friend, the poet Bernadette Hall, described her as “complex, intense, a woman of faith, a romantic, a feminist though she would eschew the term, a fighter.” Hall described the “singular, unconventional” focus that Paul brought to her art: “Joanna had energy to burn when it came to matters touching her ideals, her integrity and her loyalty, her love.”1

It is typical of Paul to title these quiet sketches Portrait of the Marlborough Sounds, as if the spirit of the place was to be found in its humblest fragments, the detritus of the shoreline. She asks us to look again, to pay attention. To quote Rilke, one of Paul’s best-loved poets, she urges us to “be one on whom nothing is wasted.”5

Although Paul was highly respected as an artist, much of her work was never exhibited during her lifetime. Including paintings, drawings, photographs and short films, Paul’s practice was intimate and exploratory in nature, hardly the type of work to attract attention in the late twentieth-century art world. Moreover, Paul herself was almost perversely self-effacing, once describing herself as “aggressively in support of the ‘minor.’”2 Any idea of self-promotion was abhorrent to her.

Jill Trevelyan

Paul’s art is strikingly distinctive in tone and sensibility. Peter Ireland has described the world she portrays as a “Cézannesque world of unstable sensations without the comforting certainties of belief and ideology.”3 Like Cézanne, she was fascinated with the nature of perception: “How 85

1

Bernadette Hall, “Bread for Isaiah: Joanna Margaret Paul,” brief 32 (2005): 55, 60.

2

Quoted in Gregory O’Brien, Lands & Deeds: Profiles of Contemporary New Zealand Painters (Auckland: Godwit, 1996), 68.

3

Peter Ireland, “A shape to part the space: Joanna Margaret Paul 1945-2003,” Art New Zealand 108 (2003): 97.

4

Joanna Margaret Paul, foreword to Joanna Margaret Paul: Chronicle/Chronology (Wanganui: Sarjeant Gallery, 1989), 5.

5

Quoted in Joanna Margaret Paul: Chronicle/Chronology, p. 6.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 4

Ian Scott Small Lattice No. 92 1982 oil on canvas inscribed 168, 18" x 18" and "SMALL LATTICE, NO. 92" in ink upper edge verso; signed Ian Scott and dated February 1982 in ink lower edge verso; signed Ian Scott and dated 82 in ink verso 460mm × 460mm

are inevitable with the overlapping system, although it's not what the paintings are about. I happen to like the suburban landscape, with its neatness, bright colours, clean edges. . . . A very arbitrary, scattered, yet very even sort of colour-order that is suburbia. In the lattices, Scott found a universe to explore. They are typically painted on a square canvas, compositionally consisting of a usually diagonal grid of interwoven colour bands. This proved to be a framework with considerable utility. In the period 1976–7 the earlier works make use of horizontal and vertical stripes as well as diagonals, their edges delineated by black crayon drawn along the masking tape. From 1978 onward, the crayon was abandoned in favour of clean edges, the forms created by abutting planes of colour. This format could reach levels of highly resolved complexity, as seen in the work which won Scott the 1978 Benson & Hedges Art Award, Lattice No. 45 (1978). This work, Small Lattice No. 92 is from the middle of Scott’s lattice phase. The basket-weave grid, vivid colours, and blacks and whites have dissolved into a study of oblongs in a muted, pastel-hued palette, floating against a blue-grey field. Not incidentally, such pastel tones were the stereotypically characteristic colour scheme of 1980s suburbia throughout the western world—think day trader living rooms and Miami Vice. This use of colour to reference a particular historical moment reinforces Scott’s assertion that his abstract compositions were anchored in the real world he could see. The work’s pretext of optical overlapping and spatiality seems to have been very nearly exorcised, its flatness reaching the visual limits of the formal constraints Scott placed upon himself. It is as though the resulting forms are trying to sublimate into something completely transcendental. This impression is created by the thickening of the dividing lines (indistinguishable from the background), a feature which is quite noticeable when compared to other works of similar date and palette like Lattice No. 79 (1982). This effect is reduced when thicker bands are used, as can be seen in Lattice Drawing No. 175 (1985). Such variation underscores the tremendous versatility and utility such a simple motif can achieve in the hands a determinedly analytical and focused artist. Perhaps the artist whose practice is most analogous to that of Scott in New Zealand art history would be Alan Maddox.

p.24

Returning to Auckland in 1973 from a stint in Nelson, Ian Scott’s work during the 1970s and ‘80s underwent a radical shift into abstraction, initiated in 1971–2. These works reference Abstract Expressionism and Colour Field painting, their rolled colour and sprayed stripes inviting comparisons to Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and Jules Olitski, as well as Larry Poons. The lattice works, geometric abstractions with a Roy Lichtenstein-esque flavour, began appearing in 1976. In a 1979 interview with Michael Dunn, published in Art New Zealand 13, Scott says of the lattice that “there are endless possibilities in it.” He also provides an understanding of how these geometric works evolved out of his earlier figurative, landscape-based paintings, saying:

Michael Dunn asked Scott where he thought he might go after the lattices, to which Scott replied: “It's a bit of a problem. I've worked on other ideas concurrently with the Lattices  to open up other possibilities. I think the lattice image is capable of further extension. There's always somewhere one can go.”

The first ones happened to look like white trellis (fences); more recent ones like the plastic backs of folding chairs. References

andrew paul wood

86


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 7

Richard Killeen untitled 1969 ink on paper signed Killeen in graphite and dated 20/4/69 in brushpoint lower left 500mm × 500mm

conspiracies?). This drawing is emblematic of this existential gawkiness: at times the monumental faces off against the intimate, a drawn line against a painted smear, and there are derangements of scale and frame. How does the large face emerging into the frame from the right relate to the smaller mid-ground figure? Their faces are turned towards each other. Yet there is no sense of priority; the face to the side is larger and closer but it does not take precedence. What is the connection between the spiky phoenix palms and the airliner in the upper right background? Why does the plane appear as if it were about to fall out of the sky? Since the composition is divided by what appear to be gathered curtains, are we looking through two large plate-glass windows at an exterior garden? Killeen, of course, is not alone in his tendency to recoil from immediate visual lucidity. There are many artists who present a critique of clarity as they work to complicate their paintings’ emotional possibilities. To look for layers of feeling or sensibility in painting or drawing (arts that purport to show all on their surface) is to find oneself in the grip of a paradox. Beginning with the most fundamental spatial ambiguity (are we inside or out?), Killeen compounds ambiguity on ambiguity—not nihilistically, but constructively, in order to make the totality of his painting subtle, sensuous, elusive. Many of the shapes in this drawing are drawn from the interchangeable vocabulary of Killeen’s late 1960s period: outsized armchairs, large faces in profile, deadpan people who exude an air of blankness and lethargy, lounges, phoenix palms, airplanes, gathered curtains, people in motion who aren’t going anywhere. His titles from this time are flat, almost banal, descriptions: Four Men and a Woman in the Street (1969), Woman with Green Sofa (1969), Lamp Lady (1968). His compositions have a narrative complexity that some might consider a muddle. Nevertheless, it is a muddle enlivened by the wit that Killeen communicates with such easy brilliance.

p.27

There are painters who aim for a direct, no-nonsense message. They marshal colours, shapes, figures, signs and symbols—even words—to convey the strongest possible emotions and experiences. Colin McCahon was a New Zealand painter of this kind. In the work of these artists, a limping brushstroke, a dotted line, a gesture makes an immediate, unequivocal appeal. It takes us right to the point. But, for many artists, getting to the point right away is anything but the point. Richard Killeen recoils from such graphic directness. With Killeen what you see in a painting, or at least what you initially see, are appearances that mask as much as they reveal. As you start looking, the game of working it all out has only just begun. The shapes and vagaries of Killeen’s early realist paintings and drawings of the late 1960s, of men and women in domestic and suburban settings, are nothing less than invitations to uncertainty.

There is something visually cacophanous, yet very amusing, about the variegated elements that Killeen packs into his compositions of this period, particularly the women in brightly coloured leotards engaged in callisthenics. This is a chaos that only a master could control, and Killeen does so by controlling it lightly, or even by seeming to give control away, delegating it to us. There is, too, a Saturnian quality—a negative energy—that conducts attention away from the work itself to something elsewhere in the world: the senselessness of suburbia, perhaps? Everyone—painter, subject and spectator— seems in suspended animation, trapped, rather than liberated, by the scene depicted. Killeen is one of our great artists, whose greatness is of a piece with the provincial clumsiness of surburban New Zealand culture in the late twentieth century. This is a working drawing that more than pays its freight in the small change of intrigue and charm.

It is this uncertainty that also tells us that “realist” is the wrong label to apply here. In these works, there exists a desire to communicate; and yet, a sense of estrangement emanates from the figures, who seem less depicted than imported, like animate stage props, seemingly entranced but with an insouciance that can unsettle the viewer. These are fictional beings, cobbled together in collaborations (or are they

Laurence simmons 87


bowerbank ninow

Lot 12

Agnes Martin On a Clear Day 1973 Screenprint on Japanese rag paper, 29/50 signed a martin and inscribed 29/50 in graphite lower edge 304mm × 304mm

an abstract expressionist. While her works are drastically different in nature from the frenzied, aggressive brushwork of a Jackson Pollock or a Franz Kline, they are equally personal, equally expressive of emotional states and the immediacy of the moment of creation. However, the emotions Martin seeks to convey are very different from the energetic posturing of many of her abstract expressionist contemporaries: calmness, focus, tranquillity and, ultimately, happiness itself. Martin was an acolyte of the Zen Buddhist author and teacher Daisetz Suzuki, whose interpretation of Zen principles and texts for a western audience was almost single-handedly responsible for the explosion of interest in Zen outside Japan in the 1960s, especially amongst the artistic and literary community in North America. Suzuki propounded an understanding of Zen as a path towards personal fulfilment and spiritual enlightenment, stripping away the Buddhist religious elements of Zen practice in order to render it compatible with western rationalism and humanism.2 In this modernist interpretation of Zen, the ultimate goal is satori, the state of enlightenment in which the dualities of good and evil, existence and non-existence, self and world, are all collapsed and rendered meaningless. This is ultimately a search for the eradication of language, a state of perfect balance in which the assignment of names or meanings becomes impossible. From 1967 to 1973, Martin completely abandoned artmaking. The completion of the On a Clear Day portfolio, a series of thirty screenprints, marked her return to art after this lengthy hiatus. The title of the series is borrowed from the 1970 film On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, a musical comedy starring Barbara Streisand and directed by Vincente Minelli. In the present lithograph, Martin’s mature style is in full evidence: the picture plane is bisected and organised by a series of evenly spaced horizontal lines, like a musical staff waiting to be filled by notes. The eye is drawn to the colour of the paper, the quality of the printed lines and the empty space within which the lines float, making viewing the work a meditative experience, a process of becoming aware of the materiality of the printed sheet. As the title suggests, this work is an invitation to clear the mind, to let go of ideas and concepts and simply be, and in this way to briefly touch the hard-won beauty and happiness which Martin sought throughout her life.

p.32

For Agnes Martin, art existed as a completely separate entity from the ideas and concepts surrounding it. She viewed writing about art as a somewhat futile exercise, as is made clear by her lecture “Beauty is the Mystery of Life,” in which she declares that “art work is responded to with happy emotions. Work about ideas is responded to with other ideas. There is so much written about art that it is mistaken for an intellectual pursuit.”1 Martin also draws a distinction between “art work,” which is fundamentally emotional and expressive, and “work about ideas,” which lacks the capacity to move the spirit which she saw as the essential component of art. Needless to say, Martin’s own work falls into the first category: she felt that her work was about the expression of pure emotion, which the viewer was intended to respond to on an instinctual, almost subconscious level.

Andrew clark

Martin’s mature work was schematic and almost procedural in nature, structured around parallel lines and gridded surfaces. The rigid and seemingly diagrammatic nature of these works has engendered a great deal of confusion with regards to Martin’s place in the art historical canon. Martin’s work was exhibited alongside that of minimalists such as Brice Marden and Robert Mangold, but she resisted this interpretation of her practice: she saw herself as 88

1

Agnes Martin: Paintings and Drawings 1974-1990 (Amsterdam: Stedeljik Museum, 1991), 15.

2

David L. McMahan, The Making of Buddhist Modernism (New York : Oxford University Press, 2008).


auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 18

Robert Ellis Motorway Journey 1970 oil on board signed Robert Ellis and dated 1970 in brushpoint lower right; signed ROBERT ELLIS, dated 1970 and inscribed 'MOTORWAY/CITY' WELL. EX N⁰7. 'MOTORWAY JOURNEY' B.L. EX. N⁰3. in brushpoint upper left verso 890mm × 890mm

new motorways. Ellis considered these three primordial colours as representative of New Zealand as a whole, an understanding based on his growing knowledge of a range of Māori arts, most notably kōwhaiwhai. He was one of the few Pākehā trained by master carver Pine Taiapa at a week-long workshop at his home at Tikitiki on the rural East Coast in 1966, which granted him new insights into form, line and the use of colour. Red paint, for instance, could be conceptualised as kōkōwai, a red pigment primarily sourced from the earth. More than just patterns, these designs, like kōwhaiwhai, have real meanings and deliver real messages about the land, the community and the environment. From the late 1960s on, the City’s white motorways were replaced at times with red, and the composition was opened up to reveal wide open monochromatic spaces, either red and white, as in Motorway Journey, or black and white. These spaces offer the eye some relief from the stimulation of the dense lines of energy/motorways, but perhaps more importantly, they ask the viewer to understand the price that has been paid for these new developments. At what environmental and community cost is progress achieved? The composition in Motorway Journey is divided horizontally. The upper half, in black and white, is a hive of wild energy, with tiny cars dotted along the thick lines of oil in a frenzy of construction. The lower half, in contrast, is calm, showing a vast expanse of land depicted in layers of red over black, with only two roads cutting into it. This use of space is characteristic of the series as a whole. In 1970, motorways provided Ellis with pathways out of Auckland and up to Kawakawa in Northland. There, his wife Elizabeth, a sculptor and teacher, was to have their twin daughters Hana and Ngarino, in June. On a personal level, motorways were conduits through the land for Ellis, connecting family and work.

p.38

By the early 1970s, Ellis’s painting had taken a new turn, as he began to depict motorway motifs behind the old meeting house and dining hall at Te Rawhiti, where his in-laws had a bach on ancestral land. The concept of a road would take on new meanings for Ellis as one was pushed through the tiny Māori community against the wishes of the local people, including his father-in-law Walter Mountain, who didn’t want “another Paihia,” as the project was being promoted by the Council workers. Ellis’s motorways can be seen differently in this light: for those living in urban areas, they spelt progress and development, the wonders of the new world; for those in rural areas, motorways often came as unwanted intruders into their communities, bringing with them ideas and people that would destabilise their way of life. Motorway Journey articulates these histories, and reminds us of our responsibility to maintain the balance between rural and urban land use. Toitū te whenua, toitū te whānau. Long live the land, long live the family.

Motorways in 1970 were a new addition to Auckland’s landscape. For Robert Ellis, they affected every facet of life. He remembers the twenty-five bulldozers that transformed Grafton Gully into new motorways, a location he knew well from time spent living on Grafton Road. In a short time, it had all changed, the noise and the dust bringing forth a new type of Auckland. Ellis enjoyed exploring these motorways in his new (second hand) Ford Prefect, as he wondered when all the building would end. Ellis could see a potential landscape full of cars: with the emergence of these new pathways through the land, Ellis began to explore a new series of permutations on the theme of cars and landscape. For instance, how might these new developments affect the forty extinct volcanoes that characterise Auckland’s terrain? In Ellis’s City series, begun in the mid-1960s, the land is depicted as series of geometric patterns, using a distinctly New Zealand palette of red, white and black: red volcanic earth, black soot from the demolitions, and the white of

Ngarino Ellis 89


Lot 13, 14 & 15

bowerbank ninow

Julian Dashper Untitled 2005 masonite on MDF signed JD, dated 05 and inscribed AP in graphite on masking tape affixed verso 304mm × 304mm × 44mm Blue Circles #4 2002 polycarbonate clear 12" lathe-cut disc, cardboard cover and inserts in plastic sleeve, edition of 20 325mm × 317mm Untitled (2006) 2006 rabbit skin size on Belgian linen 300mm × 300mm × 45mm

p.33, 34 & 35

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“Someone asked me once at a party ‘What sort of artist are you?’ and I said, ‘I’m a super-realist painter,’ and they said, ‘Well, that sounds good, what do you paint?’ I said, ‘Abstract art.’”1 –Julian Dashper

Pollock’s Blue Poles was being exhibited on tour. There, he documented the ambient noise in the gallery with a pocket digital recorder, the batteries of which were unfortunately dying; however, Dashper was able to record eight one-minute tracks before the power ran out. The genesis of the Blue Circles series grew out of this accidental malfunction; as Dashper noted, “I've got eight tracks here and there are eight blue poles (in Pollock's painting). This is something interesting.”5 Although it is a fully functional sound recording, Blue Circles #4 is designed to be shown hanging on the wall, a record-as-painting which exists at a nexus of pop-cultural and artistic quotations: it is a commentary on the low-art status of the record cover as a proletarian art form, but also a readymade abstraction, and even a collectable treasure, fetishistically sealed in its protective polythene bag.

The three works presented here fit Dashper’s self-affixed label as a “super-realist” painter of abstractions perfectly; not paintings, but representations of paintings, or perhaps of the idea of painting. Untitled (2006) consists of two stretched, sized linen canvases, stacked together and secured with screws. The status of these canvases as pre-fabricated readymades, which could have easily been purchased from any high street art supplies shop, constitutes a key element of the work. As a literal tabula rasa, the work rejects the act of reading, while at the same time presenting a blank surface, almost daring the viewer to create their own painting on its neutral tone. The only evidence of the artist’s hand, the gesture of stacking, suggests the reproducibility of the canvases, as well as their status as readymades and their interchangeability. This work is emblematic of Dashper’s approach, echoing his statement that “I don’t make work in the abstract way, but I actually make abstract art. ... I’m making it like a thing, like a chair or table.”2 Here, Dashper draws a distinction between being an abstractionist and being a maker of abstractions; he sees the abstract vocabulary as a given fact of life, to the extent that it is possible to manufacture abstract paintings the way one might produce household goods.

The Blue Circles series is part of Dashper’s ongoing investigation into the internationalism of pop music, which for him is analogous to the way New Zealanders perceive and consume international art. Like pop records, we understand art from overseas only through reproductions and facsimiles. As a result of this literal and metaphorical distancing, canonical abstract paintings like Pollock’s Blue Poles become mere commodities, seamless surfaces concealing nothing in particular. Dashper drew attention to this peculiarity of antipodean art culture in Untitled (1994), a work which consisted of the full-scale replica of Blue Poles which the staff at the National Gallery of Australia made prior to the real work’s arrival, presumably as part of planning their exhibition. For Dashper, this faux-Pollock is in many respects a more vital and interesting object than its “genuine” precursor, which by being exhibited in Australia has “been rendered a simulacrum, becoming unoriginal by functioning now as a myth”6—the myth of modernity, of artistic integrity and of the artist as genius.

This almost perversely utilitarian approach is evident throughout Dashper’s oeuvre. Untitled consists of two round hardboard panels, backed on MDF rings and screwed together to form a target shape. Like the canvases of Untitled (2006), these are “art” objects, in the sense that they take the form of prefabricated supports for paintings. Thus, they function as representations of paintings, stand-ins or placeholders whose own identity is obliterated by their function. Like Dashper’s paintings on drum-skins, such as Untitled (The Warriors) of 1998, it is also an O, a zero, a cipher, a recognition of the fact that “painting is only a language and that there is nothing beyond the sign.”3 The empty canvas or hardboard support functions as an epistemological vacancy, waiting for a painting to fill it and give it meaning. In this sense, these works are part of Dashper’s discourse of the “supplementary,” as identified by Robert Leonard: Dashper’s work highlights the extent to which art is part of a supporting structure which has nothing to do with the romantic myth of “creativity.” “Supposedly autonomous, the art object rests on all manner of disavowed supplements, without which it would not function.”4

andrew clark

1

Mark Kirby, “Pop’s art,” in Julian Dashper, Christina Barton, Trevor Smith, Mark Kirby, The Twist (Dunedin: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2000), 27.

2 Ibid.

Blue Circles #4 is an LP, complete with plastic envelope, inner sleeve and insert materials. To make this record, Dashper visited the Australian National Gallery in Canberra, where Jackson 91

3

Christina Barton, “Zero-ing in: on Julian Dashper,” in Dashper et. al., The Twist, 14.

4

Robert Leonard, “Re-reading Julian Dashper’s The Big Bang Theory,” Reading Room 5 (2012): 98–117.

5

National Library of New Zealand website, accessed 31/10/2016.

6

Barton, “Zero-ing in on Julian Dashper,” 11.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 22

Peter Robinson Boy Am I Scared Eh! 1997 acrylic and oilstick on paper signed P R Robinson and dated '97 in graphite lower right 935mm × 670mm

Christine Fletcher, was quick to distance herself from it, issuing a press release to express her “surprise and concern at the amount of money spent [with Saatchi and Saatchi] developing a new logo for the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (MONZ).” She thus repeated the misunderstanding that had caused the furore: that it had somehow cost “between $200,000 and $300,000” to develop just the “thumbprint stylised symbol.”1 That total was, in fact, the cost of the entire branding project towards the museum’s opening, but mud stuck—and an outrage was sustained, perhaps more so because the idea that a cultural institution should be sold to us at all felt new. The relationship between culture and the state was shifting in New Zealand. In this same political climate the mandate of what had been the major government arts funding body since 1963, the QEII Arts Council, changed from focusing on the support of artistic “traditions inherited from Britain and Europe,” to democratically acknowledging a greater diversity of cultural activity.2 So, with the new national museum swallowing up the role of the former National Art Gallery, support for the mainstream of professional art practice was felt by some to be under threat when the Arts Council was rebranded in 1994 as Creative NZ. The “agency” ring to that name, and the attention to art’s economic rather than its “aesthetic and spiritual” benefits,3 was also met with wariness by many in the art world. Boy Am I Scared Eh! renders the Te Papa logo as being as effortless and odd as the letters-pages haters found it at the time. The carefully doodled spiral—drawn as if with a crayon held in a clenched fist—looks much like a psychotronic film’s visualisation of mind-control powers: a campy horror of celebrity ad-land taking on a propaganda role, in service of our national identity? Robinson’s rising star had taken him to Western Europe several times already, and references to fascism were becoming a feature of his baiting quotation of racism. In at least one reworking of the “scared” phrase from this period it appears next to a swastika,4 bringing to the surface the coincidental likeness between Robinson’s consistent red, black and white palette (also standardised, customary Maori colours) and Third Reich graphics (and their associations of blood and soil).5

p.42

For four or five years before he made this piece Peter Robinson had been spinning a half-joking performance as enfant terrible into a sometimes excoriating lampoon of the art system. Beginning with an ironic deprecation of his Maori ancestry as career vehicle, it was a successful provocation: the harder he bit, the more the hand fed him. In this phase, as a badly behaved identity artist, his artistic whakapapa could have included some of the YBAs, whose shock tactics were showcased in the notable exhibition Sensation that opened in London in September 1997. Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas, Chris Ofili and Jake and Dinos Chapman, for example, were in the list, culled from the collection of their chief supporter Charles Saatchi. Of their ilk, Tania Kovat would cause a stir when her Virgin in A Condom (1994) was shown at Te Papa in Wellington a year later in Pictura Britannica, but the controversy important to Robinson’s Boy Am I Scared Eh! (1997) involves the Wellington office of Saatchi’s old firm, and their contract to design Te Papa’s brand. The announcement had played so badly that year that even the then Minister of Cultural Affairs,

The red text clearly invites interpretation as a protest against the emerging “tell the nation’s stories” role of New Zealand’s state-supported art institutions. It can’t be any straightforward personal statement, though. Most obviously, the words are a quotation—a paraphrase, in fact—of a signature work by national hero Colin McCahon, Am I Scared (1976). In McCahon lore, its words include a timid reversal of the God-voiced “I Am”s seen in the likes of Victory over death 2 (1970), and the slurred brushwork in which they trail off is a powerful visualisation of the doubt that charges the painter’s religious preoccupations. The piece is the first in a series 92


auction n°4 — november 2016

that ends with Mondrian’s Last Chrysanthemum (1976), a contemplation of nuclear holocaust. So, Robinson’s alignment of Am I Scared’s existential angst with art world politics has an element of deflationary humour to it.

set in motion an irresolvable ping-pong between the personal and the institutional, the stupidly trivial and the unfashionably existential, the sacred and the profane. The same McCahon reference was cycled through multiple iterations, the phrase evolving into “Am I Scarred”; thumbprints and flipped middle fingers aligned with the suggestion of emotional damage. Vividly highlighting the way context helps to create these larger sculptural effects, versions of this work have since been collected by Te Papa and the Auckland Art Gallery.

In another respect, though, Robinson’s two main references here do neatly abut. The story that has been well known since the 1977 touring retrospective McCahon’s “Necessary Protection” is that he painted Am I Scared in response to a photograph of two conspicuously apprehensive Maori men who had come to see his Urewera paintings at Peter McCleavy’s Cuba Street premises in Wellington.6 So it, too, is about fear in the face of the art institution, in a way. Showing with McCleavy himself (his 1997 solo show there was titled Cannon Fodder, punning on the art canon that McCahon represents), Robinson’s track record of probing the reception of Maori culture in the art world is another thing to factor into our estimation of the work.

Jon bywater

The artist’s Maori identity draws our attention to another connection between the work of Margaret Thatcher's favourite ad agency and that of McCahon: their well-meaning appropriation of all things Maori. In this unlikely combination, McCahon’s empathy for the underdog becomes an unexpected analogue for Saatchi and Saatchi’s inclusion—at the centre of their thumbprint—of a koru form. Neither gesture is flattered by the comparison. Given the bug-eyed tone of horror in Robinson’s capital lettering, it’s hard to see past the implication that both the original logo and the McCahon painting might be examples of patronising ventriloquism, overidentification, and token or rote visual biculturalism. The transposition of tone is key to this work. Whereas in McCahon the text trails off into a tentative, un-composed question, riddled with vulnerability, Robinson’s quick, bold characters suggest a kind of extrovert blurt. McCahon's phrase ends with a vernacular, rising interrogative “eh,” and addresses the listener with familiarity, using “boy” in a way particular to Aotearoa and to Maori idiom. In Robinson’s quotation, the word “boy” moves to the start of the sentence, becoming a more American way of intensifying the exclamation. At the centre, Robinson’s chunky “I” looks like an architectural column. It could also be—given its casual Cubist twist—a reference to his colleague and contemporary Michael Parekowhai’s previous McCahon quotation, the sculpture The Indefinite Article (1990). In any case, it is part of the way that Robinson carefully modulates the possibility of a personal voice, satirising the embarrassing egoism inherent in expressing anything at all. In its original presentation, the work’s dense knot of references was further complicated by Robinson’s deployment of a number of such sign-like protest pieces at once. In installations like One Love (Seppelt Art Award, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, 1997 and Artspace, Auckland, 1998), the relationships between works—like those internal to this one— 93

1

Christine Fletcher, “MUSEUM FUNDED AS MUSEUM OF NEW ZEALAND”, ministerial press release 14 March, 1997, accessed from https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/ museum-funded-museum-new-zealand

2

Martin Durrant, “Arts funding and support—Changing reasons for government support,” 22 Oct 2014, Te Ara—the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/ arts-funding-and-support/page-3

3

Martin Durrant, ibid.

4

Anna Miles, “Peter Robinson, Gordon Walters and the Corporate Koru,” Art Asia Pacific 23 (1999): 77–81.

5

Tessa Laird, “CULTURAL HASTY”, Two Cents, The Physics Room website, uploaded 06.05.97, accessed from http:// www.physicsroom.org.nz/archive/2cents/hasty.html

6

Marja Bloem and Martin Browne, Colin McCahon: A Question of Faith (Amsterdam: Stedlejik Museum, 2002), 226


bowerbank ninow

Lot 26

Don Peebles Painting 1969—No. 1 1969 acrylic on canvas signed Don Peebles, dated 1969 and inscribed “Painting 1969— No. 1” ACRYLIC/CANVAS TOP ↑ 60 1/4“x 64 1/4” in graphite upper edge verso 1530 × 1830mm

middle part of the decade, after returning to New Zealand from London in 1962, Peebles embarked on a remarkable series of constructivist assemblage works, which demonstrated his concerns with the architectonics of painting. However, Peebles was an inquisitive and highly experimental artist, and his return to canvas in the late ’60s marked another departure, transplanting his formalist concerns into yet another style and media. Painting 1969—No. 1 shows clearly the influence of both the colourfield and op-art movements, in its style and execution, as well as in its imposing dimensions and use of colour. Paton suggests that at this time Peebles was concerned primarily with “the lyrical pressure that fields of singing colour can exert on a rigid format” and “in which the relation of field to edge, surface to depth, colour to colour are freighted with the utmost consideration.”2 These concerns are clearly in evidence in the present work, which displays both an unusual choice of colour and a distinctly op-art influenced play with the distinction between subject and ground: are we looking at a pattern of gold on green, or green on gold? The work is constructed around two sets of repeating green and gold bands, which enter the picture plane from opposite sides of the canvas, coming just short of meeting in the centre. Here, the offset line of their almost-meeting forms a kind of barrier or partition, dividing the painting into two zones. The tension created by this asymmetry has an almost magnetic pull, activating the edges of the picture, where the continuity of the striped pattern suggests a repetition or extrapolation outside of the painting’s frame. The green and gold colour scheme would be somewhat unusual for a “normal” op-art or colour field painting, but it is extremely characteristic of Peebles’ idiosyncratic approach to colour. Many of his later works, such as Untitled Blue/Green (1979) have an organic feel, due to their use of colours drawn from the natural world: oceanic cobalt blues, vegetative greens, ochres and yellows. Although it is a rigid formalist essay, Painting 1969—No. 1 is perhaps an early part of this same painterly journey, its fresh leafy green offset by metallic gold, which could be read in a number of ways: perhaps golden sunlight pouring through the lattice of a nikau frond, or the metallic gleam of a beetle or dragonfly, alighting on a branch.

p.46

Don Peebles first studied art in a formal setting in Florence, while waiting to be demobilised after serving in the European theatre in World War II. There, he was exposed to Italian Renaissance paintings, and made his first watercolours and oils. From this unassuming beginning, Peebles produced a prodigious body of work, which amounts to an exhaustive investigation of the possibilities of abstract painting. Over the course of his long career, Peebles was constantly exploring and questioning his own works, seeking to expand his artistic practice through an ongoing process of reassessment and renewal. His list of influences reads almost like an evolutionary lineage of modernism itself: Cezanne, Whistler, Braque, Burri, Tapies, Passmore, Poons, Noland. From his early figurative works such as Girl With Ball (1954), which might be best characterised as fauvist or proto-cubist, to his best-known 1980s works, with their voluminous folds of colour-stained canvas that blur the lines between painting and sculpture, Peebles remained an innovator.

In either case, this painting sees Peebles at a crossroads, perfectly balanced between the disciplined formalism of his early period and the lush, expressive use of colour which characterised his later works. Andrew clark

The present work dates from 1969, produced as part of Peebles’ Linear Series, which Justin Paton characterises as “works of some panache, elegant and erudite, in which large zones of pristine colour are activated by linear foils.”1 In the

1

Justin Paton, Don Peebles: The Harmony of Opposites (Christchurch: Robert McDougall Art Gallery and Hazard Press Ltd, 1996), 21.2 Ibid.

2 Ibid.

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Lot 27 21

Karl Maughan Lee Road 2012 oil on canvas signed KM, dated 15/03/2012 and inscribed "LEE ROAD" in brushpoint verso 1530 × 1830mm

out by shade, are both specific enough to feel real and sufficiently loosely presented to be less of interest for any paticular botanical identity than for their striking form and colour. In the distance, unnaturally rounded treetops loom; are they controlled and trimmed into these unnatural shapes, or are they the spectre of triffidic overgrowth? Beneath these gigantic bushes and treetops, the composition is grounded by a pathway that makes the space navigable, even tamed. In A Philosophy of Gardens, David E. Cooper conceptualises the garden as the site and symbol of the “co-dependence between human endeavour and the natural world,” in which the natural becomes dependent on the human, but in which human creativity is also dependent upon there being a natural world in and with which to make things.1 The scale of Lee Road, not small but certainly smaller-than-life, seems to affirm the former part of Cooper’s argument—that of gardens as spaces in which people civilise and control natural forces, pushing back against their vitality through human will and action. On the other hand, the grand scale of Maughan’s nine-metre long painting of hydrangeas shown as part of Solo 2014 at the Dowse, and the largescale work A Clear Day (1999) (held in Te Papa’s permanent collection), evoke wonder at the powers of the natural world, even as it bridles against similarly impressive feats of human control. Of course Maughan’s works, both small and large, present the balance between the natural world and the human urge to shape and harness it. However, as different gardens tend towards different extremes, from overgrown to manicured, so does Maughan’s work explore the beauty of human and natural “co-dependence” found in such places and plantings.

p.47

Karl Maughan is known in New Zealand and abroad for his paintings of gardens. Typically overflowing with vibrant flowers and foliage, the gardens in Maughan’s works look as though they have been carefully cultivated into perfect bloom, kept free of any trace of decay, and yet seem on the edge of overgrowth. Much like the cultivation of an actual garden, Karl Maughan’s practice involves the deliberate consideration of the natural world and transformation of it through artifice. Through his placement of colour, manipulation of shade and light, and arrangement of plants dug out of a range of locations, imagined and real, Maughan presents the tensions and joys of a successful garden: a balance between nature and artifice, freedom and restraint, control and growth.

frances Clark

Throughout his career, Maughan has consistently focused on gardens and plants as subject matter for his paintings, and through this dedication to a particular visual language he has spent the better part of the last three decades developing an uncommon clarity and depth of vision. Prompted by his time in London in the 1990s, he moved from plein air painting to constructing composite, imagined gardens based largely on photographic sources. The development of his practice over this period also varies from modes that feel controlled and hyperreal, to the kind of energetic, near-impressionistic brushwork and close attention to light and shade seen in Lee Road. Lee Road’s towering bushes of heaped leaves and flowers, drenched in sun and carved

1

95

David E Cooper, A Philosophy of Gardens, (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006), 145.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 28

Bill Hammond Flight Recorder 1998 acrylic on six loose canvas panels signed W.D. Hammond, dated 1998 and inscribed Flight Recorder in brushpoint (each) 1800mm × 2500mm (overall)

p.48

Although much has been written about Bill Hammond’s painting since he first appeared on the national scene in the 1980s, he remains to some extent an enigma. Commentaries on his work often cite his trip to the Auckland Islands in 1989, which has been described as “transformational,”1 and which has as a result become part of the “official” mythology which surrounds Hammond’s practice. However, aside from pointing out the post-colonial metaphor implicit in painting native birds as the inhabitants of a primordial, pre-contact landscape, much of what is written about these works focuses on describing their contents, attempting to “close-read” them as though they were archaic comic strips or freeze-frames from some Palaeolithic television drama. This is in part a result of the almost aggressively figurative nature of Hammond’s works; they are rarely anything other than representational, clearly meant to show us images of objects and things, even if what exactly those things are can be difficult to make out, at times.

Flight Recorder, from 1998, shows Hammond at a transitional point in his career. The birdfolk, who have since become the defining motif of his work, are in full evidence, but the work retains traces of Hammond’s late-eighties style, a frenetic blend of Japanese ukiyo-e influences, underground comix, and punk rock. The painting is executed across six unstretched canvas pieces, three of which are elongated triangles, like sporting pennants. Here, as in early works such as The Look of Love plus The Sound of Music (1986), the composition consists of a scattered collection of objects and motifs: birds and bird-hybrids; aeroplanes; running figures; a mattress; an angel with a trumpet, perhaps heralding the End Times; a stuffed bird and a drawer of eggs; a meticulously rendered bat with a human face, like a specimen from a nightmare cabinet of curiosities; and an airport arrival board, humorously informing the viewer that flight 3058 from Wellington has “DELANDED,” and is perhaps now trapped in a quantum state. However, such a description amounts to little 96


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more than a catalogue of the work’s contents, offering few clues as to its meaning and purpose.

of Flight Recorder is the aforementioned angel, blowing the trump of doom, away from which a crowd of tiny figures are fleeing, tripping over themselves in their haste to escape their inevitable fate. The microphone in the upper right canvas also suggests the idea of recording, perhaps in the sense of cutting a record, freezing a fleeting, momentary performance in the grooves of a vinyl disc.

In order to do more than just “read” the surface of Hammond’s works, it is necessary to address those elements of their construction which remain intangible and difficult. Hammond has succeeded as an artist in part because of his reticence to explain himself; much of the strength of his works is related to their aura of mystery, and their unique atmosphere: perched somewhere between esoteric arcana and thrift-store kitsch, they resist interpretation as much as they invite it. However, some clues may be gleaned from Flight Recorder’s disparate elements.

Hammond’s oeuvre contains numerous examples of paintings which depict music: people (and, often, animals) listening to it, dancing to it, or making it. However, works such as Radio On (1985), Jingle Jangle Morning (2006) and Flight Recorder can also be read like musical notations themselves. Repetitions, patterns and harmonies suffuse his works, making the experience of viewing them more akin to a process of listening than of looking. Rather than an illusionistic space, which is apprehended and understood as a whole, Hammond’s paintings are experienced piece by piece, consumed over a period of minutes or hours like passages of song.

Firstly, this work is concerned with the idea of fragmentation and reassembly, of putting things together, both in the sense of repairing things which were one whole (like the triangular pennants, perhaps sliced from the same sheet of cloth) and also of attempting to reconcile things which were never meant to go together, a kind of conceptual and metaphorical assemblage. This complexity is addressed by the work’s title, which contains a range of possible meanings. A Flight Recorder could be a black box salvaged from the remains of a downed aircraft, memorialising the chaos and terror of the plane’s final moments, but the word “flight” could equally apply to the act of running away, in which case this painting would also be a recording of a retreat —although from what, and towards what, remains somewhat obscure. The idea that this painting is a recording, a document, or a testament is beguiling, especially given its fragmentary nature.

andrew clark

Secondly, in this work, as in most of his “birdland” output, Hammond is concerned with depicting an “Other,” but not necessarily the commonly understood Other of the colonial worldview, defined by inferiority to, and difference from, white European understandings of self. Rather than infantilised inferiors, subject to the whims of the colonising impulse, Hammond’s birds feel more like ancestors or superiors, mythological figures who move behind the scenes of the postcolonial landscape. Like Thoth, the ibis-headed god who presided over magic, science and writing, Hammond depicts birds as an unseen, mediating presence in his works. In the large rectangular bottom panel, two birds stand by the side of a bed, as though holding a wake for the indistinct, cloudlike form on the mattress. Rather than a vanished race, supplanted by unfeeling colonisers and reduced to the status of museum exhibits, they are still here, still at large. Lastly, Hammond’s painting is, and has always been, partly a response to and a celebration of the transformative effects of music. With reference to this painting, it is worth bearing in mind that, in Hammond’s punning vocabulary, a “recorder” is also a child’s first musical instrument. The presence of birds in the New Zealand landscape often takes the form of their songs, which alert us to their invisible presence. The central motif

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Jennifer Hay, “Jingle Jangle Morning” in Jennifer Hay, Laurence Aberhart, Chris Knox, Ron Brownson, Bill Hammond: Jingle Jangle Morning. (Christchurch, N.Z.: Christchurch Art Gallery, 2007), 25.


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Lot 29

Paul Hartigan Spring 1970 liquitex on canvas 2400mm × 1200mm

does not attempt literality. The painting is a melding of pop, abstract and minimalist art. Spring looks like it came from somewhere else, but the local influences are unmistakable. Three New Plymouth artists make their presence felt on this work, as they did on the young Hartigan. Tom Kreisler, his art teacher at New Plymouth Boys High School, is there on the back­­—on the verso of Spring is an unsuccessful unfinished painting by Kreisler, who recycled the canvas and gave it to his student. The spring itself could have come from amongst the pitchforks and tarpaulins found in the workshop of Don Driver, whom Hartigan had met at New Plymouth’s Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Finally, the canvas was painted in a studio that Michael Smither made available to the young artist. A cool wit provides the foundation for the work. Playing with public expectations of an artwork entitled Spring, Hartigan presents heavy industry rather than blossoming nature. These two have something in common—the half compressed spring threatens to uncoil, hinting at the change that is about to happen when it goes off, like the explosion of leaves, blossoms and life that occurs at the end of winter. It could also be a portrait of frustrated adolescence, painted by a young man for whom adulthood could not come fast enough. When interviewed by the local newspaper, his cool detachment was worthy of, if not learned from, Warhol: “There’s no great moral theme behind this, there’s no message—it’s just a painting of a steel spring.” Nor would Hartigan let the viewing public mistake his machine image for anything other than what it was: “It is not a painting related to people and human emotions. It is a painting of the thing itself—the spring.”

p.30

If the forty-six-year career of Paul Hartigan were a story, Spring would appear on or near page one. The work embodies the themes and concerns that have sustained him over the years: colour, line, wit and attitude. It was exhibited just once, as part of the Taranaki Review at the Govett-Brewster in 1970, and remains as fresh and astounding today as it was back then.

p.49

At first sight it may seem simple and exuberant, but Paul Hartigan’s Spring is unparalleled in New Zealand art.

Don Abbott

It was painted in 1970 by a young artist intent on placing his work in an international context, and on engaging with the intellectual arguments surrounding art at the time. Its subject matter is a direct link to Andy Warhol’s use and advocacy of industrial processes to manufacture art. Its execution is akin to Roy Lichtenstein’s treatment of the gun on the cover of TIME magazine in 1967, cartoon-like, free of context and shaded with Ben-Day dots. Its arrangement resembles the primary structure sculptures of Donald Judd, a series of white shelves that Hartigan connects through his spring mechanism. It is a highly stylised, graphical rendition of an object, which

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auction n°4 — november 2016

Lot 30

Julian Hooper Count Gideon Vecsey 2007 watercolour and collage signed Julian Hooper and dated 2007 in graphite lower right 640mm × 495mm

and their four children, including a daughter, Alisi, who was Hooper’s great-grandmother. Hooper’s painting is a stylised portrait of Vecsey, reduced schematically to collaged elements on a violet field of vertical watercolour wash. Echoing the gothic style, as well as the Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau aesthetic movements, the Count’s moustachioed face is rendered in tendril-like lines and black triangular forms reminiscent of bat wings or ship sails. His eyes merge, or perhaps overlap, with two bats, representing both his metaphorical blindness to his situation and the literal medical problems with his vision. Vecsey’s nose resembles a ship, rendered as a constructivist abstraction, suggesting that his travels in the Pacific were a case of him “following his nose.” The bat, vampire, and Vlad the Impaler (Vlad Tepes, the original Dracula) imagery that threads through the works of Liliu is also a reference to Vecesy’s birthplace of Transylvania, a region with its own complex history of conquest and exploitation. Vampirism is also a convenient metaphor for European attitudes to the indigenous peoples of the Pacific, and occasionally vice versa. Hooper skilfully draws together the threads of his European and Pacific heritage to tell a rich and fascinating story, through a postmodern version of history painting. The scroll winding through the bottom of the work reads: “The Future of Europe is Darker than the Dark before my Eyes.” This is a quote from a speech given by the blind Hungarian politician Baron Miklos Wesselenyi (1796­­­­–1859) in his 1848 address to the Hungarian Nati­onal Assembly. These words would prove prophetic. The Hungarian Revolution against Habsburg rule broke out on 15 March of that year, resulting in a war lasting into the following year and subsequently Hungarian passive resistance against forcible Germanisation by Austria and the creation of Austro-Hungary—a path ultimately leading to the First World War and the start of much horror and misery for Europe. Taking the long view, the gyronny/pinwheel shape between Vecsey’s eyes can be read as a Pacific manalua motif, found in tapa and ngatu cloth design, an allusion to the Union Jack of British colonisation, and a subtle suggestion of the Nazi swastika to come.

p.50

Julian Hooper’s paintings are idiosyncratic beasts, not easily co-opted into the usual art-historical descriptors. They draw on many eclectic visual themes and styles, and often relate to Pacific indigeneity and colonisation. This painting, Count Gideon Vecsey, was first shown at Auckland University’s Gus Fisher Gallery as part of the 2007 Auckland Triennial in a solo exhibition called Liliu, a word common to many Polynesian languages meaning to change and transform. This title refers to the transformations undergone by Vecsey, a Hungarian of the late nineteenth century, who attempted to make his fortune growing cotton in Fiji in 1871. The economies of Central Europe had been devastated by the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian wars, and opportunity was limited. Many sought opportunities in the Pacific where a number of German-speaking colonies existed, but it was the disastrous Hungarian Revolution of 1848 that drove Vecsey to the South Seas. Forced to leave the cotton plantation for two years to seek treatment for his failing eyesight, he returned in 1885 to find himself cuckolded and a bankrupt. Vecsey, by now a naturalised British citizen, returned to Sydney, Australia, leaving behind him a substantial debt, his estranged Tongan wife,

Vecsey is ultimately a heroic-tragic figure in the Romantic vein, as much as he is a representative of European colonial imperialism. Academic Susan Best speaks of what she calls “reparative aesthetics”—the idea that art can push through the impasses of history and identity politics by acting as a collective memory that commemorates, preserves and heals the social, personal and collective shame and anger of past wrongs and crimes. This description seems to encompass much of what Hooper’s work does: a kind of objective looking, but with feeling. andrew paul wood 99


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Lot 33

Tony de Lautour Conspiracy Plan 2002 oil on canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper right; inscribed CONSPIRACY PLAN in brushpoint upper left 1210mm × 810mm

topsoil, but of substance—in fact, these are not landscapes at all, but the ghosts of landscape, floating in the void, sometimes atop flimsy “rafts,” other times supported by the picture’s edge itself, as here. Conspiracy theories come about for the same reasons as most other folklore and mythology: a desire to reduce the complexity and randomness of the universe to an understandable narrative. The idea that an international cabal is controlling the destiny of the world is preferable in many ways to confronting the reality that there is no overarching plan in place. In this sense, conspiracy theories are a kind of perverse coping mechanism, an idea which de Lautour plays with in this painting, depicting New Zealand as a smoking wreckage, over which the lions of our colonial past strut and posture. Around them are clustered a range of esoteric icons, from which we are invited to construct our own conspiratorial explanation for the situation at hand. A black lion, barely discernible against the black background (a starless night, a windowless room, or the bowels of the earth?), hoists aloft a branch, around which a serpent is coiled, echoing a caduceus. His companion, the crowned white lion, holds a skull and a bomb, emblazoned with the union jack; his hind foot rests on a globe of the world. A small votive icon, depicting a robed figure in a bishop’s hat, incongruously holds that unmistakable icon of third-world power, an AK-47 assault rifle. Elsewhere, a tiny pyramid, topped by the “eye of providence,” is lifted from the back of the US one-dollar bill. This seemingly-innocuous symbol is associated in conspiratorial circles with the idea that a secret group of “illuminati” are plotting to bring the world under their influence; de Lautour is here positioning the real colonial history of New Zealand, whereby this place was controlled and re-shaped by far-off influences from the other side of the world, against the contemporary mythology of globalist conspiracy, with its nameless, faceless, placeless antagonists.

p.53

Tony de Lautour’s career has been characterised by a posture of “bad-ness,” what Jonathan Bywater calls the “bastard culture of commercial internationalism.”1 Of course, if you call your first show Bad White Art, this kind of thing is bound to happen; de Lautour has hardly shied away from such an identity. Even his recent shift into abstraction seems in some sense to be a reaction to the suspicion levelled at abstract painting in recent years; if abstraction has devolved to the status of “zombie formalism” in the eyes of the critical establishment, then by de Lautour’s logic, it might finally be “bad” enough for him to engage with. Over the years, de Lautour’s oeuvre has catalogued a range of icons of “badness,” in several senses of the word: bug-eyed, strung-out figures, bottles of booze, snakes, spiders, joints, hypodermics, knives, guns.

Andrew Clark

Conpsiracy Plan displays a selection from de Lautour’s library of motifs: heraldic lions, mangy leftovers of Brisith imperialism; skulls, echoes of traditional momento mori but also of gang patches and home-made tattoos; and ghostly white landscape forms, the same bare-bones representation of New Zealand’s terrain which has become synonymous with Colin McCahon. However, for de Lautour these forms are not some mystical apparatus, loaded with the trappings of national identity and art history; rather, they are like bleached skeletons, smoking ruins devoid not only of vegetation and

1

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Jonathan Bywater, “Elvis and Other Evils: The Art of Tony de Lautour,” Art New Zealand 75 (1995): 64.


auction n°4 — november 2016

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How to participate in the Auction

Attending in person Auction N˚4 will take place on Wednesday 30th November 2016 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they my do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will endeavour to contact the artist and pay the artist a resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. The steps taken to contact the artist will be at Bowerbank Ninow’s sole discretion and Bowerbank Ninow will under no circumstances be liable for failure to make payment to an artist under this clause. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Artists are invited to submit their contact details to Bowerbank Ninow to facilitate payment. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

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auction n°4 — november 2016

Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent. SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 15% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

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Auction N°5 April 2017 Entries invited

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Auction N˚4  
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