Page 1

Auction N°13 3rd Apr 2019


LEICA Q2 Accept nothing but perfection.


NEW


Graham Wall Real Estate 2 Tole Street Ponsonby PO Box 998 Shortland St Auckland 1140 New Zealand

Graham Wall +64 21 951 368 graham@grahamwall.com

Ollie Wall +64 21 520 514 ollie@grahamwall.com

Andrew Wall +64 21 520 508 andrew@grahamwall.com


M A R L E . C O. N Z


Enjoy 10% off with code bowerbankninow

270 Ponsonby Road, Auckland | 09 378 7988 | studio@everyday-needs.com | everyday-needs.com


TICKETS ON SALE NOW


Australasian Art & Culture

ISSUE 25 OUT NOW

SUBSCRIBE NOW AND RECEIVE YOUR COPY OF VAULT MAGAZINE FIRST

AUS $17.50 NZ $25.00

HODA AFSHAR, BILLY APPLE, ARI ATHANS, GORDON BENNETT, CASSILS, CLIENT LIAISON, SAM CRANSTOUN, PAUL DAVIES, URS FISCHER, MASON KIMBER, KERRY JAMES MARSHALL, NELL, LILLIAN O’NEIL & MORE ISSU E 25 · F EBRUA RY to A PR IL 2019

Hoda Afshar, Billy Apple, Ari Athans, Gordon Bennett, Cassils, Client Liaison, Sam Cranstoun, Paul Davies, Urs Fischer, Mason Kimber, Kerry James Marshall, Ana Mendieta, Nell, Lillian O’Neil, Stonehouse-Glasshouse, Angela Tiatia & more

SUBSCRIBE NOW VAULTART.COM.AU

KERRY JAMES MARSHALL Untitled (Beach Towel), 2014 acrylic on PVC panel 154.4 x 184.5 cm Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, London © Kerry James Marshall


LAYOVER LAYOVER 15 MARCH –25 MAY 2019 15 MARCH –25 MAY 2019 ↳ BC COLLECTIVE ↳ BC COLLECTIVE WITH LOUISA AFOA WITH LOUISA AFOA ↳ EDITH AMITUANAI ↳ EDITH AMITUANAI PRESENTED BY THE VISITING CURATORS PRESENTED BY THE VISITING CURATORS

ARTSPACE AOTEAROA LEVEL 1, 300 KARANGAHAPE ROAD ARTSPACE AOTEAROA AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND LEVEL 1, 300 KARANGAHAPE ROAD ARTSPACE.ORG.NZ AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND ARTSPACE.ORG.NZ


Ceramics New Zealand Magazine

Ceramics New Zealand

Volume 1 Issue 3

Autumn / Winter 2019

$17.50

1

Issue 3 out May 18 A national bi-annual ceramics magazine to engage the wider arts community in deeper conversations around ceramics. Published by The Ceramics Association of New Zealand www.ceramicsnz.org


Elam Artists

Elam Artists

Elam Artists

Over 300 contemporary art projects online

Over 300 contemporary art projects online

Over 300 contemporary art projects online

ELAMARTISTS.AC.NZ

ELAMARTISTS.AC.NZ

ELAMARTISTS.AC.NZ

Marina Rykova, The Observation Of The Repressed, 2017.


[FRAMES] by Daniel custom art freight boxes mobile: 021 660 599 email: daniel@framesbydaniel.co.nz www.framesbydaniel.co.nz


www.brothersbeer.co.nz


W W W.B ROT HERS BEER.CO.NZ


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°13 3rd April 2019 Opening

Wednesday 27th March, 2019 6pm – 8pm Viewing

Thursday 28th March – Tuesday 2nd April, 2019 10am – 5pm Wednesday 3rd April, 2019 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 3rd April 7.00pm

Attending in person Auction N˚13 will take place on Wednesday 3rd April 2019 at 7.00pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. bidding by telephone In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. absentee bids The placing of an absentee bid entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. We are able to arrange absentee bidding via email, telephone or in person. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 17.5% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°13 April 3rd, 2018 Catalogue of works Edition of 3500 ISSN 2537-6594 Design Direction DDMMYY Editor Andrew Clark Marketing Vikki McAdam Photography Sam Hartnett James Gilberd 312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


6 April – 28 July 2019 christchurchartgallery.org.nz #chchartgallery Produced by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, Minneapolis/New York/Paris/Lausanne, in collaboration with Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū.

William Wegman Ionian (detail) 2005 Colour Polaroid photograph Courtesy the artist. © William Wegman


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon


auction n°13 — april 2019

Contents Plates

24

Essays

121

Theo Schoon Rock Drawing Photographs

122

Pulman Photographic Studio Portrait of Te Hira Te Kawau

126

Frank Hofmann Being Avant-Garde: Frank Hofmann and the New Photography

128

John Johns The Right Track: John Johns’ Nature Photography

132

Marie Shannon Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters

136

Anne Noble Traces and Shadows

138

Index

144

How to participate in the Auction

158

Conditions of Sale

159

Absentee & Phone Bidding Form

160


P

L

A

bowerbank ninow

T

E

S


auction n°13 — april 2019


bowerbank ninow

26


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 1 Peter Peryer Pine 2006 inkjet print, edition 1/15 signed Peter Peryer, dated 2006 and inscribed Pine/1/15 in graphite verso 132mm × 100mm est

$600 - $900

27


bowerbank ninow

Lot 2 Fiona Pardington Norma (from One Night of Love) 1996 gelatin silver print 160mm Ă— 160mm est

$800 - $1,600

Lot 3 Fiona Pardington untitled 1996 gelatin silver print 185mm Ă— 130mm est

$800 - $1,600

28


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 4 Rhondda Bosworth Z/torn 1996 gelatin silver print 150mm × 280mm (widest points) est

$600 - $900

29


bowerbank ninow

Lot 5 Mark Adams 7.10.78 Triangle Road, Massey, West Auckland 1978 cibachrome inscribed MADA02 in graphite upper left verso 350mm Ă— 275mm est

$800 - $1,600

30


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 6 Brian Brake One of the hundreds of thousands waiting to march in a May Day Parade. Tiananmen Square, Beijing, 1957. 1957 Ektacolor print signed Brian Brake in ink lower right 380mm × 260mm est

$800 - $1,200

31


bowerbank ninow

Lot 7 Murray Hedwig Passing Man/Sign 1972 gelatin silver print signed Murray Hedwig in ink verso 163mm Ă— 236mm est

$500 - $800

32


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 8 Peter Peryer untitled 1976 gelatin silver print 172mm × 172mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

33


bowerbank ninow

Lot 9 Max Dupain Bruce Rickard house, Bayview 1972 gelatin silver print inscribed 2070 in ink upper right verso; inscribed p16 LOOK! LIVING [illegible] 3 col Ă— 5 3/4 in graphite verso; clipping from Sydney Morning Herald article affixed verso; photographer's stamp applied verso; Sydney Morning Herald stamps applied verso; inscribed Rickard House Bayview in ink lower right verso; inscribed 59 1/2 in graphite lower right verso. 250mm Ă— 190mm est

$400 - $800

34


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 10 Max Dupain An operator in the technical research laboratory of Eagle & Globe Steel Co. Ltd., Sydney 1964 gelatin silver print inscribed Metals Feature 25/5/64/03/4 Cols × 4 1/2 in graphite verso; inscribed 8173 in ink verso; inscribed 6985 in ink verso; photographer's stamp applied verso; Sydney Morning Herald stamps applied verso; clipping from Sydney Morning Herald article affixed verso. 190mm × 240mm est

$400 - $800

35


bowerbank ninow

Lot 11 Ans Westra Central Park. NY. 1987 gelatin silver print signed Ans in graphite lower right 225mm Ă— 250mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

36


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 12 Allan McDonald Glen Eden Railway 2003 c-type print 900mm × 1700mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

37


bowerbank ninow

Lot 13 Ans Westra Bottle tree, Milton, Otago 1998 c-type print 250mm Ă— 250mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

38


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 14 Peter Peryer Pavilion 2010 inkjet print, edition 5/15 signed Peter Peryer, dated 2010 and inscribed Pavilion, Rotorua/5/15 in ink verso; inscribed Pavilion 5/15 in graphite lower left verso; inscribed PETER PERYER/PAVILION, ROTORUA/2010/COLOUR PHOTOGRAPH/328 × 248MM EDITION OF 15/PP2136-02 on Michael Lett label affixed verso 328mm × 248mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

39


bowerbank ninow

40


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 15 Theo Schoon Thermal mud pool, Rotorua c.1960s gelatin silver print inscribed TOP in graphite upper edge verso; photographer's stamp applied verso; inscribed Thermal mud pool in graphite verso; inscribed C/PEOPLE JUNE 29 P.28 REDUCE in ink verso; inscribed Mud Pools Rotorua in ink right edge verso. 230mm × 180mm est

$800 - $1,600

Lot 16 Theo Schoon "Taniwha" R. Fould's, Opihi River (Detail) 1947 graphite on gelatin silver print signed Photo T. Schoon and inscribed "Taniwha" R. Fould's, Opihi River (Detail) in ink upper edge verso 250mm × 205mm est

$600 - $1,000

Lot 17 Theo Schoon untitled 1947 graphite on gelatin silver print 255mm × 205mm est

$600 - $1,000

41


bowerbank ninow

Lot 18 Theo Schoon Limestone Formation, Opuha River Rain Cliff 1947 gelatin silver print signed photo T. Schoon and inscribed Limestone formation/Opuha River/Rain Cliff in ink verso 295mm Ă— 250mm est

$600 - $1,000

Lot 19 Theo Schoon Monkey Face, Kaikoura 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Monkey Face, Kaikoura in ink upper left 205mm Ă— 166mm est

$500 - $900

42


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 20 Theo Schoon Weka Pass, North of Christchurch 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Weka Pass, North of Christchurch/Ask (?) Museum. R. Duff. in graphite verso 205mm × 255mm est

$500 - $900

43


bowerbank ninow

44


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 21 Theo Schoon Detail study of a cave drawing which is 72 feet long 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Detail study of a cave drawing which is 72 feet long. details are reminiscent of Alexander Calder and Hans Arps. in ink upper edge verso 205mm × 250mm est

$500 - $900

Lot 22 Theo Schoon Waitohi Composition from copy by Ellmore 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Waitohi Composition from copy by Ellmore in ink upper left verso 203mm × 255mm est

$500 - $900

Lot 23 Theo Schoon untitled c. 1960s gelatin silver print 165mm × 215mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

45


bowerbank ninow

Lot 24 Theo Schoon untitled 1947 gelatin silver print 305mm Ă— 260mm est

$600 - $1,000

46


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 25 Ben Cauchi Sloth 1999 argyrotype print, edition 1/3 signed B Cauchi, dated 1999 and inscribed 1/3 'Sloth' in graphite lower edge 120mm × 100mm est

$800 - $1,600

47


bowerbank ninow

Lot 26 George Valentine Crow's Nest, Taupo 1885 albumen silver print signed G.V. and inscribed CROW'S NEST. TAUPO. 198. on negative lower edge 190mm x 290mm est

$600 - $900

Lot 27 George Valentine The Great Wairakei Geyser 1885 albumen silver print signed G.V. and inscribed THE GREAT WAIRAKEI GEYSER. 200. on negative lower edge 190mm x 290mm est

$600 - $900

48


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 28 George Valentine Boar's Head, White Terrace 1885 albumen silver print inscribed BOARS [sic] HEAD WHITE TERRACE. 21. G.V. on negative lower left 190mm x 290mm est

$600 - $900

Lot 29 George Valentine Umbrella Buttress, Pink Terrace 1885 albumen silver print inscribed UMBRELLA BUTTRESS, PINK TERRACE. 17. G.V. on negative lower right 190mm x 290mm est

$600 - $900

49


bowerbank ninow

Lot 30 Gordon Walters untitled c. 1969 gelatin silver print inscribed Black on Blue Mahuiku 1969 POA/Acrylic on canvas 1969 Francis Collection in graphite verso 204mm Ă— 153mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

50


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 31 Gordon Walters untitled c. 1971 gelatin silver print inscribed Gellert in graphite lower edge verso 242mm × 192mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

51


bowerbank ninow

52


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 32 Gil Hanly Milan Mrkusich c. 1960 - 1965 gelatin silver print 145mm × 145mm est

$500 - $1,000

Lot 33 Gil Hanly Colin McCahon 1967 gelatin silver print dated 1967 and inscribed Colin McCahon in ink lower edge verso 154mm × 153mm est

$500 - $1,000

Lot 34 Marti Friedlander Ralph Hotere c. 1980s gelatin silver print signed Marti Friedlander in graphite lower right 255mm × 205mm est

$3,500 - $5,500

53


bowerbank ninow

54


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 35 Ronnie Van Hout Hybrid 1999 pegasus print 380mm × 495mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

Lot 36 Ronnie Van Hout Abduct 1999 pegasus print 380mm × 495mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

Lot 37 Rohan Wealleans Reflections of the Remote 2014 inkjet print, edition 2/3 signed Rohan Wealleans, dated 2014 and inscribed Reflections of the Remote. 2/3 in ink verso 255mm × 205mm est

$2,800 - $3,800

55


bowerbank ninow

Lot 38 Peter Peryer Kereru 2006 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, dated 2006 and inscribed 14/15 in graphite verso 140mm Ă— 185mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

56


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 39 Peter Peryer Headless Chicken 1995. Printed 1999. gelatin silver print, edition 6/15 signed Peter Peryer in graphite lower right 430mm × 280mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

57


bowerbank ninow

Lot 40 Anne Noble The white veil of a novice "Our habit signifies complete detachment from the things of this world" (M Foundress 1902) 1992. Printed 1995. gelatin silver print signed Anne Noble, dated Print made 1995 and inscribed In the Presence of Angels in graphite lower edge verso 125mm Ă— 190mm est

$2,500 - $4,500

58


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 41 Anne Noble Bed 1982. Printed 1996. gelatin silver print signed Anne Noble, dated 1982, printed 1996 and inscribed Print made 1996/'Bed' from The Series 'NIGHTHAWK' in graphite lower right verso 150mm × 150mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

59


bowerbank ninow

Lot 42 Anne Noble untitled 1978 gelatin silver print signed Anne Noble and dated '78 in graphite lower right 250mm Ă— 170mm est

$2,000 - $4,000

60


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 43 Anne Noble Aubergines 1980 gelatin silver print 280mm × 420mm est

$600 - $1,200

61


bowerbank ninow

Lot 44 Ans Westra Portrait of my Mother as a Clown 1980 gelatin silver print signed Ans Westra, dated 1980 and inscribed Portrait of my Mother as a Clown. Holland in graphite lower right verso 241mm Ă— 292mm est

$2,000 - $4,000

62


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 45 Peter Peryer Ngawha Springs 1986 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peyer, dated 1986 and inscribed Ngawha Springs in graphite verso; dated 1986 and inscribed Peter Peryer/Ngawha Springs in type on label affixed verso 350mm × 340mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

63


bowerbank ninow

Lot 46 Marie Shannon Work in progress, large Gordon Walters 1998 sepia-toned gelatin silver print, edition 1/10 signed MARIE SHANNON, dated 1998 and inscribed "WORK IN PROGRESS, LARGE GORDON WALTERS"/1/10 in graphite verso 400mm × 500mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

64


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 47 Peter Peryer Zoo Music 1983 gelatin silver print, edition 4/20 signed Peter Peryer, dated 1983 and inscribed Spider Monkeys, Auckland Zoo from Zoo Music in graphite verso (right panel); signed Peter Peryer, dated 1983 and inscribed Birds, Auckland Zoo from Zoo Music in graphite verso (left panel) 295mm × 195mm (each panel) est

$2,800 - $3,600

65


bowerbank ninow

Lot 48 Ava Seymour Corsophine Queen 1997 c-type photograph, edition 2/5 signed Ava Seymour, dated 1997 and inscribed 'Corsophine Queen' (Health, Happiness and Housing) 2/5 in ink lower edge verso 742mm Ă— 912mm est

$4,000 - $7,000

66


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 49 Martin Parr Boring 2000 c-type photograph on Kodak paper signed Martin Parr and dated 2000 in ink verso 102mm × 149mm est

$1,500 - $2,000

67


bowerbank ninow

Lot 50 Frank Hofmann Portrait of a pianist (Lili Kraus) 1946 gelatin silver print inscribed 41 43 in graphite verso 380mm Ă— 275mm est

$4,000 - $6,000

68


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 51 Frank Hofmann Arum Lilies c. 1944 gelatin silver print signed F H and inscribed 9/PHOTOGRAPH & PRINT BY FRANK HOFMANN in graphite upper edge 254mm × 203mm est

$1,200 - $2,200

69


bowerbank ninow

Lot 52 Frank Hofmann Fortress c. 1965 gelatin silver print inscribed Drawer 4 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed R327 in graphite upper right verso; dated c 1965 and inscribed "FORTRESS"/(Auckland) in graphite verso; signed S Hofmann and inscribed Photograph and Print by Frank Hofmann/Authenticated by Stephen Hofmann in another hand in graphite verso 380mm Ă— 305mm est

$3,000 - $5,000

70


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 53 Peter Peryer New Zealand 15.3.91 1991 gelatin silver print 428mm × 278mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

71


bowerbank ninow

Lot 54 Gary Blackman Otago Medical School Corridor [5] 1977 gelatin silver print dated 1977 and inscribed Otago Medical School corridor [5] in graphite upper edge verso, signed Gary Blackman in graphite lower edge verso 140mm Ă— 205mm est

$500 - $800

72


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 55 Bruce Foster Landscape 1 1977 gelatin silver print signed B Foster, dated 1977 and inscribed Landscape 1 in graphite verso 160mm × 235mm est

$600 - $900

73


bowerbank ninow

Lot 56 Fiona Pardington Rātana Church interior up north 1984 gelatin silver print signed Fiona Pardington, dated 1984 and inscribed Ratana Church interior up north in graphite verso 170mm × 250mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

Lot 57 Robin Morrison Interior, Rātana Church, Ruawai c. 1980 - 1990 gelatin silver print 380mm × 250mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

74


auction n°13 — april 2019

75


bowerbank ninow

Lot 58 Andrew Ross The Mutton Club, Whanganui 2009 printing-out paper print signed Andrew Ross, dated 4/8/2009 and inscribed The Mutton Club, Whanganui in graphite verso 195mm Ă— 240mm est

$500 - $800

76


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 59 Andrew Ross Keith Hickman, Ware Press, Ghuznee St, 1/7/99 1999 gelatin silver print inscribed Keith Hickman, Ware Press, Ghuznee St, 1/7/99 in ink lower left; signed Andrew Ross in ink lower right 280mm × 360mm est

$500 - $800

77


bowerbank ninow

Lot 60 Andrew Ross Upper Cuba Street, November, 1996 1996 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross and inscribed Upper Cuba St, Nov 96. in graphite verso. 280mm Ă— 350mm est

$500 - $800

78


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 61 John Nicol Crombie Upper Queen Street, Auckland c. 1860 albumenised salt print 145mm × 210mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

79


bowerbank ninow

Lot 62 Laurence Aberhart Kamala and Charlotte in the grounds of the Lodge, Tawera, Oxford 1979. Printed 1981. gelatin silver print signed L. Aberhart, dated 1979 and inscribed 'LOYAL OCEANIC' LODGE, ST KILDA, DUNEDIN 1979. AGFA BROVIRA - PRINTED AND AND TONED GOLD/SELENIUM 1979 in ink verso; signed L ABERHART, dated 1981 and inscribed KAMALA AND CHARLOTTE in the ground of lodge Tawara (188); Oxford, August 1981. Kodak Studio Proof Paper; gold toned. in graphite verso 195mm × 245mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

80


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 63 Ans Westra Mother has to pick him up and kiss him better. From the series: Washday at the pa 1964 gelatin silver print signed A.W in graphite lower right 284mm × 254mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

81


bowerbank ninow

Lot 64 John Johns Burnt Corsican pine (Pinus laricio), Balmoral Forest, Canterbury 1956 gelatin silver print dated 1956 and inscribed [Corsican pine stand about 20 yrs old destroyed by fire. Balmoral Forest, Canterbury] in ink upper edge verso; inscribed 6:023/A 7/11/M1569c in graphite upper right verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns in ink lower edge verso 252mm Ă— 296mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

82


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 65 John Johns Radiata pine with clear-felled settings of 80 to 100 acres, Kaingaroa Forest 1960 gelatin silver print inscribed 6F 23 4 3 in graphite upper right verso; inscribed M3580 in graphite verso; inscribed Radiata pine with clear felled settings of 80 to 100 acres./Kaingaroa Forest/Photograph + print by John Johns in ink verso 161mm × 208mm est

$800 - $1,600

83


bowerbank ninow

Lot 66 John Johns Gale damage, Hanmer Forest, Canterbury c. 1960 - 1980 gelatin silver print inscribed 6:026 A 1/2 in graphite upper right verso; inscribed Gale Damaged Forest Canterbury New Zealand/John Johns/An experiment to obtain maximum resolution from Hasselblad negative + max speed of film (F.P.4); inscribed M12060 in graphite lower left verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns in ink lower edge verso 228mm Ă— 230mm est

$800 - $1,600

84


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 67 John Johns Fern fronds, Whaka Forest, Rotorua 1970. Printed 1979. gelatin silver print dated 1970 and inscribed R of T.M/3 3/TREE FERNS, WHAKA FOREST, ROTORUA/Top/13 B 72 4/6 in graphite upper edge verso; inscribed 14 in ink upper right verso; inscribed Photo 41/Page 56+57/23.3.79/1 in graphite verso; inscribed Forest World of N.Z./5/5/Photograph by John Johns./p.56-57 in ink verso 246mm × 292mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

85


bowerbank ninow

Lot 68 John Johns Underside of fern frond, showing sori 1970 gelatin silver print dated 1970 and inscribed [UNDERSIDE OF FERN FROND, SHOWING SORI] in graphite upper left verso; inscribed 13 B 71 4/6/28.10.70/1 in graphite upper right verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns. in graphite lower edge verso 257mm Ă— 188mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

86


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 69 John Johns Fern frond, close-up c. 1960 - 1980 gelatin silver print inscribed 13B 65 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed [FERN FROND, CLOSE-U] in graphite upper edge verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns. in graphite lower edge verso 294mm × 212mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

87


bowerbank ninow

Lot 70 Peter Peryer Self-Portrait 1977 gelatin silver print inscribed Self portrait November 1977 in graphite lower right 239mm Ă— 239mm est

$3,500 - $5,500

Lot 71 Peter Peryer Erika 1978 gelatin silver print 180mm Ă— 115mm est

$2,500 - $4,500

88


auction n°13 — april 2019

89


bowerbank ninow

Lot 72 Robin Morrison Pink crib and caravan, Otago Peninsula 1979 cibachrome 265mm × 395mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

Lot 73 Ian MacDonald untitled c. 1982 cibachrome inscribed IMAC01 in graphite upper left verso 255mm × 390mm est

$400 - $600

Lot 74 Ian MacDonald untitled c. 1982 cibachrome inscribed IMAC02 in graphite upper left verso 290mm × 425mm est

$400 - $600

90


auction n°13 — april 2019

91


bowerbank ninow

Lot 75 Burton Brothers Hinemihi Meeting House, Te Wairoa c. 1880 - 1886 albumen silver print inscribed 3846 RUNANGA HOUSE (HINEMIHI.) WAIROA - BURTON BROS. DUNEDIN on negative lower left 145mm × 205mm est

$400 - $600

Lot 76 Burton Brothers Interior of Rumanga [sic] House - Ohinemutu c. 1880 - 1889 albumen silver print inscribed 3883 - INTERIOR OF RUMANGA [sic] HOUSE - OHINEMUTU. BURTON BROS. DUNEDIN; inscribed The Walls of the interior of the Wharepuni or Guest house. Ohinemutu. The figures represent the ancestors of the Maories [sic]. The natives of Ohinemutu were loyal and fought for the Queen, and so they were presented with a bust of Her Majesty, which they keep in this building in ink lower right 140mm × 200mm est

$300 - $600

92


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 77 William Henry Thomas Partington untitled c. 1880 - 1900 albumen silver print 130mm × 185mm est

$250 - $450

Lot 78 Una Garlick Unidentified man and boy by the Waikato River - Tuakau c. 1920 - 1930 gelatin silver print inscribed Una Garlick in graphite lower right 115mm × 155mm est

$200 - $400

93


bowerbank ninow

Lot 79 Josiah Martin Portrait of King Tawhiao c. 1900 gelatin silver print inscribed Tawhiao in ink lower edge 202mm x 154mm est

$800 - $1,200

Lot 80 Pulman's Photographic Studio Te Hira Te Kawau c. 1870 - 1888 albumen silver print inscribed TE HINO [sic] TE KAWAU on negative lower left; inscribed PULMAN PHOt. on negative lower right 265mm x 190mm est $1,000 - $2,000

94


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 81 Samuel Carnell Portrait of Ihaka Whaanga c. 1870 albumen silver print inscribed Maori Chief in ink upper edge verso; photographer's stamp applied verso 95mm x 62mm est

$200 - $400

Lot 82 Foy Bros untitled c. 1870s albumen silver print 90mm x 56mm est

$200 - $400

95


bowerbank ninow

Lot 83 Gil Hanly Railway Driving Creek 1983 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly photo and inscribed Railway Driving Creek in ink lower edge verso 136mm Ă— 202mm est

$500 - $1,000

Lot 84 Gil Hanly Railway Driving Creek 1983 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly photo and inscribed Railway Driving Creek. in ink lower edge verso 136mm Ă— 202mm est

$500 - $1,000

96


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 85 William Andrews Collis untitled c. 1910 gelatin silver print inscribed W.A. Collis Photographer, New Plymouth in print on mount lower edge 170mm × 110mm est

$150 - $250

97


bowerbank ninow

Lot 86 Andrew Ross MP Ongarve 2004 printing-out paper print 190mm Ă— 240mm est

$500 - $800

98


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 87 George Chance Whangarei Harbour, Near Marsden Point c. 1940 gelatin silver print signed Geo. Chance. F.R.P.S- and inscribed Whangarei Harbour - Near Marsden Point. in ink lower edge 260mm × 210mm est

$300 - $600

99


bowerbank ninow

Lot 88 Adrienne Martyn Louise Henderson, 1986 1986. Printed 1988. gelatin silver print signed Š Adrienne Martyn, dated 1988 and inscribed "Louise Henderson, 1986" in ink upper edge verso 345mm × 345mm est

$800 - $1,600

100


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 89 Frank Hofmann Kiri Te Kanawa 1965 gelatin silver print inscribed Drawer 1 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed 254 A in graphite upper right verso; dated 1965 and inscribed "KIRI TE KANAWA" in graphite verso 380mm × 300mm est

$4,000 - $6,000

101


bowerbank ninow

Lot 90 Janet Bayly Black Dress 2001 Polaroid SX-70 (5 panels) signed Janet Bayley and dated 2001 in ink lower right verso 80mm × 80mm (each panel) est

$1,000 - $1,600

Lot 91 Christine Webster Brian St. John - Eden Park 1983 cibachrome signed Christine Webster in ink lower right; signed Christine Webster, dated '83 and inscribed "Brian St. John - Eden Park" in graphite lower right verso 490mm × 490mm est

$800 - $1,600

Lot 92 Christine Webster untitled 1983 cibachrome signed Christine Webster in ink lower right 500mm × 500mm est

$800 - $1,600

102


auction n°13 — april 2019

103


bowerbank ninow

Lot 93 Wayne Barrar Point, Western Lake Wairarapa 2008 selenium toned gelatin silver print, edition 4/10 dated 2008 and inscribed Point, Western Lake Wairarya [sic] 4/10 selenium toned silver gelat in print in ink lower left verso; signed W Barrar in ink and photographer's stamp applied lower right verso 190mm Ă— 238mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 94 Wayne Barrar Lake edge, remnant spars, Lake Monowai 2003 gold and sulphide toned silver gelatin contact photograph dated 2003, printed 2004 and inscribed WAYNE BARRAR Lake Edge, Ramnant Spars, Lake Monowai/Gold & sulphide toned silver gelatin contact photograph in type on printed label affixed upper left verso; signed W Barrar in graphite lower left verso; photographer's stamp applied lower right verso 206mm Ă— 254mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

104


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 95 Derek Henderson Emily Playford, Reids Farm 2008 inkjet print 570mm × 455mm est

$800 - $1,600

105


bowerbank ninow

Lot 96 Glenn Jowitt Alofi, Niue, Food Division for Ear Piercing Ceremony 1982 cibachrome signed Glenn Jowitt NZ., dated 1982 and inscribed Alofi, Niue, Food Division for Ear Piercing Ceremony in graphite upper left verso 265mm Ă— 395mm est

$800 - $1,600

Lot 97 Glenn Jowitt Nukunopu, Tokelan Islands 1981 cibachrome signed Glenn Jowitt NZ, dated 1981 and inscribed Nukunopu, Tokelan Islands in graphite upper edge 265mm Ă— 395mm est

$800 - $1,600

106


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 98 Fiona Clark Genomegram (From The Other Half series) 1998 c-type print incorporating artist's genetic material, edition 1/1 inscribed GENOMEGRAM in embossed text left edge; inscribed 1/1 16/6/98 in graphite lower right verso 205mm × 255mm est

$400 - $800

107


bowerbank ninow

Lot 99 Julian Ward untitled 1999 gelatin silver print signed J Ward and dated 99 in graphite lower right; signed Julian Ward and dated Wellington 1999 in ink verso 140mm Ă— 210mm est

$300 - $500

Lot 100

Peter Black Agents for Art 1990 gelatin silver print signed Peter Black, dated 1990 and inscribed Agents for Art in ink lower left verso 220mm Ă— 300mm

est

$700 - $1,200

108


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 101

Glenn Busch Man With a Transistor Radio 1973 gelatin silver print signed Glenn Busch in graphite lower right 375mm × 255mm

est

$500 - $800

109


bowerbank ninow

Lot 102

Alan Knowles Dalmatian, Wigan Street 1998 gelatin silver print signed Alan Knowles, dated 1998 and inscribed Wigan St in graphite verso 155mm Ă— 235mm

est

$200 - $400

Lot 103

Julian Ward Horse Makara 1998 gelatin silver print signed Julian Ward and dated 98 in graphite lower right; signed Julian Ward and inscribed Horse Makara in ink verso 140mm Ă— 210mm

est

$200 - $400

110


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 104

Peter Peryer Billy 1988 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, dated 1988 and inscribed Billy (Morrison) in ink verso 152mm × 100mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

111


bowerbank ninow

112


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 105

Peter Black Black Power, Wellington, 1977 1977 gelatin silver print (triptych) signed P Black and dated 77 in ink upper edge verso; signed P Black and dated 77 in ink verso; signed P Black and dated 77 in ink lower edge verso 145mm × 215mm (each panel)

est

$1,000 - $1,500

Lot 106

Peter Black Black Power, Wellington, 1977 1977 gelatin silver print 220mm × 150mm

est

$500 - $800

113


bowerbank ninow

Lot 107

Anne Noble Self Portrait 1978 gelatin silver print (triptych) signed Anne Noble, dated 1978 and inscribed Triptych [sic] - Self Portrait in ink verso 175mm × 115mm (each panel)

est

$600 - $1,200

Lot 108

Sharyn Black (female symbol) III (clad pelvis) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm

est

$250 - $500

Lot 109

Sharyn Black (Revealed breast) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm

est

$250 - $500

Lot 110

Sharyn Black (female symbol) IV (clad bottom) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm

est

$250 - $500

114


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 111 Sharyn Black Male symbol II (hand on chest) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm x 200mm est

$250 - $600

Lot 112 Sharyn Black (Female/male symbol? V) (hand in pocket) 1977 gelatin silver print 200mm x 135mm est

$250 - $600

115


bowerbank ninow

Lot 113 Mary MacPherson Wairarapa 1984 c-type print signed Mary MacPherson and dated 1984 in graphite lower right; signed Mary MacPherson, dated 1984 and inscribed Wairarapa in graphite verso; inscribed May 23 in graphite lower right verso 255mm Ă— 390mm est

$400 - $800

Lot 114

Peter Black Wellington 2008 inkjet print signed Peter Black and dated 2011 in graphite lower right verso; signed Peter Black and dated 2009/2012 in graphite lower edge verso 360mm Ă— 545mm

est

$600 - $900

116


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 115 Mary MacPherson Urban Landscape 1986 cibachrome print signed Mary MacPherson and dated 1986 in graphite lower right 275mm × 270mm est

$400 - $600

117


bowerbank ninow

Lot 116

John Fields Hulme Court, 350 Parnell Road c. 1971 - 1972 gelatin silver print signed Fields in ink lower right 145mm Ă— 225mm

est

$500 - $800

Lot 117 John Fields Awning and Bike, Thames c. 1973 - 1976 gelatin silver print 129mm Ă— 216mm est

$600 - $800

118


auction n°13 — april 2019

Lot 118

Robin Morrison Allen Curnow c. 1993 gelatin silver print 250mm × 370mm

est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 119

Yvonne Westra Releasing the Shutter #2 2003 gelatin silver print inscribed Releasing the Shutter #2 in graphite lower right; signed Yvonne Westra and dated '03 in graphite lower left 195mm × 325mm

est

$200 - $400

119


bowerbank ninow

Lot 120

Murray Hedwig Façade with Windows 1977. Printed 1978. cibachrome print, edition 1/25 signed M Hedwig and dated 1977 in graphite lower right; inscribed 1/25 in graphite lower left; signed MURRAY HEDWIG, dated 1977/PRINTED 1978 and inscribed FAÇADE WITH WINDOWS/1/25 LIMITED EDITION in ink verso 190mm × 240mm

est

$300 - $600

Lot 121 Julian Ward Makara 1998 gelatin silver print signed Julian Ward and dated 1998 in graphite lower right; signed Julian Ward, dated 1998 and inscribed Makara in ink verso 140mm × 210mm est

$200 - $400

120


E

S

auction n°13 — april 2019

S

A

auction n°13 — april 2019

Theo Schoon Rock Drawing Photographs

122

Pulman Photographic Studio Portrait of Te Hira Te Kawau

126

Frank Hofmann Being Avant-Garde: Frank Hofmann and the New Photography

128

John Johns The Right Track: John Johns’ Nature Photography

132

Marie Shannon Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters

136

Anne Noble Traces and Shadows

138

121

Y

S


bowerbank ninow


left: lot 17, Theo Schoon, untitled

auction n°13 — april 2019

Theo Schoon Rock Drawing Photographs

drawings with wax crayon (a practice now known as “Schooning” in rock drawing circles) to make them photograph better, or even on occasion inventing his own.

Duff wrote regarding his misgivings about this practice of retouching to H. D. Skinner, then In 1945 Schoon had an epiphany that was to Director of the Otago Museum, in 1947: “Our radically change the direction of his artistic auction n°13 — april 2019 immediate problem with Schoon is the problem practice. While in Dunedin visiting his parents of disciplining him. You may be interested to and brother, the former recently released from a know for instance that he has gone over and Japanese POW camp in Java and the latter a new resurfaced, using red and black crayon, most father, Schoon visited Otago Museum. Primed of his new discoveries, and also as many of the by his youthful reading of the ethnographer and older ones as he has had time to do.”4 Duff’s rock art expert Leo Frobenius, his appreciation field book entries make a fascinating record of for the Bauhaus and his life in Java, Schoon first growing concern with Schoon’s practices: saw examples of early Māori rock art, which had been chiselled from its mother stone in 1916 by (17 Oct. 1946) The early afternoon to visiting American spiritualist James Lee Elmore.1 inspect Gould’s Taniwha cave where by judicious restoration, Theo has brought up a In South Canterbury alone there are previously scarcely recognisable figure. approximately 500 rock drawing sites, scattered among the foothills of the South Island High (12 Nov. 1946) Skilfully [sic] retouched by Country where wind and rain have sculpted black crayon. outcrops of limestone into strange tortured shapes. Some of these images date from the (15 Nov. 1946) …brought up by Theo in 4 sixteenth century, when the first Māori settled days tedious retouching … Figures greatly in New Zealand, and others continued to be improved by accurate and painstaking made up until the mid-nineteenth century. retouching… Māori pounamu-gathering parties heading to the West Coast likely sought shelter among the (19 March. 1947) …red ochre probably drawn caves and overhangs, and the chalky whiteness of on as with sheep raddle, as too pointedly the limestone would have provided an excellent demonstrated by Theo in going over the canvas for mark-making. drawings to freshen them up… Schoon’s interest was further aroused by a 1943 (20 March. 1947) During a long discussion article in the Journal of the Polynesian Society on previous night, obtained a promise from by amateur ethnologist G. B. Stevenson. In 1945 Theo that he would not restore any figures Schoon visited the Waitaki and Opihi River areas in future … During day, Theo got on with his in the anterior of South Canterbury to view some usual method of attacking a shelter – first of these sites for himself. Sometime in late 1945 photographs (NB, no photographs taken or early 1946 Schoon approached Canterbury before other figures restored)5 Museum ethnologist Roger Duff about whether the Museum would be interested in employing The last rock drawing copies Schoon produced him to record rock drawings for their collection, under the Internal Affairs grant were eventually and early in July of that year Canterbury Museum completed in early February 1947, but Schoon and and the Department of Internal Affairs engaged Duff were by no means in agreement over what Schoon to copy drawings at Craigmore. should be copied and what could be ignored, and Schoon wrote to Duff that month: “Could you On 10 July 1946 Schoon and Duff set off. In a oblige me with your definition of an important letter to William Vance, research officer to shelter?”6 Duff for his part suspected Schoon the Department of Internal Affairs in Timaru, of having an alternative agenda more artistic Duff wrote of their results, “I was impressed than scientific: “he [Schoon] is under a severe with their faithfulness of reproduction.”2 The temptation to highlight those [rock drawings] timeframe and effort made this exacting process which seem to conform to the modernisms of too difficult to maintain and, increasingly, Paul Klee, or Picasso, and neglect those which Schoon resorted to simpler, more schematic don’t”.7 Although Schoon had agreed to give paintings, and, unusually for the time, over all negatives and drawings to Canterbury photography. Photography quickly supplanted Museum, he kept most of the negatives and sold drawing in Schoon’s approach. The photograph the prints.8 of the Opihi Taniwha dates to this time. Schoon’s passion for rock drawings is plain in an article he wrote for the Listener in September 1947, “New Zealand’s Oldest Galleries”: “Like the priest, the artist was a link between man and the supernatural … Again and again I have found the most surprising original creations— major artistic feats, which border on uncanny and frozen music, in which the very soul of the

Life among the shelters was arduous; Schoon found himself dependent on the local farmers for survival. Like those Māori of so many centuries ago, he camped out in the rock shelters, affording him much insight into the conditions under which the drawings were made.3 Schoon’s relationship with Duff was becoming fractious due to the former’s habit of touching up rock 123


lots 16–24

bowerbank ninow

They reached the saddle about midday, and while they located a number of shelters, none of them showed any signs of human habitation. It was only when by chance they crossed paths with the station owner and his shepherd putting up a boundary fence that they acquired a clue:

mythopoetic Polynesian has been crystalised.”9 By mid-September Schoon had travelled on, to the North Otago town of Oamaru. Here he examined some threatened rock drawings on limestone outcrops at Totara roughly ten kilometres further south of the town. During the war, the Government had paid farmers to allow bowerbank ninow the local lime works access to their land, so that the limestone cliffs could be demolished with explosives to make fertiliser, a process to which many rock shelters fell victim.10 Schoon made a further application to the Department of Internal Affairs for a vehicle, which was declined, no doubt because his benefactors were increasingly irritated by the artist’s attempts to play them off against each other in order to extract more money.

The man lit his pipe and sat down on a stone. ‘I think I’ve seen what you’re looking for,’ he said, ‘about fourteen years ago it would be. I wounded a boar when I was pig-hunting and when I was following him he led me into a bit of a cave. There were all sorts of drawings on the walls but I can’t remember them very clearly, it’s too long ago. But I do remember thinking it was a funny place to find children’s drawings. Now that you mention it I suppose they could be done by the Maoris.’ He led us out to a jutting rock and pointed where he thought they were, back in the main folds which we had by-passed near the saddle.14

Shortly after November 5, 1947, Schoon moved on to Raincliff, west of Pleasant Point, and set up at the Boy Scout Reserve there. In 1979, Gordon Walters recalled this time:

Schoon’s rock drawing obsession lasted the best part of a decade. As he would later write:

I visited the rock drawing sites twice. Firstly in August 1946, when I spent about a week near Pleasant Point on the Opihi River and at Cave, Limestone Valley and thereabouts. Then at Xmas holiday time 1946/47 I went back together with Detje Andriesse and spent about 10 days or so in the vicinity of Raincliffs [sic] and somewhere further south, I can’t quite remember the exact location now. On both occasions we moved about a lot as Theo had a string of acquaintances in the district with plenty of places to stay ... I saw a lot of rock drawings.11

It has been a moving experience to me as an artist to become gradually initiated into the spirit of a new and little known form of art which belongs to the very early history of New Zealand. It has been most absorbing to gain a gradual insight into those essential features which determine a distinct and unique style – unique as all those styles are which have developed independently among isolated communities all over the world.15 andrew paul wood 1 Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New

After completing his documentation at Rancliffs, a chance remark by a local caused Schoon to direct his attention to Marlborough, continuing his quest along the upper reaches of the Conway River, behind Kaikoura at Monkey Face (called Tukutuku-iwi by Māori, or “letting down the bones”—a burial ground), where he located new drawings. On this expedition Schoon took along mountaineer and writer T. H. “Harry” Scott, a close friend of Charles Brasch. Scott described his and Schoon’s Monkey Face adventure in detail in Landfall.12 They did not reach it until the next day, and Schoon found he could no longer rely on the rules and assumptions he had intuited for himself in terms of the location of likely sites:

Zealand 1868-1961, vol 49, 1916 p563.

Schoon found it more difficult here to apply the notions he had formed of the purpose of the men who made the drawings and so predict where they would be found. But from the general topography of the country we calculated that Maori parties coming in from Kaikoura, if they had not habitually ranged the full length of the great outcrop, may have used only the northern end. This was cut off from the greater part of Monkey Face by a low saddle. But it was difficult to tell how the country might have been covered once and how it may then have looked. Nevertheless we headed for this saddle, aiming to work back from the scraps of outcrop.13

2

R. Duff, letter to W. Vance, Department of Internal Affairs, July 1946. Departmental Archives, 6/10 Ethnology, Folder 25B Canterbury Museum, Christchurch.

3

Theo Schoon, “New Zealand’s Oldest Art Galleries”, New Zealand Listener, v17, no 429 (12 September 1947), pp6-7.

4

R. Duff , correspondence to Skinner, 20 June 1947, Departmental Archives, 6/10 Ethnology, Folder 25B Canterbury Museum, Christchurch.

5

T. Fomison, “Theo Schoon and the Retouching of Rock Art”, New Zealand Archaeological Association Newsletter, vol 30 no 3, Sept. 1987, p159.

6

T. Schoon, letter to R. Duff, 24 Feb 1947, Departmental Archives, 6/10 Ethnology, Folder 25B Canterbury Museum, Christchurch.

7

R. Duff, letter to Henry Skinner, Director of Otago Museum, Dunedin, 20 June 1947, Departmental Archives, 6/10 Ethnology, Folder 25B Canterbury Museum, Christchurch.

8

Statement 4 July 1946 witnessed by R. A. Falla; R. Duff, letter to E. R. McKillop, Comissioner of Works, 6 Sept 1951, Departmental Archives, 6/10 Ethnology, Folder 25B Canterbury Museum, Christchurch. T. Schoon, “New Zealand’s Oldest Art Galleries”, New Zealand Listener, 12 Sept 1947, pp6-7.

9

124

10

T. Schoon, letter to W. Vance, undated, Estate of W. Vance.

11

Gordon Walters, correspondence to Michael Dunn, 26 November 1979, collection of Michael Dunn, p2.

12

T. H. Scott, “South Island Journal”, Landfall, Dec 1950, no16,

13

Ibid p297.

14

Ibid p298.

15

T. Schoon, “New Zealand’s Oldest Art Galleries”, New Zealand Listener, 12 Sept 1947, p6.


auction n°13 — april 2019


bowerbank ninow

Pulman Photographic Studio Portrait of Te Hira Te Kawau

bowerbank ninow

Lot 80, p.94 Pulman's Photographic Studio, Te Hira Te Kawau c. 1870 - 1888, albumen silver print, 265 × 190mm

In 1838 Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre invented the daguerreotype, in 1839 Hippolyte Bayard worked out how to obtain a positive image directly onto paper (and John Herschell discovered how to fix them) and in 1840 the Treaty of Waitangi was signed. Reliable photography is approximately as old as New Zealand, as a modern colonial entity, and New Zealand’s late Victorian history, even in the provinces, is remarkably well documented in photographs. The Pulman Studio of Auckland has an interesting role in that history, not least because of the involvement of Elizabeth Pulman (1836-1900), likely New Zealand’s first female professional photographer. Some of her most famous photographic works include portraits of Rangatira Paora Tūhaere (Ngāti Whātua), and Tāwhiao (Ngāti Mahuta), leader of the Tainui confederation of iwi and second Māori King of the Kingitanga movement. The Studio

also seems to have undertaken commercial work for the then government’s Department of Tourism. New Zealand had a very active tourism economy, touting such natural wonders as the Pink and White Terraces, later destroyed by the eruption of Mount Tarawera in 1886. Visual representations of Māori in traditional costume played an important role in this marketing. Elizabeth and her husband George (1826-1871) emigrated to New Zealand from England in 1861. George’s two young sons from his first marriage―their mother had died leaving him a widower―followed the next year. Elizabeth and George would go on to have a further three sons and two daughters. George supported the family by working as a draughtsman until around 1866 and in 1867 established a photographic studio specialising in scenic images and portraiture. Unusually for the time, Elizabeth worked 126


lot 80

auction n°13 — april 2019

ancestors, the images taking on some of mana with her husband in this endeavour and when and mauri of the sitter. In this case Te Hira was George died in 1871, Elizabeth continued to run an important rangatira of Tāmaki Makaura the studio in her name, although much of her (Auckland) who lived at Okahu and was known income came from reprints of a photograph by to Pākehā society through his participation in George of his map of the Thames gold workings. the sale of lands on the Tamaki Isthmus to the This image was so popular that Elizabeth was Crown, upon which Auckland was founded. He obliged to write to the New Zealand Herald was the son of Āpihai Te Kawau, a signatory of requesting the public not to buy pirated copies auction n°13 — april the 2019 Treaty of Waitangi at Orakei in 1840, and from copyright violators, for which there were Kirepiro, a woman of Te Taou. According to the few applicable legal protections until the Patents, account of Sir John Logan Campbell, the so-called Designs and Trade-marks Act of 1889. Such “Father of Auckland” in his autobiographical protections were not a high legislative priority in Poenamo: Sketches of the Early Days in New the colonial period. Zealand: Romance and Reality of Antipodean Life in the Infancy of a New Colony (1881), a young settler Astutely, Elizabeth employed two notable doctor might have purchased private ownership photographers to work for the studio, Thomas of the land on which Auckland stands had he not Armstrong Fairs and George Armstrong offended Te Hira by using the wrong word in te Steel, and in 1875 was married to the widowed reo Māori and thereby inadvertently accusing journalist, writer and poet John Blackman, who him of stealing a pot of pigeon stew. The story had moved in prominent literary circles back in was cited in an article by James Cowan, entitled England and occasionally lectured on Charles “The Father of Auckland” in the November 1933 Dickens and his other acquaintances. The couple issue of The New Zealand Railways Magazine and had a son together. Blackman died in 1893, illustrated with this very image, captioned, “Te leaving Elizabeth a widow once more. She carried Hira te Kawau. This old chief, Campbell’s antion the work of the studio with the assistance of landselling acquaintance of 1840, died at Orakei her son, Frederick, and sold the business in 1893,1 in 1888.”3 all of this while raising nine children. Although the Pulman studio left a rich legacy of historical This was not the first time the Pulman Studio prints, many of which are held in public library had photographed Te Hira. Auckland War and museum collections, it is often difficult Memorial Museum has in its collection another to establish exactly which photographer took portrait (PH-1987-9-2), also dated to the 1870s them and when, because not only were most (though the late 1860s might be more accurate distributed under the studio name, such was for the reasons stated below), taken for the New their enormous popularity that there are also Zealand Government Tourist Department. It several unattributed pirated copies to contend seems likely the present portrait was taken for a with. The latter issue was something Elizabeth similar purpose, as the National Library negative Pulman herself struggled with throughout the came from the same source. In the Auckland War period when she owned the studio. Memorial Museum picture, Te Hira has much darker hair. The painter Gottfried Lindauer Taken circa 1870-1888, this photograph of Te (1839-1926) regularly executed his portraits of Hira Te Kawau (Ngāti Whatua, d. 1888), dressed Māori from photographs, both his own and those in a kahu tōī (the prestigious harakeke fibre produced by other studios, including the Pulman rain cape worn by warriors of great mana) was studio, and it seems quite likely that the face of made from a negative now in the collection of his 1874 portrait of Te Hira (Auckland Art Gallery the Turnbull Library collection of the National Toi o Tāmaki) might have been based on a print Library of New Zealand (1/2-012399-F). The of this photograph judging from the specific image was retouched and the moko enhanced details of the hair and the way the face is lit. The on the original negative. In the latter part of the rest of Lindauer’s picture was likely imagined nineteenth century there was a buoyant Pākehā from studio props and other sources, and Te and international market for romantic images Hira’s hair tidied and his goatee edited out to like this of Māori in traditional costume, both show more of the moko―not an atypical practice photographic and painted, and the Pulman for the painter. As we can be reasonably sure the studio participated in that economy. These date for the Lindauer portrait is accurate, if this images appealed partly for their exoticism, image was the basis for that portrait, it probably and partly as the window dressing of a nascent dates to the very early 1870s, and is quite possibly Pākehā nationalism. Some Māori actively by Elizabeth Pulman herself. participated in this trade themselves, wanting images for their descendants or control over how they were depicted. Others were ambivalent, and some openly hostile, fearing the noa (profane) purposes to which their images might be put.2 This was not an unfounded concern, as a andrew paul wood significant number of such portraits did end up being used for commercial marketing without 1 Albertien Stolte, “George and Elizabeth Pulman: Early any regard for the feelings of the sitters and their Auckland Photographers, 1986” (unpublished manuscript), Auckland War Memorial Museum Library. MS-99-47. families. 2

Today many of these images are regarded by Māori as taonga, a visual record of their 127

Roger Blackley covers this extensively in his Galleries of Maoriland: Artists, Collectors and the Māori World, 1880-1910, Auckland University Press, 2018, see particularly chapter 6, “Problems with Portraits.”


bowerbank ninow


left: lot 50, Frank Hofmann Portrait of a pianist (Lili Kraus)

auction n°13 — april 2019

Frank Hofmann Being Avant-Garde: Frank Hofmann and the New Photography In 1940, the internationally acclaimed Hungarian auction n°13 — april 2019 pianist Lili Kraus was on a tour of Java when she and her husband were imprisoned by the Japanese because they were Jewish. She spent the years from 1942 to 1945 in an internment camp.1 Only two years after her release from Japanese captivity, Kraus had her portrait taken in New Zealand by fellow European émigré František Hoffman, who in New Zealand unassumingly called himself Frank. Hofmann’s photograph is striking for many reasons: it presents Krauss in stark silhouette, her face almost completely shrouded in darkness, framed within a glowing circle of light like a halo. She wears a cowl or hairnet that renders her profile strangely androgynous, perhaps recalling, to contemporary eyes, the eerie, inhuman figure of Death in Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal. By presenting the sitter’s face in such utter gloom, Hofmann’s photograph draws the viewer’s eye towards Kraus’ hands, which communicate an uneasy atmosphere of tension, perhaps anticipation or even anxiety. The tendons in her hands stand out as they lay crossed on her forearms, one hand extended as if grasping for purchase on the inky blackness of her clothing, while the other forms a semi-fist, the butt of a cigarette gripped between two fingers.

Lot 51, P.69 Frank Hofmann Arum Lilies c. 1944 gelatin silver print 254 × 203mm

The emphasis on Kraus’ hands makes sense, given her occupation and the source of her fame; she was a renowned professional pianist, known for her mastery of the chamber music of Mozart and Beethoven. However, it is difficult to look at this photograph and not wonder about the hardships that she and her family no doubt underwent during their captivity. Her gesture projects defiance and resilience, but also vulnerability; it is tempting to read her pose as an act of defense, hanging on, almost physically dragging herself into a new, postwar existence. This is a powerful image, and Hoffman’s mastery of commercial photography techniques in vogue at the time (images such as these recall contemporaneous shots of Hollywood celebrities in their high contrast and theatrical lighting) combines elegantly with his avantgarde sensibility to create a work that exists simultaneously as studio portrait and serious artwork. Hofmann certainly felt a great affinity for his sitter; he himself was a musician, and was, like Kraus, a Jewish refugee from Nazism. He left Prague in 1940, after Czechoslovakia was invaded by the Nazis. Between the wars, Czechoslovakia was a hotbed of Modernist innovation. Prague was second only to Paris in the adoption and promotion of Cubism, even to the extent of being home to examples of Cubist architecture.2 This

Lot 89, P.101 Frank Hofmann Kiri Te Kanawa 1965 gelatin silver print 380 × 300mm

129


lots 50–52 & 89

bowerbank ninow

was the creative and intellectual milieu that Hofmann brought with him when he emigrated to New Zealand; in particular, he imported to New Zealand the radically avant-garde developments being pioneered in photography by artists such as František Drtikol, Jaroslav Rössler and Karel Kašpařík. These practitioners sought to push photography as far, and in the bowerbank ninow same directions, as painting and the plastic arts had already been taken by the modernist project. This New Photography synthesised elements of New Objectivity and Constructivism, rebelling against the soft-focus approach and prosaic subject matter of Pictorialism, which was still the dominant mode in Czech photography at the beginning of the twentieth century.3 Other strands that developed in the inter-war years in Prague included Surrealist photography and works that drew inspiration from the realist “Straight Photography” approach of Alfred Steiglitz.4

unlit candle is rendered unreal and abstract by its placement in proximity to two semi-circular forms presumably cut from paper, their flatness and irreality extending to encompass the candle. Here, Hofmann’s skilful manipulation of the play of light against a featureless backdrop takes the place of Rossler’s cut-out forms, but a similar idea is at work: the picture places the viewer in a position where their understanding of the distinctions between abstract and figurative, flat and three-dimensional, metaphorical and literal, are brought into question. Hofmann’s work is powerful and vital because it serves as a reminder that New Zealand’s position on the edge of things, removed from the centres of cultural production by our geographic isolation, does not diminish the quality of creative work that can be achieved here. Hofmann, and those like him who fled Europe during perhaps the darkest and bloodiest period in human history, managed to find in New Zealand the components required to reconstitute the creative and intellectual frameworks that supported their endeavours overseas. Hoffman and his contemporaries offer an important lesson: being avant-garde is not a matter of belonging to any particular place or social milieu; rather, it consists of intellectual honesty, a willingness to explore, and the humility to learn from the past while pushing forward into the future.

With this background in mind, the decisions Hofmann made in his portrait of Lili Kraus begin to make sense. Works such as this are a synthesis of the portrait photography skills he acquired working for Clifton Firth’s commercial photographic studio in the early and mid-1940s with the characteristically Czech approach to modernism that flourished in the inter-war years. The resulting image has echoes of works such as Drtikol’s images of dancers, but is also a robust expression of the postwar émigré or refugee experience in New Zealand, where people like Hofmann and Kraus would have been constantly made aware of their status as outsiders, both ethnically and culturally “other” to the residents of their adopted home. New Zealand society was far from welcoming to Jewish refugees, as is attested by the examples of not only xenophobic nationalism but outright, blatant anti-Semitism culled from New Zealand newspapers in the 1930s and 40s that Leonard Bell presents in his book Strangers Arrive.5 The image of Kraus that Hofmann presents is of a person cut off, isolated and singled out but also resourceful and powerful, containing within herself an energy that allows her to survive. Bell emphasises the extent to which creativity was this kind of force in the lives of European émigré artists in New Zealand; being creative was both a way to express their relationship to their new home and a kind of coping mechanism.6 Another work in this catalogue, a study of two lilies has a similar lineage as the portrait of Lili Kraus. Again, Hofmann deploys his understanding of the visual language of European modernism to create an image that functions on multiple levels simultaneously: two blossoms float luminously in an undefined, darkened space, their white form becoming both the focal point of an abstract composition and a hypnotic object of contemplation. A shadow, cast by one of the flowers, becomes a spectral third form, its two-dimensionality throwing into relief the flowers’ smooth surfaces. The work is similar in conception to Rössler’s 1923 work Composition with Candle, in which a single

andrew clark

130

1

Leonard Bell, Strangers Arrive, Émigrés and the Arts in New Zealand, 1930-1980 (Auckland University Press, 2017), 51.

2

Vladimir Birgus, Czech Photographic Avant-Garde, 1914-1948 (Cambridge, Massachusets: The MIT Press, 2005), 14.

3

Ibid., 35.

4

Ibid., 36.


auction n°13 — april 2019


bowerbank ninow


left: lot 65, John Johns, Radiata pine with clear-felled settings of 80 to 100 acres, Kaingaroa Forest

auction n°13 — april 2019

John Johns The Right Track: John Johns’ Nature Photography “When Daguerre announced his great invention auction n°13 — april 2019 to the public in the summer of 1893, he explained how it worked but not really what it was for.” – John Szarkowski1 John Johns became interested in photography in his youth and bought his first camera, a Vest Pocket Kodak, before being called up for military service in 1942. In the RAF, he was trained as a wireless radio mechanic, but developed his photography skills with the help of other servicemen and later under the guidance of Tom Stobard (of Everest 1953 fame) and Douglas Woolf during forestry training at Dartington Hall, Devonshire, the Forest of Dean, and in Wales. Johns came to New Zealand in 1951. Having trained in forestry, he was able to find work as the official photographer for the New Zealand Forest service, a position he was to hold until 1984, only three years before the Forest Service itself was scrapped and its functions folded into the newly-formed Department of Conservation. As well as a talented photographer, Johns was an ardent believer in the value of sustainable forestry practices, and his works often have a conservationist message.

Lot 68, P.86 John Johns Underside of fern frond, showing sori 1970 gelatin silver print 257 × 188mm

In this regard, Johns is a unique figure in New Zealand’s photographic canon, and one whose work feels particularly relevant in the current historical moment. Rather than photographing the natural world purely for its aesthetic value, Johns’ work has a didactic purpose, seeking to educate the public about the value of forestry. These works also speak about the way the natural world enriches human life, and the intrinsic connections between people and the environment. Johns photographed with a purpose, and this strand of discourse runs through and connects all of his works, linking the beauty and simplicity of natural forms to their practical advantages and ecological functions. Johns’ work has a precision, clarity of vision and emphasis on formal composition that show clear links to the “Pure Photography” espoused by Ansel Adams, which emphasised a lack of artifice and discouraged excessive darkroom manipulation of images. Indeed, Johns attended two of Adams’ workshops, travelling to California in 1978 and again in 1980 to attend. At one of these events, Johns had his photographs critiqued by esteemed photographic curator, historian and critic John Szarkowski, who generally praised his efforts and, in the photographer’s own words, “confirmed that JJ [was] on the right track.”2 Any compliment at all from Szarkowski was a considerable coup, given that he was, at the time, the Director of Photography at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Lot 66, P.84 John Johns Gale damage, Hanmer Forest, Canterbury c. 1960 - 1980 gelatin silver print 228 × 230mm

133


lots 64–69

bowerbank ninow

The works included in this catalogue consist of three landscape studies and three close-up images of ferns, which collectively give some impression of the clarity of Johns’ vision and the rigorous modernist character of his imagemaking.

The trunks of the trees themselves seemingly recede into infinity, creating a different kind of play with scale; the forest becomes a realm in which the viewer finds themselves lost, the endlessly repeating ranks of pines obscuring their vision and stupefying the senses. The photographer’s camera becomes a single point on an infinite grid, the trees’ burnt trunks a kind of mathematically precise ocean of possibility. This image has an austerity and clarity of vision perhaps unmatched in New Zealand landscape photography; it is a work that challenges the viewer’s understanding of the constituent parts of landscape, stripping back the idea of the forest to produce an image that has a hypnotic, almost surrealist intensity. At the same time, it is also a cautionary warning about the scope of destruction that fires can cause.

Turning first to the close-up works, it is clear drew inspiration from Ansel Adams’ own nature studies, in which a single object such as a pine cone is isolated and becomes a kind of totem, a microcosmic encapsulation of a broader environment, and of a visual approach to that environment. The use of close-up images of plants in modernist photography has a long history, but what is noteworthy about these images is the way they navigate between the opposing poles of scientific, botanical document and abstracted modernist pattern-making. The botanical works of Imogen Cunningham, for example, use plants as a starting point for modernist subdivisions of the picture plane and compositional play, whereas Johns’ photographs retain the essential character of the natural forms in front of his camera. These are not archetypes for the idea of “fern,” or ferns as incidental contributors to modernist dialogue about the natural origins of artistic designs; rather, they are documents of the living plants themselves, multivalent images that contain within them the potential for a range of readings.

bowerbank ninow that Johns

Johns work is interesting because it is a case study in what can be achieved through thinking about what photography is actually for, to borrow Szarkowski’s observation. Johns saw in photography a didactic potential that could educate the public and effect real change in the discourse around forestry and conservation, when most of his contemporaries were instead embroiled in the task of establishing the aesthetic credentials of the medium. At a time when threats to the natural world are at the forefront of public consciousness, work like Johns’, which performs the difficult task of carrying an ecological message while also carrying out the business of serious artmaking and intellectual exploration, is all the more relevant and vital.

Johns’ landscape photographs operate differently again; in these images, the scope of the forestry plantation becomes a pattern, but retains its didactic function. Johns described the goal of his photographic practice thus: “My job was to make forestry—long-term, sustainable forestry—digestible to the public. But I started photographing during an era when forestry in New Zealand was still strongly influenced by the ‘cut out and get out’ philosophy of the logging gangs.”3 Sustainable forestry, the planting of vast tracts of pine with fire-breaks and roads accessible to logging trucks, serves as a replacement for the wholesale destruction of native bush by loggers that took place in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. For Johns, showing the expansive scope of a plantation is a way of pointing out the expanses of native forest that would have needed to be felled to supply New Zealand’s need for timber. In one particularly striking image, the separate forestry plots, some felled and some still intact, evoke fields of wheat or corn in their regularity. A wisp of cloud, intruding into the corner of the frame, is a reminder that this is a photograph taken from a plane; however, the viewer’s perception of the scale of the work is constantly shifting, a property of photography that Johns exploits here to great effect.

andrew clark

In perhaps one of his best-known images, Burnt Corsican Pine, Balmoral, Canterbury, Johns presents a ground-level view of a tract of pine forest, the foliage of which has been consumed by fire; logs lie in criss-crossed profusion on the smooth, even plane of the forest floor like the components of some inscrutable children’s game. 134

1

John Szarkowski, Looking at Photographs: 100 Pictures from the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1973), 14.

2

John and Bobbie Johns, interview with Desmond Kelley, transcription from audio recording Tape 3a transcript, 3.

3

Kennedy Warne, “Vision of the Forest,” New Zealand


auction n°13 — april 2019


bowerbank ninow

Marie Shannon Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters

bowerbank ninow

Lot 46, p.64 Marie Shannon, Work in progress, large Gordon Walters 1998, sepia-toned gelatin silver print, edition 1/10, 400 × 500mm

Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters is a paradox. It is a work about making somebody else’s artwork, a study that is in fact a finished piece—and is also audacious and funny. The photograph captures one moment in a creative process, the making of a Gordon Walters work by Marie Shannon. This peculiar act of fandom was first exhibited at Rm gallery in 1999 as part of the exhibition Leo, Gordon and I. It is a study that continues Walters’ investigation into space and the relations and tensions between shapes and does so by photographing a situation in which material is both presented and taken away.

in paper then in fabric. Shannon demonstrates her process of folding, mirroring and repetition to produce the desired forms. There are negatives, positives and something in-between, as parts of the fabric have been cut but their forms have not yet been removed. A delicious sense of placement is captured, a play of absence and presence. What is presented is Shannon’s set-up, her working environment as well as the material she has chosen to use. The beige casement cloth is a very specific firm, flat fabric used in Cook Island tivaivai. Shannon describes the material as inappropriate, translating the acrylic paint of a modernist par excellence into a softer medium, one considered to be lowly and associated with the domestic and feminine.1

A cut-out based on Walters’ design is in the process of being made from beige casement cloth, incised with the aid of paper patterns. Folds of fabric that have already been cut away lie discarded on the margins. Black-handled scissors, a ruler and a tin of pins lie at hand and a book of Walters’ works is spread open. An office chair has been pushed back and the floor has been claimed as a background. Indeed, the quaint linoleum surface of Shannon’s Waterview studio provides a florid and busy contrast to the simple beige forms and frames. The image shows a process of drawing in pencil on paper, a subtraction of form as the patterns are cut, first

The sepia tone of the photograph counters the hard-edged modernism of Walters’ paintings, adding a sense of nostalgia, sentiment and fondness. His impeccable palettes of near optical white, inky black and solid colour are rendered in shades of cream and brown. A large-format 4” × 5” camera was used so that the fine grain of the finished image would be barely perceptible. Of paramount importance was for the image to be crystal clear, like Walters’ polished and highly-finished work. Shannon sought an 136


lots 16, 17 & 63

auction n°13 — april 2019

making, or re-making could be interpreted as an absolute sharpness through a photographic undermining of other artists and their work, or process that was as transparent as possible: as passive-aggressive moves onto other people’s what mattered to her was an exact rendering turf. Likewise, they can also be seen as clever of the chosen materials and the banal details interventions or acts of affection and respect. of the scene. Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters realises an interest in this ideal of Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters is an high fidelity, but also a ludic idea of what this attempt to show processes not often seen outside actually entails. The objective was for the work auction n°13 — april 2019 of the artist’s studio. The work evokes a range to be read or easily recognised as a “Gordon of sensory moments: the rasp of scissor blades Walters” and the photograph itself records as they knock against the floor whilst cutting, Shannon coming to terms with somebody else’s the act of holding a ruler with spread fingers, practice in a very immediate and concrete way, marking with pencil, the slightness of cotton and rendering it as exactly as she could. Shannon’s paper as they slip around the floor, the pressure modified version of a Walters work re-imagines of a hand holding them down, the felt sensation the tension between interlocking shapes as a of lino and cement on kneeling knees. All of these contrast between the cut edges of fabric and the are stilled forever, and yet always in a continuous continuous plane of her studio floor. Whereas present-tense: both an endless series of Walters’ painting seems to exist in a pure adjustments and the satisfaction of a final snip. pictorial space, one that could stretch out into Referring to someone’s else’s finished artwork, infinity, Shannon’s work sits in a very specific considering the choices they have already made, site, one in which there are very real spatial selecting some components and then modifying limitations. them, layering decision upon decision, Shannon constructs her image. Work in Progress, Large Gordon Walters was part of a broader effort by Shannon to challenge or Refusing to be limited by the arbitrary muddy authorship. It comes from a period in importance placed on originality, Shannon which Shannon teasingly toyed with works by conducts an ongoing investigation into works other people, taking the objects themselves by other artists. In doing so, she undermines or at least their forms and probing them, the emphasis on authorship and experiments gently pushing them around to see what with multiple artistic identities. In Work in happened. Art Collection (1998) consisted of Progress, Large Gordon Walters the instantly sixteen photographs of artworks from around recognisable, graphic and high-modernist style her house. Each was placed on a light box and of Walters is lovingly described and re-presented photographed as an isolated object. The series in an alternative form. The photograph is also tells a specific story about how a collection of a document of Shannon’s idiosyncratic and works arbitrarily comes together over time, effervescent creative process, an artefact that the product of attending multiple exhibitions reflects her own deliberate appropriation of as well as purchases, swaps and gifts. Shannon Walters’ earlier appropriation of Māori designs. collated images of the artworks beneath her roof via a photographic process and in doing so consolidated a diverse collection of works by artists like Billy Apple, Mary-Louise Browne, Paul Cullen, Yuk King Tan, Saskia Leek, Ani O’Neill, Michael Stevenson, Gilbert and George and Felix Gonzales-Torres. There is an irreverent sense of needling about Shannon’s works from this period. She delights in interpreting artworks made by other artists, testing things for herself and trying on other artists’ identities, styles and oeuvres. In 1995 she made a series of text descriptions of artworks she dreamt by other people, recording them in detail and observing that they were “really very strong.” Some of the titles of these works were: Julian’s Dream, Julian’s Nightmare; Peter Peryer Diptych; Dick Frizzell’s Retrospective and Art Dreams, a composite work made of individual images of various artists’ dreams. Earlier, Shannon made a re-creation of the sculpture exhibition Space Fictions, curated by Mary Barr and Jim Barr, which was held at Catherine Scollay Gallery in Wellington. The show included work by Shannon as well as Richard Reddaway, Monique Redmond, L. Budd and Neil Dawson, among others. In Shannon’s recreation, all of the works were reconstructed in miniature, composed of drawings, pipe-cleaners, wire and cardboard. Each of these works demonstrates Shannon having a go. Her

victoria wynne-jones

137


bowerbank ninow


left: lot 42, Anne Noble, untitled

auction n°13 — april 2019

Anne Noble Traces and Shadows An Enlightenment desire to depict the origins of art in the late eighteenth century generated a short-lived market for a curious subgenreauction n°13 — april 2019 in history painting. Specifically, the story of Butades and Kora became a popular way for artists in the Western tradition to render the mythic beginnings of their craft. John Baptiste Regnault, Joseph Wright of Derby, and JosephLot 43, P.61 Benoît Suvée were just three such painters who Anne Noble Aubergines took up this particular challenge. The story, 1980 as described by Pliny the Elder in his Natural gelatin silver print 280 × 420mm History, tells of Kora of Sicyon, deeply in love with a Corinthian youth set to depart on a long journey. So anguished by the prospect of his departure, Kora traces the outline of his profile, cast in shadow by lamplight, so that his presence may last a while longer. Her father, Butades, on discovering the tracing, modelled the youth’s face in clay, providing the first drawing and first sculpture. These etiological quests can usually be dismissed as yet another symptom of classical European vanity, saying nothing about the supposed origins of any craft, but everything about the aspirational fantasies of the monied and powerful. There is, however, something interesting to be drawn from the manner in which these artists chose to convey the story. Although written sources place greater emphasis on Butades’ delivery of his daughter’s line-work into three dimensions, invariably, painters chose to depict Kora in the moment of tracing her lover’s shadow. The impossibility of a search for origins is built into its very representation. To these painters, art didn’t begin with a presence, but an absence. A shadow, a memory, a trace.

Lot 41, P.59 Anne Noble Bed 1982. Printed 1996. gelatin silver print 150 × 150mm

Anne Noble is an artist who works in contexts that not only diverge from those of the artists mentioned above, but often actively contradict them. She operates in different media, and in a world that has both physically and culturally left those painters of the Enlightenment behind. And yet, if one could draw a line through Noble’s varied practice, it might intersect at the very point conveyed by their representations of Kora and her lover. Noble’s works consistently demonstrate an interest and engagement with the invisible as much as the visible. They use a power, particular to photographic media: the ability to convey a simultaneous projection of what is, what has been, and what may come. Despite operating in a medium dogged by the mistaken charge of an ability to depict the visual world with total fidelity, Noble has time and again created images that powerfully evoke aspects of our lives that exist outside of optical range. Hers is a career that, from its very beginnings, produced a photography laden with ghosts and apparitions, traces and shadows.

Lot 107, P.114 Anne Noble Self Portrait 1978 gelatin silver print (triptych) 175 × 115mm (each panel)

Photohistorian Geoffrey Batchen has argued 139


lots 40–43 & 107

bowerbank ninow

that photography possesses a unique capacity for “looking askance,” a kind of looking without looking that avoids the pain-numbing banality of direct representation.1 To Batchen, the most effective documentary photography is that which avoids the heroism of singular, content-heavy imagery in favour of something more elusive and enigmatic:

counter the perception of Antarctica as a grand heroic wilderness.”4 In the Western imaginary, Antarctica remains a potent signifier of the Heroic Age, the harsh and unforgiving plateau of ice and rock where Shackleton turned back in noble retreat and Scott met his tragic end. This Antarctica is one of a pristine, masculine beauty where the only flags flying are those that mark the way to the South Pole and back. Noble’s photographs literally piss on this false imagination, granting us entry into a continent that is worked and lived in by people who eat and sleep and piss and shit. It almost appears as an attempt to lay the traces of that history to rest and imagine a new history of Antarctica, devoid of the romance that has been kept alive by imagery of male heroism and natural beauty.

bowerbank ninow

… [images that] eschew the picturing of any particular moment or history and instead immerse us in a visual experience that is at once calm and implacable, empty of ‘content’ but all the more powerful for it.2 Noble has never shied away from direct representation: her projects always have welldefined subjects that appear and reappear over the course of a series of photographs. However, this capacity to look askance perforates each project she undertakes. Using Batchen’s argument, a paucity of content forces us to retreat our gaze inward, challenging our own capacity as viewers and participants in history. Noble, however, forces us to look through and beyond her images, making the subjects depicted only the beginning of a story being told. They are photographs that encourage us to find the threads of invisible traces, following them out to larger concepts, ideas, and notions of place and people.

In the expansive, unending whiteness in the back of these photographs, it’s possible to see some of the old Romanticism calling us back into an uncharted and unknowable frozen desert. But the starkly defined, remarkably human presence of the poles forever deny our entry into that place. Noble’s subjects are just poles, their frozen pools only urine, but they let us see the shadow of a gendered imaginary that has cast itself over the continent for centuries, continuing to define it as a wild and masculine place. By looking in and through Piss Poles, we ultimately look out, and into the means and histories of defining human relationships to the environments we inhabit.

This process might best be explained by one of Noble’s Antarctic studies, Piss Poles, Antarctica, (Aurina #1 – #6) (2008). Noble describes the series as:

As Noble’s career has progressed, her engagement with politically-charged subject matter and approaches has steadily increased. Many of her recent series (of which Piss Poles could be counted) have engaged with polemic discourse around anthropogenic climate change and its lived consequences for earth’s human and nonhuman inhabitants. But it would be a mistake to conclude that her earlier projects were apolitical by comparison. Noble has always employed an interplay between absence and presence to create work charged with political meaning, and she has always employed the specific capabilities of photography to do so.

… a collection of photographs of the yellow flags that mark approved sites for pissing outdoors at Antarctic field camps set up to support big science projects during the summer season. I often noticed them when I was out photographing the weather and was drawn to the frozen yellow puddles of urine at the base of the poles. I found the word Aurina, meaning both urine and the colour of gold in a dictionary of vulgar Latin.3 In each of the six images, a solitary yellow flag rests atop a bamboo post. In some, the misted outlines of fencing and equipment signify the presence of human habitation, but in most the poles stand starkly against the omnipresent white of the Antarctic landscape. Each pole ends with a unique geometry of frozen urine at its base.

In 1982 Noble produced Night Hawk, a series that travelled with the 1982 National Art Gallery photography exhibition Views/Exposures. A reductive reading of the series might simply call it an exploration of icons of sexuality. We see fragments of bodies, rope, beds, and myriad suggestive shapes. The works gained a modicum of notoriety when one of the images, Rope, adorned the cover of Artspace’s R18 exhibition, One Hundred and Fifty Ways of Loving, in 1994. Robert Leonard has called them a “racy sexfantasy series,”5 while Justin Paton just opted for “carnal.”6 What both (male) curators may have missed is that these images simply weren’t made for them. Noble’s camera occupies the gaze of a specifically and intentionally female eroticism and sexuality. In the twentieth century, photography became the primary vehicle through which the world as a heteromale fantasy was made visible. Each image in

In gridded format, Piss Poles almost appears as an odd, urine-soaked homage to the deadpan aesthetic of Bernd and Hilla Becher, whose series of built structures in post-industrial landscapes came to define the practices of typological and monumental photography. But if the poles are monuments, Noble is less interested in what they are, and the bodily fluids that mark them, than with the narratives of place and history that they represent. During her time as a US National Science Foundation Arts Fellow, Noble embarked on “a search for photographs that might 140


auction n°13 — april 2019

Night Hawk denies the power of that vision by presenting an alternative. Bed, an image from Night Hawk, offers us a familiar domestic tableau. Two pillows sit at the top of a bed, the indentations of absent heads visible in each. The creases of an unmade sheet sweep in long curves across the mattress, each auction n°13 — april 2019 sharply defined like a cresting dune by the low light that enters from the left of the frame. From its position in this series we know that Bed is an image charged with eroticism, but the content alone can’t provide us that. The absent bodies implied by the pillows—by the bed itself—are the traces that remain to show us. The sexual presence in this image is one that has passed yet still lingers. But this is only the first absence in the image. The second is that of the male gaze. The presumed viewer of almost any photograph that promises sexual content is the erotically charged male, but Noble denies that gaze any pleasure. Bed doesn’t deliver as a “racy sexfantasy”; it’s too subtle for that. Its power is in the traces of who was there and who might return, who is given access to the image, and who is resolutely denied. At the very beginning of Camera Lucida, Roland Barthes’ ageless gift to the study of photography, the author marvels at his capacity to look at a photograph of Napoleon’s youngest brother, Jerome, and to realise, “I am looking at eyes that looked at the Emperor.”7 Barthes’ interest isn’t in Jerome at all, but in the access a photograph granted him to a world ordinarily beyond his reach. The anecdote attests to two fundamental notions of photography. The first—and most contestable—is that a photograph, far more than any another creative medium, is a true document of something that really happened. While it’s easy to take a cynical stance on such a proposition in the digital age, we can at least appreciate that, at a particular moment in time, Jerome stood in front of a camera and his likeness was captured. The second—and far more interesting—is that a photograph can act as a kind of threshold through which we might access worlds which are normally denied to us.

Lot 42, P.60 Anne Noble untitled 1978 gelatin silver print 250 × 170mm

In the Presence of Angels: Photographs of the Contemplative Life, produced between 1987 and 1988, is one such example of photography’s particular capacity to deliver us to places outside our regular experience or access. The series is comprised of images depicting the life, work, and prayer of Benedictine nuns in London’s Tyburn Convent. Crucially, Noble’s photographs are not a documentary project or pure photographic essay. They aren’t presented to us as evidence of the nuns’ existence, but through a careful marriage of form and content, become an evocation of the interior lives of women devoted to their spirituality and their silence.

Lot 40, P.58 Anne Noble The white veil of a novice "Our habit signifies complete detachment complete detachment from the things of this world" (M Foundress 1902) 1992. Printed 1995. gelatin silver print 125 × 190mm

Noble expressed a desire to “show the outward aspect of an inward spiritual activity without disturbing the contemplative nature of the order or breaking into this silent, starkly beautiful realm.”8 With The White Veil of a Novice “Our Habit 141


lots 40–43 & 107

bowerbank ninow

Signifies Complete Detachment from the Things of this World” (M Foundress 1902), Noble goes some way to achieving this goal in a single image. Just as in Bed, we are confronted by a stark interplay of light and drapery. Instead of an unmade sheet, the effect is rendered through the titular veil. The novice turns her back to the camera, offering us only the slightest glimpse of her cheek. bowerbank ninow The remainder of the photograph plays out in material and ephemeral symmetries. The veil is flanked by two dark masses, one the dark shadow cast by an unseen light source, the other the darker material of the novice’s dress. To the left of the image, bright light swiftly fades into an arc of shadow that reaches above the frame and offers only the most subtle hint of its downward trajectory in the opposite corner. The “silent, starkly beautiful realm” suggested by The White Veil of a Novice is so much more than the literal, physical space of Tyburn Convent. Noble takes photography’s capacity to steal a moment from time and expands it to evoke an entire way of being: a world of inwardfacing spirituality, of silence and prayer. It’s an image where the invisible markers of a life of contemplation appear as present as any of their physical counterparts. Again, she uses the medium to express senses and experiences beyond the purely optical. Technically speaking, photography is an incredibly limited medium. A photographer makes myriad choices both before and after the moment of exposure that affect how an image looks and how it might be received. But in that moment, all a camera can do is record light, transferring dynamic information onto a static matrix. A photograph can only ever capture the material surface of the world. Knowing this, there is something remarkable in the fact that Anne Noble has made a career out of producing images that show far more than that material surface ever should. Her work conjures apparitions and makes shadows more real than their referents. It’s a vital reminder that in that much replicated story of the origins of art, the most important gesture was not made by Butades or Kora’s lover. It was by Kora, tracing the outline of a shadow. lachlan taylor 1

Geoffrey Batchen, “Looking Askance,” in Picturing Atrocity: Photography in Crisis (London: Reaktion Books, 2012), 227-293.

2

Ibid., 238.

3

“Anne Noble, Piss Poles, 2008,” Toxic Blooms blog, accessed 8/03/2019, https://toxicblooms.wordpress.com/about/annenoble/.

4 Ibid. 5

6

7

Robert Leonard, “Love Not Given Lightly: A contribution to the panel discussion, Choker: Twenty Years On, City Gallery Wellington, 1 October 2015,” RobertLeonard.org, accessed 8/03/2019, http://robertleonard.org/love-not-given-lightly/. Justin Paton, “Anne Noble: States of Grace,” City Gallery Wellington Te Whare Toi, accessed 8/03/2019, https:// citygallery.org.nz/exhibitions/anne-noble-states-of-grace/. Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, trans. Richard Howard (New York: Hill and

142


auction n°13 — april 2019


I #

artwork

#

artwork

1

N

history

D

E

X

plate / essay

estimate

history

plate / essay

estimate

Peter Peryer Pine 2006 inkjet print, edition 1/15 signed Peter Peryer, dated 2006 and inscribed Pine/1/15 in graphite verso 132mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland, Acquired from the artist, c. 2006.

p.27

$600 - $900

2

Fiona Pardington Norma (from One Night of Love) 1996 gelatin silver print 160mm × 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist, c. 2001 - 2002. Exhibitions Fiona Pardington: One Night of Love., Waikato Museum of Art and History, Hamilton, 2001. Literature Fiona Pardington and Kyla McFarlane, One Night of Love. (Hamilton: Waikato Museum of Art and History, 2001), 9.

p.28

$800 - $1,600

3

Fiona Pardington untitled 1996 gelatin silver print 185mm × 130mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist, c. 2001 - 2002.

p.28

$800 - $1,600

4

Rhondda Bosworth Z/torn 1996 gelatin silver print 150mm × 280mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from McNamara Gallery, Wanganui, 2002. Exhibitions Rhondda Bosworth, 44 Photographs: 1974 - 1999, McNamara Gallery, Wanganui, 2002. Literature Rhondda Bosworth, 44 Photographs: 1974 - 1999, (Wanganui, McNamara Gallery, 2002), 43.

p.29

$600 - $900

5

Mark Adams 7.10.78 Triangle Road, Massey, West Auckland 1978 cibachrome inscribed MADA02 in graphite upper left verso 350mm × 275mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Exhibitions New Zealand Photography Collected, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 - 7 August 2016. Literature Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 281. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1993).

p.30

$800 - $1,600

6

Brian Brake One of the hundreds of thousands waiting to march in a May Day Parade. Tiananmen Square, Beijing, 1957. 1957 Ektacolor print signed Brian Brake in ink lower right 380mm × 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Exhibitions Brian Brake, Brian Brake: Lens on the world, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, 2011 (toured nationally). Literature Brian Brake, Lens on the World, ed. Athol McCredie (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2010), 134

p.31

$800 - $1,200

7

Murray Hedwig Passing Man/Sign 1972 gelatin silver print signed Murray Hedwig in ink verso 163mm × 236mm

Provenance Private collection, Nelson.

p.32

$500 - $800

8

Peter Peryer untitled 1976 gelatin silver print 172mm × 172mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Literature The PhotoForum Supplement 1 (December 1977).

p.33

$1,000 - $2,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

9

Max Dupain Bruce Rickard house, Bayview 1972 gelatin silver print inscribed 2070 in ink upper right verso; inscribed p16 LOOK! LIVING [illegible] 3 col × 5 3/4 in graphite verso; clipping from Sydney Morning Herald article affixed verso; photographer's stamp applied verso; Sydney Morning Herald stamps applied verso; inscribed Rickard House Bayview in ink lower right verso; inscribed 59 1/2 in graphite lower right verso 250mm × 190mm

Provenance Private collection, Los Angeles. Literature Eva Buhrich, "House for the environment," Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday October 11, 1972, 16.

p.34

$400 - $800

10

Max Dupain An operator in the technical research laboratory of Eagle & Globe Steel Co. Ltd., Sydney 1964 gelatin silver print inscribed Metals Feature 25/5/64/03/4 Cols × 4 1/2 in graphite verso; inscribed 8173 in ink verso; inscribed 6985 in ink verso; photographer's stamp applied verso; Sydney Morning Herald stamps applied verso; clipping from Sydney Morning Herald article affixed verso 190mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Los Angeles. Literature "Progress in Metals Feature," Sydney Morning Herald, Monday May 25, 1964, 14.

p.35

$400 - $800

11

Ans Westra Central Park. NY. 1987 gelatin silver print signed Ans in graphite lower right 225mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Exposures Gallery, Wellington, November 1987. Exhibitions Ans Westra, Exposures Gallery, Wellington, November 1987.

p.36

$2,000 - $3,000

12

Allan McDonald Glen Eden Railway 2003 c-type print 900mm × 1700mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Corban Estate, Auckland, 2003.

p.37

$1,000 - $2,000

13

Ans Westra Bottle tree, Milton, Otago 1998 c-type print 250mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Christopher Moore Gallery, Wellington, 1999.

p.38

$1,500 - $2,500

14

Peter Peryer Pavilion 2010 inkjet print, edition 5/15 signed Peter Peryer, dated 2010 and inscribed Pavilion, Rotorua/5/15 in ink verso; inscribed Pavilion 5/15 in graphite lower left verso; inscribed PETER PERYER/PAVILION, ROTORUA/2010/COLOUR PHOTOGRAPH/ 328 × 248MM EDITION OF 15/PP2136-02 on Michael Lett label affixed verso 328mm × 248mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Michael Lett, Auckland, 2011.

p.39

$2,000 - $3,000

15

Theo Schoon Thermal mud pool, Rotorua c.1960s gelatin silver print inscribed TOP in graphite upper edge verso; photographer's stamp applied verso; inscribed Thermal mud pool in graphite verso; inscribed C/PEOPLE JUNE 29 P.28 REDUCE in ink verso; inscribed Mud Pools Rotorua in ink verso 230mm × 180mm

Provenance Private collection, Los Angeles.

p.40

$800 - $1,600

16

Theo Schoon "Taniwha" R. Fould's, Opihi River (Detail) 1947 graphite on gelatin silver print signed Photo T. Schoon and inscribed "Taniwha" R. Fould's, Opihi River (Detail) in ink upper edge verso 250mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.41

$600 - $1,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

17

Theo Schoon untitled 1947 graphite on gelatin silver print 255mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.41

$600 - $1,000

18

Theo Schoon Limestone Formation, Opuha River Rain Cliff 1947 gelatin silver print signed photo T. Schoon and inscribed Limestone formation/Opuha River/Rain Cliff in ink verso 295mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.42

$600 - $1,000

19

Theo Schoon Monkey Face, Kaikoura 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Monkey Face, Kaikoura in ink upper left 205mm × 166mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.42

$500 - $900

20

Theo Schoon Weka Pass, North of Christchurch 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Weka Pass, North of Christchurch/Ask (?) Museum. R. Duff. in graphite verso 205mm × 255mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.43

$500 - $900

21

Theo Schoon Detail study of a cave drawing which is 72 feet long 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Detail study of a cave drawing which is 72 feet long. details are reminiscent of Alexander Calder and Hans Arps. in ink upper edge verso 205mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.44

$500 - $900

22

Theo Schoon Waitohi Composition from copy by Ellmore 1947 gelatin silver print inscribed Waitohi Composition from copy by Ellmore in ink upper left verso 203mm × 255mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.44

$500 - $900

23

Theo Schoon untitled c. 1960s gelatin silver print 165mm × 215mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.45

$1,000 - $2,000

24

Theo Schoon untitled 1947 gelatin silver print 305mm × 260mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by the artist, c. 1965.

p.46

$600 - $1,000

25

Ben Cauchi Sloth 1999 argyrotype print, edition 1/3 signed B Cauchi, dated 1999 and inscribed 1/3 'Sloth' in graphite lower edge 120mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Photospace, Wellington, c. 1999.

p.47

$800 - $1,600

26

George Valentine Crow's Nest, Taupo 1885 albumen silver print signed G.V. and inscribed CROW'S NEST. TAUPO. 198. on negative lower edge 190mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki (acquired 1986).

p.48

$600 - $900


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

27

George Valentine The Great Wairakei Geyser 1885 albumen silver print signed G.V. and inscribed THE GREAT WAIRAKEI GEYSER. 200. on negative lower edge 190mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.48

$600 - $900

28

George Valentine Boar's Head, White Terrace 1885 albumen silver print inscribed BOARS [sic] HEAD WHITE TERRACE. 21. G.V. on negative lower left 190mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.49

$600 - $900

29

George Valentine Umbrella Buttress, Pink Terrace 1885 albumen silver print inscribed UMBRELLA BUTTRESS, PINK TERRACE. 17. G.V. on negative lower right 190mm × 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.49

$600 - $900

30

Gordon Walters untitled c. 1969 gelatin silver print inscribed Black on Blue Mahuiku 1969 POA/ Acrylic on canvas 1969 Francis Collection in graphite verso 204mm × 153mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.50

$2,500 - $3,500

31

Gordon Walters untitled c. 1971 gelatin silver print inscribed Gellert in graphite lower edge verso 242mm × 192mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.51

$2,500 - $3,500

32

Gil Hanly Milan Mrkusich c. 1960 - 1965 gelatin silver print 145mm × 145mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.52

$500 - $1,000

33

Gil Hanly Colin McCahon 1967 gelatin silver print dated 1967 and inscribed Colin McCahon in ink lower edge verso 154mm × 153mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Literature Marja Bloem and Martin Browne, Colin McCahon: A Question of Faith (Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 2002), 208.

p.52

$500 - $1,000

34

Marti Friedlander Ralph Hotere c. 1980s gelatin silver print signed Marti Friedlander in graphite lower right 322mm × 488mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.53

$3,500 - $5,500

35

Ronnie Van Hout Hybrid 1999 pegasus print 380mm × 495mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 30 May 2014. Exhibitions I've Abandoned Me, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 29 August–28 November 2004 Literature Ronnie van Hout, I've Abandoned Me (Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2003), 37

p.54

$2,000 - $3,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

36

Ronnie Van Hout Abduct 1999 pegasus print 380mm × 495mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Michael Lett, Auckland, 21 August 2012. Exhibitions I've Abandoned Me, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 29 August–28 November 2004 Literature Ronnie van Hout, I've Abandoned Me (Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 2003), 37

p.54

$2,000 - $3,000

37

Rohan Wealleans Reflections of the Remote 2014 inkjet print, edition 2/3 signed Rohan Wealleans, dated 2014 and inscribed Reflections of the Remote. 2/3 in ink verso 435mm × 350mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 18 June 2014.

p.55

$2,800 - $3,800

38

Peter Peryer Kereru 2006 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, dated 2006 and inscribed 14/15 in graphite verso 140mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist. Literature Peter Peryer and Bill Manhire, Silver (Whanganui: McNamara Gallery, 2007), u.p.; Peter Peryer, Peter Peryer: A Careful Eye (Lower Hutt: Dowse Art Museum, 2014), 74.

p.56

$1,000 - $2,000

39

Peter Peryer Headless Chicken 1995. Printed 1999. gelatin silver print, edition 6/15 signed Peter Peryer in graphite lower right 430mm × 280mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch. Acquired from Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, 1999. Exhibitions At Home and Away: Recent Photographs by Peter Peryer, Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua, Whanganui, November 1 - December 7, 1997; The Left Hand Raised, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 21 April - 24 June 2001. Literature Peter Peryer, The Left Hand Raised: Peter Peryer photographs 1995-2002 (New Plymouth: Govett-Brewster Art Gallery Publications, 2001), u.p.; Peter Peryer and Peter Simpson, Peter Peryer: Photographer (Auckland University Press, 2008), 53.

p.57

$2,500 - $3,500

40

Anne Noble The white veil of a novice "Our habit signifies complete detachment from the things of this world" (M Foundress 1902) 1992. Printed 1995. gelatin silver print signed Anne Noble, dated Print made 1995 and inscribed In the Presence of Angels in graphite lower edge verso 125mm × 190mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Exhibitions Anne Noble, In the Presence of Angels: Photographs of the Contemplative Life, Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui, 1 November - 6 December 1989; Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, 14 November - 12 January 1992; Fisher Art Gallery, Auckland, 25 January - 27 February 1992; Gisborne Museum and Art Gallery, 5 March - 3 May 1992; Robert McDougall Art Gallery, Christchurch, 21 May - 5 July 1992; Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 3 June - 1 July 1992; Anne Noble: States of Grace, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, December 2001 - March 2002; City Gallery Wellington, 4 May - 11 August 2002; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, 14 June - 31 August 2003. Literature Anne Noble, In the Presence of Angels: Photographs of the Contemplative Life (Whanganui: Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui, 1989), u.p. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 1993).

p.58

$2,500 - $4,500

41

Anne Noble Bed 1982. Printed 1996. gelatin silver print signed Anne Noble, dated 1982, printed 1996 and inscribed Print made 1996/'Bed' from The Series 'NIGHTHAWK' in graphite lower right verso 150mm × 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 23 July 2009, lot 803. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1982).

p.59

$2,000 - $3,000

42

Anne Noble untitled 1978 gelatin silver print signed Anne Noble and dated '78 in graphite lower right 250mm × 170mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.60

$2,000 - $4,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

43

Anne Noble Aubergines 1980 gelatin silver print 280mm × 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1980).

p.61

$600 - $1,200

44

Ans Westra Portrait of my Mother as a Clown 1980 gelatin silver print signed Ans Westra, dated 1980 and inscribed Portrait of my Mother as a Clown. Holland in graphite lower right verso 241mm × 292mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.62

$2,000 - $4,000

45

Peter Peryer Ngawha Springs 1986 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peyer, dated 1986 and inscribed Ngawha Springs in graphite verso; dated 1986 and inscribed Peter Peryer/Ngawha Springs in type on label affixed verso 350mm × 340mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist, c. 1988.

p.63

$1,500 - $2,500

46

Marie Shannon Work in progress, large Gordon Walters 1998 sepia-toned gelatin silver print, edition 1/10 signed MARIE SHANNON, dated 1998 and inscribed "WORK IN PROGRESS, LARGE GORDON WALTERS"/1/10 in graphite verso 400mm × 500mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 15 July 2000. Exhibitions Marie Shannon, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, June - July 2000.

p.64

$1,500 - $2,500

47

Peter Peryer Zoo Music 1983 gelatin silver print, edition 4/20 signed Peter Peryer, dated 1983 and inscribed Spider Monkeys, Auckland Zoo from Zoo Music in graphite verso (right panel); signed Peter Peryer, dated 1983 and inscribed Birds, Auckland Zoo from Zoo Music in graphite verso (left panel) 295mm × 195mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist.

p.65

$2,800 - $3,600

48

Ava Seymour Corsophine Queen 1997 c-type photograph, edition 2/5 signed Ava Seymour, dated 1997 and inscribed 'Corsophine Queen' (Health, Happiness and Housing) 2/5 in ink lower edge verso 742mm × 912mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Exhibitions Ava Seymour, Health, Happiness and Housing, Artspace, Auckland, 1997; The Physics Room, Christchurch, 1998; Primary Care, Hocken Collections Uare Taoka o Hākena, Dunedin, 30 June 2018 - 25 August 2018; Ava Seymour: I'm So Green, Hocken Collections Uare Taoka o Hākena, Dunedin, March - May 2001. Literature Ava Seymour, Health, Happiness and Housing (Auckland, 1997), u.p. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 2013); Hocken Collections Uare Taoka o Hākena (acquired 2001).

p.66

$4,000 - $7,000

49

Martin Parr Boring 2000 c-type photograph on Kodak paper signed Martin Parr and dated 2000 in ink verso 102mm × 149mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Rocket Gallery, London.

p.67

$1,500 - $2,000

50

Frank Hofmann Portrait of a pianist (Lili Kraus) 1946 gelatin silver print inscribed 41 43 in graphite verso 380mm × 275mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Exhibitions New Zealand Photography Collected, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 - 7 August 2016. Literature Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 238; Leonard Bell, Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand, 1930–1980 (Auckland University Press, 2017), 51. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1986).

p.68

$4,000 - $6,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

51

Frank Hofmann Arum Lilies c. 1944 gelatin silver print signed F H and inscribed 9/PHOTOGRAPH & PRINT BY FRANK HOFMANN in graphite upper edge 254mm × 203mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.69

$1,200 - $2,200

52

Frank Hofmann Fortress c. 1965 gelatin silver print inscribed Drawer 4 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed R327 in graphite upper right verso; dated c 1965 and inscribed "FORTRESS"/ (Auckland) in graphite verso; signed S Hofmann and inscribed Photograph and Print by Frank Hofmann/Authenticated by Stephen Hofmann in another hand in graphite verso 380mm × 305mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.70

$3,000 - $5,000

53

Peter Peryer New Zealand 15.3.91 1991 gelatin silver print 428mm × 278mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist. Exhibitions Peter Peryer, Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 14 July to 1 August 1992; Second Nature, City Gallery, Wellington (toured internationally), 1995-97; Paradise Now?: Contemporary Art from the Pacific, Asia Society Museum, New York, 18 February to 9 May 2004; New Zealand Photography Collected, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 - 7 August 2016 Literature Peter Peryer, Second Nature (Zurich: Edition Stemmle, 1995), 105; Melissa Chiu, Paradise Now?: Contemporary Art from the Pacific (Auckland: David Bateman, 2004), 76; Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 8 Collections Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui, acquired 1991; Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, acquired 1992; Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, acquired 2004.

p.71

$2,500 - $3,500

54

Gary Blackman Otago Medical School Corridor [5] 1977 gelatin silver print dated 1977 and inscribed Otago Medical School corridor [5] in graphite upper edge verso, signed Gary Blackman in graphite lower edge verso 140mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from McNamara Gallery, Wanganui.

p.72

$500 - $800

55

Bruce Foster Landscape 1 1977 gelatin silver print signed B Foster, dated 1977 and inscribed Landscape 1 in graphite verso 160mm × 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.73

$600 - $900

56

Fiona Pardington Rātana Church interior up north 1984 gelatin silver print signed Fiona Pardington, dated 1984 and inscribed Ratana Church interior up north in graphite verso 170mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from McNamara Gallery, Whanganui, 2005. Exhibitions Verbatim . . . revelation to oblivion, Lopdell House Gallery, Auckland, August 2005.

p.74

$1,500 - $2,500

57

Robin Morrison Interior, Rātana Church, Ruawai c. 1980 - 1990 gelatin silver print 380mm × 250mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Literature Robin Morrison, Robin Morrison: A Journey (Auckland: Tandem Press, 1994), 23.

p.75

$1,500 - $2,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

58

Andrew Ross The Mutton Club, Whanganui 2009 printing-out paper print signed Andrew Ross, dated 4/8/2009 and inscribed The Mutton Club, Whanganui in graphite verso 195mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Exhibitions Round and About Wanganui: 72 Photographic Studies by Andrew Ross, Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui, 2010. Literature Andrew Ross and Peter Ireland, Round and About Wanganui: 72 Photographic Studies by Andrew Ross (Whanganui: Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui, 2010), cover. Collections Sarjeant Gallery Te Whare o Rehua Whanganui (acquired 2010).

p.76

$500 - $800

59

Andrew Ross Keith Hickman, Ware Press, Ghuznee St, 1/7/99 1999 gelatin silver print inscribed Keith Hickman, Ware Press, Ghuznee St, 1/7/99 in ink lower left; signed Andrew Ross in ink lower right 280mm × 360mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Photospace Gallery, Wellington, 22 November 2002. Exhibitions Andrew Ross, Workshops in the central Wellington Area, Photospace Gallery, Wellington, 18 October - 5 November 2002.

p.77

$500 - $800

60

Andrew Ross Upper Cuba Street, November, 1996 1996 gelatin silver print signed Andrew Ross and inscribed Upper Cuba St, Nov 96. in graphite verso. 280mm × 350mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Photospace Gallery, 1999. Exhibitions Views Around Wellington, Photospace Gallery, Wellington, 22 February - 20 March 1999.

p.78

$500 - $800

61

John Nicol Crombie Upper Queen Street, Auckland c. 1860 albumenised salt print 145mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Literature Michael Graham-Stewart, Crombie to Burton: Early New Zealand Photography (Auckland: John Leech Gallery, 2010), 13.

p.79

$2,000 - $3,000

62

Laurence Aberhart Kamala and Charlotte in the grounds of the Lodge, Tawera, Oxford 1979. Printed 1981. gelatin silver print signed L. Aberhart, dated 1979 and inscribed 'LOYAL OCEANIC' LODGE, ST KILDA, DUNEDIN 1979. AGFA BROVIRA - PRINTED AND AND TONED GOLD/SELENIUM 1979 in ink verso; signed L ABERHART, dated 1981 and inscribed KAMALA AND CHARLOTTE in the ground of lodge Tawara (188); Oxford, August 1981. Kodak Studio Proof Paper; gold toned. in graphite verso 195mm × 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Lower Hutt. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, August 1981. Exhibitions Laurence Aberhart: 23 Photographs, Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1 - 21 August 1981. New Zealand Photography Collected, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 - 7 August 2016; Aberhart Starts Here, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 15 September 2017 - 6 February 2018 Literature Laurence Aberhart et al., Aberhart (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2007), 278; Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 281. Lara Strongman and Laurence Aberhart, Aberhart Starts Here (Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 2017), 85. Collections Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū (acquired 1982); Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1982).

p.80

$2,000 - $3,000

63

Ans Westra Mother has to pick him up and kiss him better. From the series: Washday at the pa 1964 gelatin silver print signed A.W in graphite lower right 284mm × 254mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Literature Ans Westra, Washday at the Pa (Wellington: Caxton Press, 1964), u.p.; Ans Westra et al., Handboek: Ans Westra Photographs (Wellington: Blair Wakefield Exhibitions, 2004), 146. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1999).

p.81

$5,000 - $7,000

64

John Johns Burnt Corsican pine (Pinus laricio), Balmoral Forest, Canterbury 1956 gelatin silver print dated 1956 and inscribed [Corsican pine stand about 20 yrs old destroyed by fire. Balmoral Forest, Canterbury] in ink upper edge verso; inscribed 6:023/A 7/11/M1569c in graphite upper right verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns in ink lower edge verso 252mm × 296mm

Provenance Estate of John Johns, Wellington. Literature PhotoForum 22 (October/November 1974), 17.; Nina Seja, PhotoForum at 40: Counterculture, Clusters and Debate in New Zealand (Auckland: Rim Books, 2014), 68. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 2003); Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki (acquired 1976).

p.82

$1,500 - $2,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

65

John Johns Radiata pine with clear-felled settings of 80 to 100 acres, Kaingaroa Forest 1960 gelatin silver print inscribed 6F 23 4 3 in graphite upper right verso; inscribed M3580 in graphite verso; inscribed Radiata pine with clear felled settings of 80 to 100 acres./Kaingaroa Forest/Photograph + print by John Johns in ink verso 161mm × 208mm

Provenance Estate of John Johns, Wellington. Exhibitions New Zealand Photography Collected, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 - 7 August 2016. Literature PhotoForum 22 (October/November 1974), 17; Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 250. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 2003); Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki (acquired 2014).

p.83

$800 - $1,600

66

John Johns Gale damage, Hanmer Forest, Canterbury c. 1960 - 1980 gelatin silver print inscribed 6:026 A 1/2 in graphite upper right verso; inscribed Gale Damaged Forest Canterbury New Zealand/John Johns/An experiment to obtain maximum resolution from Hasselblad negative + max speed of film (F.P.4); inscribed M12060 in graphite lower left verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns in ink lower edge verso 228mm × 230mm

Provenance Estate of John Johns, Wellington. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 2003).

p.84

$800 - $1,600

67

John Johns Fern fronds, Whaka Forest, Rotorua 1970. Printed 1979. gelatin silver print dated 1970 and inscribed R of T.M/3 3/TREE FERNS, WHAKA FOREST, ROTORUA/Top/13 B 72 4/6 in graphite upper edge verso; inscribed 14 in ink upper right verso; inscribed Photo 41/Page 56+57/23.3.79/1 in graphite verso; inscribed Forest World of N.Z./5/5/Photograph by John Johns./p.56-57 in ink verso 246mm × 292mm

Provenance Estate of John Johns, Wellington. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 2003).

p.85

$1,000 - $2,000

68

John Johns Underside of fern frond, showing sori 1970 gelatin silver print dated 1970 and inscribed [UNDERSIDE OF FERN FROND, SHOWING SORI] in graphite upper left verso; inscribed 13 B 71 4/6/28.10.70/1 in graphite upper right verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns. in graphite lower edge verso 257mm × 188mm

Provenance Estate of John Johns, Wellington.

p.86

$1,000 - $2,000

69

John Johns Fern frond, close-up c. 1960 - 1980 gelatin silver print inscribed 13B 65 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed [FERN FROND, CLOSE-U] in graphite upper edge verso; inscribed Photo + print by John Johns. in graphite lower edge verso 294mm × 212mm

Provenance Estate of John Johns, Wellington.

p.87

$1,000 - $2,000

70

Peter Peryer Self-Portrait 1977 gelatin silver print inscribed Self portrait November 1977 in graphite lower right 239mm × 239mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist.

p.88

$3,500 - $5,500

71

Peter Peryer Erika 1978 gelatin silver print 180mm × 115mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Gifted by Erika Parkinson, 1979.

p.89

$2,500 - $4,500

72

Robin Morrison Pink crib and caravan, Otago Peninsula 1979 cibachrome 265mm × 395mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Literature Robin Morrison, The South Island of New Zealand: From The Road (Martinborough: Alister Taylor, 1981), 79; Robin Morrison, Robin Morrison: At Home and Abroad, A collection of photographs (Auckland: Tandem Press, 1991), 63; Robin Morrison, The Robin Morrison Collection (Auckland Museum, 1997), 62. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1981).

p.90

$2,500 - $3,500


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

73

Ian MacDonald untitled c. 1982 cibachrome inscribed IMAC01 in graphite upper left verso 255mm × 390mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Exhibitions Short Back and Sides: Photographs by Peter Hannken and Ian MacDonald, Real Pictures Gallery, Auckland, 1982.

p.91

$400 - $600

74

Ian MacDonald untitled c. 1982 cibachrome inscribed IMAC02 in graphite upper left verso 290mm × 425mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Exhibitions Short Back and Sides: Photographs by Peter Hannken and Ian MacDonald, Real Pictures Gallery, Auckland, 1982.

p.91

$400 - $600

75

Burton Brothers Hinemihi Meeting House, Te Wairoa c. 1880 - 1886 albumen silver print inscribed 3846 RUNANGA HOUSE (HINEMIHI.) WAIROA - BURTON BROS. DUNEDIN on negative lower left 145mm × 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Collections National Library of New Zealand; negative held in the collection of Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

p.92

$400 - $600

76

Burton Brothers Interior of Rumanga [sic] House - Ohinemutu c. 1880 - 1889 albumen silver print inscribed 3883 - INTERIOR OF RUMANGA [sic] HOUSE - OHINEMUTU. BURTON BROS. DUNEDIN; inscribed The Walls of the interior of the Wharepuni or Guest house. Ohinemutu. The figures represent the ancestors of the Maories [sic]. The natives of Ohinemutu were loyal and fought for the Queen, and so they were presented with a bust of Her Majesty, which they keep in this building in ink lower right 140mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Literature Burton Brothers: fotografen in Niew-Zeeland, 1866-1898, ed. Paul Faber et al. (Amsterdam: Fragment Uitgeverij, 1988), 65.

p.92

$300 - $600

77

William Henry Thomas Partington untitled c. 1880 - 1900 albumen silver print 130mm × 185mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 2001.

p.93

$250 - $450

78

Una Garlick Unidentified man and boy by the Waikato River Tuakau c. 1920 - 1930 gelatin silver print inscribed Una Garlick in graphite lower right 115mm × 155mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Collections Tamaki Penga Hira Auckland War Memorial Museum.

p.93

$200 - $400

79

Josiah Martin Portrait of King Tawhiao c. 1900 gelatin silver print inscribed Tawhiao in ink lower edge 202mm × 154mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Collections Negative held in the collection of Tamaki Penga Hira Auckland War Memorial Museum.

p.94

$800 - $1,200

80

Pulman's Photographic Studio Te Hira Te Kawau c. 1870 - 1888 albumen silver print inscribed TE HINO [sic] TE KAWAU on negative lower left; inscribed PULMAN PHOt. on negative lower right 265mm × 190mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.94

$1,000 - $2,000

81

Samuel Carnell Portrait of Ihaka Whaanga c. 1870 albumen silver print inscribed Maori Chief in ink upper edge verso; photographer's stamp applied verso 95mm × 62mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Collections Negative held in the collection of the National Library of New Zealand.

p.95

$200 - $400

82

Foy Bros untitled c. 1870s albumen silver print 90mm × 56mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.95

$200 - $400


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

83

Gil Hanly Railway Driving Creek 1983 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly photo and inscribed Railway Driving Creek in ink lower edge verso 136mm × 202mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.96

$500 - $1,000

84

Gil Hanly Railway Driving Creek 1983 gelatin silver print signed Gil Hanly photo and inscribed Railway Driving Creek. in ink lower edge verso 136mm × 202mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.96

$500 - $1,000

85

William Andrews Collis untitled c. 1910 gelatin silver print inscribed W.A. Collis Photographer, New Plymouth in print on mount lower edge 170mm × 110mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.97

$150 - $250

86

Andrew Ross MP Ongarve 2004 printing-out paper print 190mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.98

$500 - $800

87

George Chance Whangarei Harbour, Near Marsden Point c. 1940 gelatin silver print signed Geo. Chance. F.R.P.S- and inscribed Whangarei Harbour - Near Marsden Point. in ink lower edge 260mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Cordy's, Auckland, 9 October 2018.

p.99

$300 - $600

88

Adrienne Martyn Louise Henderson, 1986 1986. Printed 1988. gelatin silver print signed © Adrienne Martyn, dated 1988 and inscribed "Louise Henderson, 1986" in ink upper edge verso 345mm × 345mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Brooker Gallery, Wellington, 1988. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1980); Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu (acquired 1990).

p.100

$800 - $1,600

89

Frank Hofmann Kiri Te Kanawa 1965 gelatin silver print inscribed Drawer 1 in graphite upper left verso; inscribed 254 A in graphite upper right verso; dated 1965 and inscribed "KIRI TE KANAWA" in graphite verso 380mm × 300mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.101

$4,000 - $6,000

90

Janet Bayly Black Dress 2001 Polaroid SX-70 (5 panels) signed Janet Bayley and dated 2001 in ink lower right verso 80mm × 80mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Photospace Gallery, Wellington, June 2001. Exhibitions Janet Bayly, Polaroid works: 1971 - 2001, Photospace Gallery, Wellington, 2001.

p.102

$1,000 - $1,600

91

Christine Webster Brian St. John - Eden Park 1983 cibachrome signed Christine Webster in ink lower right; signed Christine Webster, dated '83 and inscribed "Brian St. John - Eden Park" in graphite lower right verso 490mm × 490mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.103

$800 - $1,600

92

Christine Webster untitled 1983 cibachrome signed Christine Webster in ink lower right 500mm × 500mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.103

$800 - $1,600


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

93

Wayne Barrar Point, Western Lake Wairarapa 2008 selenium toned gelatin silver print, edition 4/10 dated 2008 and inscribed Point, Western Lake Wairarya [sic] 4/10 selenium toned silver gelatin print in ink lower left verso; signed W Barrar in ink and photographer's stamp applied lower right verso 190mm × 238mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.104

$1,000 - $2,000

94

Wayne Barrar Lake edge, remnant spars, Lake Monowai 2003 gold and sulphide toned silver gelatin contact photograph dated 2003, printed 2004 and inscribed WAYNE BARRAR Lake Edge, Ramnant Spars, Lake Monowai/Gold & sulphide toned silver gelatin contact photograph in type on printed label affixed upper left verso; signed W Barrar in graphite lower left verso; photographer's stamp applied lower right verso 206mm × 254mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.104

$1,000 - $2,000

95

Derek Henderson Emily Playford, Reids Farm 2008 inkjet print 570mm × 455mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from the artist, 2013. Literature Derek Henderson, Mercy Mercer (Auckland: Michael Lett, 2009), u.p.

p.105

$800 - $1,600

96

Glenn Jowitt Alofi, Niue, Food Division for Ear Piercing Ceremony 1982 cibachrome signed Glenn Jowitt NZ., dated 1982 and inscribed Alofi, Niue, Food Division for Ear Piercing Ceremony in graphite upper left verso 265mm × 395mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.106

$800 - $1,600

97

Glenn Jowitt Nukunopu, Tokelan Islands 1981 cibachrome signed Glenn Jowitt NZ, dated 1981 and inscribed Nukunopu, Tokelan Islands in graphite upper edge 265mm × 395mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch.

p.106

$800 - $1,600

98

Fiona Clark Genomegram (From The Other Half series) 1998 c-type print incorporating artist's genetic material, edition 1/1 inscribed GENOMEGRAM in embossed text left edge; inscribed 1/1 16/6/98 in graphite lower right verso 205mm × 255mm

Provenance Private collection, Wanganui.

p.107

$400 - $800

99

Julian Ward untitled 1999 gelatin silver print signed J Ward and dated 99 in graphite lower right; signed Julian Ward and dated Wellington 1999 in ink verso 140mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist, c. 1999.

p.108

$300 - $500

100 Peter Black Agents for Art 1990 gelatin silver print signed Peter Black, dated 1990 and inscribed Agents for Art in ink lower left verso 220mm × 300mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist.

p.108

$700 - $1,200

101 Glenn Busch Man With a Transistor Radio 1973 gelatin silver print signed Glenn Busch in graphite lower right 375mm × 255mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist, c. 1973 - 1974.

p.109

$500 - $800

102 Alan Knowles Dalmatian, Wigan Street 1998 gelatin silver print signed Alan Knowles, dated 1998 and inscribed Wigan St in graphite verso 155mm × 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.110

$200 - $400


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

103 Julian Ward Horse Makara 1998 gelatin silver print signed Julian Ward and dated 98 in graphite lower right; signed Julian Ward and inscribed Horse Makara in ink verso 140mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.110

$200 - $400

104 Peter Peryer Billy 1988 gelatin silver print signed Peter Peryer, dated 1988 and inscribed Billy (Morrison) in ink verso 152mm × 100mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist.

p.111

$1,000 - $2,000

105 Peter Black Black Power, Wellington, 1977 1977 gelatin silver print (triptych) signed P Black and dated 77 in ink upper edge verso; signed P Black and dated 77 in ink verso; signed P Black and dated 77 in ink lower edge verso 145mm × 215mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist. Collections The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1983).

p.112

$1,000 - $1,500

106 Peter Black Black Power, Wellington, 1977 1977 gelatin silver print 220mm × 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist.

p.113

$500 - $800

107 Anne Noble Self Portrait 1978 gelatin silver print (triptych) signed Anne Noble, dated 1978 and inscribed Triptych [sic] - Self Portrait in ink verso 175mm × 115mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.114

$600 - $1,200

108 Sharyn Black (female symbol) III (clad pelvis) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist c. 1980. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 2010).

p.115

$250 - $500

109 Sharyn Black

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist c. 1980. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 2010).

p.115

$250 - $500

110 Sharyn Black (female symbol) IV (clad bottom) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist c. 1980. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 2010).

p.115

$250 - $500

111 Sharyn Black Male symbol II (hand on chest) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist c. 1980. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 2010).

p.115

$250 - $600

112 Sharyn Black (Female/male symbol? V) (hand in pocket) 1977 gelatin silver print 200mm × 135mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist c. 1980. Collections Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki (acquired 2010).

p.115

$250 - $600

113 Mary MacPherson Wairarapa 1984 c-type print signed Mary MacPherson and dated 1984 in graphite lower right; signed Mary MacPherson, dated 1984 and inscribed Wairarapa in graphite verso; inscribed May 23 in graphite lower right verso 255mm × 390mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.116

$400 - $800

(Revealed breast) 1977 gelatin silver print 135mm × 200mm


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

114 Peter Black Wellington 2008 inkjet print signed Peter Black and dated 2011 in graphite lower right verso; signed Peter Black and dated 2009/2012 in graphite lower edge verso 360mm × 545mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist. Exhibitions New Zealand Photography Collected, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, 6 November 2015 - 7 August 2016. Literature Peter Black and Ian Wedde, I Loved You The Moment I Saw You (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2011), 3; Athol McCredie, New Zealand Photography Collected (Wellington: Te Papa Press, 2015), 299. Collections The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 2015).

p.116

$600 - $900

115 Mary MacPherson Urban Landscape 1986 cibachrome print signed Mary MacPherson and dated 1986 in graphite lower right 275mm × 270mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.117

$400 - $600

116 John Fields Hulme Court, 350 Parnell Road c. 1971 - 1972 gelatin silver print signed Fields in ink lower right 145mm × 225mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.118

$500 - $800

117 John Fields Awning and Bike, Thames c. 1973 - 1976 gelatin silver print 129mm × 216mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Collections Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 2016).

p.118

$600 - $800

118 Robin Morrison Allen Curnow c. 1993 gelatin silver print 250mm × 370mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland.

p.119

$1,000 - $2,000

119 Yvonne Westra Releasing the Shutter #2 2003 gelatin silver print inscribed Releasing the Shutter #2 in graphite lower right; signed Yvonne Westra and dated '03 in graphite lower left 195mm × 325mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington.

p.119

$200 - $400

120 Murray Hedwig Façade with Windows 1977. Printed 1978. cibachrome print, edition 1/25 signed M Hedwig and dated 1977 in graphite lower right; inscribed 1/25 in graphite lower left; signed MURRAY HEDWIG, dated 1977/ PRINTED 1978 and inscribed FAÇADE WITH WINDOWS/1/25 LIMITED EDITION in ink verso 190mm × 240mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Exhibitions Invisible Cities, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 2012. Collections Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū (acquired 1977).

p.120

$300 - $600

121 Julian Ward Makara 1998 gelatin silver print signed Julian Ward and dated 1998 in graphite lower right; signed Julian Ward, dated 1998 and inscribed Makara in ink verso 140mm × 210mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from the artist, c. 1998.

p.120

$200 - $400


bowerbank ninow

How to participate in the auction

Attending in person Auction N˚13 will take place on Wednesday 3rd April 2019 at 7.00pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they may do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange absentee bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

158


Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied. BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding. RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent. SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars. FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. If there is an unsatisfied  debt  then the applicant agrees that they be liable for and pay for all costs of recovery of the contract, which costs shall be collected by a debt collection agency. Costs payable by the applicant shall include, legal fees, commissions, fee’s and disbursements, and /or court fees and disbursements. COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 17.5% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

159


bowerbank ninow

Absentee & Phone Bidding Form Auction N°13 3rd Apr. 2019 bowerbank ninow

first name

Please specify the maximum amount that you wish to bid for this lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on your behalf until your maximum bid amount has been exceeded. The auctioneer will endeavor to secure this lot for you at the lowest possible price.

surname company postal address

ph mobile Ph landline email

Lot

Description

Amount

By completing and signing this form you confirm that you have read and accept Bowerbank Ninow’s conditions of sale (on reverse) and understand that this bid will be binding and that a buyer’s premium of an additional 17.5% + GST of the hammer price applies to this sale. The bid submitted here is exclusive of buyer’s premium and any GST on the premium.

SIGNED AS AGREED

date

160


Profile for Bowerbank Ninow

Auction N˚13  

Auction N˚13