Page 1

Auction N°3 3rd Aug 2016


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Auction N°3 3rd August 2016 Opening

Wednesday 27 July 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 28 July – Tuesday 2 August 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 3 August 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 3 August 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°3 August 3rd, 2016 Catalogue of works Edition of 2000 Design Direction Editor Design Photography

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Elliot Ferguson Paul Nathan, Sam Hartnett

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


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Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°2 March 30th, 2016 Catalogue of works Edition of 2000 Design Editor Photography Research

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Paul Nathan Hannah Daly

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


auction n°3 — august 2016

Contents Plates

18

Index

83

Essays

94

Brendon Wilkinson Port Royal

96

Billy Apple Paid: The Artist has to Live Like Everybody Else

97

Martin Thompson untitled

98

Simon Ingram Spirit Level Painting

99

Yvonne Todd Rashulon

100

Michael Illingworth Flower Painting

101

Francis Upritchard Derek

102

Allen Maddox Grid & Green

104

Grahame Sydney Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar

106

Ralph Hotere Port Chalmers Painting 77 untitled

108

Allen Maddox X 69

110

How to participate in the Auction

112

Conditions of Sale

113


P

L

A

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T

E

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auction n°3 — august 2016


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22


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 1

Brendon Wilkinson Port Royal c. 1997 mixed media 162mm × 124mm × 40mm (widest points)

est

$800 – $1,600

23


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Lot 2

Judy Darragh untitled c. 1998/1999 acrylic and adhesive labels on found poster 985mm x 685mm

est

$700 – $900

24


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 3

Judy Darragh untitled c. 1998/1999 acrylic and adhesive labels on found poster 985mm x 685mm

est

$700 – $900

25


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Lot 4

Jae Hoon Lee Yellow Cloud 2007 C-type print, edition of 250 signed Jae Hoon Lee and dated 2007 verso 200mm × 250mm

est

$700 – $1,200

26


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 5 p.97

Billy Apple Paid: The Artist has to Live Like Everybody Else 1999 serigraph with receipt and payment slip attached signed Billy Apple in graphite lower right; inscribed 5249 c in ink lower right verso 418mm × 294mm

est

$800 – $1,600

27


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Lot 6

Peter Stichbury untitled (Florian Habicht) c. 1997 coloured pencil on paper 640mm Ă— 480mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

28


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 7

Peter Stichbury untitled c. 1997 coloured pencil on paper 640mm × 480mm

est

$2,000 - $3,000

29


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Lot 8 p.98

Martin Thompson Untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 250mm Ă— 500mm (overall)

est

$1,000 - $2,000

30


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 9 p.98

est

Martin Thompson untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 250mm × 500mm (overall) $1,000 - $2,000

31


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Lot 10 p.98

est

Martin Thompson untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 395mm Ă— 540mm (overall) $1,000 - $2,000

32


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 11 p.99

Simon Ingram Spirit Level Painting 1996 enamel on plywood with Stabila spirit level 400mm × 392mm

est

$2,500 – $3,500

33


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Lot 12

John Hurrell Bars in 4 Directions 1979 acrylic on canvas signed John Hurrell, dated 1979 and inscribed Bars in 4 Directions (Pale) in ink upper right verso 1550mm Ă— 1275mm

est

$1,500 – $2,500

34


auction n°3 — august 2016

lot 13

Richard Killeen Feeling stronger every day 1974 oil and acrylic on canvas signed Killeen in brushpoint lower right edge; signed Killeen, dated 1974 and inscribed PLEASE REPLACE PLASTIC WHEN PACKING PAINTING in ink on stretcher verso; inscribed RICHARD KILLEEN, AUCKLAND NEW ZEALAND and TITLE in printed type and FEELING STRONGER EVERY DAY and 150 in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed TOP in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed DATE, MEDIUM and SIZE in printed type and FEBRUARY 1974, OIL AND ACRYLIC ON CV CANVAS and 32" × 28" in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed ARTISTS REFERENCE NUMBER in printed type and 150 in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed Richard Killeen, Catalogue no: 150, Feeling stronger every day, 1974, Oil and acrylic on canvas and 32 x 28 ins in printed type on label affixed to frame verso 812mm × 812mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

35


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lot 14

Richard Killeen Untitled 1979 oil on paper signed Killeen, dated 22 . 7 . 79 and inscribed 3190 in graphite lower edge 570mm Ă— 390mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

36


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 15

Richard Killeen Island Mentality 1981 acrylic and collage on paper signed Killeen, dated 7.81 and inscribed Island Mentality in graphite lower edge 755mm × 565mm

est

$2,000 – $3,000

37


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Lot 16

Tony de Lautour Sample 2002 acrylic on canvasboard inscribed SAMPLE and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper left; signed Tony de Lautour in brushpoint lower right 230mm Ă— 300mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

38


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 17

Michael Parekowhai Acts c. 1993 lost wax bronze cast 165mm × 295mm

est

$3,500 – $5,500

39


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Lot 18

Sean Kerr Waiting for Jiri to Email Me… 2010 screenprint on paper, edition of 6 + 1 artist proof 965mm × 695mm

est

$500 – $1,000

40


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 19

Michael Stevenson Isolated Mass/Circumflex 1993 acrylic and charcoal on paper signed Michael Stevenson, dated 1993 and inscribed 'Isolated Mass/Circumflex' in graphite verso 570mm x 770mm

est

$3,000 – $5,000

41


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Lot 20

Yvonne Todd Mrs. Van Valkenburg's Doll 1998 gelatin silver print signed Y. Todd in ink verso 150mm Ă— 120mm

est

$800 - $1,200

42


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 21 p.100

Yvonne Todd Rashulon 2007. Printed 2010 C-type print, edition of 3 signed Yvonne Todd, dated 2007 and inscribed Rashulon and printed 2010 in ink verso 667mm × 557mm

est

$4,500 - $6,500

43


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Lot 22

Heather Straka Kia Ora 2010 oil on canvas on board signed Heather Straka, dated 2010 and inscribed Kia Ora in graphite verso 1030mm Ă— 830mm

est

$15,000 - $20,000

44


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 23

Sheng Qi untitled 2000 acrylic on linen signed Sheng Qi and dated 2000 in brushpoint lower left verso 600mm × 500mm

est

$5,000 – $7,000

45


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lot 24

Michael Parekowhai Rainbow Servant Dreaming 2012 automotive paint on fibreglass 415mm Ă— 170mm Ă— 105mm

est

$9,000 - $12,000

46


auction n°3 — august 2016

lot 25

Michael Parekowhai Rainbow Servant Dreaming 2012 automotive paint on fibreglass 415mm × 170mm × 105mm

est

$9,000 - $12,000

47


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Lot 26 p.101

Michael Illingworth Flower Painting 1968 oil on canvas signed Illingworth, dated 68 and inscribed Flower painting in ink verso; inscribed 2 in conte top left verso 384mm Ă— 280mm

est

$15,000 - $20,000

48


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 27 p.102

Francis Upritchard Derek 2007 earthenware, modelling clay and rope 490mm × 320mm × 250mm

est

$9,000 – $14,000

49


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Lot 28

Shane Cotton Red Chasing Blue 2007 oil on canvas signed S Cotton, dated 2007 and inscribed Red Chasing Blue in brushpoint lower right; signed Shane L. Cotton, dated 2007 inscribed Red Chasing Blue in ink lower right verso 840mm Ă— 1150mm

est

$30,000 – $40,000

50


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 29

John Walsh Deregulation Debate 2005 oil on board signed J Walsh, dated 2005 and inscribed Deregulation Debate in graphite lower left verso 890mm × 1190mm

est

$13,500 - $15,500

51


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Lot 30 p.104-105

Allen Maddox Grid & Green 1976 acrylic on canvas signed am, dated 2.2.76 and inscribed Grid & Green and 37 in brushpoint upper left verso 2700mm Ă— 2120mm

est

$30,000 – $50,000

52


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 31

Fiona Pardington Still Life with Freud and Puriri 2012 C-type print, edition of 10 1095mm × 825mm

est

$12,000 - $16,000

53


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Lot 32

Laurence Aberhart Taranaki [afterglow into night], 19 November 2002 2002 gelatin silver print 190mm Ă— 240mm Image courtesy of Webb's

est

$3,500 – $4,500

54


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 33 p.106-107

Grahame Sydney Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar 1982 - 2001 egg tempera on board signed Grahame Sydney and dated 1981 - 2001 in brushpoint lower left; signed Grahame Sydney, dated 1982 - 2001 and © 2001 and inscribed "Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar", Grahame Sydney, Dunedin, New Zealand and Egg Tempera on Gesso in ink verso 480mm × 800mm

est

$80,000 – $140,000

55


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lot 34

Gretchen Albrecht Untitled 1984 acrylic on canvas signed Albrecht and dated 1984 in brushpoint lower right verso 1255mm Ă— 2510mm (widest points)

est

$20,000 – $30,000

56


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 35 p.108-109

Ralph Hotere Untitled 1977 brolite-lacquer on board signed Hotere, dated 77 and inscribed For Alan Harris in brushpoint verso 620mm × 630mm

est

$30,000 – $50,000

57


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Lot 36

Rohan Wealleans Jelly Babay Dreaming 2008 acrylic on canvas blind signed Rohan Wealleans and dated 2008 ink lower left verso 1630mm Ă— 1200mm

est

$12,000 – $16,000

58


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 37

Allen Maddox A Broken Egg 1991 acrylic and pastel on paper signed am, dated 3.91 and inscribed 'a broken egg' in graphite lower edge 720mm × 520mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

59


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lot 38 p.108-109

Ralph Hotere Port Chalmers Painting 77 1977 brolite-lacquer on board signed Hotere, dated '77 and inscribed Port Chalmers and Group Exhibition 77 in brushpoint verso; inscribed After exhitbion please leave with Brooke/Gifford Gallery, clean surface with soft cloth, Title "Port Chalmers Painting 77" and Price $600 in graphite verso 1185mm x 810mm

est

$75,000 – $85,000

60


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 39

Pat Hanly Love Plate. X. 1973 enamel on board signed P. Hanly., dated 1973 and inscribed Love Plate. X. in ink upper edge verso 445mm × 440mm

est

$10,000 – $15,000

61


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Lot 40 p.110

Allen Maddox X 69 1976 oil on canvas signed am, dated 4.76 and inscribed X 69 in brushpoint verso 580mm Ă— 520mm

est

$7,000 - $12,000

62


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 41

Allen Maddox Head 1995 oil on canvas signed AM, dated 95 and inscribed 'Head' in brushpoint verso 915mm × 915mm

est

$10,000 - $15,000

63


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Lot 42

Ian Scott Asymmetrical Lattice, No. 9 1983 acrylic on canvas signed Ian Scott and dated 83 in ink upper edge verso; dated MAY, 1983 and inscribed 244, 29 3/4" × 26 1/4", TOP ↑ and "ASYMMETRICAL LATTICE NO. 9" in ink on stretcher verso 760mm × 665mm

est

$5,000 – $7,000

64


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 43

Greer Twiss Frozen Frames: Plain 4 1969 enamel on cast bronze signed Greer Twiss, dated 1969 and inscribed Cat 7, Frozen Frames and Plain 4 in ink on label affixed to underside 175mm × 130mm

est

$7,000 – $9,000

65


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lot 44

Tony de Lautour Raft (with Trees and Lions) 2003 acrylic and pencil on a stretched canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2003 in brushpoint top right; inscribed Raft (with Trees and Lions) in brushpoint top left; dated 2003 in graphite verso 610mm Ă— 500mm

est

$4,000 - $6,000

66


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 45

Dick Frizzell Still Life with Felix the Cat Cut Out and Statuette 1982 oil on board signed Frizzell, dated 10/10/82 and inscribed Still Life with Felix the Cat Cut Out and Statuette in brushpoint top right; Ferner Galleries label fixed verso 645mmx 585mm

est

$9,000 – $14,000

67


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Lot 46

Peter Robinson untitled c. 1997 oilstick and acrylic on cardboard affixed to wooden palette 755mm Ă— 565mm

est

$12,000 - $16,000

68


auction auction n°3 — n°3 august — august 2016 2016

Lot 47

Reuben Patterson untitled (Time and Place) 2007 sequins, pins, polyurethane foam 300mm × 250mm × 150mm

est

$800 – $1,600

69


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Lot 48

Nigel Brown Even the best laid plans 2004 oil on board signed N. Brown in brushpoint upper left; dated 2004 in brushpoint upper right; signed Nigel Brown, dated 2004 and inscribed "Even the best laid plans" and oil on board in brushpoint verso 1242mm Ă— 695mm

est

$12,000 - $16,000

70


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 49

Israel Birch Gold Oriori 4 2004 lacquer on stainless steel signed Israel T Birch, dated 2006 and inscribed Gold Oriori 4 in ink verso 1010mm × 1010mm

est

$5,000 - $7,000

71


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Lot 50

Bill Hammond Limbo Bay II 2001 lithograph on paper, edition 16/48 signed W.D Hammond, dated 2001 and inscribed Limbo Bay II in graphite lower edge 525mm Ă— 740mm

est

$3,000 - $5,000

72


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 51

Liz Maw Deepa 2004 giclée on paper, edition 4/10 signed E Maw, dated 2004 and inscribed Deepa in graphite lower edge 715mm × 600mm

est

$1,800 – $2,600

73


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lot 52

Tony Fomison Old Age - insight looking out 1982 lithograph on paper, edition 10/16 signed Tony, dated 82 and inscribed Old Age - insight looking out in graphite lower edge 370mm Ă— 260mm

est

$500 - $700

74


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 53

Tony Fomison More? More of What? c. 1986 lithograph on paper, edition 14/15 signed Fomison and inscribed More? More of What? in graphite lower edge 375mm × 260mm

est

$500 - $700

75


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lot 54

Agnes Martin Untitled # 5 1990 lithograph on velum, edition of 2500 304mm Ă— 304mm

est

$500 - $1,000

76


auction n°3 — august 2016

lot 55

Agnes Martin Untitled # 10 1990 lithograph on velum, edition of 2500

est

$500 - $1,000

77


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Lot 56

Richard Killeen From the museum 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Killeen, dated 2002 and inscribed From the museum in graphite lower edge 570mm Ă— 765mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

78


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 57

Gretchen Albrecht Pounamu 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Albrecht, dated 2002 and inscribed Pounamu in graphite lower edge 570mm × 765mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

79


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Lot 58

Giovani Intra untitled 1990 acrylic on paper, triptych 250mm Ă— 160mm (each panel)

est

$800 – $1,600

80


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 59

Bill Hammond Bone Eagle A 2007 etching, edition 16/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle A in graphite lower left 125mm × 180mm

est

$1,500 - $2,500

81


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Lot 60

John Pule Fenonga Kia Koe 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed John Pule, dated 2002 and inscribed Fenonga Kia Koe in graphite lower edge 765mm Ă— 570mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 61

Robert Ellis Captured & Described 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Robert Ellis and dated 2002 in graphite lower right 765mm × 570mm

est

$300 - $600

83


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Lot 62

Dick Frizzell BIG EGG - LittLe egg (ACTUAL SIZE) 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Dick Frizzell and dated 2002 in graphite lower right 570mm Ă— 765mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

84


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#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

1

Brendon Wilkinson Port Royal c. 1997 mixed media 162mm x 124mm x 40mm (widest points)

Provenance Private Collection Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland.

p.21/P.96

$800 – $1,600

2

Judy Darragh untitled c. 1998/1999 acrylic and adhesive labels on found poster 985mm x 685mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wairarapa.

p.22

$700 – $900

3

Judy Darragh untitled c. 1998/1999 acrylic and adhesive labels on found poster 985mm x 685mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wairarapa.

p.23

$700 – $900

4

Jae Hoon Lee Yellow Cloud 2007 C-type print, edition of 250 signed Jae Hoon Lee and dated 2007 in ink verso 200mm x 250mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist.

p.24

$700 – $1,200

5

Billy Apple Paid: The Artist has to Live Like Everybody Else 1999 serigraph with receipt and payment slip attached signed Billy Apple in graphite lower right; inscribed 5249 c in ink lower right verso 418mm x 294mm

Provenance Private Collection Auckland.

p.25/p.97

$800 – $1,600

6

Peter Stichbury untitled (Florian Habicht) c. 1997 coloured pencil on paper 640mm x 480mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.26

$2,000 – $3,000

7

Peter Stichbury untitled c. 1997 coloured pencil on paper 640mm x 480mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.27

$2,000 – $3,000

8

Martin Thompson untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 250mm x 500mm (overall)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.28/p.98

$1,000 – $2,000

9

Martin Thompson untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 250mm x 500mm (overall)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.29/p.98

$1,000 – $2,000

10

Martin Thompson untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 395mm x 540mm (overall)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.30/p.98

$1,000 – $2,000

11

Simon Ingram Spirit Level Painting 1996 enamel on plywood with Stabila spirit level 400mm x 392mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist.

p.31/p.99

$2,500 – $3,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

12

John Hurrell Bars in 4 Directions 1979 acrylic on canvas signed John Hurrell, dated 1979 and inscribed Bars in 4 Directions (Pale) in ink upper right verso 1550mm x 1275mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.32

$1,500 – $2,500

13

Richard Killeen Feeling stronger every day 1974 oil and acrylic on canvas signed Killeen in brushpoint lower right edge; signed Killeen, dated 1974 and inscribed PLEASE REPLACE PLASTIC WHEN PACKING PAINTING in ink on stretcher verso; inscribed RICHARD KILLEEN, AUCKLAND NEW ZEALAND and TITLE in printed type and FEELING STRONGER EVERY DAY and 150 in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed TOP in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed DATE, MEDIUM and SIZE in printed type and FEBRUARY 1974, OIL AND ACRYLIC ON CV CANVAS and 32" x 28" in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed ARTISTS REFERENCE NUMBER in printed type and 150 in ink on label affixed to frame verso; inscribed Richard Killeen, Catalogue no: 150, Feeling stronger every day, 1974, Oil and acrylic on canvas and 32 x 28 ins in printed type on label affixed to frame verso 812mm x 812mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.33

$3,000 – $5,000

14

Richard Killeen untitled 1979 oil on paper signed Killeen, dated 22 . 7 . 79 and inscribed 3190 in graphite lower edge 570mm x 390mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, c. 2006.

p.34

$5,000 – $7,000

15

Richard Killeen Island Mentality 1981 acrylic and collage on paper signed Killeen, dated 7.81 and inscribed Island Mentality in graphite lower edge 755mm x 565mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington. Acquired from Dunbar Sloane, Wellington, 27 November 1994.

p.35

$2,000 – $3,000

16

Tony de Lautour Sample 2002 acrylic on canvasboard inscribed SAMPLE and dated 2002 in brushpoint upper left; signed Tony de Lautour in brushpoint lower right 230mm x 300mm

Provenance Private Collection, Christchurch.

p.36

$1,500 – $2,500

17

Michael Parekowhai Acts c. 1993 lost wax bronze cast 165mm x 295mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired from Gregory Flint Gallery, Auckland. notes This work relates to the larger sculpture Acts. (10: 34-38) "He went about doing good"., which is held in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tamaki (purchased 1993).

p.37

$3,500 – $5,500

18

Sean Kerr Waiting for Jiri to Email Me… 2010 screenprint on paper, edition of 6 + 1 artist proof. 965mm x 695mm

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist. exhibited Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce Danced, Arspace, Auckland, 3 September - 2 October 2010. I have to keep talking…, FUZZYVIBES, Auckland, 30 July - 8 August 2015. literature Kerr, Sean, Tobias Berger, Jon Bywater, Emma Bugden, Andrew Clifford, Adam Willetts, Zita Joyce, and Jan Bryant. Sean Kerr: Bruce Is in the Garden, so Someone Is in the Garden. Edited by Gwynneth Porter. Auckland, N.Z.: Clouds, 2010.

p.38

$500 – $1,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

19

Michael Stevenson Isolated Mass/Circumflex 1993 acrylic and charcoal on paper signed Michael Stevenson, dated 1993 and inscribed 'Isolated Mass/Circumflex' in graphite verso 570mm x 770mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.39

$3,000 – $5,000

20

Yvonne Todd Mrs. Van Valkenburg's Doll 1998 signed Y. Todd in ink verso 150mm x 120mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist. exhibited Another from the edition included in Personal Messages, Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 23 March - 16 April, 2016.

p.40

$800 – $1,200

21

Yvonne Todd Rashulon 2007. Printed 2010 C-type print, edition of 3 signed Yvonne Todd, dated 2007 and inscribed Rashulon and printed 2010 in ink verso 667mm x 557mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Peter McLeavy Gallery, Wellington, 2011. exhibited Another from the edition included in The Lamb's Book of Life, Peter McLeavy Gallery, Wellington, 2007. Another from the edition included in 17th Biennale of Sydney: The Beauty of Distance: Songs of Survival in a Precarious Age, Cockatoo Island, Sydney, 12 May - 1 August 2010. Another from the edition included in Creamy Psychology, City Gallery Wellington, 6 December 2014 - 15 March 2015. literature Hurrell, John. "The Eight New Zealanders in the Sydney Biennale." EyeContact, last modified August 16, 2010. http:// eyecontactsite.com/. Todd, Yvonne, Robert Leonard, Claire Regnault, Anthony Byrt, Megan Dunn, and Misha Kavka. Creamy Psychology. Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2014, unpaginated.

p.41/p.100

$4,500 – $6,500

22

Heather Straka Kia Ora 2010 oil on canvas on board signed Heather Straka, dated 2010 and inscribed Kia Ora in graphite verso 1030mm x 830mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington. Commissioned by present owner. exhibited Heather Straka: The Asian, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 20 March - 20 June, 2010. literature Straka, Heather, Aaron Kreisler, and Robyn Notman. Heather Straka: The Asian. Dunedin, N.Z.: Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2010, 21. notes This image was used as the basis for an editioned screenprint. It was produced in 2012 and carries the same title as this work.

p.42

$15,000 – $20,000

23

Sheng Qi untitled 2000 acrylic on linen signed Sheng Qi and dated 2000 in brushpoint lower left verso 600mm x 500mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. exhibited Gow Langsford and John Leech Galleries Spring Catalogue 2008 Group Exhibition, Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 19 September - 10 October, 2008.

p.43

$5,000 – $7,000

24

Michael Parekowhai Rainbow Servant Dreaming 2012 automotive paint on fibreglass 415mm x 170mm x 105mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.44

$9,000 – $12,000

25

Michael Parekowhai Rainbow Servant Dreaming 2012 automotive paint on fibreglass 415mm x 170mm x 105mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.45

$9,000 – $12,000

26

Michael Illingworth Flower Painting 1968 oil on canvas signed Illingworth, dated 68 and inscribed Flower painting in ink verso; inscribed 2 in conte top left verso 384mm x 280mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist. exhibited Little Paintings, Big Pots: Michael Illingworth, Barry Brickell, Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 9 - 25 December 1968.

p.46/p.101

$15,000 – $20,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

27

Francis Upritchard Derek 2007 earthenware, modelling clay and rope 490mm x 320mm x 250mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2007. exhibited Bogagnome, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2007.

p.47/p.102

$9,000 – $14,000

28

Shane Cotton Red Chasing Blue 2007 oil on canvas signed S Cotton, dated 2007 and inscribed Red Chasing Blue in brushpoint lower right; signed Shane L. Cotton, dated 2007 inscribed Red Chasing Blue in ink lower right verso 840mm x 1150mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.48

$30,000 – $40,000

29

John Walsh Deregulation Debate 2005 oil on board signed J Walsh, dated 2005 and inscribed Deregulation Debate in graphite lower left verso 2700mm x 2120mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.49

$13,500 – $15,500

30

Allen Maddox Grid & Green 1976 acrylic on canvas signed am, dated 2.2.76 and inscribed Grid & Green and X 37 in brushpoint top left verso 2700mm x 2120mm

Provenance Private Collection, Los Angeles. Originally acquired from Denis Cohn Gallery, Auckland, by Bill Cocker. Acquired directly from Bill Cocker by the present owner, 2003.

p.50/p.104

$30,000 – $50,000

31

Fiona Pardington Still Life with Freud and Puriri 2012 C-type print, edition of 10 1095mm x 825mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. exhibited Another from the edition included in Metaphysical Landscapes, Two Rooms, Auckland, 2012.

p.51

$12,000 – $16,000

32

Laurence Aberhart Taranaki [afterglow into night], 19 November 2002 2002 gelatin silver print 190mm x 240mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.52

$3,500 – $4,500

33

Grahame Sydney Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar 1982 - 2001 egg tempera on board signed Grahame Sydney and dated 1981 - 2001 in brushpoint lower left; signed Grahame Sydney, dated 1982 - 2001 and © 2001 and inscribed "Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar", Grahame Sydney, Dunedin, New Zealand and Egg Tempera on Gesso in ink verso 480mm x 800mm

Provenance Private Collection, Dunedin. Commissioned by the present owner in 1982. The artist completed and delivered the work in 2001.

p.53/p.106

$80,000 – $140,000

34

Gretchen Albrecht untitled 1984 acrylic on canvas signed Albrecht and dated 1984 in brushpoint lower right verso 1255mm x 2510mm (widest points)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.54

$20,000 – $30,000

35

Ralph Hotere untitled 1977 brolite-lacquer on board signed Hotere, dated 77 and inscribed For Alan Harris in brushpoint verso 620mm x 630mm

Provenance Private Collection, Dunedin. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 1977.

p.55/p.108

$30,000 – $40,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

36

Rohan Wealleans Jelly Baby Dreaming 2008 acrylic on canvas blind signed Rohan Wealleans and dated 2008 ink lower left verso 1630mm x 1200mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2008. exhibited Rohan Wealleans - Deep Heat, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 22 July - 16 August, 2008.

p.56

$12,000 – $16,000

37

Allen Maddox A Broken Egg 1991 acrylic and pastel on paper signed am, dated 3.91 and inscribed 'a broken egg' in graphite lower edge 720mm x 520mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.57

$5,000 – $7,000

38

Ralph Hotere Port Chalmers Painting 77 1977 brolite-lacquer on board signed Hotere, dated '77 and inscribed Port Chalmers and Group Exhibition 77 in brushpoint verso; inscribed After exhitbion please leave with Brooke/Gifford Gallery, clean surface with soft cloth, Title "Port Chalmers Painting 77" and Price $600 in graphite verso 1185mm x 810mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.58/p.108

$75,000 – $85,000

39

Pat Hanly Love Plate. X. 1973 enamel on board signed P. Hanly., dated 1973 and inscribed Love Plate. X. in ink upper edge verso 445mm x 440mm

Provenance Private Collection, Dunedin. Formerly in the collection of Russell Haley, who acquired the work from RKS Art, Auckland in 1971. Haley was the author of the first published monograph on Pat Hanly, Hanly: A New Zealand Artist (Hodder & Stoughton, Auckland). The painting was sold by Haley at Webb's, Auckland in 2010, where it was acquired by the present owner.

p.59

$10,000 – $15,000

40

Allen Maddox X-69 1976 oil on canvas signed am, dated 4.76 and inscribed X 69 in brushpoint verso 580mm x 520mm

Provenance Estate of Philip Clairmont, Auckland.

p.60/p.110

$7,000 – $12,000

41

Allen Maddox Head 1995 oil on canvas signed AM, dated 95 and inscribed 'Head' in brushpoint verso 915mm x 915mm

Provenance Private Collection, Dunedin. Acquired from International Art Centre, Auckland, 27 August 2009.

p.61

$10,000 – $15,000

42

Ian Scott Asymmetrical Lattice, No. 9 1983 acrylic on canvas signed Ian Scott and dated 83 in ink upper edge verso; dated MAY, 1983 and inscribed 244, 29 3/4" x 26 1/4", TOP and "ASYMMETRICAL LATTICE NO. 9" in ink on stretcher verso 760mm x 665mm

Provenance Private Collection Auckland.

p.62

$5,000 – $7,000

43

Greer Twiss Frozen Frames: Plain 4 1969 enamel on cast bronze signed Greer Twiss, dated 1969 and inscribed Cat 7, Frozen Frames and Plain 4 in ink on label affixed to underside 103mm x 300mm x 910mm (widest points)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.63

$7,000 – $9,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

44

Tony de Lautour Raft (with Trees and Lions) 2003 acrylic and pencil on a stretched canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2003 in brushpoint top right; inscribed Raft (with Trees and Lions) in brushpoint top left; dated 2003 in graphite verso 610mm x 500mm

Provenance Private Collection, Christchurch.

p.64

$4,000 – $6,000

45

Dick Frizzell Still Life with Felix the Cat Cut Out and Statuette 1982 oil on board signed Frizzell, dated 10/10/82 and inscribed Still Life with Felix the Cat Cut Out and Statuette in brushpoint top right; Ferner Galleries label affixed verso 645mmx 585mm

Provenance Private Collection, Napier. Acquired from Ferner Galleries, Wellington, 2003.

p.65

$9,000 – $14,000

46

Peter Robinson untitled c. 1997 oilstick and acrylic on cardboard affixed to wooden palette 980mm x 1300mm x 125mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wairarapa.

p.66

$7,000 - $12,000

47

Reuben Patterson untitled (Time and Place) 2007 sequins, pins, polyurethane foam 300mm x 250mm x 150mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. exhibited Bottled Lightning, Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland, 20 January 30 March, 2012. literature Clifford, Andrew. Reuben Paterson: Bottled Lightning. Auckland, N.Z.: University of Auckland, Centre for New Zealand Art Research and Discovery, 2012, 27.

p.67

$800 - $1,600

48

Nigel Brown Even the best laid plans 2004 oil on board signed N. Brown in brushpoint upper left; dated 2004 in brushpoint upper right; signed Nigel Brown, dated 2004 and inscribed "Even the best laid plans" and oil on board in brushpoint verso 1242mm x 695mm

Provenance Private Collection, Queenstown. Acquired from Milford Galleries, Queenstown.

p.68

$12,000 - $16,000

49

Israel Birch Gold Oriori 4 2004 lacquer on stainless steel signed Israel T Birch, dated 2006 and inscribed Gold Oriori 4 in ink verso 1010mm x 1010mm

Provenance Private Collection, Wellington.

p.69

$5,000 - $7,000

50

Bill Hammond Limbo Bay II 2001 lithograph on paper, edition 16/48 signed W.D Hammond, dated 2001 and inscribed Limbo Bay II in graphite lower edge 525mm x 740mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.70

$3,000 - $5,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

51

Liz Maw Deepa 2004 giclée on paper, edition 4/10 signed E Maw, dated 2004 and inscribed Deepa in graphite lower edge 715mm x 600mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.71

$1,800 – $2,600

52

Tony Fomison Old Age - insight looking out 1982 lithograph on paper, edition 10/16 signed Tony, dated 82 and inscribed Old Age insight looking out in graphite lower edge 370mm x 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.72

$500 - $700

53

Tony Fomison More? More of What? c. 1986 lithograph on paper, edition 14/15 signed Fomison and inscribed More? More of What? in graphite lower edge 375mm x 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.73

$500 - $700

54

Agnes Martin untitled # 5 1990 lithograph on velum, edition of 2500 304mm x 304mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. exhibited Another from the edition included in Bloem, Marja. Agnes Martin, Paintings and Drawings: 1974 - 1990. Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1991, 87.

p.74

$500 - $1,000

55

Agnes Martin untitled # 10 1990 lithograph on velum, edition of 2500 304mm x 304mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. exhibited Another from the edition included in Bloem, Marja. Agnes Martin, Paintings and Drawings: 1974 - 1990. Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1991, 87.

p.75

$500 - $1,000

56

Richard Killeen From the museum 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Killeen, dated 2002 and inscribed From the museum in graphite lower edge 570mm x 765mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.76

$1,000 - $2,000

57

Gretchen Albrecht Pounamu 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Albrecht, dated 2002 and inscribed Pounamu in graphite lower edge 570mm x 765mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.77

$1,000 – $2,000

58

Giovani Intra untitled 1990 acrylic on paper, triptych 250mm x 160mm (each panel)

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.78

$800 - $1,600

59

Bill Hammond Bone Eagle A 2007 etching, edition 16/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle A in graphite lower left 125mm x 180mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.79

$1,500 - $2,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

60

John Pule Fenonga Kia Koe 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed John Pule, dated 2002 and inscribed Fenonga Kia Koe in graphite lower edge 765mm x 570mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.80

$1,000 – $2,000

61

Robert Ellis Captured & Described 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Robert Ellis and dated 2002 in graphite lower right 765mm x 570mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.81

$300 - $600

62

Dick Frizzell BIG EGG - LittLe egg (ACTUAL SIZE) 2002 lithograph on paper, edition 13/100 signed Dick Frizzell and dated 2002 in graphite lower right 570mm x 765mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland.

p.82

$1,000 - $2,000


E

S

S

bowerbank ninow

Brendon Wilkinson Port Royal

96

Billy Apple Paid: The Artist has to Live Like Everybody Else

97

Martin Thompson untitled

98

Simon Ingram Spirit Level Painting

99

Yvonne Todd Rashulon

100

Michael Illingworth Flower Painting

101

Francis Upritchard Derek

102

Allen Maddox Grid & Green

104

Grahame Sydney Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar

106

Ralph Hotere Port Chalmers Painting 77 untitled

108

Allen Maddox X 69

110

A

Y

S


auction n°3 — august 2016


bowerbank ninow

Lot 1

Brendon Wilkinson Port Royal c. 1997 mixed media 162mm × 124mm x 40mm (widest points) Port Royal is an earlier example of this facet of Wilkinson’s practice. It takes an everyday piece of consumer detritus (a Port Royal brand loose tobacco packet, emptied of its contents) and transmutes it into a tiny world, the bounds of a miniature scene. In the packet, there is a handful of solidified, frozen-in-time white-capped ocean and a tiny, carefully crafted eighteenthor nineteenth-century ship, drawn straight from the Port Royal advertising imagery, to sail those seas. Filled out with these contents, with its upper flap held up and painted as a sunset backdrop, the pouch will sit plumply on a shelf or hand. Its immediacy, the physicality and evidently careful craft of it as an object, make it gratifying to hold. Its manipulation of space transforms its scale, from container of consumables to container of oceans. It has the puckish charm of a dollhouse or magic trick. It also has the needling discomfort of being a romantic vision of not just smoking (note that this packet is from the days before graphic health warnings), but also of colonial history— of the exploitative and murderous tobacco trade in Jamaica’s very real Port Royal in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. By making this imagery so appealing, and by making it seem so immediate, naïve and non-threatening in miniature, Port Royal presents for us an object which is literally made to hold the weight of its own history.

p.21

In On Longing, her exploration of scale and space in art and literature, poet and critic Susan Stewart remarks that strange processes are set into motion by an encounter with miniature things. “The miniature,” she writes, “has the capacity to make its context remarkable; its fantastic qualities are related to what lies outside it in such a way as to transform the total context.”1 She goes on to say that miniatures, although they may feel manipulable and subject to our overseeing mastery, alter not just our sense of space but also our sense of time, and even while depicting a version of history, “lose us within . . . presentness”.2 Brendon Wilkinson (born in Masterton, 1976) has been performing this magic of spatial and temporal distortion for years within his sculptural practice. In his unsettling miniature tableaux, such as 2002’s The Gauntlet (now held by Te Papa), and 2006’s Meat Dust, he places viewers in the position of apparent mastery that miniatures imply, and then allows us to fall into the trap of shouldering the responsibility of that mastery: we must make our own ideas and stories out of his sculptures.3

frances clark

98

1

Susan Stewart. On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection. Duke University Press. (Durham and London: 1993). 46.

2

Ibid., 60.

3

See artist’s remarks in Dan Chappell "Hovering on the edge of a nightmare" Art News, 30:4. Matrix Publishing Ltd. (Auckland: 2010). 72.


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 5

Billy Apple Paid: The Artist has to Live Like Everybody Else 1999 serigraph with receipt and payment slip attached 418mm × 294mm This work shares its trademarked tagline, “the artist has to live like everybody else,” with Auckland Art Gallery’s 2015 retrospective of Apple’s work, the largest-to-date, in which others from this series, Paid (1987–), were displayed alongside around 200 other Billy Apple® works. Paid (1987–) places bills, receipts and other financial records belonging to the artist between two blocks of uniform blackon-white text, and asks us to see both the art object and the actions they document as part of the artist’s practice. Jon Bywater’s analysis of the tagline perfectly articulates the opacity of this phrase: it is at once a bald declaration of financial necessity, of the artist as business, a “liberal appeal to the rights of the artist” and a “barb…[that] states a conservative demand, that the artist conform to social norms.”4 At the centre of this particular work is a Telecom phone bill, dated precisely and aggressively, for immediate payment of an overdue sum on one line, and on the next of another sum by 3 August 1999. Stapled to the bill is a shiny receipt indicating that just like everybody else (everybody else in 1999, that is) the artist had the need to go to the post office to pay a bill. As ambiguous as “the artist has to live like everybody else” is, the word “Paid” turns out to be similarly tongue-in-cheek; it isn’t technically incorrect but there’s less absolute truth to it than the block capitals might suggest. According to the docket, the artist’s payment comes a month after the date demanded haughtily on the bill, and not for the entire amount. Perhaps not so “paid” after all—or at least not until the bill itself can be monetised and validated as evidence of the reality and value of the artist’s practice. It may not be art of depths, but the clarity of its surface-reading of art and transaction make for more than enough to think about.

p.25

Billy Apple®, born Barrie Bates in Auckland in 1935, established his career in art and advertising in London and New York from the 1960s through the 1980s, and returned to live and work in New Zealand in 1990. Although he has resisted being considered a New Zealand artist specifically, and declared that his is more of a “global mind,”1 Apple is undoubtedly a prominent figure in New Zealand art history, particularly in bringing pop and conceptual art influences back to New Zealand in the 1970s and 1980s, and in continuing his conceptual practice here. As the registered trademark on his name suggests, ideas of commodification, exchange and identity under capitalism are central to much of his practice. Apple’s self-decribed “advising critic and sometime contributing copywriter”2 Wystan Curnow is responsible for much of the language made text in Apple’s works, and their collaboration has often challenged the customary distinctions between artist, critic and curator. In relation to Apple’s first major institutional show upon his return to New Zealand, Curnow remarked that the work is “art of surfaces, not depths.”3 This quality is part of what makes Apple’s works affable but affronting.

FRANCES CLARK

99

1

Billy Apple—Major Retrospective, Interview of Billy Apple by Wallace Chapman, Radio New Zealand National Programme, Broadcast 16 March 2015.

2

Wystan Curnow, “As Good as Gold,” As Good as Gold: Billy Apple Art Transactions, 1981-1991. Wellington City Art Gallery, (Wellington: 1991). 31.

3

ibid., 21.

4

John Bywater, “Brand Management: Billy Apple Surveyed at Auckland Art Gallery,” Art New Zealand. (154: Winter 2015), 60.


bowerbank ninow

Lot 8, 9 & 10

Martin Thompson untitled c. 2002 fibre-tip pen on graph paper, diptych 395mm × 540mm (overall) The drawings aspire to a kind of absolute technical perfection, to match the perfection of their underlying mathematics. However, the actual act of drawing—the focus, the intense counting, the filling-in and cutting—has its own significance. These actions play a filtering role, screening out the everyday world. In this regard Thompson’s work has been compared to the work of American minimalist Agnes Martin, who describes “turning her back on the world” through her immersive, meditative practice, in which sequential mark-making works to order space on the page. Apart from the aim of visually manifesting the perfection and possibilities of mathematics, other factors contribute to the success of Thompson’s works. One such factor is the particular relationship between colour and pattern in the work. Each series of drawings has its own colour, and a new colour will not be used until the previous series is complete. Another factor simply involves the achievement of a visual dazzling effect, in which the retina of the viewer is over-stimulated by the contrasts and details in the work, such that little flashes of after-image occur in the eye.

p.30

Thompson’s work is unique in the way it exists across multiple categories in the art world. It holds up as a legitimate example of minimalism, psychedelia, op-art and outsider art.

"New Zealand artist Martin Thompson (b.1956), calls the world 'a mindless distraction.' For Thompson, the rational (mathematical) basis of his art provides a balance to the distraction of an irrational world." —Cindi di Marzo1

In terms of the factors discussed above, the works on offer are good examples of Thompson’s practice. The dayglo yellow or orange colour and the small cut-out spaces in the borders of these drawings suggest this work was made in the ‘90s or early 2000s, prior to the New York show. In more recent works Thompson insists on cropping the drawings to their drawn outer edge, so that no evidence of the editing process is apparent.

Thompson was a familiar part of the local Wellington street scene in the ‘70s and ‘80s, but it was not until curator Brooke Anderson included his work in the 2005 exhibition Obsessive Drawing at the American Folk Art Museum in New York that his work began to be shown seriously and collected in New Zealand. That exhibition was hailed as a landmark for the AFAM. It was the first time in its forty-year history that it had produced an exhibition that was widely reviewed as the not-to–be-missed contemporary art show of the season, blurring the distinctions between contemporary, contemporary folk and Outsider art.

These particular drawings were part of a large collection of work selected for the first exhibition of New Zealand self-taught art at the New York Outsider Art Fair in 2009. STuart shepherd

Thompson has been producing drawings since he was a teenager. He uses as his materials graph paper, ink pens, a scalpel and clear tape. His drawings are based on numerical divisions and progressions, using a process of filling in 1mm squares on the graph paper and then surgically editing sections of it.

1

100

Cindi di Marzo for Studio International, “The Obsessive Drawing Show,” September 2005.


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 11

Simon Ingram Spirit Level Painting 1996 enamel on plywood with Stabila spirit level 400mm × 392mm

The present work, titled Spirit Level Painting, extrapolates the properties of the spirit level itself, pairing it with a plywood panel of similar thickness. The edges of the panel have been slightly modified so that their thickness mirrors the plastic end caps on the metal spirit level, and the upper surface has been painted with a flat yellow enamel, matching the powder-coated metal surface of the tool. The resulting work has an aesthetic of casual functionality, like a template or guide put together in a workshop to aid in the production of some other, more complex product. The inclusion of text in the work, in the form of the markings on the found spirit level itself, adds another layer of irony and meaning to the work; the misleading inscription “Made in Germany” further problematises the issue of artistic intentionality. The work also includes a sly dig towards the abstract ideals of perfection which lie behind the modernist canon; this work will always (presumably) be hung level, because it includes in its very construction the tool required to assure that this is so. Ingram’s practice, which also includes the construction of elaborate painting machines, preserves a tongue-in-cheek insistence on placing artistic decision-making at a remove from the work itself. Ingram rather sets in motion a series of mechanistic processes, resulting in works which are both conceptual and material in equal measure. Spirit Level Painting points towards a conceptual concern with the nature of artistic intentionality and autonomy, while also existing as a beguiling example of minimalist abstraction, tempered by a humorous DIY aesthetic.

p.31

Simon Ingram’s Instrumental (Spirit Level Paintings, Paintings with Rules) series includes a number of works produced by extrapolating the properties of industrially produced objects: in the case of the present work, a yellow Stabila spirit level. Although this work gestures towards the minimalist tradition exemplified by artists such as Yves Klein, Barnett Newman and, of course, ultimately to Kasimir Malevich’s Black Square (1915), Alan Smith notes that Ingram’s practice draws widely on the modernist canon, noting his affinity to Jasper Johns, Frank Stella and Andy Warhol.1 Rather than severe minimalism, Ingram aspires towards paintings which preserve some of their status as objects, incorporating materials which speak to their existence as the result of a process.

andrew clark

Ingram speaks of wanting to escape from the “metaphysics of presence” which characterises some New Zealand abstractions.2 He is eager to distance his works from the “theological haze that abstraction can find itself shrouded in,” preferring the “conceptual and implicitly Marxist implications of involvement with materiality” in which he became interested while living in Australia in the ‘90s.3 Rather than the sense of the sublime which characterises a Mark Rothko, Ingram’s approach to abstraction emphasises the materials themselves and, more importantly, the processes and mechanisms by which the final result is arrived at.

1

Ingram, Simon., Smith, Allan. Simon Ingram : Towards a Painting That Thinks. Art School Press, School of Visual Art, Manukau Institute of Technology, 2004, 2.

2

Ibid., 5.

3 Ibid.

101


bowerbank ninow

Lot 21

Yvonne Todd Rashulon 2007 C-type print edition of 3 signed Yvonne Todd, dated 2007 and inscribed printed 2010 3/3 in ink verso 667mm × 557mm

indeed there is evidence here of that same chaste sobriety, the same spotless, faintly ghoulish aura of piety.1 The image’s title, Rashulon, also suggests a fantastical deity, and the girl’s constrained attire is consistent with commonly held perceptions of hermetic worshippers. The otherworldly title is emphasised by an unworldly mode of presentation. Another of Todd’s reference points—the brittle and fetishized nature of girlhood in popular culture—is theatricalised by the oval vignette format. This shape, an artifice of middle class family photography from the 1980s and 1990s, also recalls the short story “The Oval Portrait” by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1842. The connection between Todd and the 19th century gothic imaginary of Poe seems fitting; in Poe’s story, a compliant young wife agrees to sit for her portrait. Her husband, so engrossed in precisely rendering her image, fails to notice she is physically fading away before him. He finishes his painting to find she has died in her pose. In many of Todd’s photographs of women, something is noticeably off balance about the subject. The women in her portraits pose rigidly, as if frozen. One aspect of the sitter is often over-emphasised: buck teeth, an unhealthy pallor, evidence of stilted development from child- to adulthood, a void where a face a should be. The artifice of femininity on display—wigs, maquillage, costume—is often deliberately outmoded and, above all, never natural. However, Todd’s presentation of a gothic feminine undercuts the conventions of Poe’s tale of horror vacui; the impulse to fill space and to render the object in exacting detail is overturned by her subject’s unreadable expression. Rashulon, from the series The Lamb’s Book of Life, is one of six portraits featuring a young, female subject that we might imagine coming from the closed order of a religious sect.2 Perhaps the Book of Life is an object of worship; perhaps it could be read more generally as an indexical register of different modes of existence. In none of these images can we meet the gaze of the woman pictured. Instead, we regard her without ever quite managing to fully apprehend her.

p.41

In a 2001 work by Yvonne Todd entitled Cheer, six women pose with the backs of their heads to the camera. Their French braids, ponytails and scrunchie-buns, those of young girls who might be competing at a Saturday gymnastics competition, are decorated with sequined and lace baubles. I mention the work because Rashulon is like an epilogue to this earlier image, as if one of those teenage cheerleaders has finished high school and entered a new phase of her life. Her gaze—hesitant, even a bit baleful, considers the middle distance in a manner that seems to flinch from direct confrontation. Look longer, and that appraisal grows gentler, her eyes softer. Look back, and the shutters are down again.

julia lomas

Like many of Todd’s subjects, the attire of the girl in Rashulon is conspicuously awkward; the oversized spectacles and girlish floral print, the prim manner in which she wears her hair. She poses stiffly, dutifully. The landscaped area behind her shows signs of regular and conscientious tending. You get the feeling that there is something confined about her existence. Curator Robert Leonard has noted that Todd’s subjects are often referred to as “cultish,” and 102

1

Robert Leonard, Yvonne Todd: Creamy Psychology (Wellington: VUP, 2014).

2

See, for reference, the images Angel (2007), Molvah, Prayerful One, (2007), or Feast of Phyllis, (2007).


auction n°3 — august 2016

Lot 26

Michael Illingworth Flower Painting 1968 oil on cotton signed Illingworth, dated 68, inscribed Flower painting in ink verso and inscribed 2 in conte top left verso 384mm × 280mm

and optimism with its brilliant yellow centre and brisk green petals. The landscape is merely a supporting act—a gently rolling horizon that echoes the curve of the blood-red earth. Flower painting has the vitality of a child’s drawing in its crisply outlined forms and striking colour, and Illingworth himself would have enjoyed the comparison. “I’d like to think I have the eyes of a child,” he once remarked.2 But the technique— the patient layering of thin oil paint—is that of a meticulous craftsman. And the image is more complex than it initially appears: a tightly cropped composition with the flower just off-centre, and a delicate balance of straight and curving lines. Illingworth’s flower “portraits” of 1968 include several variations on this format. The most anthropomorphic have stylised human facial features, while another, the whimsical Pylon flower, fuses symbols of nature and industry. Elsewhere, flowers are not uncommon in his work, and are featured in paintings such as Man and woman figures with still life and flowers (1971) in the Auckland Art Gallery collection. The spiky yellow-pronged flowers in that work are simplified versions of the one shown here. Illingworth was in his late thirties when he completed Flower Painting, and was well known in the fledgling New Zealand art world. A regular exhibitor at the Barry Lett Galleries, in 1966 he had been the first recipient of the prestigious Frances Hodgkins Fellowship in Dunedin. In 1967 he made headlines with a sell-out show at Lett’s—an unheard of event at the time. Peter McLeavey wrote to him, ”It seems that everyone from Kaitaia to Invercargill is talking and the consensus of opinion is that it is the biggest thing that has ever hit the local art world . . .”3 In the following years Illingworth painted some of his most remarkable images, but his productivity was short-lived. In 1973, he bought a rural property at Coroglen in the Coromandel, hoping that farming would help to support his growing family. In fact, the farm sapped his energy and resources. He ceased painting for years at a time, and most of his later exhibitions consisted of earlier works, recycled for the occasion.

p.46

In 1968, at the peak of his reputation and notoriety, Michael Illingworth painted a series of small oils of flowers. The humble flower might seem an unlikely subject for a young male artist in New Zealand at the time, but to Illingworth it was a powerful symbol. The flower represented the world of nature: pure, abundant and redemptive.

Looking back on his career, it is clear that the 1960s was Illingworth’s most fruitful decade. Flower Painting is part of that history—Michael Illingworth at his most lyrical and exuberant.

Illingworth championed an idealistic, back-tonature philosophy which was part of the broader 1960s counter-culture. Only by living close to nature, he believed, was it possible to escape the spiritual alienation of modern life and flourish as an artist. He described his creativity in mystical terms in a letter to his dealer, Peter McLeavey: “I am flowering in the light and from my bud petals are opening all round . . . I mean to make this flower a fine one that is assured of pollination and good seed.”1 Perhaps it is not too far-fetched to see this painting as a self-portrait. In any case, the flower—like Illingworth himself—is irrepressible. It radiates energy

jill travelyan

103

1

Letter to Peter McLeavey, 14 July (1986), Peter McLeavey archive.

2

Kate Coughlan, "Sometimes cold on the feet: pauper painter likes good life", Dominion, 16 June 1980, p. 5.

3

Letter from Peter McLeavey to Michael Illingworth, 6 June 1967, Peter McLeavey archive. The seventeen works in the exhibition were purchased by one collector.


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Lot 27

Francis Upritchard Derek 2007 earthenware, modelling clay and rope 490mm Ă— 320mm Ă— 250mm

p.47

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Born in 1976 in New Plymouth, Francis Upritchard studied at Ilam, the Canterbury University of Fine Arts in Christchurch, graduating in 1997. Although she currently lives and works in London (where she reportedly owns a worm farm), Upritchard cites the art scene of the late 1990s in New Zealand, and the artists she worked and collaborated with during this time, as highly significant for her practice and her growth as an artist.1 Upritchard has shown both nationally and internationally, and in 2009 she was selected to exhibit on behalf of New Zealand in the 53rd Venice Bienniale. Upritchard has produced solo shows for a number of public art institutions, dealer galleries and museums, including Whitechapel and Kate MacGarry in London, Anton Kern Gallery in New York and is represented by Ivan Anthony in Auckland.

While Upritchard places an emphasis on anachronistic display conventions, both amateur and institutional, many of which are still employed in museological settings, she interweaves these with fictive narratives. Her re-made faux-antiques or invented “artifacts” muddle art historical lineages, styles and cannons. This is also evident in the small humanoid figures and faces that Upritchard makes out of various types of earthenware and modeling clay. Focusing on the idiosyncrasies of human physiognomy, and on the rendering of delicate limbs and the curvature of finger bones or ribcages, Upritchard invents characters that nimbly dance in and out of time. These are characters that might also belong tangentially to various subcultures and eras, as Anne Ellegood writes: “Some hail from long-ago eras—protagonists of medieval mythology like the knight, the harlequin, the jester—while others are from the more recent past—beatniks, hippies, and other nonconformists. Various figures are identified by their vocation—music teacher, potato seller, psychic—or distilled to a primary, and often less than laudatory, characteristic, such as ‘liar,’ ‘misanthrope,’ ‘ninny,’ or ‘nincompoop.’”2

Upritchard’s practice utilises an eclectic range of sculptural traditions, drawing on her research into the fields of ceramics, textiles, glass blowing, modeling and casting. Bringing these disparate realms together into highly stylised exhibitions, Upritchard’s work craftily encompasses the disciplines of homeware production, interior design, furniture design, applied arts, contemporary sculpture and installation practice.

Aside from her often problematised appropriation of indigenous making traditions, perhaps this weaving of voices—of the mystical, marginalised, whimsical and even stupid (‘“nincompoop”)—might also act to detour, in some small way, the dominant and authoritative voice of art history; a voice still ideologically tied to the activities of plundering, conquest and colonial imperialism, a voice that continues to charge spaces of display today.

Upritchard’s interdisciplinary bent is emphasised by her collaborations with other practitioners, in particular with her Italian husband Martino Gamper, who is a furniture and interior designer. Upritchard has also worked with many other artists and makers. For example, in the exhibition Gesamtkunsthandwer (meaning “a total artwork” in German), produced as part of the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery's 2011 international group exhibition Stealing the Senses, Upritchard, Gamper and jeweler Karl Fritsch worked with a large group of New Zealand artists, mostly from New Plymouth, to produce a sprawling installation. These artists included the weaver Lynne Mackay, potter Nicholas Brandon, bronzecaster Jonathan Campbell, felter Pam Robinson, glass blower Jochen Holz and woodturners Jan Komarkowski and Peter Waleto.

george watson

As well as collaborating with other artists and drawing on a diverse range of making techniques, another strong thread that runs throughout Upritchard’s practice is her play with modes of display. In her use of quasimuseological display furnishings such as glass cabinets, cases, low tables and plinths, as well as in her employment of methods of categorising or indexing, Upritchard often gestures towards institutional exhibition making tropes. Her eclectic installations also often resemble the stylings of an amateur collector, evoking the Euro-fetishisation of ethnographic artifacts, or the Renaissance-era “cabinet of curiosity” in which objects of ambiguous provenance and methods of acquisition are gathered together under the dilettante’s eye. 105

1

Warren Feeney, "Francis Upritchard discusses Dark Resters," Stuff: The Press, http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/ christchurch-life/art-and-stage/visual-art/78714481/francisupritchard-discusses-dark-resters (accessed 27 June 2016).

2

Anne Ellegood, "Francis Upritchard’s Figurative Sculptures," Hammer Projects, https://hammer.ucla.edu/blog/2015/02/ francis-upritchards-figurative-sculptures/ (accessed 27 June 2016).


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Lot 30

Allen Maddox Grid & Green 1976 acrylic on canvas signed am, dated 2.2.76 and inscribed 37 Grid & Green in brushpoint top left verso 620mm × 630mm

p.50

“Maddox's works are a veil between him and the world: ravelling, torn, fragmentary, they look both ways, in to the mind of the artist and out to the mind of the viewer.” —Martin Edmond, Militant Artists Reunion, 2005.

and expression than of cold ultramodernist geometry, the chocolate brown weave and weft of the grid pulsates rhythmically against a pea soup yellow-green. Both colours are unified by their earthiness, but the warmth of the brown sets up a frisson against the fractionally cooler green, with perhaps just a faint echo of tapa cloth.

British-born Allen Maddox’s Grid & Green (painted 2 February 1976) is placed right at the beginning of the artist’s exploration of the X-grid motif that brought him to public attention. For something so simple (and compared to later works, this two-colour palette is very pared-back) it’s an extraordinarily adaptive and mutable hook to hang the act of painting from; more an example of intuition, innovation

The composition of the painting follows an architectural logic, rising up from a solid foundation of large boxed Xs surmounted by a row of smaller squares. On top of these the rhythm changes, with a piano nobile of stretched rectangles aspiring upwards, and another row of shorter rectangles capped with a cornice of 106


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square boxes. The impression is of a classical harmony of proportions, even if structurally it more closely resembles the elaborate hākari structures erected for hui and ceremonial feasts by North Island Māori in the nineteenth century. The gestural, bravura brushwork and careless spatter serve to emphasise the vitality and immediacy of the way Maddox painted, a link to Action Painters like Jackson Pollock and Franz Klein. Maddox’s practice was painting on the fly, but with all the certezza of a master, leading to his position as one of the top tier artists in the Gow Langsford stable during the 1980s.

artist to a status similar to that of his successful contemporaries among the Gopas generation, particularly Phillip Clairmont and Tony Fomison. The three were close friends, first meeting at Ilam in 1968 (Maddox had arrived in New Zealand as a teenager in 1963), where they were students of the eccentric East Prussian/Lithuanian Rudi Gopas; together, they referred to themselves as the Militant Artist’s Union. The description of Lord Byron as “mad, bad, and dangerous to know” was equally applicable to these three: brilliant artists wrestling with similar demons, chiefly addiction and mental health issues. Only Maddox lived to see the century out. They embodied that slightly tired cliché, the painter as unrestrained id, as modernist rebel-hero, stealing the Promethian fire, sacrificing all in pursuit of the transcendental truth of their art.

Several trees worth of paper have been expended in the discussion of Maddox’s X. The most popular theory is that in crossing out what he didn’t like in earlier paintings of his, he fell in love with the gesture and mark: a point of intersection. Others have compared it to the crudest form of signature; the Greek letter Chi (the initial letter of Christ and therefore a reference to Maddox’s earnest Christianity); or a nihilistic negation of the universe in general. Perhaps the answer is as obvious as its being right there at the end of his surname. Another possibility is that Maddox’s use of St Andrew’s cross (the Saltire or crux decussata) represented a more modest reference to spiritual suffering than would the outright adoption of the upright cross of the Crucifixion. It simultaneously suggests and denies significance and meaning.

Maddox didn’t stay long at Ilam after that year. When asked to produce a “passive painting” for examination, he submitted a blank sheet of paper and was failed. Maddox’s art was schismatic from that of his peers, eschewing their obsession with figurative neoexpressionism in pursuit of something else, altogether more spontaneous and transcendental. His personal life might have been an absolute disaster, but the integrity of his process and vision was absolute and unassailable. Maddox’s abstraction was something relatively radical in New Zealand art, where the painterly tradition was still anchored heavily in the British landscape tradition (kept very much alive into the late 1970s by the Kelliher Prize), and where even the best known modernists, Colin McCahon and Toss Woollaston, still made close reference to the land in their works. Experimental adventures such as Maddox’s are even more extraordinary, considering that he spent most of his life in New Zealand, living in Napier in Hawke’s Bay.

In the 1990s, the Xs became wild and chaotic, once and for all severing themselves in Dionysian fury and ecstasy from the Apollonian modernist grid, light years removed from this comparatively austere work which began it all. Maddox’s painting is a little like Bryan Ferry’s singing. Just as Ferry’s quavering falsetto toes the line between arch postmodern irony and sincere sentimentality, the viewer can never quite tell if Maddox’s painting is a wild and frenzied catharsis, or a carefully and calculatingly contrived pastiche of modernism, with a dollop of Scouse humour.

The artist’s death in 2000 brought to an end not only a turbulent and fraught life, but also one of the most radical experiments in the history of New Zealand art.

Perhaps the order-in-chaos of the grids appealed to Maddox’s obsessive personality. They move about randomly, like the tropical fish he used to breed. At the same time, there is a logical desire for order and perfection that resonates with his other hobbies: stamp collecting, tying fishing flies and breeding German shepherd dogs. The visual rhythms of these works also reflect something of his love of music, ranging from the taut fugues of Bach to the mathematicallybased atonalism of Iannis Xenakis, and even less expectedly, Jimi Hendrix and Can.

andrew paul wood

In 1977, not long after this work was painted, Maddox was selected as a finalist in the prestigious Benson and Hedges Art Award (he would be selected again in 1978) and had his first solo exhibition. Over 1977 and 1978, art historian Tony Green ponied up four intense considerations of Maddox’s work in Art New Zealand, a critical context that elevated the 107


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Lot 33

Grahame Sydney Dog Champs at Charlie's Bar 1982–2001 egg tempera on board signed GRAHAME SYDNEY and dated 1982 - 2001 in brushpoint lower left 620mm × 630mm

p.53

It is easy to see why Grahame Sydney’s paintings have enjoyed such long-standing acclaim, both from the general public and from critics and collectors of New Zealand art. His immaculate landscapes in particular immediately command attention, drawing in the eye with their smooth, seamless surfaces and delicately observed details. However, his works are more than virtuoso performances of painterly technique; what gives Sydney’s works their lasting value is the way he composes and frames his landscapes, buildings and figures, and the overwhelming sense of silence and stillness which pervades his images. Sydney pulls off the deft trick of producing works which are inherently grounded in a particular place and time, the arid plains of Central Otago, without any trace of provinciality. His works perfectly capture the sense of atemporal stasis which characterises the experience of being in the New Zealand landscape, particularly the vast expanses of the South Island, where the inhuman scale of the endless country and vacant sky leads to an almost complete erasure of the individual ego.

Sydney’s landscapes are of course descendants of the Romanticist school of landscape painting in New Zealand, in which the landscape was configured as a representation of the fearinducing sublime, before which humans are powerless. However, Michael Findlay notes that Sydney’s work has more in common with the considered studies of W.M. Hodgkins than with the lush, frenzied canvasses of Nicholas Chevalier or John Hoyte.1 In fact, Sydney’s depictions of wide open space are actually constructed in the studio, producing deliberate and technically flawless paintings which seem almost to have been created without the intervention of the artist’s hand. These highly finished objects exist in a kind of uncanny valley, in between the transparent, immediately graspable pseudo-reality of the photograph and the opaque physicality of the artist’s brush. Like his romanticist forebears, Sydney positions his landscapes as oppositional forces to humanity, testing and challenging us, rebuffing our attempts to modify them, or to extract utility from them. However, they are not reflections 108


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of the human condition or metaphors for our own crises and emotions. The dry hills and clear, cloudless skies which make up the horizons of this world have as little to do with human frames of reference as the craters of a distant planet.

cloud. In the foreground, a corrugated iron dunny stands on a rakish angle, positioned as though a spectator to the activities of the dog trial. However, this comical structure is the most human element of the scene; the three dogs, their wagging tails disappearing over the brow of the hill, are intent on their own business, not deigning to engage with the observer. The buildings stand silent and apparently empty; in the background, a skeletal frame structure and a single upright post suggest that this place has either been abandoned under construction, or already begun to decay. This is a place “where human presence has been and withdrawn, or where its traces, its relics, unsettlingly persist.”3 Nested on the horizon, a small sliver of icy, snowcapped mountain offers a reminder of the biting cold of the high country, and of how isolated and exposed this human intervention in the landscape really is.

This tendency towards the concealment of artistic technique leads to comparisons with photorealism,2 but Sydney in fact has far more in common with the Surrealists, particularly Magritte and De Chirico. Like both of these artists, Sydney imbues his images with a sense of desolate, eerie calm. Even figure paintings such as Evening in the Studio (1987) are not free of this sense of abjection and abandonment; they too seem to be winding down, withdrawing into themselves like the bony hills which might be glimpsed from the windows of their dwellings. Like De Chirico, Sydney employs stark shadows, which lend the objects in his works a richly modelled quality; his works find a commonality between New Zealand’s harsh light and the Mediterranean glare of a painting such as The Enigma of an Autumn Afternoon (1910). Like De Chirico, in many works Sydney emphasises the absence of the human figure, introducing instead proxies such as the flaccid mailbag in Private Bag (1977), or the comical but sinister figure of the shrouded signpost in Slow Sign (1975). The animate and inanimate are confused and conflated in works such as these, in which dilapidated buildings and rural ephemera take on a kind of quiet, sideways vitality, while the figures in paintings such as Standing Nude (1986) are seemingly trapped in the process of becoming inanimate; the half-removed t-shirt which obscures the model’s face is the visual and conceptual analogue of the hastily-tied sack which likewise obscures the “face” of the Slow Sign.

Sydney says of his work, “each painting is a vault of invested memory.”4 His images are about how the thought of a place, the feeling which being in space engenders, persists through the years, and how these moments also contribute to the construction of our sense of ourselves. In the case of Dog Champs at Charlie’s Bar, this memory remained fresh for the artist for over twenty years; when the work was delivered to the person who commissioned it, it was accompanied by a card, reading: “As it says in the Mainland Cheese ad, ‘good things take time,’ so this must be bloody good.” andrew clark

The present work, Dog Champs at Charlie’s Bar, depicts a collection of buildings which make up the titular “bar,” in reality the Lowburn dog trial site, located just outside Cromwell, on the road to Wanaka. This is presumably the same location as is depicted in Dogtrials Bar (1977), as well as in Marquee at the Dog Trials (1982), the titular structure of which also features prominently in this work. The 1982 watercolour Dog Water is also likely to be a representation of the Lowburn site; this converted bathtub, from which the dogs drank, can be seen in the present work just over the crest of the hill, in front of the marquee and to the right of the three dogs. The inscription on the work, “1982-2001,” reflects the period of time between its date of commission and its completion, a gap of almost twenty years. This is indicative of the deliberate nature of Sydney’s work, and of the way his practice has visited and revisited the same locations and themes over the years. Like many of Sydney’s landscape works, the sky is in fact the dominant figure in this work. The buildings and animals are dwarfed by the vast emptiness which hangs above them, leavened only slightly by a few wisps of high-altitude 109

1

Sydney, Grahame, and Michael Findlay. The Art of Grahame Sydney. Dunedin, N.Z.: Longacre Press, 2000, 47.

2

Ibid., 55.

3

Sydney, Grahame, and Vincent O'Sullivan. Grahame Sydney: Paintings 1974-2014, 7.

4

Ibid., 90.


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Lots 35 & 38

Ralph Hotere Port Chalmers Painting 77 1977 brolite-lacquer on board signed Hotere, dated '77 and inscribed Port Chalmers and Group Exhibition 77 in brushpoint verso; inscribed After exhibition please leave with Brooke/Gifford Gallery, clean surface with soft cloth, Title “Port Chalmers Painting 77”and Price $600 in graphite verso 1185mm × 810mm untitled 1977 brolite-lacquer on board signed Hotere, dated 77 and inscribed For Alan Harris in brushpoint verso 620mm × 630mm

p.55, p.58

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believed to herald the arrival of spring. The title, as well as the honeyed gold colours, rich walnut and tiger-eye browns connect it to a handful of non-circle, highly linear paintings from the 1970s: Te Tangi o Te Pīpīwharauroa (Hocken Library, 1976) and Test Piece: Pīpīwharauroa (1977, formerly of the collection of Dame Judith Binney and Sebastian Black). The title of the Hocken Library work is the same as a waiata by Hotere’s father, Tangirau Hotere (1898-1982), which also inspired Colin McCahon’s 1974 painting of the same name—one of McCahon’s “answering harks” to a poem or another artist’s work—also in the Hocken collection. Like the Godwit/Kūaka mural, Pīpīwharauroa was inspired by a Te Aupōuri Māori waiata, also passed on, along with his catechism, by Hotere’s devoutly Roman Catholic father. Both works celebrate the long-distance migratory patterns of the bar tail godwit, their circles representing the wheel of the seasons and ever-returning spring, but also the eternal human path from birth to death paced out against eternity. Part of the godwit waiata also appears in another brolite circle work, Ruia Ruia, Opea Opea, Tahia Tahia (1977), an indication of the overlapping, rhizomatic whakapapa present within Hotere’s oeuvre.

Te Tangi o te Pipiwhararua Tuia Tui Tahia Tahia Kotahi Te Manu I Tau Ki Te Tahuna Tau Mai Tau Mai Tau Mai Grief song of the Shining Cuckoo Bind together Make way, make way One bird has come to rest On the beach Alight here Alight here Alight here —Tangirau Hotere (Trans. APW) Ralph Hotere’s brolite-lacquered, thinlyincised circle paintings say a lot about him as a formalist. As enigmatic as the artist himself, concrete readings have a habit of skittering off these immaculate surfaces.

In the 2004 McCahon documentary Victory Over Death, Francis Pound suggested Hotere perform the Pīpīwharauroa waiata, which describes the departed soul as taking the form of a shining cuckoo flying along Ninety Mile Beach to leap from Cape Reinga into the underworld beneath the sea. In effect, the cuckoo is the equivalent of the dove representing the Holy Spirit in Hotere’s Catholic upbringing, psychopomp and paraclete, which also suggests that the painting is a visual tangi and requiem, a meditation on death in the vanitas tradition. The flight of the cuckoo was also supposed to have inspired the first Polynesian pioneers to set forth from Hawaiki, following the bird all the way to Aotearoa New Zealand.

Circles have a long history in art as a symbol of eternity, of the universe, and of the delineation of inside from outside. To the artist, the circle represents a demonstration of skill. In Zen Buddhism, the ensō is a circle drawn in a single calligraphic stroke, signalling the ability of the body to create, uninhibited by the mind. Vasari tells a similar story of Giotto impressing Pope Boniface VIII by drawing a perfect circle in a single motion. Perhaps, in Hotere’s work, there is also a suggestion of the Renaissance tondo. Circles appear in several of Hotere’s Black paintings of the 1960s, in most of the Malady works of the early 1970s (inspired by the Bill Manhire poem), and in the Godwit/ Kūaka mural (Auckland Art Gallery, 1977), commissioned for Auckland International Airport. Unlike Jasper Johns’ encaustic targets or Kenneth Noland’s circle paintings, Hotere was aiming for something more perfectly finished: as precise as the grooves in a vinyl LP, and as polished as a sports car.

The square work is clearly of the same period as the portrait format work, perhaps representing a dry run, but the shape suggests a possible segue between Pīpīwharauroa and the earlier, square, Black and Requiem works. The formal aesthetic properties of the square and circle are ancient and universal, suggesting the superimposition of the circular vault of the heavens on a square earth, with a hint of Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man and a faint Biblical echo: “And after these things I saw four angels standing on the four corners of the earth, holding the four winds of the earth.” (Revelation 7:1) This work demonstrates how articulate Hotere’s austere formalism could be, even without the addition of words; its deceptive simplicity is rooted deeply and cryptically in two rich cultural traditions.

The high gloss surface of these circle works reflects Hotere’s fascination with cars, and their finishing and detailing. Brolite nitrocellulose lacquer made luxury cars shiny and gave their paintjobs such luxurious depth. Hotere’s circles were created using the same type of line-roller used to paint racing stripes, but attached to a compass (the process could be imagined as looking a little like William Blake’s fantasy portraits of Isaac Newton and Urizen, riffing on medieval depictions of a patriarchal God creating the universe).

Andrew Paul wood

Pīpīwharauroa was painted in Port Chalmers in 1977. The title, blazoned as a framing device at the top and bottom of the image, is the Māori name for the shining cuckoo, whose call was 111


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Lot 40

Allen Maddox X-69 1976 oil on canvas signed am, dated 4.76 and inscribed × 69 in brushpoint verso 580mm × 520mm

advertising work in Wellington instead. The two met again in the early ‘70s and Clairmont convinced Maddox to leave the advertising industry to pursue painting. After an LSD session in Waikanae, Maddox had an epiphany of some sort. Clairmont’s partner Rachel Power, who grew to know Maddox well in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, said of that moment: “Overnight, he kissed goodbye the white shoes and the white tie. Advertising was finished for him.” This “revelation” in Waikanae, tied as it was to the use of psychedelic drugs, may demonstrate an early manifestation of Maddox’s troubled, ambivalent position, caught between artistic insight and psychological instability.  This grey area between creativity and mental illness was an aspect of Maddox’s life and painting career. At times, medication inhibited his ability to paint, and at times his painting inspiration crossed over into psychosis. Pharmaceutical treatments for the schizophrenia he suffered from were still the early stages of their development, presenting Maddox with a dilemma: he couldn’t paint whilst on the medication, and he couldn’t stay entirely sane without it. There were times when he would shun sanity for the sake of his art. Clairmont and Maddox would bounce off each other, winding each other up in their artistic excitement, yet the relationship between the two was sometimes fraught. At times when Maddox was grappling with mental illness, his feelings towards Clairmont bordered on the homicidal. Several incidents took place in the early ‘80s in which Maddox threatened or physically attacked Clairmont, including one occasion when he broke down the door of Clairmont’s house and entered holding a knife, intent on killing him. Clairmont eventually calmed Maddox down and stayed with him until mental health professionals arrived.

p.60

The mid-1970s were a tumultuous time for New Zealand. Norman Kirk rose to power amidst anti-war protests, precipitating the country’s withdrawal from the Vietnam War. His untimely death then paved the way for the big-thinking, dawn-raiding Muldoon. The All Blacks toured South Africa, leading to a boycott of the Montreal Olympics by twenty-six nations. Bastion Point was occupied, and the Waitangi Tribunal was established.

This work from 1976 is a well-preserved artefact of that tumultuous yet distinctly creative friendship—something that has endured the barely controllable chaos that simmered in both painters. It’s also an early example of Maddox’s distinctive cross paintings. While they are unquestionably tied to Christian symbolism, the exact meaning of Maddox’s crosses remains opaque. When asked about his friend’s use of the symbol, Clairmont responded enigmatically, “Well, it’s not a kiss.”

Against this stormy backdrop, in a paintsplattered and smoke-filled garage in Waikanae, two of New Zealand’s most notable painters engaged in a series of individual and collaborative art-making benders. Droning Krautrock thumped out of a worn set of speakers as Allen Maddox and Philip Clairmont painted furiously. The two found inspiration in art making, each other, and occasionally whiskey, weed, and LSD. They would work tirelessly for days, whilst a cassette of  Can  played on endless repeat. Maddox gifted this work,  X-69, to Clairmont during this time. Given its palette, it’s likely to have been painted with Clairmont’s paints in the Waikanae garage.

X-69 is from the personal collection of Phillip Clairmont. This is the first time it has been shown in public and offered for sale. Julian mckinnon

The two artists had met in their first year at Ilam School of Fine Arts in 1967, although Maddox didn’t continue, leaving Christchurch to pursue 112


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bowerbank ninow

How to participate in the Auction

Attending in person Auction N˚3 will take place on Wednesday 3rd August 2016 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they my do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will endeavour to contact the artist and pay the artist a resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. The steps taken to contact the artist will be at Bowerbank Ninow’s sole discretion and Bowerbank Ninow will under no circumstances be liable for failure to make payment to an artist under this clause. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Artists are invited to submit their contact details to Bowerbank Ninow to facilitate payment. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

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Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent. SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 15% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

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Auction N°4 December 2016 Entries invited

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Auction N˚3  

Bowerbank Ninow, Auction N˚3 Catalogue, August 2016