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Auction N°10 25th July 2018


HOME / GALLERY

www.precinct35.co.nz


Graham Wall Real Estate 2 Tole Street Ponsonby PO Box 998 Shortland St Auckland 1140 New Zealand

Graham Wall +64 21 951 368 graham@grahamwall.com

Ollie Wall +64 21 520 514 ollie@grahamwall.com

Andrew Wall +64 21 520 508 andrew@grahamwall.com


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Photographer: David C Ginn

A Billingham is unlike any other bag. It isn’t about nostalgia or tradition and it is much more than just a desirable object. It is about wanting and expecting the best protection for your camera and equipment, giving you comfort and peace of mind.

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GOLDEN VASE by celebrated French ceramic house, Astier de Villatte.


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ONLY TEN LEFT

Collector’s edition art book and woodcut print by Tony de Lautour

395

$

This special collector’s edition of Tony de Lautour’s new book Us v Them is stab-bound with blue thread and presented in a foil-stamped slipcase, with a limited edition woodcut print by the artist. For more information or to order, contact Sarah Pepperle: sarah.pepperle@ccc.govt.nz / tel 03 941 7397.

US V THEM: TONY DE LAUTOUR 5 MAY – 9 SEPTEMBER 2018 CHRISTCHURCH ART GALLERY TE PUNA O WAIWHETŪ STRATEGIC PARTNERS


ISSUE 23 OUT NOW

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ABDUL ABDULLAH, TONY ALBERT, DAVIDA ALLEN, POLLY BORLAND, MICHAEL BUGELLI, HEAVENLY BODIES, ISAAC JULIEN, FRANCIS KURKDJIAN, RON ROBERTSON SWANN, RONNIE VAN HOUT, GORDON WALTERS, ALLISON ZUCKERMAN & MORE ISSU E 23 · AUGUST to OC TOBER 2018

Abdul Abdullah, Tony Albert, Davida Allen, Polly Borland, Michael Bugelli, Andrew Hazewinkel, Heavenly Bodies, Isaac Julien, Francis Kurkdjian, Ron Robertson Swann, Yvonne Todd, Ronnie Van Hout, Gordon Walters, Allison Zuckerman & more

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RONNIE VAN HOUT I can’t give up, 2012 painted polyurethane and fibreglass 150 x 30 x 28 cm Courtesy the artist and STATION, Melbourne


www.brothersbeer.co.nz


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°10 25th July 2018 Opening

Wednesday 18th July, 2018 6pm – 8pm Viewing

Thursday 19th – Tuesday 24th July, 2018 10am – 5pm Wednesday 25th, 2018 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 25th July 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 17.5% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon Bowerbank Ninow Auction N°10 July 25th, 2018 Catalogue of works Edition of 3500 ISSN 2537-6594 Design Direction Editor Design Design Intern Photography

DDMMYY Andrew Clark Elliot Ferguson Lucas Flynn Sam Hartnett

312 Karangahape Rd. Newton Auckland 1010 New Zealand +64 9 307 8870 info@bowerbankninow.com bowerbankninow.com Simon Bowerbank +64 21 045 1464 simon@bowerbankninow.com Charles Ninow +64 21 053 6504 charles@bowerbankninow.com


bowerbank ninow

Auction N°2 30th March 2016 Opening

Wednesday 23 March 2016 6pm Viewing

Thursday 24 – Tuesday 29 March 2016 10am – 5pm Wednesday 30 March 2016 10am – 1pm

Auction

Wednesday 30 March 2016 6.30pm

Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will pay the artist a voluntary resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Bowerbank Ninow are the first and only auction house in New Zealand to pay resale royalties to artists. buyer's premium A buyer’s premium of 15% will be charged on all items listed in this catalogue. GST (15%) is payable on the buyer’s premium.

colophon


auction n°10 — july 2018

Contents Plates

24

Essays

113

Interview Tony de Lautour & Andrew Clark

114

Nick Austin No Hiding in a Fishbowl

122

Ian Scott Universal Language

124

Eric Lee-Johnson Bone Country

126

Karl Fritsch Gradually Acquiring Gleam

128

André Hemer Contract with Reality

130

Jake Walker Concentrated Surfaces

133

Jeffrey Harris Wandering to Golgotha

134

Laith McGregor Overload

136

Don Driver Actual Depths

138

Index

139

How to participate in the Auction

150

Conditions of Sale

151

Absentee & Phone Bidding Form

152


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auction n°10 — july 2018


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26


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 1 John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #44 2002 paint marker on primed canvas signed Reynolds, dated 2002 and inscribed Acronyms Etc #44 in ink on stretcher verso 105mm × 105mm est

$200 - $400

27


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Lot 2 Peter Robinson untitled 1994 oil and graphite on canvasboard signed P R Robinson and dated April 94 in graphite lower edge verso 200mm Ă— 150mm est

$3,000 - $6,000

28


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 3 Darryn George Schedule Study #8 2015 automotive paint on melamine board signed DW George, dated 2015 and inscribed Darryn George/'Schedule Study #8/Automotive paint on Melamine Board in ink verso; inscribed Red in graphite verso 200mm × 140mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

29


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Lot 4 Bill Hammond Picnic 2007 lithograph on paper, 16/30 signed WD Hammond, dated 2007 and inscribed Picnic in graphite lower right 545mm Ă— 660mm est

$4,000 - $7,000

30


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 5 Shane Cotton Moerewa 2004 lithograph on paper, 37/40 signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2004 and inscribed Moerewa in graphite lower edge 560mm × 760mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

Lot 6 Shane Cotton Veil 2004 lithograph on paper, 38/40 signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2004 and inscribed Veil in graphite lower edge 560mm × 760mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

31


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Lot 7 Gavin Hurley Elizabeth 2009 collaged found paper signed GJH, dated 09 and inscribed Elizabeth in graphite verso 275mm Ă— 205mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

32


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 8 Gavin Hurley Fru Fru 2002 collaged found paper 305mm × 235mm est

$700 - $1,200

Lot 9 Gavin Hurley Put pop singer Madonna on stage and she oozes sex appeal 2002 collaged found paper signed gjh and dated 02 in graphite verso 280mm × 215mm est

$700 - $1,200

Lot 10 Gavin Hurley I won't be told what to do 2003 collaged found paper signed GJH, dated 03 and inscribed “I won't be told what to do” in graphite verso 135mm × 160mm est

$700 - $1,200

33


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Lot 11 André Hemer Big Node #42 2016 acrylic and pigment on canvas signed André Hemer, dated 2016 and inscribed Big Node #42/André Hemer/Vienna in graphite verso 420mm × 315mm est

$2,200 - $3,200

34


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 12 André Hemer SP_IRL #8 2017 acrylic and pigment on canvas signed André Hemer/AH, dated 2017 and inscribed SP_IRL #8 in graphite verso 360mm × 270mm est

$2,200 - $3,200

35


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Lot 13 Max Gimblett Swamp 2010-2011 watercolour and gold leaf on paper signed Max Gimblett and dated 2010/11 in graphite lower edge; artists stamp applied lower right 580mm Ă— 760mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

36


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 14 Arie Hellendoorn Multihead 2015 acrylic on linen signed Arie Hellendoorn, dated 2015 and inscribed Multihead in ink verso 405mm × 380mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

37


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Lot 15 Liz Maw Lady Kathryn and I 2011 giclee on paper, 1/10 signed E Maw, dated 2011 and inscribed Lady Kathryn and I in graphite lower edge 755mm Ă— 550mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

38


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 16 Liz Maw Aura

est

2002 giclee on paper, 2/10 signed E Maw, dated 2002 and inscribed Aura in graphite lower edge 730mm × 605mm

$1,500 - $2,500

39


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Lot 17 Stella Corkery untitled c. 2013-2017 oil pastel on paper 420mm Ă— 295mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

40


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 18 David Noonan untitled 2008 screenprint and embossing on paper, 49/60 signed David Noonan and dated 2008 in graphite lower right 620mm × 435mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

41


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Lot 19 Gavin Hurley Helen (Lona) 2003 oil on hessian 408mm Ă— 303mm est

$2,000 - $4,000

42


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 20 Gavin Hurley Dr Meyer 2003 oil on hessian 408mm × 303mm est

$2,000 - $4,000

43


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Lot 21 Brendon Wilkinson Basics 1999 modelling putty, oil, flocking, aluminium can signed Brendon Wilkinson and dated 1999 AD in brushpoint underside 110mm × 75mm × 70mm (widest points) est

$800 - $1,200

Lot 22 Brendon Wilkinson Beans c. 1999 modelling putty, oil, flocking, stainless steel spoon, aluminium can 170mm × 100mm × 70mm (widest points) est

$800 - $1,200

44


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 23 Laurie Steer Potato Sack Pot 2014 Kuatuna wild clay stoneware, ash glaze and Opunake iron sand 107mm × 165mm × 165mm (widest points) est

$800 - $1,200

45


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Lot 24 Laurie Steer Sarah 2018 wood-fired Great Barrier Island wild clay stoneware 95mm Ă— 63mm Ă— 63mm (widest points) est

$800 - $1,200

46


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 25 Laurie Steer War Flower 2018 wood-fired Karangahake wild clay stoneware and slips dated 18 and inscribed STEER with incision on underside 68mm × 100mm × 100mm (widest points) est

$1,200 - $2,200

47


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Lot 26 Laurie Steer Transcendental Avalanche 2015 wood-fired wild clay stoneware, ash glaze and iron sand 600mm Ă— 600mm Ă— 380mm (widest points) est

$2,500 - $3,500

48


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 27 Laurence Aberhart Amberley Memorial ('to Thine Own Self Be True'), Amberley, October, 1981 1981 gold toned gelatin silver print dated 1981 and inscribed Memorial: Amberly in ink lower left; signed L. Aberhart and dated 1982 in ink lower right 195mm × 245mm est

$3,000 - $5,000

49


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Lot 28 Dick Frizzell Circle Line 1995 oil on canvas signed Frizzell, dated 31/5/95 and inscribed Circle Line in brushpoint lower right 495mm Ă— 625mm est

$5,000 - $8,000

50


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 29 Jake Walker Untitled Painting 7 2013 oil on linen, glazed ceramic signed J Walker and dated 2013 in ink verso 345mm × 410mm est

$3,000 - $4,000

51


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Lot 30 Seung Yul Oh Untitled II 2004 acrylic on canvas signed Seung Oh in graphite verso 235mm Ă— 290mm est

$700 - $1,200

52


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 31 Max Gimblett untitled 1985 ink on paper signed Max Gimblett and dated 1985 in graphite upper left 1210mm × 800mm est

$3,000 - $5,000

53


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Lot 32 Gordon Walters Painting No. 7 2016 screenprint on paper, 62/100 Walters Estate bindstamp applied lower left; inscribed Painting No. 7 in graphite in another hand lower edge 500mm Ă— 375mm est

$4,000 - $6,000

54


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 33 Gordon Walters untitled c. 1970-1976 fragment of a gouache painting on paper with a study for a poster for the exhibition Amercian Graphics, Petar/James Gallery, 18-28 September 1976 on the reverse signed Gordon Walters in graphite lower edge 155mm × 92mm est

$2,000 - $4,000

55


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Lot 34 et al.

est

untitled & untitled II 1992 ink and grease pencil on found postcard signed LB, inscribed radiator electrique/untitled in grease pencil verso (upper panel); dated 1992 and inscribed 1-5 in ink verso (upper panel); inscribed radiator souffiant/untitled II in grease pencil verso (lower panel); dated 1992 and inscribed 1-5 in ink verso (lower panel) 39mm Ă— 89mm (each panel)

$1,000 - $2,000

56


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 35 Nick Austin Aquarium (with cave) 2012 acrylic on newspaper Hopkinson Mossman label affixed verso 575mm × 785mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

57


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Lot 36 Colin McCahon Sign to Reinga 1973 charcoal on paper inscribed Lets walk in graphite lower left; signed Colin McCahon and dated Easter '73 in graphite lower right; Peter McLeavey Gallery stamp applied verso 216mm Ă— 283mm est

$15,000 - $25,000

58


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 37 Colin McCahon Cashmere Hills 1948 conté on paper signed McCahon, dated ’48 and inscribed Cashmere Hills in graphite lower edge; John Leech Gallery label affixed verso 197mm × 250mm est

$6,000 - $8,000

59


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Lot 38 Ian Scott Small Lattice No.223 1989-1990 acrylic on canvas signed Ian Scott in graphite verso and inscribed 501/“Small Lattice No.223.” in ink verso 763mm × 763mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

60


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 39 Allen Maddox untitled 1977 oil on paper signed am and dated 1.7.77. in ink lower edge 600mm × 450mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

61


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Lot 40 Don Peebles Drawing 1974 graphite, ink and acrylic on paper signed Don Peebles, dated 1974 and inscribed Drawing in graphite verso 750mm Ă— 555mm est

$800 - $1,200

62


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 41 Carl Sydow untitled 1973 letraline on paper signed Carl Sydow and dated 1973 in ink lower right 560mm × 710mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

63


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Lot 42 Andrew Beck Focus Point 2015 acrylic on glass and silver gelatin print in artist-made frame signed A.Beck, dated 2015 and inscribed Focus Point in paint marker verso 660mm Ă— 510mm est

$2,900 - $3,500

64


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 43 Tony de Lautour Indicator 2007 acrylic on canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2007 in graphite verso 800mm × 1200mm est

$7,000 - $10,000

65


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Lot 44 Richard Killeen Left, Right 1981 gouache on paper signed Killeen, dated 1981 and inscribed Left, Right in graphite lower edge 750mm Ă— 550mm est

$5,000 - $8,000

66


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 45 Richard Killeen Island Mentality 1981 acrylic and collage on paper signed Killeen, dated 7.81 and inscribed Island Mentality in graphite lower edge 755mm × 565mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

67


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Lot 46 Don Driver Duck, Doll and Bug Assemblage c. 1980-1995 mixed media sculpture 490mm × 335mm × 335mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

68


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 47 Don Driver Painted Relief No 6 1972 acrylic on canvas and enamel on aluminium, artist-made frame signed Don Driver, dated 1972 and inscribed Painted Relief No 6 in ink verso 1395mm × 1840mm est

$15,000 - $20,000

69


bowerbank ninow

Lot 48 Michael Parekowhai Rainbow Servant Dreaming 2005 polyurethane and two-pot automotive paint 640mm Ă— 240mm Ă— 160mm (widest points) est

$10,000 - $15,000

70


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 49 Paul Cullen untitled 4 2005 wooden rulers, glue, varnish signed Paul Cullen, dated 2005 and inscribed 4 in ink verso 186mm × 240mm × 32mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

71


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Lot 50 John Reynolds Epistemologies IV 2004 oil pastel on paper inscribed IV in oil pastel lower right; signed Reynolds and dated 2004 in oil pastel lower left 990mm Ă— 690mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

72


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 51 John Reynolds Epistemologies VIII 2004 oil pastel on paper inscribed VIII in oil pastel lower right; signed Reynolds and dated 2004 in oil pastel lower left 990mm × 690mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

73


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Lot 52 Karl Fritsch untitled 2013 aluminium, cubic zirconia signed KF and dated 13 with incision 39mm × 26mm × 21mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 53 Karl Fritsch untitled 2009 silver, sapphires signed KF and dated 09 with incision 37mm × 29mm × 25mm est

$1,500 - $1,800

Lot 54 Karl Fritsch untitled 2014 gold, diamonds signed KF, dated 14 and inscribed gy with incision 30mm × 20mm × 21mm est

$2,200 - $2,800

74


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 55 Karl Fritsch untitled c. 2009-2010 gold, crystal signed KF with incision 36mm × 20mm × 20mm est

$1,700 - $2,200

Lot 56 Karl Fritsch untitled 2013 silver, rubies, sapphires, garnets signed KF and dated 13 with incision 32mm × 23mm × 14mm est

$1,600 - $2,200

Lot 57 Karl Fritsch untitled 2013 copper, silver, cubic zirconia signed KF and dated 13 with incision 37mm × 37mm × 37mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

75


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Lot 58 Bill Hammond Bone Eagle A 2007 etching, 12/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle A in graphite lower left 90mm × 150mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

Lot 59 Bill Hammond Bone Eagle B 2007 etching, 6/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle B in graphite lower left 90mm × 150mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

Lot 60 Bill Hammond Bone Eagle C 2007 etching, 16/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle C in graphite lower left 90mm × 150mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

76


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 61 Bill Hammond untitled 2006 lithograph on paper, 36/100 signed WD Hammond and dated 2006 in graphite lower right 570mm × 420mm est

$3,000 - $4,000

77


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Lot 62 Andrew Barber Study 12 2007 oil on linen signed AWB, dated 2007 and inscribed “Study 12” in ink verso 355mm × 305mm est

$1,800 - $2,600

78


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 63 Robert Ellis untitled 1963 ink and acrylic on paper signed Robert Ellis and dated ‘63 in ink lower left 780mm × 560mm est

$4,000 - $6,000

79


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Lot 64 Robert Ellis River Bend & City 1964 oil on hardboard signed Robert Ellis and dated 64 in brushpoint lower left; signed by Robert Ellis, dated 1964 and inscribed ‘River Bend & City’/91 × 71 cms. in ink verso 910mm × 710mm est

$10,000 - $15,000

80


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 65 Robert Ellis The Road Crosses the River into the City 1964 oil on hardboard signed Robert Ellis and dated 64 in brushpoint lower right; signed by Robert Ellis, dated 1964 and inscribed ‘The Road Crosses the River into the City’/71 × 91 cms. in ink verso 710mm × 910mm est

$10,000 - $15,000

81


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Lot 66 Eric Lee-Johnson Hokianga Settlement 1950 ink, watercolour and graphite on paper signed E, dated 50 and inscribed Hokianga Settlement in ink lower right 570mm Ă— 390mm est

$7,000 - $12,000

82


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 67 Eric Lee-Johnson Bones among the Boulders 1948 watercolour and graphite on paper inscribed Bones among the Boulders in ink upper right verso 560mm × 760mm est

$3,000 - $5,000

83


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Lot 68 Laith McGregor These Teas are Saving Me 2014 ink, graphite and watercolour on paper inscribed These Teas are Saving Me... in ink lower left; signed LM, dated November 2014 and inscribed 8:08am/12:08am/3:31pm/2:58pm/10:38pm in ink lower right; signed LM in brushpoint lower right 320mm × 235mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

Lot 69 Laith McGregor Jelly 2014 ink and watercolour on paper inscribed of Jelly Roll Mortons blues on the in ink lower edge; inscribed 10 02am in graphite lower right; signed LM, dated 14 and inscribed 1:09 am/4:47pm in ink lower right 320mm × 235mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

Lot 70 Laith McGregor Coffee Time 2015 ink, graphite and watercolour on paper inscribed 8:08 am/3:48 pm/COFFEE TIME in graphite lower left; signed LM and dated 6.1.15 in graphite lower right 320mm × 235mm est

$1,200 - $1,800

84


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 71 John Reynolds Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations. 1999 ink transfer on cotton signed Reynolds, dated 1999 and inscribed Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations. in graphite lower edge 1865mm × 2245mm est

$3,500 - $4,500

85


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Lot 72 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm Ă— 230mm est

$400 - $700

Lot 73 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm Ă— 230mm est

$400 - $700

86


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 74 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm × 230mm est

$400 - $700

Lot 75 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm × 230mm est

$400 - $700

87


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Lot 76 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm Ă— 230mm est

$400 - $700

Lot 77 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm Ă— 230mm est

$400 - $700

88


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 78 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm × 230mm est

$400 - $700

Lot 79 Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm × 230mm est

$400 - $700

89


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Lot 80 Jeffrey Harris untitled 1974 oil on board signed JH and dated ‘74 in brushpoint lower left 175mm Ă— 290mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

90


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 81 Jeffrey Harris untitled 1980 charcoal on paper 420mm × 290mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

91


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Lot 82 Colin McCahon Fifteen Drawings for Charles Brasch 1951-1952 lithograph on paper (24 panels) 260mm Ă— 200mm (each panel) est

$4,000 - $6,000

92


auction n°8 — march 2018

93


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Lot 83 Simon Denny Picture Flip 2007 custom-woven cotton towel 740mm Ă— 1510mm est

$2,500 - $3,500

94


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 84 Kushana Bush Alabaster Man 2014 etching and aquatint on paper signed Kushana Bush and dated 2014 in graphite lower right; inscribed Alabaster Man in graphite lower left 335mm × 255mm est

$1,500 - $2,500

95


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Lot 85 Michael Thompson untitled 2014 acrylic on paper 760mm Ă— 565mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

96


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 86 Richard Thompson untitled 2000 ink on paper signed R.T. and dated 2000 in graphite lower left 110mm × 110mm est

$500 - $1,000

97


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Lot 87 Rohan Wealleans The Mighty Thor c. 2010-2012 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene 250mm × 160mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 88 Rohan Wealleans The Golem c. 2010-2012 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene 250mm × 160mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

Lot 89 Rohan Wealleans The Thing and Skull c. 2010-2012 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene 250mm × 160mm est

$1,000 - $2,000

98


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 90 Rohan Wealleans Jelly Baby Dreaming 2008 acrylic on canvas signed Rohan Wealleans and dated 2008 ink lower left verso 1630mm × 1200mm est

$9,000 - $13,000

99


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Lot 91 Billy Apple Forty Years: 1962-2002 2002 screenprint, from an edition of 40 signed Billy and inscribed ’80 in graphite 380mm × 572mm est

$800 - $1,200

100


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 92 Emily Hartley-Skudder Galloway Collection 2013-2014 oil on calico signed E Hartley Skudder/Emily Hartley-Skudder and inscribed Galloway Collection in ink upper edge verso; dated 2013-14 in ink lower edge verso 150mm × 230mm est

$1,200 - $2,200

101


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Lot 93 Jason Greig The Hopeful Christians 2007 oil on board signed JG and dated 07 in brushpoint lower right; Hamish McKay Gallery stamp applied verso 320mm Ă— 357mm est

$3,500 - $4,500

102


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 94 Roger Mortimer Recovery 1998 acrylic on canvas signed Roger Mortimer and dated 1998 in ink verso 1340mm × 1340mm est

$3,500 - $4,500

103


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Lot 95 Stephen Bambury Co-ordinates (study) c. 1977-1978 acrylic on canvas on hardboard signed Stephen Bambury, dated 1977-78 and inscribed acrylic on canvas/ Co-ordinates (study) in ink verso 435mm Ă— 687mm est

$5,000 - $7,000

104


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 96 Max Gimblett Tiburon/Grisant 1983 acrylic polymer on canvas signed Max Gimblett, dated ‘83 and inscribed Tiburon/Grisant in ink upper edge verso 300mm × 495mm est

$4,000 - $6,000

105


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Lot 97 James Robinson untitled 2002 mixed media on canvas (12 panels) signed www.jamesrobinson.co.nz in ink verso (8 panels); signed James Robinson and dated 02 in ink verso (2 panels) 580mm Ă— 840mm (overall, installation size variable) est

$1,500 - $2,500

106


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 98 Richard Lewer untitled c. 1997 graphite on paper signed From Richard Lewer in graphite lower left 1000mm × 795mm est

$2,000 - $3,000

107


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Lot 99 Michael Smither untitled 1990 graphite on paper signed MDS and dated 90 in graphite lower right 295mm Ă— 215mm est

$500 - $1,000

108


auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 100

Michael Smither Rocks, Tractor & Mountain 2012 screenprint on paper, 18/80 signed MDS and dated 2012 in graphite lower edge 460mm × 595mm

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$1,200 - $2,200

Lot 101

Michael Smither Coral Head with Fish 2013 screenprint on paper, 12/50 signed MDS and dated 2013 in graphite lower edge 375mm × 440mm

est

$800 - $1,600

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Lot 102

Alexis Hunter Circle 1991 oil on canvas signed Alexis Hunter in ink verso; inscribed Alexis Hunter/Circle/oil on canvas/11 × 9in/1991/EN 4/AH in ink on gallery K label affixed verso 255mm × 200mm

est

$700 - $1,400

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auction n°8 — march 2018

Lot 103

Alexis Hunter Secret Places IV 1990 oil on canvas signed Alexis Hunter, dated 1990 and inscribed Secret Places IV, oil on canvas 24" × 20"/R skin Glue & lead w u/c orange in ink verso 610mm × 510mm

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$1,500 - $2,500

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Lot 104

Denys Watkins Davy Crockett 2016 gouache on paper signed Watkins and dated 016 in graphite lower right 420mm Ă— 420mm

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$500 - $1,000

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auction n°10 — july 2018

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auction n°8 — march 2018

Interview Tony de Lautour & Andrew Clark

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Nick Austin No Hiding in a Fishbowl

122

Ian Scott Universal Language

124

Eric Lee-Johnson Bone Country

126

Karl Fritsch Gradually Acquiring Gleam

128

Andre Hemer Contract with Reality

130

Jake Walker Concentrated Surfaces

133

Jeffrey Harris Wandering to Golgotha

134

Laith McGregor Overload

136

Don Driver Actual Depths

138

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lot 43

auction n°10 — july 2018

Interview Tony de Lautour & Andrew Clark auction n°8 — march 2018 Tony de Lautour graduated from the University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts in 1988, and had his first solo show, Bad White Art, in 1995. De Lautour is part of a group of Christchurch artists often characterised as the “pencil-case painters,” known for work that embraced the grungy aesthetic of the 1990s and challenged an academic painting discourse focused on conceptualism and minimalism. De Lautour’s work is held in numerous major private and public collections, and a retrospective of his practice, Us v Them, was held this year at the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, curated by Peter Vangioni.

AC Perhaps we should start at the start—maybe we could talk about your student days at Ilam in Canterbury? I’ve read that you studied sculpture during your time there—who were you looking to for inspiration, at the time? What kind of stuff were you making? Tdl We had sculptural exercises. My very first year, which was the intermediate year, you looked at line, and that sort of thing. In the second year, you started looking at the figure, and I was making these kind of wooden fetish talisman-objects. I didn’t fully realise them, in a way, but then later I got into almost Carl Andre-type repetitions of a square—spreading hardboard squares on the floor, almost painting with them. They were stacked and arranged and then I made a sort of L-shaped block form derived from a chair, and used that to cast these little blocks. I suppose the easiest summary of them without trying to describe them all is that they were quite formal, but maybe a play on formalism. AC So coming out of a very regimented art school background, then. I imagine that Ilam at the time was quite traditional in terms of the teaching methodology. Tdl Yeah, it was. It was split—you were either doing painting, or you were doing sculpture. There was very little cross-over between the departments, like you would see now. If you went into the painting department at Ilam now, and you wanted to make primarily threedimensional work, you probably could. It was quite divided. You were there for four years, and you had your major, which in my case was sculpture, but for two years you could also do one day a week of another field, like painting or photography, or whatever. So I did painting, and John Hurrell was the tutor for that, which was really good. He was into a lot of chance-based work. AC I’ve seen some of his paintings that are based on randomness and rolling dice. They’re quite interesting. Tdl He sort of introduced us to that idea. There was also another project where he had us take a magazine page and render it up in sort of a pop-art way, but from memory, there was also a chance element involved. Maybe the colours we were using were randomly determined. It gave me a bit to think about. I had gone to art school intending to be a painter, but had kind of got side-tracked by sculpture, because we had a really good sculpture tutor in our first year. AC That can happen. Sometimes it’s the teachers that you have who drive your interest, rather than the other way around.

Left: Lot 43, P.65/114 Tony de Lautour Indicator 2007 acrylic on canvas 800mm x 1200mm

Tdl Yeah. Funnily enough, in my final year the head of the painting department could see that I was possibly more interested in painting anyway, and would benefit from a year over there. He told me to go ask my sculpture tutor if I could join the painting department for my final year, and the sculpture tutor just said, “tell him to fuck off.” [laughter] That was sort of the end of it. At the time I felt like it wasn’t in the best interests of the student, but it was about two tutors just trying to mess with each other’s department and each other’s ego. It wasn’t really to do with me. In hindsight I think staying in the sculpture department, finishing the year, and then sort of finding my own way with painting was 115


probably beneficial anyway. It was kind of funny, after art school there were definitely people saying, “oh, you shouldn’t be doing paintings, you’ve got a sculpture degree!” It was pretty ridiculous, all that sort of stuff. How ingrained the divisions between departments were in those days.

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Tony de Lautour untitled 2010 coloured pencil on paper 296mm x 210mm Auction N˚6 Achieved $240.25

AC That’s kind of interesting to me as well, that idea of coming out of art school and then taking this left turn in your practice. What’s interesting to me about the earlyto-mid ‘90s as an era is the kind of grunge/post-punk DIY ethos that seems to have infiltrated a lot of areas of creative production, not just painting. What was your experience of being part of that scene? Tdl We grew up in that post-punk era, the early ‘80s—walking around with Doc Martens on and spiky hair, ripped jeans, and we were going to lots of gigs. It was the Flying Nun days, so there were lots of good bands coming through—not just Flying Nun ones, but lots of local punk bands, like the Gordons and Desperate Measures. I’d go and see bands at the Gladstone—underage, but that was all good. There was that kind of attitude amongst a lot of people that you could just do anything, and it didn’t really matter. I just kept on with that, in a lot of ways. AC Thinking about punk, and the idea of that lack of artifice, it could be argued that folk or outsider art is the most potent manifestation of the DIY idea. You’ve referenced folk art in your work to some extent—I’m thinking particularly of your painted saws, which I believe have a pedigree in American folk art. Tdl That was one of those things—my parents had been away on holiday, and they’d visited some relatives of my mother’s in Canada and said they’d seen these saws with landscape paintings on them. I was going to garage sales and picking up these saws, and I started painting on them—probably not in the way my parents thought I would! I’ve always had an interest in folk art, and naïve and primitive art. I’ve got a collection of funny little watercolours and oil paintings that people have made. I think it goes into a similar area to that punk roughness. AC The lack of a sense of polish, or of the need to display artifice or skill, maybe? Tdl I guess it’s an authenticity, or something. It hasn’t been fussed over, you know? Although some of those naïve works are intensely fussed over, in that they’ve had an idea, and they render it in such a slow, deliberate manner, even though the whole thing is completely wonky. AC You’ve also done some fabricating of your own— ceramics, things like that. The china cabinet is kind of an interesting New Zealand site—it tends to be full of things that are too precious to throw away, and too impractical to use—useless, basically. Was there an element of that going on in those works? Tdl I think the ceramics came out of an interest in Staffordshire figures, which are quite naïve, if you start looking at the way they’re painted. Also, older blue-and-white china and Chinese export ceramics— AC Willow pattern? Tdl Yeah, and there was also this early nineteenth century Chinese export china that had renderings of European subject matter, but it had this definitely Asian look to it—like they’re trying to do something that’s unnatural to their sensibility. They must have been copying images from European prints. 116


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Tony de Lautour untitled 2008 glazed white earthenware 115mm x 195mm x 80mm Auction N˚7 Achieved $961.00

Those sorts of things influenced me. A friend of mine was working at Aranui High School as the head of the art department, and they’d recently bought a kiln. He said to me, “there’s a kiln here, you should make some ceramics and test it out,” so I made a few and just kept going. This was around 2007-8. I made a whole lot, and then just sort of stopped. All of a sudden, ceramics have become quite a cool thing to do, in recent years. auction n°8 — march 2018

AC One of the strengths of your work, I find, is that it talks explicitly about New Zealand in a way that’s refreshingly unvarnished and direct. I’ve got this idea that your work taps into some elements of New Zealand society—the drinking culture, the music, maybe also a kind of selfstarting “fuck you” attitude—that don’t get a lot of play in fine arts circles. What’s your take on the problem of how to represent New Zealand to New Zealanders? Tdl I suppose I just started out with looking at that New Zealand iconography. It came to me in an odd way—I was working in a second-hand store, and people were bringing in stuff to try and sell, and a lot of it was obviously stolen. The guys were just criminals, and a lot of them had the DIY tattoos: “Love” and “Hate,” cobwebs, but also kiwis and “NZ.” I was like, man, these people are being kind of nationalistic, but they’re antisocial at the same time. There was a conundrum there that made me want to use that imagery. I just went on from there—using the kiwis and having them holding syringes, drinking, doing all sorts of boozy things. That is also part of the culture here but, like you say, it probably isn’t represented. The other irony of the whole thing is that you’re pretty much dis-playing them in dealer art galleries where the maximum number of people who’re going to see the exhibition while it’s up is a couple of hundred. I guess when you have it in a public art gallery it’s different. Looking back at the works now, they seem kind of tame and a bit humorous. I remember at the time people getting upset about them. AC There’s a lot of violent subtext (and supertext, I guess) in your earlier figurative works—guns, knives, skulls and so on. I think people often interpret these images as being intentionally confrontational or transgressive, or at least they did at one point, but I kind of see them as shorthand for these very straightforward power dynamics that underlay a lot of social interactions. Tdl Yeah. Say, for example, using the hypodermic syringe. People just went, “oh, drugs.” And I was thinking, well, actually, you’re leaping to the negative side—it could also be about providing a cure. There are other things that could be possible. AC You’ve talked (in the interview you did recently with Peter Robinson1) about the impact of heraldry and the idea of family genealogy in your work—something that seems obvious in retrospect. Heraldry is really a very, very ancient idea—using images as a shorthand for groups of people, sticking this icon on your shield or your flag and saying, “this is us.” I can see a connection to your work, there. Tdl There’s a family coat of arms. We had a coat of arms in our house, so it was a visual reference that I always had. I guess it’s connected to the New Zealand identity thing, and the tattoos and stuff. It was also bound up in this idea that I’m living in New Zealand, but also, what’s my identity or my background? I guess I got caught up in the identity politics of the time, like what Peter Robinson was exploring, although down quite a different path.

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1

Peter Robinson, “Interview” in Peter Vangioni et al., Us v Them: Tony De Lautour (Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 2018), 209.


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Tony de Lautour, Underworld 2, 2006. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū

AC I think quite a lot of New Zealand art historically has been about artists trying to figure out how to make art here, or to be from New Zealand. It’s really an extension of a very long, ongoing conversation. Tdl I guess early on it was just about recording the place, wasn’t it? AC Exactly. That regionalist impulse, to try to make things that are recognisably from New Zealand, and then later it becomes about figuring out what that means. In the work that’s in this catalogue, there’s a different thing going on—maybe something to do with the idea of mapping out connections between ideas—all the various points and icons making up a kind of informational matrix. How close is that reading? Tdl I’m open to any reading on my work. [laughter] I’ve never been one to close down a reading, or to say that there’s one definitive reading. I like that open-ness. AC I sort of see those works as mind maps, or something. Going from idea to idea, point A to B, and then drawing a path through it all. Tdl A connection. Yeah, they are sort of like that. That particular work is probably near the end of the series, where there are still representational, figurative elements in there, but there are also a few more arrows and circles and things where it’s starting to head—not towards full abstraction, but the interest in shapes is coming through. AC So more formal elements, then? Tdl Yeah. I guess the early ones are a sort of dense overload of figurative images, maybe a comment in some ways on the beginning of the digital age, where there’s a mass overload of imagery. The ironic thing is doing it with paint, which is the old-school way of doing things. AC In your massive painting Underworld 2, is there something similar going on? In her recent essay, Lara Strongman identifies this work as a distillation of a lot of your previous themes and iconography—the British lions, heads, spider webs, kiwis, lightning bolts, crucifixes, etc—an encyclopaedia of imagery. How did that painting come about?

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Tdl I had done a lot of previous, similar works, and I was about to have a show at Ray Hughes gallery in Sydney. They had an extremely long wall, and I just thought I’d try to make a painting that was as long as the wall in my studio at the time, which was a five-metre wall. As I was working on it, it did start to become a catalogue of all the previous images. Because I had to fill up the space, I had to just think back to what other imagery I had used, or what I could bring auction n°8 — march 2018 to it. Maybe it was the sheer overload of making that work that led me down the track of being more interested in shapes. AC It’s almost like you’re saying goodbye to all that stuff, because your work took such a different turn subsequently. Tdl Yeah. I guess it took a few years to change, but even in that Indicator painting, which was made in the same studio as Underworld 2, but just a bit after, there are noticeably less figurative elements. Like they’re sort of easing out, now, in the newer work. AC I’m interested in these big paintings, and linking that somehow to the idea of landscape. I’ve got a small work of yours hanging in my house—it’s a little painting of some hills, white on a black background, from 2002. There’s the obvious reference to McCahon using Cotton’s Geomorphology of New Zealand (a book that no one’s ever read, but that has this mythic status in New Zealand art historical circles)—breaking the landscape down into its constituent parts. However, in other works from the mid-2000s you do things like arranging the little hill forms into the shape of the Golden Arches or the Apple logo, these elements of the contemporary cultural landscape. I wonder if there are notes of landscape subjects in a lot of your works. Tdl I suppose so? Obviously, if you’re referencing mountains. . . Initially, they were mountains referenced from the early landscape painting of New Zealand, like Augustus Earl or whoever. I’d just copy them out. Later they became little smooth hills—more like McCahon’s. Even if you just put a canvas lengthways, it’s called a landscape format. Even if you draw a face on it, it still has the orientation of a landscape. AC So it’s like inescapable background noise, painting in New Zealand? Tdl Maybe? When I did my Revisionist paintings, obviously, they’re landscapes, but altered. So, I guess it’s been present. It wasn’t a deliberate, conscious thing to go into landscape painting. AC So many of these things aren’t. You mentioned your Revisionist series of works using found canvases, some of which have this dreamlike quality to them. Another thing I like about them is how economical they are—you’re making what is, in many cases, a fairly small intervention in the found object, but it has the effect of completely transforming the scene into something else. I’d love to hear anything you had to say about the series. Tdl It was just one of those things I started doing—they did just seem like empty stage sets, waiting for a few characters to arrive. You really didn’t have to do much. Initially, I did want them to still look like the original landscape, but then if you looked close you’d see that the mountain had smoke coming out of it, or it was shaped like a head, or there was a small snake in a tree. Early on, I wanted the intervention to be subtle, and later they became more obvious. You didn’t need to alter a lot, though. Most of the work had already been done.

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Tony de Lautour Raft (with Trees and Lions) 2003 acrylic and graphite on canvas 610mm x 500mm Auction N˚3 Achieved $4,690.00

Tony de Lautour Conspiracy Plan 2002 oil on canvas 1210mm x 810mm Auction N˚4 Achieved $5,862.50


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AC So were they mostly op-shop finds, those pictures?

Tony de Lautour Landscape bowerbank ninow 2001 acrylic and coloured pencil on canvasboard 305mm x 406mm Auction N˚4 Achieved $3,986.50

Tdl Yeah, initially I started finding them at op-shops or garage sales. A lot of them were really nice, naïve little landscapes that I kept. Some of them were quite damaged and I just thought, well, I’m not going to restore these. So, I started just using the damaged ones. Then I started going to local estate auctions, things like that. AC There’s a bit of a narrative that your more recent abstract paintings are a reflection or comment of some kind on the Christchurch quakes and the ongoing effect they’ve had on the city. I wonder if this massive disjunction—physically, mentally, emotionally, economically—has been fully processed yet by the creative people who live there. It’s still very present. Tdl I suppose everyone has or had their own way of processing it. It is an ongoing thing—but in some ways, I feel that my most recent work has probably moved away from that. I’ve worked my way through the earthquake ideas, the ideas about property and those kinds of things, that became prevalent after the earthquake. Now it’s gone on to something else.

Tony de Lautour Sample 2002 acrylic on canvasboard 230mm x 300mm Auction N˚3 Achieved $2,345.00

I guess it is just a way of working through things. Some people had different ways—they’d say “oh, I’m definitely not going to make any work about the earthquake.” They don’t realise it, but that’s actually a stance caused by the earthquake, as well—it’s still a reaction. I didn’t set out to deliberately make work about the earthquake. But I stayed in Christchurch—I had a lot of issues to deal with, like a property that was damaged and was either going to get demolished or fixed, or whatever. That was a process that a lot of people had to go through. I was living in a temporary place for a while, working in a garage, and I guess all those things feed into your work. On a purely visual level, seeing the piles of rubble, buildings halfdemolished, it all feeds in. AC It’s kind of hard for art to deal with the big issues, sometimes—you run the risk of being didactic, or producing things that are too literal or one-dimensional in their reading. I’d be very interested to hear your thoughts on this. Tdl I know what you mean. I guess the path to abstraction had already been set before the earthquake—I made what you’d call abstract paintings just prior. Funnily enough, a lot of them were a series called Tower, which were these wonky towers—weird, in retrospect. I found, after the earthquakes, that it felt a lot more real to deal with shapes and blocks of colour, rather than figurative imagery. I didn’t want to go back to that. And I really didn’t want, if I was going to make anything to do with the earthquakes, to do something that was just illustration. Doing a drawing of a broken building, or something—that’s not really helping anyone. Also, there were so many people documenting it with photography. It would have been pointless on another level, anyway. It just seemed to be a better way to express any thoughts or issues, or anything, that I had about the earthquake, or what had happened. AC Do you think there’s any element of that idea of heraldry, or the earlier iconography, that filters through into the abstract work? Or do you feel that it’s a separate enterprise? Tdl No? I don’t know. Some things seem to just come up. Some basic things, like that powder blue colour, just keep resurfacing. It’s not in every painting, but it goes away and then I just come

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back to it. I guess there’s a sort of a formality to heraldry, and even naïve painting. AC It can become interesting because of the mark-making, or it can even inadvertently become a weird formal exercise, somehow. Tdl I guess you come back to that. I always think that even the figurative auction n°8 — march 2018 work I was doing back then was quite formal, or placed, in a lot of ways. Some of that came from looking at Philip Guston, who was an abstract painter who’d gone into figurative work later in life. I’ve gone the other way. Although, talking about the art-school days, I was making abstract work then, before going on to figurative stuff. AC That formalist training you got is finally paying off! Tdl Yeah! It’s funny, in some ways a parallel thing has happened to Peter Robinson. His work is essentially abstract, now. I wouldn’t say strictly formal, but it does go back to work that I recall him making at art school. It’s almost like we’ve gone right back to the beginning again. AC To what extent are you consciously thinking about all the stuff that goes along with abstraction in New Zealand? There’s a genealogy there: Walters, Mrkusich, and the rest. Maybe even someone like Don Peebles? Tdl You can’t not be aware of that work. I’ve quite recently come around to Don Peebles’ work. Years ago, I thought it was a little bit fussy, or something. AC They can be. I really like some of his early assemblage works, the things he was making in the UK. Tdl The box things, yeah. Peter Vangioni, who curated the survey,2 got together about a dozen of those works about a year ago and put them up at the Christchurch Art Gallery.3 It was a lovely show. I suppose on a visual level I’m aware of those works—Walters, Mrkusich and New Zealand abstraction. But I guess I haven’t read too deeply into it, or investigated what their rationale was for making them. I really don’t know a lot about why Mrkusich was making the works that he did. Walters and McCahon, you can’t help but know about them. AC That’s the wallpaper, right? Tdl Yeah. . . I guess the short answer is, you’re aware of that lineage and parts of it surface in the work. AC I think it’s probably a good thing not to be hyper-aware of that stuff, to be honest. It could be paralysing. Tdl That’s the danger that I’ve always found. You start to read too much about what their intentions were, or what they were trying to do— their aims. Then you start to equate it to your own work. Like you say, it can paralyse you. Also, some of the works recently have come more out of investigating letter forms and typography—being a bit more playful, rather than strictly making high minded, serious abstraction.

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2

Us V Them: Tony de Lautour, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 5 May – 16 September, 2018.

3

Don Peebles: Relief Constructions, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, 8 April – 3 September, 2017.


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left: lot 35, nick austin, Aquarium (with cave)

auction n°10 — july 2018

Nick Austin No Hiding in a Fishbowl

painted for use as a video projection room, with the windows open to the world so the sound of a nearby stream would play as a kind of “stereo soundtrack.”2 Meanwhile, the accompanying works from Denny used photographs of fish and Nick Austin’s paintings are out of a Kafkaesque housed these in television casings. These were storybook. The style is simple, even sweet with intended to be read as TV-aquariums—the kind delicate washes of colour, but the narrativeauction is that were once ubiquitous in electronics stores, n°8 — march 2018 essentially a TV playing a long slow clip of exotic one of excruciating mundanity. In an interview fish swimming around. In early 2011, Austin with Megan Dunn, Austin recounts the words of a local art critic: “TJ McNamara once described showed another grouping in his solo exhibition Not haiku at Hopkinson Cundy, this time with some of my work as dull paintings of a dull world. Maybe he was right.”1 What better subject for a the works hung low on the wall, forcing viewers to bend to peer within, just as they might when painter of the dull than the worn-out monotony gazing into a domestic aquarium resting at table of a fish tank? And yet, Austin’s Aquarium paintings are somehow not dull at all, but are, height, perhaps the one in your doctor’s office or at your child’s kindergarten. rather, enchanting in their almost overblown attempts to be ordinary. They could be boring, if only they weren’t so amusing. Even the These playful methods of display feel entirely materials are almost laughably domestic, for appropriate for works as droll as Austin’s, works each of Austin’s watery scenes is carefully that are more likely to provoke a wry smile than a painted onto newspaper, with articles and cackle of laughter. He has said before that “Good advertisements only partially obscured comedy is utterly serious,” a comment Dunn behind various degrees of murk. followed with the observation that his work is more funny-peculiar than funny-ha-ha.3 They Aquarium (with cave) appears to be one of the remind me of the funny-peculiar paintings of cleaner fish tanks Austin has painted. Only a René Magritte, in the sense that they portray slight, milky-blue haze veils the New Zealand such perfectly ordinary things and yet somehow Herald spread that serves as its ground. This appear very odd, partly because they are only broadsheet is emblazoned with a typically garish paintings of things: ce n'est pas un aquarium. full-page advertisement to “Trade-in & SAVE” Magritte famously told someone that if they on appliances at Smiths City, a slim column of were to try filling the pipe in his famous painting supermarket specials including giant bottles The Treachery of Images (1928-29) with tobacco, of soft drink and cut-price Gingernuts, and a they would quickly see it was not a pipe. Pour photograph of Stonehenge at dusk under the water into Austin’s Aquarium (with cave) and cryptic headline “’Acoustic shadows’ theory.” watch as the paper gets wet. However, try and A quick online search reveals the correlation read the newspaper and you will be reading the between Stonehenge and the phrase “acoustic newspaper—but it still won’t be an aquarium. shadows”—apparently, the layout of Stonehenge There’s something almost wicked about trying to is thought to have been inspired by auditory look at a painting and being faced with an ad for illusions, in which sound waves are able to outdoor furniture. reinforce and cancel each other out, sometimes creating the misleading sensation that a large Austin has said, “I want my work to function object is standing between the listener and the intimately but also to allow a distance from source of the sound. Aside from signaling that which to observe structures.”4 Within an these are simple, every-day paintings made with aquarium, everything is intimate. For the viewer whatever was at hand (Dunn has previously with their nose pressed to the glass, everything described the “delightful sense of austerity in is available to their hungry eyes. However, the his practice, a making do mentality”), the use painted aquarium is not an aquarium but a of newspaper as a backdrop in these works representation of the ideas associated with it: performs an archival function, placing them a lack of privacy, entrapment and monotony. firmly in time—the acoustic shadow theory, for There is no hiding in a fishbowl: you are always example, was advanced in early 2012. However, vulnerable to hungry eyes, and to the minds it seems Austin has chosen the pages for his and mouths attached to them. backdrops with whimsical considerations, too: the standard miniature-cave fish tank Lucinda Bennett accessory, complete with waving tufts of lurid green seaweed, echoes the form of Stonehenge as depicted in the picture just behind it. With 1 Megan Dunn, ‘The Gorgeous Nothings: An Interview with Nick Austin,’ The Pantograph Punch, 2017. http://pantographthe notion of misdirected soundwaves now punch.com/post/interview-nick-austin swimming around my head, I can’t help but wonder how the world sounds from inside an 2 Chiara Leoni, “Double Takes: Simon Denny,” Mousse 18, 2009. http://moussemagazine.it/double-takes-simonaquarium, or even from inside the goldfishes’ denny-2009/ tiny blue Neolithic-revival cave. The Aquarium works had their first outing was in 2008, for an exhibition entitled Aquarium Paintings with Simon Denny at Center in Berlin, in which Austin’s paintings were hung in a space 123

3

Megan Dunn, “No Fixed Answers: on Nick Austin,” Art News New Zealand, 2014. https://www.megandunn.org/2014/03/01/ no-fixed-answers-on-nick-austin/

4

Nick Austin and Wystan Curnow, Personal Address, (Auckland: Hopkinson Mossman, 2017), pp. 28.


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Ian Scott Universal Language

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Lot 38, p.60/124 Ian Scott, Small Lattice No.223 1989-1990, acrylic on canvas, 763mm x 763mm

Formalist Abstraction is back in vogue, reaching levels of popularity that it enjoyed late last century when it was considered the logical outcome of the entire tradition of Western painting. Back in the 1970s and ’80s, the lattice paintings of Ian Scott, like the stacked staves and bulbs of Gordon Walters, fulfilled the requirements of a grid, the structure that Rosalind Krauss pronounced to be “emblematic of the modernist ambition within the visual art” in her 1979 October essay on the topic. Locally, this quest manifested as mostly a male preoccupation. Paintings by John Hurrell, Mervyn Williams, Allen Maddox, Geoff Thornley, Rob McLeod, Rick Killeen and Don Peebles were rounded up with Walters and Scott and nationally toured by Andrew Bogle for the Auckland City Art Gallery’s The Grid: Lattice and Network in 1983.

Of these practitioners, it was Ian Scott who became most closely identified with the flattened lattice form in New Zealand. Eschewing compositional depth and complexity as well as development, Scott made over 200 lattice paintings between 1976 and 1982. The description published by Art New Zealand in 1979 of his method is a primer in the steps taken to arrive at a post-painterly abstraction. Each lattice painting was made by placing stretched and white-primed cotton duck canvas over saw horses so that he could work on the surface from all sides. Wielding a roll of masking tape, he would then mark off the borders in preparation for the application of flat acrylic colour. Plaited together, these bands of paint created an all-over composition supposedly devoid of associations. An Iron Curtain crashed down with the advent of grid painting, Krauss argued, 124


lot 38

auction n°10 — july 2018

“walling the visual arts into a realm of exclusive visuality and defending them against the intrusion of speech. . . It’s what art looks like when it turns its back on nature.”

Lett Galleries in Auckland and with Peter McLeavey in Wellington in 1970.

It was the 1971 exhibition of Morris Louis striped paintings at Auckland City Art Gallery But are Ian Scott’s lattices so completely devoid that shifted Scott’s practice into abstraction. Having spent a few years teaching in Nelson, of reference? As Scott himself observed in that 1979 article, “they tended to look like trellisauction n°8 — march Scott returned to Auckland in 1973 and unleashed 2018 his Sprayed Stripe series at his Petar/James fences” and “the colours are there to generate exhibition that year. Responding to the way feeling.” Emigrating from the dreary textile town of Bradford in West Yorkshire, during the years that Louis floated colour on a white or unprimed canvas, Scott’s saturated colour eliminated not of post-war rationing, to Sunnyvale in 1952 at the age of seven, Scott loved his childhood playing just figuration but the gesture of the brush itself, on the mowed lawns of suburban West Auckland. showing how structure, form and colour could Their house was symmetrical, flat-roofed and be ends in themselves. clad in white weatherboard, a tidy aesthetic that Scott came to admire: “I happen to like the The idea for the lattices first occurred in suburban landscape with its neatness, bright mid-1975, and by winter 1976 he had done colours, clean edges,” he later wrote. some drawings, and made the first painting with an under and over pattern: “the first ones At the age of fifteen, he fixed on art as his were vertical rectangles with vertical, horizontal vocation. Taught by Rex Head and Garth and diagonal white bands defined by black Tapper at Kelston Boys’ High, he shared the crayon-edging. . . Running diagonals from 1963 prize for the Auckland Star’s post-primary corner to corner immediately felt right and school art competition with fellow high school also solved a number of formal and expressive prodigies, Marté Szirmay and Robin White. problems for me. . . I shifted this system to Scott was able to pay to join the Auckland City a square format to make it more logical Art Gallery’s classes, where he was instructed by and balanced, and to give a greater sense of Colin McCahon, whose retrospective with Toss scale. Gradually the number of bands were Woollaston also went on exhibition there in 1963. reduced. . .” He had found his formula. The following year, Scott enrolled for a Diploma at the Elam School of Fine Arts where Tapper and It was a system that offered an infinite number McCahon (the latter described by Mark Young of possibilities and brought him much success. in the introduction to New Zealand Art: Painting These bold and bright combinations of colour 1950-1967 as a guru) were now teaching. and pattern asserted their materiality wherever they went. Scott won the Pakuranga Art Award In his second year at Elam, Scott won the with Lattice #12 in 1977, and the Benson & Hedges junior section of the Kelliher Prize in 1965 with Art Award in 1978. This work from the middle Low Tide, Anawhata, a bird’s eye view of the of the series consists of six crossed bands of rugged beach that catapulted him to national white-edged colour. It creates an illusion of fame: “I was 18 at the time I won the Kelliher intensely-coloured ribbons, brightened by their award and used to go out and paint the West white edges, and laid under and over each other Coast beaches. Turner and Constable were across a background of battleship grey. The the only painters I knew,” he later explained. sinistrals, spanning from top left to bottom right As Scott’s collection of paintings by Kelliher corner are yellow, blue and green: two primary artists Douglas Badcock, Ernest Buckmaster colours that, when mixed, form the secondary, and Owen Lee attests, he continued to admire while the dextrals (top right to bottom left) are a well-executed composition, but soon left the the neutrals of grey and black with a slice of red traditional landscapists behind and went Pop: carving through the centre. Enhanced by its “Halfway through art school I changed from encounter with the complementary green in the a realistic style because it began to conflict top right corner, the dominant red stripe forms with what I wanted to say.” a triad with its fellow primaries at bottom left. This colour play is a universal language, legible That same year, 1965, the exhibition to anyone, and the edges of the composition are Contemporary American Painting from the compelling in their implicit endlessness. James A. Michener Collection went on display in Auckland’s art gallery. Consisting of forty Scott’s lattices were painted against the backpaintings by New York artists, it surveyed drop of the frayed ends of modernism which is Abstract Expressionism and Post-Painterly now a vast fabric being referenced nostalgically Abstraction, and included works by Kenneth by many other painters. Although he stopped Noland, Ellsworth Kelly and Morris Louis. Scott exhibiting the lattice works after 1982, they painted a homage to the latter American artist remained the benchmark for all his art due to in 1969, but did not try abstraction himself for their integration of pictorial elements, as he another six years. Like the swimmers in the later stated: “the colour, edge, surface, form and sunlit Californian pools of Bradford’s other space—the problem solving and the discovery artistic export, David Hockney, Scott now fixed of content, idea and feeling are all one thing.” on frolicking females to animate the geometric shapes of his landscapes. These bouncy beauties linda tyler won him his first solo exhibitions at the Barry 125


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Eric Lee-Johnson Bone Country

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Lot 67, p.83/126 Eric Lee-Johnson, Bones among the Boulders, watercolour and graphite on paper, 560mm x 760mm

What ends begins. Bones, they’re not things for play; Have them go sleep again, a sleep corruptive. Whitely they burn, dazzling our pilots’ day. —Kendrick Smithyman, Atlantis May Be Six Feet Under, 1943

Although he was not in favour of the more extreme facets of modernism that New Zealand painting began to embrace in the postwar decades, Lee-Johnson’s work has close parallels to the work of British surrealists such as Paul Nash, whose blasted, war-ravaged landscapes seem to echo Lee-Johnson’s similarly bleak vision of the New Zealand countryside. Michael Dunn characterises Lee-Johnson’s approach as “Neo-Romantic,”1 a reading that perfectly encapsulates the artist’s anthropomorphic trees and swirling landscapes, as well as the heightened emotional atmosphere that his best works create. However, whereas eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Romanticism largely depicted landscape as a realm of sublime and terrible forces outside of man’s control, Lee-Johnson’s work almost exclusively deals with landscape as an arena where man imposes his own will on nature.

Eric Lee-Johnson’s paintings and drawings emerge from a specific time, when New Zealand’s artists and intellectuals were engaged in an intense debate about the nature of this country’s identity. The regionalist project, familiar to us now from the works of artists such as Doris Lusk, Rita Angus and William Sutton, sought to deploy specifically New Zealand imagery as a way of creating an art that would belong intrinsically to this country. Johnson’s work moved away from the historically sanitised view of the New Zealand landscape in art and towards a depiction of it as a frontier zone, where the remnants of the colonial project left visible scars on the land: ramshackle buildings, tangled fencing, tree stumps, and other artefacts of the agricultural reshaping of New Zealand.

In 1981, G.E. Fairburn would write of Lee-Johnson’s work that “it tells us what it means to live in a semi-civilised land.”2 This statement 126


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is worth unpacking, as it reveals something of and revisited—the metaphorical “bones” of how Lee-Johnson’s work was perceived at the slaughtered trees assuming eerily human form. time, and perhaps how he himself conceived of his overall project. It is notable that as late as Hokianga Settlement is typical of the more 1981, his work was still seen (at least by an older illustrative side of Lee-Johnson’s practice. The generation, of whom Fairburn was a part) as an scene is, as the inscribed title tells us, a settleexpression of one of the cornerstone narratives ment in the Hokianga, showing a view from the of the colonial worldview, namely the distinction porch of a house past several other dwellings auction n°8 — march 2018 between “civilised” and “savage,” a duality that and structures towards a hillside on which is extended to people, places, and even culture and built a church. A man and a woman, recognisably the arts. In this model, the colonisation of New Māori, recline in the shade of the porch, while Zealand and the transformation of vast swathes another small figure in the middle distance of the landscape into pasture for livestock was drives a horse towards the church on the hill. A a process of “making civil” the country. By this washing line hung with clothes fills the upper metric, Lee-Johnson’s decision to represent the portion of the picture plane, lending the scene after-effects of this process, particularly the a sense of informality and verisimilitude. The destruction of native forest, in a particularly image would not be out of place as an illustration emotive fashion, is worthy of comment. in a magazine from the time, and possibly this This empathetic tendency perhaps casts him was Lee-Johnson’s intent. However, it is notable as less of a reactionary figure than Fairburn’s that the crooked posts and sloping deck of the essay, which spends a considerable part of its veranda and the extreme foreshortening impart length railing against “progressive” artistic an uneasy energy to the scene that transcends trends such as Abstract Expressionism and the merely illustrative or documentary, as does Dada (surely even in 1981 a distant memory), his scratchy, expressive use of line. would make him out to be. Lee-Johnson’s work, to a contemporary eye, can The works in this catalogue date from 1948 read as somewhat anodyne, and his images of and 1950, near the beginning of Lee-Johnson’s tortured, twisted trees and strangely humanoid serious period of artistic production. He had rocks and branches, reaching for oddly returned to New Zealand from England in the compressed, unreachable skies, may not have late 1930s, and spent two years in a sanitarium the power to shock or provoke that they once due to ill-health, after which he lived in various possessed. His images of Māori are also, it might locations in Auckland and the Coromandel, and be argued, somewhat problematic, given the long developed the style of painting for which he history of anthropologically-oriented looking would later become well known.3 Lee-Johnson by pakeha observers that they dovetail into. was a prolific and skilled draftsman, and had However, placing Lee-Johnson in his era reveals worked extensively in the advertising industry him as a fascinating figure; a New Zealander as a commercial artist, typographer, copywriter from a rural background, whose subsequent and illustrator. It is also worth mentioning experiences living and working in Britain during his interest in and use of photography, both a particularly fertile period for the visual arts for commercial purposes and as an aid to the shaped his response to his place of birth. production of paintings and drawings. andrew clark Bones among the Boulders depicts a tangle of stones and driftwood on a beach, rendered in Johnson’s characteristically expressive, although tightly controlled, style. Behind them rise a stylised range of hills, above which float a string of lozenge-shaped, almost cartoonish clouds. On the extreme right edge of the paper, a small crescent of beach and a headland solidify the coastal setting. The work consciously or unconsciously plays with the viewer’s sense of scale, almost reading at first glance as a still-life composition, perhaps a pile of sticks and sea-smoothed pebbles salvaged by a beachcomber. However, the driftwood “sticks” are, upon closer inspection, the trunks of felled trees, bleached to a skeletal whiteness by the sun, while the “pebbles” are in fact the massive boulders of the title. The reference to tree trunks as “bones” is typical of Johnson’s anthropomorphic approach to landscape, as seen in works such as The Slain Tree (1945), which at first glance resembles a contorted figure with upraised arms, or perhaps even a crucifixion. 1 Michael Dunn, New Zealand Painting: A Concise History (Auckland University Press, 2003), 94. This surrealist tendency is also apparent in Bones among the Boulders, whose trees become 2 G.E. Fairburn and Tony Mackle, Eric Lee-Johnson Exhibition (Waikato Art Museum, 1981), 7. more like grasping, skeletal fingers or weirdly distorted ribcages the more they are pondered 3 Ibid., 6. 127


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left: lot 52, karl fritsch, untitled

auction n°10 — july 2018

Karl Fritsch Gradually Acquiring Gleam

been melted to form an alloy, their unusual colours derived from the various other materials that have been introduced into the alloy by virtue of these martyred pieces being old, and having lived. Other times, his rings are made more gently from extant pieces: in a recent interview, Fritsch described a crucial moment that took How would a person date these rings? ‘Dating,’ place during his time studying at the Academy of auction n°8 — march 2018 in the sense of counting the growth rings in a Visual Arts in Munich when “instead of melting tree to determine its age, not in the sense of down the old jewellery I bought for casting, I holding hands in a darkened cinema. The most started to fix the pieces instead.” He continues, common way to discover when an object was born is through radiocarbon dating, but this is From that moment on I understood how to only useful if your object was once part of a living access all the conventional jewellery skills I had learnt and use them in my own way, I organism. Usually, metallic objects are dated started to really own what I had been taught. by examining their design in relation to the I could suddenly set a stone, saw, file, hammer, material; for example, it can be assumed that cast, solder, the way I wanted and not just a bronze axe-head was forged before the technology to produce iron or steel tools existed. the way I had been taught.3 But what of these rings, made from gold, silver, bronze, aluminium, speckled and bedecked with diamonds, garnets, rubies, sapphires and cubic zirconia? What of rings that look like molluscs, like dying stars, burnished space rocks, soft metal bands ridged in fingerprints, dark like they have lived underground, crystals snug in their erratically embossed settings? Rings like tiny lopsided flower frogs, with crystals pressed in where buds should be, rings like fat baby fingers offering a fistful of glistening wet sweets still warm from the mouth, thick curlicued rings that could be proffered by a prideful monarch for you to kiss? Where do these rings come from? How would you date them? How could you?

Hinting towards conventionality, these “fixed” pieces may offer more clues as to their origin, but attempting to identify them, to distinguish Fritsch’s hand from the maker of the original piece, would be beside the point: the rings don’t exist as artefacts to be placed in a vitrine and studied. They want to be slipped onto fingers, to be taken out, to be worn throughout films, dinners and heartbreaks. With each hand they pass through and each finger they live on, their patina shifts and shimmers, the darkness of oxidisation rubs away and they gradually acquire the gleam that was, in fact, there all along. Through wear, they become shiny, they catch the light, they are completed.

Born in Sonthofen, Germany, Karl Fritsch never intended to be a jeweller. As a schoolboy, he had hoped to become a woodcarver, but missed the application deadline and so, in 1982, he took up an empty spot to study goldsmithing at the Goldschmiedeschule Pforzheim. He then went on to work as an industrial goldsmith, during which time he was surprised to discover that most jewellery “…products are made in a working process that’s essentially no different from the process used to produce cars.”1 Desiring an approach to jewellery-making that was simpatico with his own interests, one that involved research and experimentation, Fritsch left his job to study under legendary jewellery professors Hermann Jünger and Otto Künzli at the Academy of Visual Arts in Munich. It was here that he begun using materials in the intuitive, idiosyncratic fashion for which he has become renowned. Central to his work is an ongoing challenge to the accepted conventions of jewellery, by prioritising what is beautiful and curious over that which is merely precious or valuable: “From the point of view of conventional craftsmanship, you could say that I deliberately overlook or ignore materials.”2

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1

Fritsch’s disregard for the hierarchy of materials, his iconoclasm, even, is why I imagine his rings would prove so hard to date. As (primarily) metal artefacts, they already defy standard methods of dating, but they are also often metal mongrels, made from older pieces of jewellery that have

Karl Fritsch, SCHMUCK: The Jewelry of Karl Fritsch. (Amsterdam: O Book Publisher, 2001) 157.

2 Fritsch, SCHMUCK, pp. 159. 3

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Sanna Svedestedt, ‘Karl Fritsch 2014 – on the year that passed and breakthrough moments,’ Klimt02, 2015. https:// klimt02.net/forum/interviews/featured-karl-fritsch-2014year-passed-and-breakthrough-moments


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left: lot 12, andre hemer, SP_IRL #8

auction n°10 — july 2018

Andre Hemer Contract with Reality

experience time, our existential experience) and its noölogies mostly visualised and consumed on-line in a fleeting and superficial way. The artist describes it like this:

“Image and object increasingly exist in a After telephotography [humanity] will multiplicity of forms (without hierarchy). continually invent graphies and scopesauction and n°8 — march 2018 For example, the digital (de-materialised) phones, all of which will be “tele” and one form exists independently in the world and is often the form that is viewed and shared will be able to go around the earth in less than no time. But it will always be only the the most. This has affected the fundamental temporal earth. And it will even be possible way that we see and interact in the world. to burrow inside the earth and pierce it ‘New Representation’ is literally the reprethrough as I do this ball of clay. But it will sentation of this state of being—manifested through the 'digital transaction' between always be the carnal earth. —Charles Péguy (1907) these forms in the creation of an artwork. Digital technology allows for the transacting You can always tell a good André Hemer painting. of forms—for example, a piece of paint can They’re almost viscerally lickable—he is the be scanned (flatbed or three-dimensionally, or both) into a digital image or object, and Emperor of Ice-Cream, whipper of concupiscent curds that cry out for a dessert spoon as much outputted again onto canvas or as a 3D print, the original painted object attached and as an enraptured gaze. But beyond this level of amalgamated—and this cycle can be looped instant accessibility, each painting is a complex synthesis of Hegelian dialectic where a multitude or altered or begun at different points. It's different from Shadows by Warhol, because of influences and visual sources converge down the rabbit hole of paradoxical oppositions: that always relies on the idea of the ‘original image’ and the linear copy.” analogue and digital, abstraction and figuration, trompe-l'œil and virtual, Baurdrillardian hyperreality and ebullient metaphysical pop. Theorist and philosopher Bruno Latour’s concept of “iconoclash” might be a useful concept to introduce here. We inhabit a world A dual citizen of New Zealand and Germany, saturated with images being mass-produced Hemer completed an MFA in painting at the at an exponential rate. At the same time, University of Canterbury’s School of Fine Arts, they are usually disposable, ephemeral, and and, with the encouragement of Australian artist and lecturer Matthys Gerber, went on destroyed almost as quickly as they are created. However, if it can’t be determined whether the to do a PhD in painting at the University of dematerialisation of an image is aesthetically Sydney. He has received the Arts Foundation destructive or constructive, we are in a state New Generation Award (2016), The Wallace Arts of iconoclash. To destroy the pagan idol as Awards, Paramount Award (2016) The National Contemporary Art Award, Waikato Museum worthless, one must still regard it as having a transcendental significance to begin with. (2011) and the Bold Horizons Contemporary Art It’s a paradox. The democratising, iconoclastic Award (2011). Currently, he is based in Vienna, tendencies of digital representation (also, in Austria and making major inroads into the part, a social relationship—it’s not a coincidence European, Asian and US art scenes. His work featured on the cover of 100 Painters of Tomorrow, that relational aesthetics derived most of its jargon from the internet) exist in a similar Thames and Hudson’s 2014 survey publication of relationship to the traditional, physical artistic young international artists to watch out for. object. Hemer starts with random blobs of paint (the antithesis of art) and, in the end, creates a With works like Big Node #42 (2016) and SP_IRL #8 (2017), Hemer begins with a new image, an object of virtue, by assimilating the methods that are usually associated with the sculptural process, making blobs of paint and destruction of aesthetic value. photographing the interesting ones to capture the play of the light. Then, the work becomes Hemer’s “New Representation” is a necessary digital art when printed onto a canvas (American antidote to zombie formalism. It looks digital, digital artist Judith Moncrieff’s coinage “tradigital” is applicable here—the melding of hyperreal even, but is physically real and present, bonded to the intimacy of the physical act of old and new media processes). More traditional painting. In the Big Node and New Smart Object painting takes over from here, as the artist applies multiple layers of translucent and opaque paintings the quality of the forms ranges from a weightless, floating quality reminiscent of paint to create the rich depth of the pictorial plane. This application of impasto to the digital late Monet waterlilies or Alex Katz’s magnolia image has a playful resonance with the masspaintings, to a robust, tactile solidity, as in Big Node #42 and SP_IRL #8. It locates itself market prints similarly treated to give them an ersatz painterly authenticity, such as might be somewhere between nostalgia for the studio culture of traditional painting and the digital, bought at The Warehouse or IKEA. between authentic object and hyperreal imago. Hemer describes this work as “new represenAt the same time, Hemer is wary about fetishising the craft of making or art-historical tation” art, a post-internet “rematerialising” of a contemporary ontology (the way we references. “Realistically,” he says, “I'm not 131


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thinking about much other art, other than what's already embedded! You can talk about the failure of Post-Internet art to do anything other than fetishise a particular kind of digital image without considering how it might become (or be materialised as) an object that's new in the world.”

reclamation for the humanist agenda. Something of the same can be seen in the SP_IRL work, perhaps conjuring up images of a virtual paradise of Baroque clouds and Platonic perfections. The Elizabethan miniaturist Nicholas Hilliard (c. 1547-1619), wrote that he used silver, gold and precious stones in his work so that the image seemed the “thinge itself, even the work of God and not of man,” so perhaps drawing a parallel between Hemer’s work and the religious devotional image isn’t too far-fetched. The rich framing device results in a particularly intimate way of seeing the work, as the image exists in its own space outside of the mundane world; “insisting,” as Professor of English at the University of Delaware, Julian Yates, says of Hilliard, “on its own mimetic privilege.” Ceci n'est pas une pipe, except when it is. This has the effect of breaking the image out of the commodification and political economy of signs and symbols. Random blobs of paint become consciously aesthetic image, and then back to blobs of paint again.

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Hemer’s paintings echo the philosophical and aesthetic tendencies of other stylistic periods—Mannerism, the Baroque, the Rococo, early Modernism, Pop and Minimalism—often associated with alienation, melancholy and nostalgia, where a lightness and deceptively theatrical frivolity of touch is a stand in for the utopian, the dangerous, the divine, and the rebelliously perverse. Those things can be enormously liberating in an era of uncertainty and anxiety—a profound statement against the status quo and a refusal to submit. At the same time, there is a great wit and sense of humour at work. SP_IRL stands for “Small Painting” plus a pun on the internet shorthand for “In Real Life,” as opposed to online. Big Node is a reference to the nodes that support the networks that are the basis of cryptocurrencies like Etherium and Bitcoin. Nodes are individual computers that connect to the network, maintaining copies of blockchains and, in some cases, processing transactions.

Gold also symbolically suggests the commodification of art. At the same time there’s an elaborate interplay between the digitally-based representation of gold paint and the actual metallic pigment surrounding it, that suggests philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein’s wellknown observation in Remarks on Colour (1959), that “there is gold paint, but Rembrandt didn't use it to paint a golden helmet.” For Hemer, the gold paint approximates reality—not as fake, but as a representation of the material. This works just as well for the rococo contrasts of pastels, blacks and iridescence in the SP_IRL painting. “The reason,” says Hemer, “that I'm consistently using metallic colours or pigments with mica, etc., is that they speak less as colour than as the illusion or representation of material.” The artist plays on the facsimile and simulacra—all that glisters is not gold, but is its metaphorical counterpart, the alchemical ideal of gold.

“The Big Nodes,” says Hemer, “are almost these kind of joke paintings (well, sort of anyway—in the sense that I still take them seriously). The title implies that by using the word ‘Node,’ a blockchain cliché even back in 2016. And, in the process, they speak to that too, the ‘thick’ seemingly cut away to reveal the ‘flat’ or impasto paint cut away to reveal a contorted image of some digital lineage—but with a visual dynamic in which the perceived flatness and thickness can be confused. Unlike the New Representation and later Deep Surfacing works, which really amalgamate materialities and transactions into a more unified object, these have a much simpler dynamic.”

Hemer’s art is full of such games and metaphysical conceits, which is what gives his work its incredible staying power. Image and form flip back and forth between dematerialised and re-materialised states, flat and gestural, virtual and material. It’s part of a far larger and more ambitious aesthetic project to unveil and illuminate the act of looking at and experiencing art. No matter what technology allows us to do with the image, it still has a contract with reality (no matter how strained) and with the physical world. While technology may sometimes make us feel a little like disembodied intelligences experiencing the world as a fragmented swarm of abstractions, Hemer reminds us that to make, and to look, are carnal acts.

As with some other Big Node works, the gold paint in #42 conveys a sense of lavishness and luxe but also references the gold grounds of icon painting and the reliquaries of holy images. Just as physical gold in religious art manifests the aura of the divine, the gold paint in Hemer’s works emphasises the physicality of the painting itself and its hand-crafted Benjaminian aura of authenticity. Hemer’s thick impasto and visually rich palette reify the image, transcending the banality of the everyday and raising it up as something of higher significance; realer than real. And yet, the interposed digital step, aside from creating a satisfying aesthetic distance between its making and any potential autobiographic element, also contributes to the unheimlich peculiarity of the image, its techno-Platonic perfection, mimicking the acheiropoieton—the miraculous image created “without hands,” i.e. ‘by the divine’—or in this case, by the computer and printer. It is as if the applying of acrylic paint by hand is an act of

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lot 29

auction n°10 — july 2018

Jake Walker Concentrated Surfaces

But what of the building-up of colour into these stubbornly thick wedges? I think it might be about light. The colours may be sometimes muddy, sludgy, overbearing even. But they bounce off the icy pastel blues and ballerina pinks, and the contrast creates a sense of equal distance between each slab. A relatively diminutive painting in terms of scale, it somehow hums auction n°8 — march 2018 with spacious activity. Blue sky opens up between the thick grey blue of the top right corner and around the deep khaki square in the upper centre. Paint spatters, smears and smudges embellish the corners at bottom right and top left, so that the more implacable, solid hunks of pigment seem to have movement happening around and about them. The L-shaped Tetris block of icy blue on the left-hand edge provides a kind of anchor to this movement, creating a sense of dense, but blank space. Part of the pleasure of the work lies in the way it plays at crudity. It’s like a well-practised move that looks offhanded, but isn’t. There’s something punkish about that black frame, while the muddier colours are deliberately offset by the more pristine, precious pastel tones. I don’t want to do a disservice to the grungy, satisfying materiality of this painting by making what might sound like a clichéd connection between Walker’s splodgy tessellations and Cézanne and the Cubists that he inspired, but it’s hard to ignore. The modular, woven effect of Walker’s Untitled Painting makes its own play at passage, like a more brutal, simplified Lac d’Annecy. The physicality of his paint is even a bit like a visual pun on Cézanne’s attempts to convey the tactility of vision. Likewise, Walker’s play with edges echoes Mondrian’s slivers and corners of yellow. They’re charming anachronisms, these nods to European Modernism’s big names, a reminder of the fidelity those artists had to painting as a means to access the spiritual, psychical nature of vision and sensation. It seems somewhat anti-trend, or outmoded, to revisit painting on these terms, but it is an invitation to interrogate our own experiences of looking. What sensations might we encounter if we allow ourselves to take time with the painting, and the spaces and shapes it carves out with dense, textural colour?

Lot 29, p.51/133 Jake Walker, Untitled Painting 7 2013, oil on linen, glazed ceramic, 345mm x 410mm

Jake Walker’s Untitled Painting 7 (2009 – 2013) establishes that time is an accumulative material in the work. The painting wears its age, both in the numbers and dates in the title, and in the accretion of paint and texture that commix on its surface, so that the process of building the painting immediately feels palpable to the viewer. In Walker’s other paintings, more obvious architectural references to Ian Athfield’s tubular structures decorate the canvas, or even the frame. In his Untitled Painting 6 (2013), three orbs hang from the top as if from the sky, or a ceiling, denoting a sense of vertical perspective. However, in this work, the painting’s movement comes from its flatness. The absence of definitive focal points sends the viewer’s eye dancing over the canvas, finding places to rest in the spaces created by the thick, pasted blocks of colour. These heavy pastes and slabs of paint share space like neighbours, as separate parts, but they all sit on the same plane. The oblong shapes might even refer to buildings side by side, and there is something of an arbitrary unity to the composition, like a neighbourhood that has grown over time, structures placed side by side that eventually got used to one another. The cracks between the shades of khaki, forest green and chocolate brown in the centre let in edges of golden brightness. Each slab might sit on layers of colour underneath it, but nothing recedes. Hunks of lumpy, textured paint form planes of colour that have become object-like in their chunky roughness. The tactility of the painting extends to the frame, which has a roughly hewn, wieldy quality. You can imagine gripping it, the painting like an object to be held. The surface is so clotted and thick it seems almost like a random decision to keep the work on flat canvas; surely, this practice is as sculptural as it is painterly.

The four years that are spanned in the work’s title delineate a chunk of time condensed into this painting, its layers and moments of coarseness and precision. Untitled Painting 7 stakes out its territory quite unassumingly; the title presents it as simply one of a series of works. However, the painting also lays its own structure bare: the choices made by the artist about colour values, quantities, measures, and parts that fit together are this work’s content and material. For a painting that really seems to be about painting itself, it (almost perversely) hangs together as if it came into being quite organically. julia lomas

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Jeffrey Harris Wandering to Golgotha

Phillip Clairmont, and Alan Maddox—and free of the straightjacket of art schools. He sought out his teachers—Colin McCahon and Smither being especially significant—and he could hardly be called a naïve or outsider artist. Through the 1970s and ‘80s Harris produced a significant body of work, rightly earning a reputation as one of New Zealand’s most significant painters.

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His imagery remains largely introspective: autobiographical, expressionist and heavily symbolic. The family unit is a common theme, though he repeatedly returns to imagery of the Crucifixion. The result is powerfully idiosyncratic, consistently original, and quite unlike the work of any other artist. A characteristic of Harris’ work is his ability to forge a smooth synthesis out of an extraordinary range of art-historical sources and references without ever looking recherché or contrived. References to German Neue Sachlichkeit artists like Otto Dix, George Grosz and Max Beckmann rub shoulders with gloomy, vampire-haunted Norwegian Edvard Munch and Anglo-American R. B. Kitaj. There are echoes, too, of Rita Angus, Nigel Brown and Robin White. Few living New Zealand artists have Harris’ command of the full breadth of human tensions and passions, or his expressive virtuosity in using the human form as a subject.

Lot 80, p.90/134 Jeffrey Harris, untitled 1974, oil on board, 175mm x 290mm

“I have my own problems relating to the religious aspect of the Crucifixion. But Bacon used the theme as a symbol for human suffering or his personal suffering— and so do l. At some stage throughout my work I've probably used the Crucifixion for most of the reasons it's ever been used in the history of art. But it was Bacon who showed me it could be used to communicate suffering that is spiritual but doesn't have a conventional religious content.”

Harris has noted the influence of Francis Bacon’s profane and worldly Crucifixions on his work, as well as that of Dürer (to whom we should probably also add Grünewald’s splendid Isenheim Altarpiece). However, closer to home, he also acknowledges being influenced by the Crucifixions of his mentor Smither. Smither’s approach to the subject, as seen in his 1966 Crucifixion in the collection of the GovettBrewster, seems altogether more symbolist and less robustly fleshy than this untitled crucifixion work by Harris. Tonally, there seems to be a kinship with McCahon’s 1947 Crucifixion According to St Mark, now in the collection of Christchurch Art Gallery—although Harris’ Man of Sorrows is altogether more well-fed and muscular than McCahon’s. Whereas McCahon’s Christ owes much to Titian (and likely Piero della Francesca, too), Harris’ Christ has more to do with the practical piety and physical suffering of Low Countries and Northern European art than the sighing ecstasies of Renaissance Italy.

Jeffrey Harris has been painting and exhibiting crucifixions since his first solo show in the foyer of the Otago Museum in 1969, but despite the subject’s Biblical heft and cultural baggage, for him these works are not an expression of religious faith, but rather a visual metaphor for something altogether more existential: the suffering of humanity as a whole, rather than any specific faith or sect. Harris’ practice follows a circular pattern, forever ranging out across the broadest possible fields of imagination and experimentation, only to return again and again to the artist’s archetypal existential themes. Each painting is a call, a challenge, and a confrontation to the viewer. This is not to say that they are a repudiation of Christianity, but rather that they are an attempt by Harris to tease out the universal aspects of this imagery:

The organic smoothness and roundness of Harris’ forms are dramatically counterpointed by the bravura gestural impasto of the underpainting. In contrast to his more obviously divided-up and fractured compositions, in this work the image is classically unified. The palette is subtle: bands of warm earth tones contrast with the chilly blues and greens of sea and sky and the clothing of the two (female? Mother and daughter?) figures in the foreground. The mountains, too, are replete with these colours in alternating bands, giving the whole a slightly Easter egg-like effect reminiscent of late Malevich. The pink flesh tones unify the whole composition, but leave us wondering

“The whole thing seems to be going in a circle. It's not a straightforward progression. I keep coming back to the same things. I do repeat things, but I don't see it as a fault. Since my work is an emotional biography, whether or not I still believe something is an important matter.” Born in Akaroa in 1949, Harris grew up on his parents’ farm on Banks Peninsula, beginning his art career in Christchurch before moving to Dunedin to learn from Michael Smither. A largely self-taught artist, Harris’ practice evolved moreor-less independently of the Gopas generation of Canterbury Neoexpressionists—Tony Fomison, 134


lot 80

auction n°10 — july 2018

why the two male figures appear to be nude, consideration. The viewer inevitably feels drawn to a state of introspection, alone with their own or at least not wearing shirts. The artist is not going to give us an answer. Perhaps they were thoughts in an examination of the self that offers a secular parallel to the religious, devotional art enjoying a day at the beach and inexplicably Harris’ work resembles. wandered into Golgotha? According to Harris, “If you look at any of my pictures you should And yet, texturally, there’s a lot going on. learn a lot more about what's happening in the centre of visual attention by looking at what's Note how masterfully Harris suggests the pelt auction n°8 — march 2018 happening around it.” of the tussock, the grained wooden planks of the fence and the deep valleys of the mountains The setting localises the image to New Zealand in that echo the folds of the loincloth. Definitive much the same way that McCahon did by setting characteristics like hands and faces are lumpen his religious scenes in Nelson and Otago, riffing and merely suggested, like half-moulded on how the Tuscan artists of the Quattrocento clay or melted wax. The effect is out of the made their Arno stand in for the Holy Land. Neo-Expressionist playbook—the distortions Harris generalises his locale somewhat, giving of form as metaphor for the emotional and the impression of a syncretic landscape, a somemetaphysical tensions beneath the surface— what cartoonish pastiche of the Otago and Banks but can be traced back through that Northern Peninsulas, with a substantial helping of Milford Renaissance period (I’m thinking here of Sound. It’s generic enough that anyone can Grünewald again and the twisted feet of his respond to it, and anything can be staged in it, crucified Christ) and, maybe, all the way back but at the same time it feels very much anchored to the earliest human history and the stylised in the geography of the South Island. Harris forms of Neolithic carving: captures the otherworldly, untamed impression of those southern locales. The human element “They've no hands, no feet, no genitals, has no more or less importance, in the scheme indistinct features. The Crucifixions on the of things, than the landscape itself. The elements whole are less autobiographical than my of the scene radiate an intensely psychological other paintings, though it's hard to make atmosphere of isolation, anxiety and despair, clear distinctions. In them I'm often getting particularly the lone cabbage tree in the backout what I generally feel about life, the ground. The work seems to be a more developed human condition.” version of smaller detail in the painting Day After Day, also from 1974, from which it is At the heart of Harris’ work is a persistent distinguished by the landscape backdrop. and driving humanist impulse that prioritises On this subject, Harris has this to say: human life, emotion and experience, a composition organised though gaze and gesture in the “My landscapes are always populated. And great Western tradition of figurative art. Indeed, it's normally the people in it who give the it’s difficult to think of many contemporary picture its meaning. Once again it's hard artists for whom the Renaissance canon is so to separate these from my other pictures immediate or so deeply and fluently felt, rather - many of them contain self-portraits: and than merely a historical visual reference or all of the Crucifixions are also 'figures in ironic postmodern hat-tip. It’s work that asks landscape' of a sort.” big questions, and even when we think we know the story, it doesn’t give away all the “Backdrop” is the right word, because there is answers easily. Harris sums it up: something theatrical about this scene—a theatre of the world—where all the action is crammed, “It's the end. It's just death. You have to tableau-like, into the foreground. The crucified remember that my Crucifixions aren't speciffigure lacks the hair that individualises the other ically Christian. I don't believe in life after figures in the scene, from which we may infer death. Death's final. But that 1969 Crucifixion that he is a generic everyman (or, being relatively also expresses compassion, I hope. It arouses androgynous, an everyhuman), although there compassion in me—it should also do so in is also something pink and childlike about him the viewer.” too, not entirely unlike the early Renaissance paintings of the infant Jesus that depict Him as andrew paul wood an odd adult-in-miniature. At the same time, this crucified figure is well on the way to becoming the amorphous protean meat-lump of later Harris paintings. The loading of the foreground and the reduction of the background to a stylised allusion to landscape gives the impression of late Medieval Gothic and Byzantine Icon painting, lending the work a timeless quality positioned outside of linear histories of art and taste. The quiet alienation of this work is less immediately disturbing than many of Harris’ other paintings, but its mysteries and unease have a slowly cumulative effect, given time and

All quotations are from Jeffrey Harris, “A Conversation with Jeffrey Harris,” Art New Zealand 18 (Summer 1981).

135


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left: lot 69, Laith McGregor, jelly

auction n°10 — july 2018

Laith McGregor Overload

ourselves the momentary contacts between pen and paper, the satisfying tactility of pushing the ink-laden ball across the pristine surface of a newly-turned page.

In These Teas are Saving Me, McGregor presents a doubling of the figure: a central, Laith McGregor’s work is difficult to categorise solidly rendered man’s face, seemingly wearing auction n°8 — march 2018 at first glance. His ballpoint-and-wash drawings a pointed hat, perhaps a dunce’s cap, is accomare part of a larger project of diaristic artmaking, panied by a thin, bearded man in a robe, either an output that includes drawings executed on inspired by or directly drawn from the illust ping-pong tables (Ping-pong Paradise, 2011) and a rations of William Blake—perhaps an old four-metre long sheet of paper (S-O-M-E-O-N-E, testament prophet. This second figure literally pushes against the central man’s hat, a cartoon 2012). McGregor’s drawing practice encompasses thought bubble repeating the word “push” meticulous ball-point pen renderings, utilizing spilling from his head like a nimbus cloud. the soft middle-tones of this humble medium A litany of seemingly non-sequitur phrases, to create delicate gradients, loose, expressive like a hyper-charged cavalcade of t-shirt slogans, wash drawings and references to cartoons, art spills down the side of the paper: fragments of history and twentieth-century pop culture. The slang (“totes”), snatches of conversation (“this other omnipresent component of McGregor’s is reality, Greg”) and phrases that seem to be work is his use of inscriptions: text as pattern, in-jokes or simply free-association (“pasta as glossolalia, as an expression of the pure joy of brain man”). There are also notes, written handwriting—a retrograde, visceral act in an age with more haste than the meticulously rendewhere text is almost universally generated by the red block letters of the rest of the phrases, such impersonal dictates of software. as “William Blake” and “Helm of the Rambut Pura,” the title of a 2008 work of McGregor’s, The three works reproduced here, These Teas are and perhaps a reference to the Rambut Pura Siwi, Saving Me (2014), Jelly (2014), and Coffee Time a Balinese Hindu temple that, in legend, grew (2015), were made while McGregor was living in from a single lock of a monk’s hair overnight. Bali. The works are part of a series of drawings done as a kind of diary, recording oddments In Coffee Time, McGregor again juxtaposes two drawn from his surroundings alongside less figures, in this instance a vague, almost ghostly geographically specific, and more psychologically figure of a formally dressed man, complete vague, figures and references. McGregor’s oneiric with top hat, and a meticulous ball-point cavalcade of people, words and images resonates drawing of a leyak, a demon-witch figure in the with the other, omnipresent informational fevertraditional folklore of Bali. The leyak’s foot rests, dream that is the average social media feed: incongruously, on that omnipresent symbol of everything in the world, jumbled together, contemporary consumer culture, the disposable an endless torrent devoid of hierarchy or structcoffee cup. Meanwhile, in Jelly, another ure. If there is a unifying trend in McGregor’s top-hatted man’s face, this time complete work, it is his privileging of the face as a site with beard (another trademark of McGregor’s where the buffeting gusts of his stream-ofimagery) is rendered in washes of blue and consciousness image-making clash. Nearly all black watercolour, and a second, smirking face the Bali drawings contain, somewhere in their superimposed over the top using thick, black multivalent forms, a head, eyes, or a face. lines. The accompanying, fragmentary sentence, “of Jelly Roll Morton’s blues on the” offers a The recurrence of this face motif perhaps reflects cryptic comment. Morton, a New Orleans band a desire on McGregor’s part for something the leader and pianist who was a pivotal figure in the viewer, and perhaps the artist himself (many of early history of jazz, seems an odd reference for McGregor’s figures resemble self-portraits) can an Australian artist living in Bali, but perhaps use as an anchor point. When confronted with this is the point; referential short-circuits of an endless, inexhaustible stream of information, this kind are an omnipresent feature of the people need ways to ground themselves—in contemporary informational landscape. McGregor’s case, by returning to the physicality of the act of drawing itself. In another 2014 andrew clark work, Three Years, McGregor presents a massive pile of pencil shavings in a box frame, pressed against the glass like an ant farm. In works such as these, he consciously draws attention to the minutiae of his own creative process—a similar impulse that leads him to incorporate notes, phone numbers and doodles into his works, immortalising these ephemeral gestures like insects trapped in amber. Although this sort of self-reflexive comment on an artist’s own inner workings can come across as fetishistic, it also serves an important purpose in McGregor’s schema, encouraging us to visualise him actually making the works, to attempt to recreate for 137


lot 26

bowerbank ninow

Don Driver Actual Depths

feel more chromatically forward than the blue above it, recedes into the frame, with a shadow and reflection affirming that the blue panel physically overhangs the pink. How light interacts with the reflective surface of the glossy pink panel further complicates the problem of transcribing the visual experience of the work in terms of colour and depth.

bowerbank ninow

The work as a whole rejects the practice of image-making as illusory representation, but its highly polished surface often provides an immediate, physically present, reflected image: depending on its position and surroundings, that image might be a reflection evocative of the depth of an entire room, the distance of a light source causing a bright, specular reflection, or the face of the viewer themselves. The furthest recessed, the lightest in colour, the most reflective and mercurial, the pink panel takes on a shifting position relative to depths of colour, reflection and physical placement. Across the four panels and their interactions, the work neither consistently affirms nor rejects an alignment between illusory reflection-depth, metaphors of colour depth, and physical depth, only the visual experience of parsing them as distinctly separate but simultaneously and often similarly felt.

Lot 47, p.69/138 Don Driver, Painted Relief No 6 1972, acrylic on canvas and enamel on aluminium, artist-made frame, 1395mm x 1840mm

In the 1960s and 70s, Don Driver’s diverse artistic practice included not only murals, collages, and found-object assemblages but also works that might be broadly described as abstract, and which Driver variously referred to as “purely abstract,” “the more immaculate works,” and “pure works.”1 The Painted Relief series, made between 1971 and 1974, sits within this “immaculate” subset of Driver’s practice. Each entry in the series consists of an arrangement of long, rectangular, horizontal panels: some made of painted canvas, some of painted aluminium or stainless steel, all arranged at varying levels of relief, and encased in a frame that provides a visual axis against which to measure the relative forward or backward positioning of each component.

In 1973, Driver contextualized the work by explaining that after working on flat, largescale paintings, particularly 1971’s Eight Part Work, he “disbanded any extraneous compositional ideas and made the bands work as actual, not illusory things.”2 The “actual, not illusory” objecthood of the work’s components seems to place all these many and competing visual effects on a common plane, none in service of representation, and none any more or less real than another: all facets of actual, observable and present things. For me, rather than meanly exposing colours’ effects as illusion and physical distance’s truth, or offering an opportunity to see simply and clearly, Painted Relief No. 6 issues an invitation to attend closely to the various experiences describable as ‘visual depth’: colour depth, physical depth and reflected depths. Each is equally observable, only coincidentally in concert, and, in the field of vision, equally real.

Painted Relief No. 6 (1972) consists of one perfectly smooth glossy-painted pink aluminium panel and three matte canvas panels evenly painted in single colours: the top and bottom panels in an almost pastel blue; and a large, wide, central panel in a bright, saturated red. The stretches of colour fit neatly up against each other, some slid to the fore and some back, with their square edges defined by the delicate shadowing that they cast onto or receive from one another.

frances clark

Like others in the series, Painted Relief No. 6 attends to how colour, surface texture, and physical distance, when looked at as visual realities, can create unresolved, specifically visual experiences. In terms of distance and advancing or receding colour, for instance, some panels work all in one direction, but other panels have colours and placement that seem to work in opposite directions. For instance, the red panel’s warm, saturated tone not only seems to stretch forward, but the panel itself also physically protrudes, and it takes on a kind of solidity in the centre of the relief. By way of contrast, the shiny pink panel, while it might 138

1

Don Driver quoted in in Don Driver: a survey of his life and works incorporating a catalogue of the Don Driver 1965 - 1978 Exhibition; edited by R. N. O’Reilly (New Plymouth: GovettBrewster Art Gallery, 1979), 15; Don Driver, “Letter to Michael Dunn, 1973” in New Art: Some Recent New Zealand Sculpture and Post-Object Art, edited by Jim Allen and Wystan Curnow (Auckland: Heinemann, 1976), u.p.; Don Driver quoted in Jim Barr, Mary Barr and Marti Friedlander, Contemporary New Zealand Painters, (Martinborough: Alistair Taylor Publishing, 1980), 62.

2

Don Driver, “Letter to Michael Dunn, 1973” quoted in Michael Dunn, “Don Driver” in New Art: Some Recent New Zealand Sculpture and Post-Object Art, edited by Jim Allen and Wystan Curnow (Auckland: Heinemann, 1976) u.p.


I #

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John Reynolds Acronyms, etc. #44 2002 paint marker on primed canvas signed Reynolds, dated 2002 and inscribed Acronyms Etc #44 in ink on stretcher verso 105mm x 105mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.27

$200 - $400

2

Peter Robinson untitled 1994 oil and graphite on canvasboard signed P R Robinson and dated April 94 in graphite lower edge verso 200mm x 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Taranaki

p.28

$3,000 - $6,000

3

Darryn George Schedule Study #8 2015 automotive paint on melamine board signed DW George, dated 2015 and inscribed Darryn George/'Schedule Study #8/Automotive paint on Melamine Board in ink verso; inscribed Red in graphite verso 200mm x 140mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 2015

p.29

$1,000 - $2,000

4

Bill Hammond Picnic 2007 lithograph on paper, 16/30 signed WD Hammond, dated 2007 and inscribed Picnic in graphite lower right 545mm x 660mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington

p.30

$4,000 - $7,000

5

Shane Cotton Moerewa 2004 lithograph on paper, 37/40 signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2004 and inscribed Moerewa in graphite lower edge 560mm x 760mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.31

$1,200 - $1,800

6

Shane Cotton Veil 2004 lithograph on paper, 38/40 signed Shane W Cotton, dated 2004 and inscribed Veil in graphite lower edge 560mm x 760mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.31

$1,200 - $1,800

7

Gavin Hurley Elizabeth 2009 collaged found paper signed GJH, dated 09 and inscribed Elizabeth in graphite verso 275mm x 205mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.32

$1,200 - $1,800

8

Gavin Hurley Fru Fru 2002 collaged found paper 305mm x 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.33

$700 - $1,200

9

Gavin Hurley Put pop singer Madonna on stage and she oozes sex appeal 2002 collaged found paper signed gjh and dated 02 in graphite verso 280mm x 215mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.33

$700 - $1,200


#

artwork

history

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estimate

10

Gavin Hurley I won't be told what to do 2003 collaged found paper signed GJH, dated 03 and inscribed "I won't be told what to do" in graphite verso 135mm x 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.33

$700 - $1,200

11

André Hemer Big Node #42 2016 acrylic and pigment on canvas signed André Hemer, dated 2016 and inscribed Big Node #42/André Hemer/Vienna in graphite verso 420mm x 315mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 2016 Exhibitions New Representation Part III, Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 20 April-14 May 2016

p.34/130

$2,200 - $3,200

12

André Hemer SP_IRL #8 2017 acrylic and pigment on canvas signed André Hemer/AH, dated 2017 and inscribed SP_IRL #8 in graphite verso 360mm x 270mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Bartley + Company Art, Wellington, 2017 Exhibitions Small Paintings IRL, Bartley + Company Art, Wellington, 26 April-27 May 2017.

p.35/130

$2,200 - $3,200

13

Max Gimblett Swamp 2010-2011 watercolour and gold leaf on paper signed Max Gimblett and dated 2010/11 in graphite lower edge; artists stamp applied lower right 580mm x 760mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland, 2012

p.36

$5,000 - $7,000

14

Arie Hellendoorn Multihead 2015 acrylic on linen signed Arie Hellendoorn, dated 2015 and inscribed Multihead in ink verso 405mm x 380mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from {Suite}, Wellington, 2015 Exhibitions Body Electric, {Suite}, Wellington, 3-26 September 2015

p.37

$2,000 - $3,000

15

Liz Maw Lady Kathryn and I 2011 giclee on paper, 1/10 signed E Maw, dated 2011 and inscribed Lady Kathryn and I in graphite lower edge 755mm x 550mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.38

$1,500 - $2,500

16

Liz Maw Aura

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.39

$1,500 - $2,500

2002 giclee on paper, 2/10 signed E Maw, dated 2002 and inscribed Aura in graphite lower edge 730mm x 605mm

17

Stella Corkery untitled c. 2013-2017 oil pastel on paper 420mm x 295mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.40

$1,000 - $2,000

18

David Noonan untitled 2008 screenprint and embossing on paper, 49/60 signed David Noonan and dated 2008 in graphite lower right 620mm x 435mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Chisenhale Gallery, London, 2008

p.41

$2,000 - $3,000

19

Gavin Hurley Helen (Lona) 2003 oil on hessian 408mm x 303mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003 Exhibitions Agent, Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 25 November – 24 December 2003

p.42

$2,000 - $4,000


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artwork

history

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estimate

20

Gavin Hurley Dr Meyer 2003 oil on hessian 408mm x 303mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, November 2003 Exhibitions Agent, Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland, 25 November – 24 December, 2003

p.43

$2,000 - $4,000

21

Brendon Wilkinson Basics 1999 modelling putty, oil, flocking, aluminium can signed Brendon Wilkinson and dated 1999 AD in brushpoint underside 110mm × 75mm × 70mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1999 Note This work is accompanied by an artist-made display shelf

p.44

$800 - $1,200

22

Brendon Wilkinson Beans c. 1999 modelling putty, oil, flocking, stainless steel spoon, aluminium can 170mm × 100mm × 70mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.44

$800 - $1,200

23

Laurie Steer Potato Sack Pot 2014 Kuatuna wild clay stoneware, ash glaze and Opunake iron sand 107mm x 165mm x 165mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.45

$800 - $1,200

24

Laurie Steer Sarah 2018 wood-fired Great Barrier Island wild clay stoneware 95mm x 63mm x 63mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Tauranga

p.46

$800 - $1,200

25

Laurie Steer War Flower 2018 wood-fired Karangahake wild clay stoneware and slips dated 18 and inscribed STEER with incision on underside 68mm x 100mm x 100mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Tauranga

p.47

$1,200 - $2,200

26

Laurie Steer Transcendental Avalanche 2015 wood-fired wild clay stoneware, ash glaze and iron sand 600mm x 600mm x 380mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Tauranga

p.48

$2,500 - $3,500

27

Laurence Aberhart Amberley Memorial ('to Thine Own Self Be True'), Amberley, October, 1981 1981 gold toned gelatin silver print dated 1981 and inscribed Memorial: Amberly in ink lower left; signed L. Aberhart and dated 1982 in ink lower right 195mm x 245mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1984 Exhibitions Aberhart, City Gallery, Wellington, 13 May-29 July 2007 (toured nationally); Aberhart Starts Here, Christchurch City Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetū, Christchurch, 15 September 2017-5 February 2018 Literature Laurence Aberhart, Aberhart (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2007), u.p; Laurence Aberhart, Aberhart Starts Here (Christchurch: Christchurch City Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetū, 2017), 95 Collections Another from the edition included in the collection of Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (acquired 1982); Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetū (acquired 1988)

p.49

$3,000 - $5,000

28

Dick Frizzell Circle Line 1995 oil on canvas signed Frizzell, dated 31/5/95 and inscribed Circle Line in brushpoint lower right 495mm x 625mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Art + Object, Auckland, 1 August 2015 (lot 34)

p.50

$5,000 - $8,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

29

Jake Walker Untitled Painting 7 2013 oil on linen, glazed ceramic signed J Walker and dated 2013 in ink verso 345mm x 410mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Gallery 9, Sydney, 2016 Exhibitions Painting Questions, Gallery 9, Wellington, 17 July-10 August 2013

p.51/133

$3,000 - $4,000

30

Seung Yul Oh Untitled II 2004 acrylic on canvas signed Seung Oh in graphite verso 235mm x 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, 2006

p.52

$700 - $1,200

31

Max Gimblett untitled 1985 ink on paper signed Max Gimblett and dated 1985 in graphite upper left 1210mm x 800mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.53

$3,000 - $5,000

32

Gordon Walters Painting No. 7 2016 screenprint on paper, 62/100 Walters Estate bindstamp applied lower left; inscribed Painting No. 7 in graphite in another hand lower edge 500mm x 375mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Starkwhite, Auckland, 2016

p.55

$4,000 - $6,000

33

Gordon Walters untitled c. 1970-1976 fragment of a gouache painting on paper with a study for a poster for the exhibition Amercian Graphics, Petar/James Gallery, 18-28 September 1976 on the reverse signed Gordon Walters in graphite lower edge 155mm x 92mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.54

$2,000 - $4,000

34

et al.

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.56

$1,000 - $2,000

35

Nick Austin Aquarium (with cave) 2012 acrylic on newspaper Hopkinson Mossman label affixed verso 575mm x 785mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hopkinson Mossman, Auckland, 2012

p.57/122

$2,500 - $3,500

36

Colin McCahon Sign to Reinga 1973 charcoal on paper inscribed Lets walk in graphite lower left; signed Colin McCahon and dated Easter '73 in graphite lower right; Peter McLeavey Gallery stamp applied verso 216mm x 283mm

Provenance Private collection, Welllington. Purchased from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1976 Note Colin McCahon Online Catalogue (www.mccahon.co.nz) number: cm000908

p.58

$15,000 - $25,000

untitled & untitled II 1992 ink and grease pencil on found postcard signed LB, inscribed radiator electrique/ untitled in grease pencil verso (upper panel); dated 1992 and inscribed 1-5 in ink verso (upper panel); inscribed radiator souffiant/ untitled II in grease pencil verso (lower panel); dated 1992 and inscribed 1-5 in ink verso (lower panel) 39mm x 89mm (each panel)


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

37

Colin McCahon Cashmere Hills 1948 conté on paper signed McCahon, dated ’48 and inscribed Cashmere Hills in graphite lower edge; John Leech Gallery label affixed verso 197mm x 250mm

Provenance Private collection, London. Acquired from John Leech Gallery, Auckland, 1998 Note Colin McCahon Online Catalogue (www.mccahon.co.nz) number: cm001490

p.59

$6,000 - $8,000

38

Ian Scott Small Lattice No.223 1989-1990 acrylic on canvas signed Ian Scott in graphite verso and inscribed 501/"Small Lattice No.223." in ink verso 763mm x 763mm

Provenance Private collection, Taupo

p.60/124

$5,000 - $7,000

39

Allen Maddox untitled 1977 oil on paper signed am and dated 1.7.77. in ink lower edge 600mm x 450mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.61

$5,000 - $7,000

40

Don Peebles Drawing 1974 graphite, ink and acrylic on paper signed Don Peebles, dated 1974 and inscribed Drawing in graphite verso 750mm x 555mm

Provenance Private collection, Lyttleton. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, 1974

p.62

$800 - $1,200

41

Carl Sydow untitled 1973 letraline on paper signed Carl Sydow and dated 1973 in ink lower right 560mm x 710mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.63

$1,000 - $2,000

42

Andrew Beck Focus Point 2015 acrylic on glass and silver gelatin print in artist-made frame signed A.Beck, dated 2015 and inscribed Focus Point in paint marker verso 660mm x 510mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2015

p.64

$2,900 - $3,500

43

Tony de Lautour Indicator 2007 acrylic on canvas signed Tony de Lautour and dated 2007 in graphite verso 800mm x 1200mm

Provenance Private collection, Christchurch

p.65/114

$7,000 - $10,000

44

Richard Killeen Left, Right 1981 gouache on paper signed Killeen, dated 1981 and inscribed Left, Right in graphite lower edge 750mm x 550mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 1986 Exhibitions Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington, 28 September-15 October 1982

p.66

$5,000 - $8,000

45

Richard Killeen Island Mentality 1981 acrylic and collage on paper signed Killeen, dated 7.81 and inscribed Island Mentality in graphite lower edge 755mm x 565mm

Provenance Private Collection, Auckland. Acquired by the present owner from Bowerbank Ninow, Auckland, 3 August 2016 (lot 15). Acquired by the previous owner from Dunbar Sloane, Wellington, 27 November 1994

p.67

$2,000 - $3,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

46

Don Driver Duck, Doll and Bug Assemblage c. 1980-1995 mixed media sculpture 490mm x 335mm x 335mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington Exhibitions Francis Upritchard - The Neighbour, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 20 May-11 June, 2016.

p.68

$1,000 - $2,000

47

Don Driver Painted Relief No 6 1972 acrylic on canvas and enamel on aluminium, artist-made frame signed Don Driver, dated 1972 and inscribed Painted Relief No 6 in ink verso 1395mm x 1840mm

Provenance Private collection, Whangarei. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 1972

p.69/138

$15,000 - $20,000

48

Michael Parekowhai Rainbow Servant Dreaming 2005 polyurethane and two-pot automotive paint 640mm x 240mm x 160mm (widest points)

Provenance Private collection, Matakana Exhibitions Rainbow Servant Dreaming, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, May 2005 Literature Michael Parekowhai, Michael Parekowhai (Auckland: Michael Lett Publishing, 2007), 108-109, 118, 228, 456-457, 590 Collections Another from the edition held in the collection of Auckland Art Gallery Toi O Tāmaki (acquired 2005)

p.70

$10,000 - $15,000

49

Paul Cullen untitled 4 2005 wooden rulers, glue, varnish signed Paul Cullen, dated 2005 and inscribed 4 in ink verso 186mm x 240mm x 32mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Exhibitions 64zero3, Christchurch, 2005

p.71

$1,000 - $2,000

50

John Reynolds Epistemologies IV 2004 oil pastel on paper inscribed IV in oil pastel lower right; signed Reynolds and dated 2004 in oil pastel lower left 990mm x 690mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1 March 2005 Exhibitions Harry Human Heights, Artspace, Auckland, 12 June-28 July 2001

p.72

$5,000 - $7,000

51

John Reynolds Epistemologies VIII 2004 oil pastel on paper inscribed VIII in oil pastel lower right; signed Reynolds and dated 2004 in oil pastel lower left 990mm x 690mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Sue Crockford Gallery, Auckland, 1 March 2005 Exhibitions Harry Human Heights, Artspace, Auckland, 12 June-28 July 2001

p.73

$5,000 - $7,000

52

Karl Fritsch untitled 2013 aluminium, cubic zirconia signed KF and dated 13 with incision 39mm x 26mm x 21mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.74/128

$1,000 - $2,000

53

Karl Fritsch untitled 2009 silver, sapphires signed KF and dated 09 with incision 37mm x 29mm x 25mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.74/128

$1,500 - $1,800

54

Karl Fritsch untitled 2014 gold, diamonds signed KF, dated 14 and inscribed gy with incision 30mm x 20mm x 21mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.74/128

$2,200 - $2,800

55

Karl Fritsch untitled c. 2009-2010 gold, crystal signed KF with incision 36mm x 20mm x 20mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.75/128

$1,700 - $2,200


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

56

Karl Fritsch untitled 2013 silver, rubies, sapphires, garnets signed KF and dated 13 with incision 32mm x 23mm x 14mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.75/128

$1,600 - $2,200

57

Karl Fritsch untitled 2013 copper, silver, cubic zirconia signed KF and dated 13 with incision 37mm x 37mm x 37mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from The Young, Wellington, c. 2014

p.75/128

$1,200 - $1,800

58

Bill Hammond Bone Eagle A 2007 etching, 12/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle A in graphite lower left 90mm x 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.76

$1,500 - $2,500

59

Bill Hammond Bone Eagle B 2007 etching, 6/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle B in graphite lower left 90mm x 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.76

$1,500 - $2,500

60

Bill Hammond Bone Eagle C 2007 etching, 16/25 signed WD Hammond and dated 2007 in graphite lower right; inscribed Bone Eagle C in graphite lower left 90mm x 150mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.76

$1,500 - $2,500

61

Bill Hammond untitled 2006 lithograph on paper, 36/100 signed WD Hammond and dated 2006 in graphite lower right 570mm x 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.77

$3,000 - $4,000

62

Andrew Barber Study 12 2007 oil on linen signed AWB, dated 2007 and inscribed 'Study 12' in ink verso 355mm x 305mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Exhibitions andrew barber, andrew barber, Gambia Castle, 5-21 April 2007

p.78

$1,800 - $2,600

63

Robert Ellis untitled 1963 ink and acrylic on paper signed Robert Ellis and dated '63 in ink lower left 780mm x 560mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.79

$4,000 - $6,000

64

Robert Ellis River Bend & City 1964 oil on hardboard signed Robert Ellis and dated 64 in brushpoint lower left; signed by Robert Ellis, dated 1964 and inscribed 'River Bend & City'/91 x 71 cms. in ink verso 910mm x 710mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Exhibitions Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, 1964

p.80

$10,000 - $15,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

65

Robert Ellis The Road Crosses the River into the City 1964 oil on hardboard signed Robert Ellis and dated 64 in brushpoint lower right; signed by Robert Ellis, dated 1964 and inscribed 'The Road Crosses the River into the City'/71 x 91 cms. in ink verso 710mm x 910mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Exhibitions Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, 1964

p.81

$10,000 - $15,000

66

Eric Lee-Johnson Hokianga Settlement 1950 ink, watercolour and graphite on paper signed E, dated 50 and inscribed Hokianga Settlement in ink lower right 570mm x 390mm

Provenance Estate of Eric Lee-Johnson

p.82/126

$7,000 - $12,000

67

Eric Lee-Johnson Bones among the Boulders 1948 watercolour and graphite on paper inscribed Bones among the Boulders in ink upper right verso 560mm x 760mm

Provenance Estate of Eric Lee-Johnson

p.83/126

$3,000 - $5,000

68

Laith McGregor These Teas are Saving Me 2014 ink, graphite and watercolour on paper inscribed These Teas are Saving Me... in ink lower left; signed LM, dated November 2014 and inscribed 8:08am/12:08am/3:31pm/2:58pm/10:38pm in ink lower right; signed LM in brushpoint lower right 320mm x 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Starkwhite, Auckland, 2015 Exhibitions Somewhere Anywhere, Starkwhite, Auckland, 2 June-4 July 2015 Literature Laith McGregor, S-O-M-E-O-N-E (Melbourne: Perimeter Editions, 2016), 143

p.84/136

$1,200 - $1,800

69

Laith McGregor Jelly 2014 ink and watercolour on paper inscribed of Jelly Roll Mortons blues on the in ink lower edge; inscribed 10 02am in graphite lower right; signed LM, dated 14 and inscribed 1:09 am/4:47pm in ink lower right 320mm x 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Starkwhite, Auckland, 2015 Exhibitions Somewhere Anywhere, Starkwhite, Auckland, 2 June-4 July 2015 Literature Laith McGregor, S-O-M-E-O-N-E (Melbourne: Perimeter Editions, 2016), 137

p.84/136

$1,200 - $1,800

70

Laith McGregor Coffee Time 2014 ink and watercolour on paper inscribed 8:08 am/3:48 pm/COFFEE TIME in graphite lower left; signed LM and dated 6.1.15 in graphite lower right 320mm x 235mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Starkwhite, Auckland, 2015 Exhibitions Somewhere Anywhere, Starkwhite, Auckland, 2 June-4 July 2015 Literature Laith McGregor, S-O-M-E-O-N-E (Melbourne: Perimeter Editions, 2016), 137

p.27

$200 - $400

71

John Reynolds Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations. 1999 ink transfer on cotton signed Reynolds, dated 1999 and inscribed Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks, The lady of situations. in graphite lower edge 1865mm x 2245mm

Provenance Private collection, Napier. Acquired from Muka, Auckland, 2007

p.85

$3,500 - $4,500

72

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.86

$400 - $700

73

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.86

$400 - $700

74

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.87

$400 - $700


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

75

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.87

$400 - $700

76

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.88

$400 - $700

77

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.88

$400 - $700

78

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 oil pastel on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.89

$400 - $700

79

Richard Lewer untitled c. 2004-2005 ink on sandpaper signed Lewer in ink verso 280mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Whanganui. Gifted by the artist to the present owner, c. 2005

p.89

$400 - $700

80

Jeffrey Harris untitled 1974 oil on board signed JH and dated '74 in brushpoint lower left 175mm x 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.90/134

$5,000 - $7,000

81

Jeffrey Harris untitled 1980 charcoal on paper 420mm x 290mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.91

$1,000 - $2,000

82

Colin McCahon Fifteen Drawings for Charles Brasch 1951-1952 lithograph on paper (24 panels) 260mm x 200mm (each panel)

Provenance Private collection, Wellington Note Colin McCahon Online Catalogue (www.mccahon.co.nz) number: cm001655

p.92

$4,000 - $6,000

83

Simon Denny Picture Flip 2007 custom-woven cotton towel 740mm x 1510mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland Exhibitions Compression Club, Michael Lett, Auckland, 10 October - 10 November, 2007.

p.94

$2,500 - $3,500

84

Kushana Bush Alabaster Man 2014 etching and aquatint on paper signed Kushana Bush and dated 2014 in graphite lower right; inscribed Alabaster Man in graphite lower left 335mm x 255mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2015 Exhibitions First Show, Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 31 January - 28 February, 2015.

p.95

$1,500 - $2,500

85

Michael Thompson untitled 2014 acrylic on paper 760mm x 565mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Gow Langsford, Auckland, 2014

p.96

$1,000 - $2,000

86

Richard Thompson untitled 2000 ink on paper signed R.T. and dated 2000 in graphite lower left 110mm x 110mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.97

$500 - $1,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

87

Rohan Wealleans The Mighty Thor c. 2010-2012 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene 250mm x 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2012

p.98

$1,000 - $2,000

88

Rohan Wealleans The Golem c. 2010-2012 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene 250mm x 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2012

p.98

$1,000 - $2,000

89

Rohan Wealleans The Thing and Skull c. 2010-2012 acrylic on found comic book, paper and polystyrene 250mm x 160mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2012

p.98

$1,000 - $2,000

90

Rohan Wealleans Jelly Baby Dreaming 2008 acrylic on canvas signed Rohan Wealleans and dated 2008 ink lower left verso 1630mm x 1200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2008 Exhibitions Rohan Wealleans – Deep Heat, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 22 July – 16 August, 2008.

p.99

$9,000 - $13,000

91

Billy Apple Forty Years: 1962-2002 2002 screenprint, from an edition of 40 signed Billy and inscribed ’80 in graphite 380mm x 572mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, 2003

p.100

$800 - $1,200

92

Emily Hartley-Skudder Galloway Collection 2013-2014 oil on calico signed E Hartley Skudder/Emily Hartley-Skudder and inscribed Galloway Collection in ink upper edge verso; dated 2013-14 in ink lower edge verso 150mm x 230mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from {Suite}, Wellington, 2013

p.101

$1,200 - $2,200

93

Jason Greig The Hopeful Christians 2007 oil on board signed JG and dated 07 in brushpoint lower right; Hamish McKay Gallery stamp applied verso 320mm x 357mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Hamish McKay, Wellington, 2007

p.102

$3,500 - $4,500

94

Roger Mortimer Recovery 1998 acrylic on canvas signed Roger Mortimer and dated 1998 in ink verso 1340mm x 1340mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Ivan Anthony, Auckland, 2001

p.103

$3,500 - $4,500

95

Stephen Bambury Co-ordinates (study) c. 1977-1978 acrylic on canvas on hardboard signed Stephen Bambury, dated 1977-78 and inscribed acrylic on canvas/Co-ordinates (study) in ink verso 435mm x 687mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.104

$5,000 - $7,000

96

Max Gimblett Tiburon/Grisant 1983 acrylic polymer on canvas signed Max Gimblett, dated '83 and inscribed Tiburon/Grisant in ink upper edge verso 300mm x 495mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.105

$4,000 - $6,000


#

artwork

history

plate / essay

estimate

97

James Robinson untitled 2002 mixed media on canvas (12 panels) signed www.jamesrobinson.co.nz in ink verso (8 panels); signed James Robinson and dated 02 in ink verso (2 panels) 580mm x 840mm (overall, installation size variable)

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Webb's, Auckland, 26 August 2012 (lot 37)

p.106

$1,500 - $2,500

98

Richard Lewer untitled c. 1997 graphite on paper signed From Richard Lewer in graphite lower left 1000mm x 795mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland

p.107

$2,000 - $3,000

99

Michael Smither untitled 1990 graphite on paper signed MDS and dated 90 in graphite lower right 295mm x 215mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from International Art Centre, Auckland, 5 May 201 (lot 179)

p.108

$500 - $1,000

100 Michael Smither Rocks, Tractor & Mountain 2012 screenprint on paper, 18/80 signed MDS and dated 2012 in graphite lower edge 460mm x 595mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.109

$1,200 - $2,200

101 Michael Smither Coral Head with Fish 2013 screenprint on paper, 12/50 signed MDS and dated 2013 in graphite lower edge 375mm x 440mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington

p.109

$800 - $1,600

102 Alexis Hunter Circle 1991 oil on canvas signed Alexis Hunter in ink verso; inscribed Alexis Hunter/Circle/oil on canvas/11 x 9in/1991/ EN 4/AH in ink on gallery K label affixed verso 255mm x 200mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Brooker Gallery, Northland

p.110

$700 - $1,400

103 Alexis Hunter Secret Places IV 1990 oil on canvas signed Alexis Hunter, dated 1990 and inscribed Secret Places IV, oil on canvas 24" x 20"/R skin Glue & lead w u/c orange in ink verso 610mm x 510mm

Provenance Private collection, Wellington. Acquired from Brooker Gallery, Northland

p.111

$1,500 - $2,500

104 Denys Watkins Davy Crockett 2016 gouache on paper signed Watkins and dated 016 in graphite lower right 420mm x 420mm

Provenance Private collection, Auckland. Acquired from Mirage Gallery, Parnell.

p.112

$500 - $1,000


bowerbank ninow

How to participate in the auction

Attending in person Auction N˚10 will take place on Wednesday 25th July 2018 at 6.30pm. Buyers will need to register with Bowerbank Ninow in order to receive a bidder’s card, which is required for participation in the auction. Buyers are able to register at any stage during the viewing period or on the evening of the auction. For those wishing to register on the night of the auction, we would advise that they arrive 15-20 minutes prior to the auction commencing. Bidding by Telephone For those who wish to participate in the auction but cannot attend in person, there are two methods by which they may do so remotely. The first of these is to bid by telephone. Telephone bidders are welcome to bid on either single or multiple lots. In order to bid by telephone, buyers are required to register with Bowerbank Ninow prior to the auction commencing. We are able to arrange telephone bidding via email, telephone or in person. Registration for telephone bidding closes an hour before the auction commences. Absentee Bids Absentee bids are an alternate method of remote participation to phone bidding. The placing of an ‘absentee bid’ entails a buyer specifying the maximum hammer price that they wish to pay for a given lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on the buyer’s behalf until their maximum price is exceeded. Bowerbank Ninow will always act in good faith for absentee bidders and will endeavor to secure items on which they bid for the lowest possible price. We are able to arrange absentee bidding via email, telephone or in person. Bids Placed on Our Website Bids placed online, through bowerbankninow.com, are considered to be ‘absentee bids’ and will be treated in the manner outlined in the paragraph above. Resale Royalty For any works sold at auction that are by living artists, Bowerbank Ninow will endeavour to contact the artist and pay the artist a resale royalty of 2.5% of the hammer price. The steps taken to contact the artist will be at Bowerbank Ninow’s sole discretion and Bowerbank Ninow will under no circumstances be liable for failure to make payment to an artist under this clause. This royalty is funded by the proceeds of our buyer’s premium and does not result in any additional cost for either the buyer or seller. Artists are invited to submit their contact details to Bowerbank Ninow to facilitate payment. Physical Condition of Artworks The artworks included in this auction range from having been made within the last decade to having been made more than forty years ago and, as such, the physical condition of each will vary. We encourage buyers to inspect the artworks in person when possible. However, we are happy to supply additional information and images of any artwork to those who cannot attend the viewing. Freighting of Artworks As per the terms and conditions, the buyer is responsible for the collection of any lots bought. This being said, Bowerbank Ninow is happy to assist with freighting and packaging where the buyer has special requirements. Any freighting or packaging will be undertaken at the buyer’s expense.

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Conditions of Sale

REGISTRATION All bidders must complete a bidding card or absentee bidding form prior to the commencement of the auction. It is required that a correct name, address, telephone number and email address be supplied.

on, or before, the day after the sale. If a 20% deposit is made instead of full payment, a payment of the balance must be made within 5 working days of the sale. Eftpos, electronic transfer, bank cheques or cash are accepted as payment. Visa and MasterCard are also accepted but are subject to an additional charge of 2.5%. All amounts specified are in New Zealand Dollars.

BIDDING In each instance, the highest bidder on a lot will be its purchaser, subject to both the bid being above the lot’s reserve and the auctioneer’s right to refuse the bid that they have placed on it. By bidding on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) the bidder acknowledges that they may become the lot’s purchaser and that they are responsible for any payments required by their purchase of it. The auctioneer has sole discretion with regards to the increments at which bidding increases. No bids that have been placed above reserve may be withdrawn by the bidder. However, the auctioneer has the right to withdraw any bids before a lot has closed or return to a previous bid in the advent of a dispute about the highest bid arising. The auctioneer also has the right to bid on behalf of the vendor up to the reserve. Any person wishing to bid on behalf of a third party must provide Bowerbank Ninow with written authority to do so prior to bidding.

FAILIURE TO MAKE PAYMENT If the purchaser fails to fulfill their obligation to make the required payment(s), Bowerbank Ninow has the right to a) cancel the sale, b) pursue the purchaser for damages from their breach of contract, c) without notice, sell the lot to another individual, either by private sale or by auction, d) store the lot, either at Bowerbank Ninow’s premises or off-site at the purchaser’s expense. The difference between any lower amount made from the re-sale of the lot (as per point c) and the amount still owed by the original purchaser, will remain owed to Bowerbank Ninow by the original purchaser. If payment has not been made after seven days, Bowerbank Ninow has the right to charge interest on any monies owed by the purchaser of an amount equal to their bank’s then current interest rate for commercial overdraft facilities. If there is an unsatisfied  debt  then the applicant agrees that they be liable for and pay for all costs of recovery of the contract, which costs shall be collected by a debt collection agency. Costs payable by the applicant shall include, legal fees, commissions, fee’s and disbursements, and /or court fees and disbursements.

RESERVES All lots in this sale are subject to reserve and will be sold subject to bids meeting the reserve price, which is set by Bowerbank Ninow in consultation with the vendor or his/ her agent.

COLLECTION Purchased items must be collected, or freighted, at the purchaser’s expense within a week of payment being received by Bowerbank Ninow.

SUBJECT BIDS When the highest bid falls below the reserve, the auctioneer will announce to the room, and the bidder who has placed the highest bid, in particular, that the lot has been sold “subject to the vendor’s consent,” or some such words to the same effect. This “subject bid” remains binding until the vendor either accepts or refuses the sale, until which time no other offers may be put to the vendor. Prior to the vendor’s acceptance of the “subject bid,” it may be withdrawn at any time by the bidder who has placed it but, once accepted by the vendor, the bidder has entered into a contract to purchase the lot at the accepted price plus the buyer’s premium. BUYERS’ PREMIUM By registering to bid at auction and then subsequently bidding on a lot, the bidder accepts that a buyers premium of 17.5% + GST will be charged in addition to the hammer price of any lot sold to them. SOLD LOTS It is assumed that bidders have inspected any lots that they bid on, or made sufficient enquiries into the condition and authenticity of any lots that they bid on prior to the auction. Advice about each lot is made available by Bowerbank Ninow to any prospective purchasers but it is not intended to replace the expert opinion of third-party specialists such as conservators. Any purchase is ultimately made according to the purchasers own judgment and any bids made on a lot (either in person, over the telephone or by way of absentee bid) constitute an acceptance of the lot’s present condition. PAYMENT Successful bidders are required to make payment to Bowerbank Ninow on either the same day as the sale or the following day. A deposit of 20% may be made in lieu of full payment if, for any reason, full payment cannot be made

151


bowerbank ninow

Absentee & Phone Bidding Form Auction N°10 25th July 2018 bowerbank ninow

first name

Please specify the maximum amount that you wish to bid for this lot. This absentee bid will be executed by the auctioneer, who will bid on your behalf until your maximum bid amount has been exceeded. The auctioneer will endeavor to secure this lot for you at the lowest possible price.

surname company postal address

ph mobile Ph landline email

Lot

Description

Amount

By completing and signing this form you confirm that you have read and accept Bowerbank Ninow’s conditions of sale (on reverse) and understand that this bid will be binding and that a buyer’s premium of an additional 17.5% + GST of the hammer price applies to this sale. The bid submitted here is exclusive of buyer’s premium and any GST on the premium.

SIGNED AS AGREED

date

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Auction N˚10  
Auction N˚10