Graduations Publication 2014-2015

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Architecture Urbanism Landscape Architecture Graduation Projects 2014-2015 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


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Architecture Urbanism Landscape Architecture Graduation Projects 2014-2015 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


Contents 10 Edwin Oostmeijer, The Trunk of the Elephant ARCHITECTURE 14 Jarrik Ouburg, To ask the question is to answer it

18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72 78 84 90 96 102 108 114 120

Dirk Durrer, House of the Senses Immanuel Fäustle, GenerationLab Eva Engele, Counterspace  Sylvia Hendriks, Port of refuge Marjan van Herpen, Present Alies Koree, GAASTER[LAND-GOED] Marco Kramer, Re-Creation Hein van Lieshout, The New Dam Sjors Onneweer, Space for a place Milad Pallesh, Pairi Dæza Jeroen Schoots, Believe in health Mark Spijkerman, House of Power Marijke van Suijdam, The loop Egle Suminskaite, Platform for science Giles Townshend, Reimagining Sheepscar Jim de Valk, Swifterbant cemetery Michiel van Zeijl, The Thermae of Ockenburgh Lars Zwirs, The European Embassy


URBANISM 126 Arjan Klok, Expectations

130 136 142 148 154 160

Eric-Jan Bijlard, Aveiro Lagoon Science Park Geert den Boogert, Boomerang Sloterdijk Tijl Hekking, Lake for entrepreneurs Els Van Looy, From burden to desire  Luc Spee, The amalgamation Sjoerd Wolbertus, The Periphery Central

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 166 Maike van Stiphout, Prepared for the future

168 174 180 186 192 198 204

Jacques Abelman, Urban L.A.C.E. Marijne Beenhakker, New perspective for the Hollandse Hout Mathé van Kranenburg, Deep-Rooted Judith van der Poel, Watery Huzhou Hannah Schubert, Second Nature Gert-Jan Wisse, Common Ground Belfast Yuka Yoshida, Re.CLAIM

210 Archiprix 2016 Nominations


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The Trunk of the Elephant Edwin Oostmeijer Visiting critic


A trunk sometimes shows more than the whole elephant. That is a lesson that I learnt when I was still a journalist and received writing training from a poet. ‘Describe the fear of the dark from the viewpoint of a child’, read one assignment. I can still remember it very well. You step into a lift in a hotel, go to the 13th floor and enter into a discussion with an eccentric older lady. Describe this situation without using one of these words. A multitude of short exercises without much time to think about them. It taught me to tell stories. We are all inclined to tell too much; rather too much than too little. What it always amounts to, of course, is getting through to, seducing or seizing the other person by the throat. The question and challenge is how you achieve that. The thing which struck me about the 31 graduation projects at the Academy of Architecture from the past year is that they are all indeed stories. Students and graduates have a story to tell. And they do that with verve. The subjects are unbelievably diverse. From accommodation for refugees to the partial demolition of the Stopera building complex in Amsterdam, from restoring the broken band between Tokyo and its Nihonbashi river to activating remaining residual spaces around, between and underneath the railway track in Rotterdam-Noord. Large blocks of buildings were drawn, in orderly formation, with many green outdoor spaces. It is interesting that these buildings can shrink and grow, according to changes over time. Big, bigger, biggest or rather very small, orderly and wellchosen. I have seen tents pass before my eyes, like a travelling circus for refugees, accommodation for the elderly in Havana, a clever parcelling for smallscale residential building in Flanders. A European embassy in Delhi, colourful orchards in a grey city somewhere in Brazil. They are all interesting assignments, some of which get bogged down in good intentions and others which grow wings.

Impressions sometimes display what the assignment is about at a glance. Plans can also help one understand which intervention is proposed for which place. The question is why that specific intervention is desirable. Who is the intervention intended for and why would people want to contribute to this? Making beautiful impressions. Most students are currently unbelievably adept at that. It often looks polished and seductive. The impression as the means, but with which objective? I once became a property developer by accident. Trained as a journalist, one day I came across a camouflaged empty German bunker in the historic city centre of Utrecht. According to the zoning plan, residential building was an option. A drawing was made quickly. A drawing showing what I and my architect had in mind for that location. A beautifully restrained apartment building on the foundations of the old bunker. The drawing was the beginning and the real work began afterwards. Telling an honest and seductive story to politicians, local residents and financial backers. Why it was a good idea to replace the bunker with a new residential building. That is something you can learn. You can learn to tell the right story to the right person. We can all draw paper tigers and elephants, one better than the other, but the drawback of paper tigers and elephants is that they never roar. They are beautiful animals, yet animals that are never heard. It is about finding stakeholders, being able to surround yourself with people and bodies that want to allow your idea and assignment to become a reality. That is one of the most important question that I have, with regard to the rich harvest that the Academy of Architecture has delivered in the past year. Have you ever invited property developers to the Academy in order to exchange ideas about the assignments of these times? Have you ever spoken to a municipal councillor, a high-ranking official, a chairman of a water authority board or another administrator? With his project ‘Pairi Dæza’, the old Persian word for paradise, Milad Palesh has told a beautiful story about children who 11


live with their parents around walled gardens. Has a developer or municipality ever looked at this beautiful ensemble of residential buildings around Persian gardens? What we talk about when we talk about love, which is also the title of a story by the American writer Raymond Carver. The wall in Belfast which has been partially demolished by Gert Jan Wisse, as a result of which a long-hidden river emerges and the flowing water becomes a metaphor for a new and hopeful world in a traumatised city. Then the museum of Mr Scheringa which was never realised. The enormous building was already a ruin before it was completed. A new designated use was never found easily. Hannah Schubert did not search for obvious solutions in her graduation project Second Nature. No transformations into homes or office space, but small interventions instead, which over time ensure that nature takes over the building and changes it into a wilderness. The building as landscape. The French have a beautiful expression for that: C’est la nature qui va le manger. Three of the four nominated graduation projects are landscape projects. That was the surprise for me this year. The enormous power of the landscape, the relationship between the developed and undeveloped space. Poetry is sometimes captured in the graduation projects, poetically beautiful, whereby the trunk often told me more than the whole elephant. And now go outside! Take to the streets! You will roar, roar very loudly!

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Jarrik Ouburg Head of Architecture Department


To ask the question is to answer it – Salvatore Quasimodo How can you integrate a cemetery into the heart of the village Swifterband and thus give the inhabitants the opportunity to not only live in the village, but also to be buried there? How can you design a building where deaf, deaf-blind and blind people take the ‘healthy’ people by the hand? How can you integrate an existing motorway with new buildings in such a way that the spatial quality of the surroundings is given a spatial boost? How can you introduce the concept ‘urban ensemble’ into the English context, whereby an alternative is offered to large-scale apartment complexes in the city on the one hand and endless amounts of singlefamily homes in the countryside on the other hand? How can the Stopera complex in Amsterdam once again form part of the city, and in transforming this building where is the historical core which can be built upon? How can you design a part of the city in which the desire of different generations to live together and take care of each other is realised?

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Architecture

How can you design a humane place close to Amsterdam Airport Schiphol where people seeking safety and peace in the Netherlands can apply for asylum? How can you design a residential complex in Cuba for a mixture of residents, in which music (and its transmission) is a catalyst? How can you design a place of residence for asylum seekers who have exhausted all rights of appeal in which the residents regain a sense of self-worth and are given a role in the city through a combination of living and working? How can you design a building where sport, relaxation and physical and mental exertion are the main focus, and architecture is the medium that ties everything together? How can you shape the growing demand for holiday homes in the bulb-growing district in such a way that they reinforce the existing qualities of the landscape? How can you improve the rehabilitation of people who have ended up in a wheelchair through architecture? How can the new housing for a growing church community simultaneously be a place for contemplation, as well as a place where the church can play a new social role? How can a design of a European embassy in New Delhi be a means of fostering understanding of the values of different cultures and ensuring sustainable peace in a globalising world?

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To ask the question is to answer it

How can you transform a mono-functional campus in Lithuania that is dominated by motor traffic through a single clear intervention, as a result of which the buildings are connected once again to each other and nature becomes the connecting element? How can you create a lifetime neighbourhood where everyone can remain living, have children and grow old by means of clever shrinkage and growth scenarios on the scale of the home itself? How can a holiday park make more use of the existing qualities of the location and be flexible in its design in such a way that it allows different forms of use?

The generation of graduates this year make optimal use of the possibility at the Academy to graduate on a subject of one’s own choice. The background to the plans vary from personal motivation to social engagement. The lines of approach are very different, but what the students do have in common is that they are part of a generation that commenced and also completed their studies at a time when the building sector was in a very bad state. That may be the reason that the role of architecture as means and as objective are less strongly represented in these plans. The questions and accompanying objectives that the students have set themselves go beyond the architectural quality. The students are concerned with the difference a building or architecture can actually make; architecture as a societal, social and cultural catalyst. I am convinced that it will be this generation of students who can restore trust in the field and convince the sceptics that architecture can be more than an extra layer to a building when the budget permits that. It is a generation that is seeking to integrate architecture in the foundations of a culture.

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Architecture

Dirk Durrer House of the Senses

A safe harbour for the deaf & blind

Introduction It must become a ‘House of the Senses’, which is also available to deaf-blind people and blind people. Hearing, seeing, smelling, feeling and tasting can also be examined and treated there. The question is how you can play on the senses by means of architecture. By switching off one of the senses, you rely even more on the others. One sense functioning badly can be compensated for by another sense. Furthermore, the choice of material can be influenced by touch and smell. Fascination If you are deaf, you do not hear and speech does not develop after birth. If the speech does actually develop, this is very difficult to understand. How is it possible to learn how to talk if you do not hear your own voice and cannot correct it. A deaf person who can talk is like a blind painter who paints a landscape. Deaf space Deaf people have a strong sense of community and often feel connected with a building. The space that exists can give a good feeling. Light is necessary to be able to see the place where we live. How is light and space formed? What are concept and space made up of? What is necessary in order to understand the building and to navigate one’s way there? Openness means no boundaries. Let the space flow through the building. You must feel at ease everywhere and be able to see each other in the building You must also be able to have a private discussion. You must be able to walk through the building easily, but there must also be surprises and it must be possible to organise different things at the same time. A staircase offers the opportunity to see others through the open space. Inspiration Space that consists of free-flowing circular movements is linked to the invented anthropological term ‘maluma’ and is the soft, flowing essence of deaf language and culture. Deaf people can see each other better in a semi-circle opposite each other. ‘Takete’ is the opposite of ‘maluma’ and is a rigid, sharp and angular aesthetic.

Graduation date 22 06 2015

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Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Machiel Spaan Jeroen Spee

Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Micha de Haas


Dirk Durrer

Tailor-made area: from far away during the day.

Tailor-made area: from far away in the evening.

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Architecture

Image caption

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Situation: head of the Java Island.

Image caption

Image caption

Image caption

Location: public area and semi-public area.

Location: recreational activities.

Location: concept.

Location: orientation in the evening.

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Image caption


Dirk Durrer

Accessibility: closed mass.

Accessibility: view.

Accessibility: corridor and main axis.

Accessibility: public and private.

Image caption

Section: 3D Section.

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Architecture

Corridor: deaf people can see each other and communicate.

Materialisation: sensory experience, see.

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Dirk Durrer

Plan: ground floor

begane grond 1:200

Plan: fourth floor

4e verdieping 1:200

Section + facade: cross section + west facade.

23 dwarsdoorsnede + westgevel 1:100


Architecture

Immanuel Fäustle GenerationLab

Research into a lifetime neighbourhood The government has been working on cutting back on the welfare state for several years and is focusing on self-reliance. This means living at home longer and depending on neighbours, friends and family. This is, in principle, a nice idea, but unfortunately the phenomenon of being hesitant to ask for or offer help is not included in this policy. “You want to help, but are afraid of being trapped” or the other way round “You would like help, but don’t want to burden the other person”. Urban sociologists warn that this phenomenon could lead to the policy failing. This lifetime neighbourhood is an urban answer to the current policy. Multiple generations can live with and next to each other. And there is room for the dynamics of families and getting older. By searching for common denominators, my project contributes to breaking down the hesitancy to ask for or offer help. Dynamics of families, growing older and lifetime neighbourhood Living in a lifetime neighbourhood means that you stay living in the same apartment or the same neighbourhood as you grow older. Famillies have the most dynamic and demanding households. Therefore each family home has 2 shafts and 4 splitlevel domains. The kitchen and living room domain, an oversized children domain, a parents domain and work domain. Each domain has its own entrance which gives the option of being able to sublet without loss of privacy. As a result, you can make smaller independent homes with minimal architectural adjustments. In the event of the number of family members decreasing you can thus sublet part of your house. Applying the same subletting principles in eldery homes gives the oppertunity to live longer at home in case of a (health) care demand. In the case of a growth demand (for work or living), this means that the need for space can not only be solved in internally, but also in the neighbourhood. Over time this will result in a dynamic and socially sustainable neighbourhood. Common denominators Elderly people live on the ground floors and families live on the upper floors. The various generations can meet each other on the elevated extensive collectieve roof gardens and in the collectieve adjoining garden rooms. These collective indoor and outdoor spaces are programmed by small groups of residents. Individuality vs collectivity This low rise high density neighbourhood with 124 homes per hectare is designed on the basis of the outdoor spaces with attention for landscape experiences, human scale and precise transitions between public, collective and private domains. Different levels of individuality and collectivity can be found in the urban design, stairwells, facades and homes. The point of departure is always the possibility of decreasing or increasing your distance from your neighbour or family members, both inside and outside. Privacy buffer zones in the facade contribute to the level of privacy. Location and urban design Children and elderly people in particular like to have a quiet car-free neighbourhood, where there is also enough hustle and bustle at the same time. This is why the neighbourhood is located above the busy car park of Artis zoo. Visitors of all ages park under the neighbourhood in an ascending splitlevel car park. During the day, they create the hustle and bustle in the public street above when they walk to the entrance of Artis. A sequence of four public squares traverse the street and mark four neighbourhoods. Public facilities, small collective alleyways and collective courtyards situated lower down connect with the squares. The dimensions of the small communities stem from the growing roaming radius of children growing up. The youngest discover (the neighbourhood around) the house and the roof gardens first. The older children can be found in the courtyards, alleyways, street and neighbourhoods. Graduation date 28 05 2015

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Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Ira Koers Susanne Komossa Hanneke van Lieshout

Additional members for the examination Machiel Spaan Herman Kerkdijk


Immanuel F채ustle

section multiple generation apartments connecting extensive collective roofgardens and public street

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openbaar

Architecture collectief

openbaar

entrepotdok

visitors to Artis and visitors to the car park

collectief

Artis entrepotdok number of parking places for Artis needs to be expanded

Artis

B3 D7<23< 7< 23 0CC@B 0-4 jr 0-4 jr

;

families

4-8 jr 4-8 jr entrepotdok

8-12 jr8-12 jr

;

elderly people

;

location Artis, quiet neighbourhood close to amenities, and hustle and bustle due to car park

openbaar

roaming radius and activity of children: 0-4 years old: 30m, 4-8 years old: 150m, 8-12 years old: 500m

roaming radius translated on block level Artis

use of roof gardens for numerous generations

entrepotdok

collectief

Artis

openbaar

split-level car park for 900 people

definition four small neighbourhoods collectief

public street: on southern green edge, northern hard edge. Access to homes from street.

public squares with entrances to parking and workspaces

public openbaar

collective collectief

collectiveentrepotdok alleyways with access to elderly people’s homes

collective courtyards with access to care group homes and water garden courtyards

1 overzicht 1:500

openbaar urban integration

routing through neighbourhood

collectief Artis

entrepotdok

Artis

A

B

D

entrepotdok C

E

Artis entrepotdok plan ground floor: A. neighbourhood policing centre, B. neighbourhood supermarket, C. childcare, D. cafĂŠ/restaurant, E. Artis

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Artis


P

P

Immanuel Fäustle

family homes steeg

straat met hoogte verschillen

plein

straat met harde en zachte kant

generation homes

werk

nbaar

ectief

prive

roof edges same height as Entrepotdok 15m

11-16m

22m 4-7m collectieve tuin

14m

34m

2m

3m

voetpad

fiets

elderly people’s homes on ground floors

2m

7m

2m

3m

2m

collectieve entreezone

roof gardens and garden rooms

4m 2m

steeg

transitions private-collectivepublic

P P

P

werk steeg

dimensions public street with high setback volumes

openbaar

plein

15m

collectief collectieve multifunctionele ruimte

14m 7m

prive 2m

3m

2m 5m 4m

12-17m

11-16m

auto 27m

14m

definition of domain connections forms landscape

2m

P P

P

steeg

dimensions street by the public squares plein

15m

5m

car park

12-17m

11-16m

27m

4m

14m

2m

7m

animal shelters Artis

P

steeg

dimensions collective alleyways with space for self-employed workers 15m

12-17m

5m

11-16m

27m

7m

14m

steeg

dimensions collective/public urban water garden courtyards

14m 11-16m

27m

7m

dimensions collective courtyards for elderly peoples (group)homes

27 7m


Architecture

family home facing collective courtyard with view on loggia, living room and children domain

parents work

prive collectief

children

loggias + kitchen + living room

openbaar/collectief

family apartment with four split-level domains

Two-room apartment

family apartment family apartment roof gardens and garden rooms space for self-employed workers car park entrance storage space

family apartment divided into two

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construction family block


e

openbaar

P

collectief

P

P

prive

15m

Immanuel F채ustle P 22m

P

11-16m 4-7m collectieve tuin

steeg

14m

34m

2m

3m

voetpad

fiets

2m

7m

plein

2m

3m

2m

collectieve entreezone

4m 2m

12-17m

5m

11-16m

27m

steeg

P

plein

straat met harde en zachte kant

P

P

steeg

plein

privacy buffer zone in alleyways 15m 12-17m

5m 11-16m 2m

3m

voetpad

fiets

11-16m

27m

7

14m

34m 2m

7m

2m

3m

2m

collectieve entreezone

4m

14m

2m

P

P

2m

P P

P

steeg

steeg

plein

plein

12-17m

5m

11-16m

27m

7m

concept materialisation street

2m

15m

privacy buffer zone in collective alleyways

14m

34m 7m

2m

3m

2m

4m

14m

2m

P P

P

steeg

plein

12-17m

5m

11-16m

27m

7m

privacy buffer zone towards publc street P

P

steeg

plein

alleyway with spaces for self-employed workers direction public/collective water garden and car park entrance

15m

14m

34m 2m collectieve entreezone

privacy buffer zone towards collective courtyards

7m

2m

3m

2m

4m

14m

2m

P P

P

steeg

plein

5m

privacy buffer zone loggia towards collective domains

12-17m

11-16m

27m

7m

lower down situated public/collective water gardens with elderly homes and entrance family homes

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Architecture

Eva Engele Counterspace Rotterdam North Line

The project shows the spatial potential of the ‘North Line’ in Rotterdam. The area is a 2.5 km long and up to 400 m wide strip between three city parts, currently dominated by large-scale infrastructure and a large amount of unused spaces. The proposal sets up an urban strategy to transform this void within the city into an active recreational line with different scenarios. Rotterdam North station area is used as an example to show the strategy in action. Organising the area on all scales and creating the possibilities for activities to happen are essential for these left over spaces to function. The project is not about the building itself, but about the space it creates around it. I have designed a counterspace for Rotterdam North line. A space in-between, where activities inside the buildings are extended into the public.

Graduation date 04 12 2014

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Commission members Uri Gilad (mentor) Bruno Doedens René Heijne

Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Jan-Richard Kikkert


Eva Engele

1

1

1

1

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Architecture

void inside the city

connect

new connection

hiding the infrastructure

dialogue with infrastructure

‘North Line’ in Rotterdam

existing situation

Rotterdam North Station area

architecture

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counterspace


Eva Engele

urban space where nature, variety of infrastructures and public program coexist

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Architecture

existing situation

downgrading A20 - from motorway to city boulevard

urbanising railway line Rotterdam - Gouda

new routes

more accessibility

intensifying ecological values

adding programme

2 4 3 5

1

multi-functional space / Rotterdam North station / Bus, tram, water bus stop / culture activities / recreation & commerce

strategy

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Eva Engele

multi-functional space

2

Rotterdam North Station

3

art gallery

4

multi-functional space

5

extending activities within the buildings into the public

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Architecture

Sylvia Hendriks Port of refuge A welcome to refugees

The current migration flow to Europe is starting to assume substantial proportions. Every year, thousands of refugees arrive in the Netherlands. They travel not only by boat across the Mediterranean, but also by plane. This journey by air from outside Europe’s borders is their entrance into the ‘Schengen’ zone, which determines registration in the first EU country of arrival. The Netherlands has a deterrence-based asylum policy, which becomes particularly clear during the registration process for refugees that takes place in detention at the airport. Like criminals, refugees await their asylum procedure in prison with similar restrictions. A Western country like the Netherlands, which presents itself as a humane and modern community, can not deal in such a way with people in need. The refugees often come having suffered a traumatic experience in their country of origin and strongly in need of safety and peace. In this project, I want to show that it is possible within the existing policy and politics to deal with refugees in a humane way. A place where safety and privacy is guaranteed for a vulnerable group of people, and the two-week registration process can be completed in an efficient manner for all parties. On the border with the Netherlands and the rest of the world, the building is positioned at a location in the Dutch ‘polder landscape’, elusive and detached from its immediate environment. Matching the subdued nature of the vulnerable users, the Port of Refuge focuses on the views of the ever-present horizon. The programme derives its scale from a recognisable architectural form of living, which refers to the surrounding built context of ‘polder’ barns and farms. Fitting into the grid of the Haarlemmermeer polder, living areas, recreational areas and offices will form a so-called lintdorp (ribbon village) in the polder. The building is materialised from one material, which will show multiple shades and merge into the Dutch air. The building retains its proximity to the outside world by means of the flat finish detailing of the facade. The building contains individual and inviting spaces inside. The diverse users with their own needs each receive a residence overlooking the horizon. One can stay outside in several places and there is an ongoing collective space without gates, fences or closed doors. After 14 days, there will be definite answer about the future: asylum procedure or a return. Positioned in a no man’s land, the project facilitates a first step into a possible new future without making any promises.

Graduation date 25 08 2015

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Commission members Marcel van der Lubbe (mentor) Ira Koers Rob Hootsmans

Additional members for the examination Marnix van der Meer Laurens Jan ten Kate


Sylvia Hendriks

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border

Architecture

NL

Entrance area

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Sylvia Hendriks

Collective garden

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Architecture

Room with a view

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Sylvia Hendriks

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Architecture

Marjan van Herpen Present

To show my potential significance as an architect, I have given myself a fictitious assignment. I want to make something I do not yet understand tangible, using my own area of expertise. I also want to address the current situation, to make visible what we, the Dutch society, do. At the Academy, I have researched the accommodations of refugees and aliens; research into how the Netherlands physically receives the people who seek asylum here. During my research I discovered that people disappear from the system. Some aliens vanished into anonymity at the moment of their scheduled deportation, but did not leave. Others cannot be deported because they do not cooperate, or because their country of origin will not recognise them, or because it is too dangerous there to be sent back. Ilegals may not be here legally speaking, but factually they are definitely present. The Dutch state intended to present a sound reception/deportation policy starting January 2010, which in turn caused the municipalities to close their shelters. However, there is a hole in this policy. And in that hole there are people. Those without nationality do not have rights. For them, human rights are a utopia; an unfeasible dream. Refugee aid organisations can relieve the poverty of these displaced people, but they cannot improve their actual situation, the fact that they cannot be part of a visible community. The alien does not want accidental charity, they want their basic human rights: a house, work, a family and citizenship. It is impossible to pursue these rights when you are a person without nationality. The assignment is to create a manifesto for this grey area in which one can be somewhere while not being allowed to be there. A telling sign, visible, for people who act as invisible as possible. A (temporary) accommodation, a refuge, to give these people a collective place to bridge the interim period. A hiding place where one can recover from the hunted existence and where there is space to hope and dream. A place to be visible, to present oneself, where one can work to provide oneself with the basic necessities; to be self-sufficient instead of being dependent on support - work is not only financially, but also psychologically, a basic necessity. In the middle of life, these people are made passive, when they have enough to offer. This is a place where they can develop themselves. A place where they can offer their abilities to the city, to ‘us’, to earn their own livelihood. In the scenario of my fictitious assignment this, in line with old Dutch customs, will be tolerated. The challenge is to unite the conflicting interests and its spatial materialisation in one building, in a new typology. For this purpose, I have created a programme of requirements with specific workspaces. The workplace functions as a buffer between pubic and private. A part of the workplace is accessible to the public; for example for sales, and a part is inaccessible, for focused work, but still visible. The physical limits of the workspaces influence possible relationships and the type of work and vary in degrees of visibility. By placing these limits, or spatially speaking, these shells over each other, the limits pile up. The more shells, the less accessible; the more private. Or conversely: the external skin becomes increasingly thinner. In the spaces between, the workplaces arise. Much like this project is about ‘the alien other’, I also search for what is unfamiliar to me in designing; I want to surprise myself, to make something I do not yet know. Graduation date 20 11 2014

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Commission members Gianni Cito (mentor) Frank Havermans Paul Toornend

Additional members for the examination Micha de Haas Judith Korpershoek


Marjan van Herpen

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zicht

vanuit de sta d zo op

en mo gelijk lat

en, ov er

Circu it heen

Architecture

afslag Circuit op mogelijk

shortcu

Musea t, vanuit

tro, doo

naar me

r gebouw

heen,

g

overda

mogelijke afmetingen van ondergrondse Stationshal

I choose a collection of small buildings to prevent it becoming an institute, an impregnable fortress. The locations consist of a combination of: - Stations: to reach the network of friends and acquintances; a station is a place where one can be at once anonymous and visible, and it is a symbol of transition, - Open green places: where there is space to build something, Residential areas: to increase the quality of life of my building. They are locations which would fit a small building, which fit in with the neighbourhood and the larger network of the city; with the local resident and the passer-by.

night_theoretical (roundabout = moat)

ground floor plan

44

night_inside

I have further elaborated on the location Weteringcircuit. A station of the North/South metro line will be placed on the North side: the greatest onrush will come from the direction of the museums (from the South West towards the Weteringcircuit). I aim to keep this area as open as possible from the direction of the city centre, on the North side, the Vijzelgracht. The building will be placed in the North East corner, to facilitate an access from the roundabout and to fit in with the rest of the existing sub square.

Living private/ work / work public

daytime private / public


Marjan van Herpen

I want the location to influence the appearance of the building. Through the use of vectors, I follow the outline.

On it, I place the work units with the public section inside the outline and the private section on the outer edge of it.

I reform this around the trees and in such a way that the internal corners are accessible.

The private section will be situated at the external edge surrounding it, in order to create a closed first impression.

0

1

2

3

daytime private / public

rooms

rooms / communal spaces

(short cuts) routes

floor plan

45


Architecture

Plan fragment: coffee house with a kitchen as a closed work section and a bar as a public section. The kitchen is in the private section.

Fragment in scale model 1:20

section

concrete slab : foundation for the publically accessible work spaces

publically accessible work spaces

46

wooden floor: foundation for the inaccessible work section

inaccessible work spaces

carpeting: foundation for the separate private spaces

private spaces

private spaces in wooden skeleton construction with the construction on the outside and the finished side on the inside


Marjan van Herpen

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

blocks of wooden skeleton construction function as columns for the following layers

shell of polycarbonate: these cover the inaccessible yet visible work spaces

construction for the next layer

the tent: a thin shell in order to make the boundary between the public external space and the publically accessible work space as thin as possible

exploded view East side

47


Architecture

Alies Koree GAASTER[LAND-GOED]

Create your own type of stay, within and in harmony with the surroundings

The plan Gaaster[land-goed] demonstrates a new contemporary way of relaxing at a holiday park, in which the contact between the user and the surroundings is key. The current developments in the field of holiday parks in the Netherlands consist of large-scale parks. The parks constitute almost complete village extensions in themselves with an entirely unique style, level of facilities and accommodations. A similar ‘all-inclusive’ range prevents the holiday-maker entering and exploring the surroundings. With this park layout, hardly any use is made of the local qualities and facilities present, in spite of the fact that the holiday maker in the year 2015 increasingly demands authenticity, contact with nature and the surroundings. The plan Gaaster[land-goed] demonstrates how an existing but unused country estate can be transformed into a new, contemporary small-scale holiday park with houses as part of a larger recreational network. The holiday maker can, on the basis of the desired atmosphere and degree of privacy, choose his or her ideal place to stay at the park and thus experience the surroundings optimally. By linking the holiday park, the surroundings and the regional facilities with each other, a sustainable recreational network is created, which is tailored to the experience of the holidaymaker. New strategic network Gaasterland is, with all its contrasts, a unique densely-wooded coastal area in Friesland. The chosen location is located at the edge of the Rijsterbos country estate. These abandoned grounds surrounding the monumental villa have the potential to be used better. The new strategic network ensures that the location is interwoven, both visually and functionally, with the Rijsterbos country estate. The recreational network can be expanded simply in the future by linking both new and existing facilities and holiday accommodation with each other. Because the business owners focus on one specific facility, instead of an ‘all-inclusive’ system, the quality of the network in strengthened and thus the (recreational) functioning of the surroundings. Design There are no individual plots with private front garden and parking spot at Gaaster[land-goed]. The houses are positioned in so-called clusters, each with its own atmosphere and degree of privacy. In addition, the clusters make it possible to stay at the park both as a group and individually. In this respect, the plan caters for the current accommodation needs; people want to relax together, but are also fond of their own privacy. The chosen building method is inspired by a traditional construction principle, which has been frequently used in recreational building. The system is easily expandable and applicable on the basis of a basic principle. As a result of this, it can be tailored to a variety of uses and the specific location in an efficient way. The variety in terms of positioning, orientation and design gives the holidaymaker the opportunity to tailor their stay to personal preferences. Almost all (re)used materials come from the region. Your own unique spot in the forest. Be amazed by the diverse landscape time and time again. Feel the atmosphere of the surroundings, even in your house; the view and materials from the forest. There is space between the houses to meet and come together, while there is also space to retreat near your house. Take off and explore the surroundings or read a book on your own veranda. ‘Create your own type of stay within and in harmony with the surroundings.’ Graduation date 24 08 2015

48

Commission members Jeroen van Mechelen (mentor) Harm Veenenbos Machiel Spaan

Additional members for the examination Marcel van der Lubbe Jan-Richard Kikkert


Alies Koree

0

10

50m

Overview park

Impression cluster on the canal

49


Architecture

construction principle

+

Add trussed rafters (variation layout/capacity)

fixed core

ground floor

s

6p+

w

e

8p+

s s

e w

s

6p

s s

w e

s

variation floor level variation facade openings

extension construction

s

s

1st floor

+

external 4p

=

2p

e w

s s

e w

s

ground floor

1st floor

open

internal

ingress of light

bedroom

balcony

single-prop support

single-prop support

veranda

hanging bed

ingress of light

view/light

terrace

bench

storage space

ingress of light

ingress of light

storage space

veranda

roof terrace

see-saw

extension

hammock

furniture

tent (i/o)

canopy

wall (privacy)

furniture

outdoor shower

veranda

fireplace

jetty

box bed

staircase

extension kitchen

bed + view

casting jetty

balcony indoor

seat

veranda

view/light

boat house

Matrix typology: houses can simple be individually tailored to the surroundings and in relation to each other

Additions versus surroundings

50

closed

sunken

outdoor pool

jetty


Alies Koree p=0

1200+

600-

1800+

600-

Overview detailed cluster

Rental scenario: individual

8

8

8

Rental scenario: couple

Rental scenario: entire cluster

6

6

6 4

8

4

private together meet

8

8

4

6-8

ingress of light

Detail section

seat

casting jetty

ingress of light

see-saw

Detailed example type 1: general

51


Architecture p=0

1500+

p=0

p=0

1200+

1200+

p=0

p=0

Villa new significance in and for the surroundings

villa (1912) chapel (1929) kitchen (1961) flat (1968)

Current situation: diverse building styles, lot of interference around villa, flat shares grounds in two parts

villa: teahouse, hotel rooms new structure as connecting element chapel: bathhouse cellar area flat: swimming pool

New situation: elements added in harmony with villa, villa visible again, villa as support of par

New location in the forest: space for new stories

52

Impression natural swimming lake and bathhouse


Alies Koree

+ surroundings

+ park

= buildings

New strategic network

Connection with the surroundings

53


Architecture

Marco Kramer Re-Creation

An intervention in the cultural landscape

Re-Creation is the result of a design-based and evolving research, which strengthens and safeguards the cultural and economic landscape of the bulb-growing region (Bollenstreek). The characteristic bulb farms of the Bollenstreek attract thousands of tourists to the region each year and belong to the branding of the Netherlands. The preservation of these cultivated lands is, therefore, of economic importance for the existence of the bulb industry and the tourist sector; the same tourist sector that wants to expand the possibility of recreational accommodation at the expense of the bulb farms. The municipality of Noordwijk forms part of the bulb-growing region and is also one of the coastal towns of the Netherlands. This combination makes the municipality, especially in the summer months when the beach and bulb tourism coincide, an attractive place to relax. This applies both for day recreation, as well as recreation over several days for which various accommodation options are offered in Noordwijk, such as hotels, hostels and holiday parks. The municipal policy on the development of recreation parks has already been liberalised, as a result of which the Noordwijk bulb growers are allowed to designate their farms as recreation parks. Looking at the current region with recreation parks, a framing and densification has arisen there with camp sites, chalets and holiday homes, which are totally not focused on improving the surroundings. Persisting with this idea will harm the cultural landscape, even though this landscape actually offers opportunities for a new impulse. Based on a strong personal fascination for this cultural landscape, a solution is offered by preserving the existing accents and vistas. These should not, therefore, be framed, as is the case with the existing recreation parks, but there should instead be a transformation of the existing characteristic farmyard buildings. The greenhouses and sheds with their solid construction and natural climate control offer space for distinctive facilities in, and at the centre of, the landscape. Through this intervention, the cultivated lands are given extra appeal, as a result of which the experience of the continually changing fields with their smells and colours, throughout the four seasons of the year, contribute to recreation in the region.

Graduation date 06 07 2015

54

Commission members Danielle Huls Rik de Visser Harm Timmermans

Additional members for the examination Paul de Vroom Marcel van der Lubbe


Marco Kramer

55


ONTWIKKELING NOORDWIJK

ANNO 1615

ANNO 1900

BOLLENSTREEK NEDERLAND

BOLLENSTREEK NEDERLAND

PRIMAIRE WATERKERING (DUINEN)

Architecture

DUINEN

PRIMAIRE WATERKERING (DUINEN)

DUINEN

BOS

BOS

OPPERVLAKTE WATER

OPPERVLAKTE WATER

BEBOUWING

BEBOUWING

REREATIE BEBOUWING

REREATIE BEBOUWING

DE ZILK

Langevelderslag

N 206

ote

n

D uin

SANCTA MARIA

s

ho

ren

teg

sc

en

me

Ge

D uin

t

en

en

ijk hou rdw ijker Noo rdw Noo

ho

og

e

ve

NOORDWIJKERHOUT

D e

NOORDWIJKERHOUT ns

gre

nte

ee

em

e

G

ig

id

Hu

ut

ijk ho dw ijker or dw or

No

No

NOORDWIJK

NOORDWIJK

NOORDWIJKBINNEN

VOORHOUT

Noordwijk: Country houses by the rear dunes 1615

Noordwijk: Bulb farms after digging up rear dunes 1900

Aerial photo plan area

Future picture if going ahead with policy

Transformation of four lots as an example

56


ONTWIKKELING NOORDWIJK

HOTELS EN PARKEN

PLANGEBIED

BOLLENSTREEK NEDERLAND

BOLLENSTREEK NEDERLAND

PRIMAIRE WATERKERING (DUINEN)

Marco Kramer

PRIMAIRE WATERKERING (DUINEN)

DUINEN

DUINEN

BOS

BOS

OPPERVLAKTE WATER

OPPERVLAKTE WATER

BEBOUWING KASSEN

BEBOUWING

REREATIE BEBOUWING

KASSEN REREATIE BEBOUWING

DE ZILK

DE ZILK

NOORDWIJK NOORD

29 PARKEN

OOSTERDUINSE MEER

2050 VERBLIJVEN

OOSTERDUINSE MEER

SANCTA MARIA

N 206

N 206

SANCTA MARIA

ijk

ijk

rdw

rdw Noo

Noo

NOORDWIJKERHOUT

NOORDWIJKERHOUT

74 HOTELS

1850 KAMERS

NOORDWIJK

NOORDWIJK

NOORDWIJKBINNEN

NOORDWIJKBINNEN

VOORHOUT

VOORHOUT

Noordwijk: Recreation parks at the bulb farms 2010

Noordwijk: Plan area

Urbanisation of holiday homes

Parks without relationship to the surroundings

Enclaves turned in on themselves

Blockades in sight and passageway

Plan of farm buildings Duinschooten

57


Architecture

Public neighbourhood barn

Short-stay two-person room

Terrace restaurant on the field

58

Living space lodge


Marco Kramer

New connection between the farm buildings, as a result of which functions are linked

Lodges in the greenhouse. Veranda where interaction with the semi-public inner garden is possible.

In the winter, the farm buildings offer protection and warmth.

59


Architecture

Hein van Lieshout

The New Dam & the liberation of the Stopera

‘In my quest to create a modern monument I focused my research on the Stopera: an architectural phenomenon on the former island of Vlooienburg in the historical city centre of Amsterdam. The Stopera today combines the City Hall of Amsterdam and the Dutch National Opera & Ballet (stadhuis + opera). My ongoing quest transformed into a desire to end the current pejorative ‘Stopera’ and to reveal the hidden monument in the Stopera complex, embedding it in the surrounding urban fabric. This extensive research and analysis resulted in a clearly defined plea recorded in a 150 paged-book full of high quality illustrated analogies, metaphors, diagrams and drawings showing the potential of the existing Stopera. The book describes the spatial and symbolic relationship between several monuments of Amsterdam on different scales. The outcome is a high potential strategy to transform the 129,000m2 Stopera building into the new city centre for Amsterdam by using nearly 80% of the existing structure.’ As an archaeologist and sculptor combined, Hein van Lieshout re-evaluated the Stopera, discovering, and freeing, the Houses of Apollo and Dionysus. As inter-related planets revolving around the sun, the new Amsterdam City Hall and National House for Opera and Ballet re-emerge as Siamese twins liberated. Embraced and re-designed, the House of Apollo and House of Dionysus redefine the heart of the city.

25

50

100

zoektocht naar het monument in het gebouw

N

0 5

DE STOPERA

0 5

25

50

DE STOPERA

100

zoektocht naar het monument in het gebouw

N

zoektocht naar het monument in het gebouw

0 5

25

50

DE STOPERA

100

zoektocht naar het monument in het gebouw

N

DE STOPERA

0 5

25

50

100

N

Revaluation: phasing plan and the transformation through time

Graduation date 23 05 2015

60

Commission members Machiel Spaan (mentor) Paul Toornend Tom Frantzen Pjotr Müller

Additional members for the examination Rik van Dolderen Judith Korpershoek


Hein van Lieshout

HET BETOOG VOOR DE STOPERA

DE NIEUWE DAM

zoektocht naar het monument in het gebouw & DE BEVRIJDING VAN DE STOPERA

0 5

25

50

100

N

ARCHITECTURALTHINGS

HEIN VAN LIESHOUT

Cover design of book with the essential intervention to make a powerful ensemble

61


Architecture

Current situation

Sculptural extension on the north side and Zwanenburgwal houses the demolished volume

MARKET SQUARE

AMSTELZIJDE METRO

BLAUWBRUG CORNER

Vista with enlarged Waterlooplein, the Amstelzijde - beautiful spot in the Amstel river bend - and catering establishments on the Blauwbrug. The theatre forms the centrepiece.

Model scale 1:500

62


Hein van Lieshout

A

existing AMSTEL VIEW

CONTINUING PUBLIC DOMAIN

ELEVATE VOLUME

staircase

Transformation in which the existing architectural idiom steers the intervention

A

new

View of the Amstel with view of the public staircase that leads the Amsterdam citizen to the Tuin van Amsterdam (Garden of Amsterdam) and enables us to enjoy a stunning view over the city.

Vista: enlarged Waterlooplein (renamed Vlooyenburg) with view in the direction of the Amstel. To the right, the main entrance of the revamped City Hall

63


Architecture

The sculptural extension forms a public corridor along the Zwanenburgwal.

View from the Zwanenburgwal of the public corridor. The material refers to the Palace on the Dam.

64


Hein van Lieshout

NAP NAP

extension

renovation

new building

DNO DNO

NAP NAP

DNO DNO

01

02

03

04

Transformation: 95% of the theatre building is retained

Current situation

Vista: the building forms the centrepiece in the urban fabric of Amsterdam. The new facade forms a horizontal city in the Amstel river bend.

65


Architecture

Sjors Onneweer Space for a place

Accommodation for the elderly in Havana, Cuba

Elderly people Being able to grow old in your own district. Staying in contact with your neighbours and your neighbourhood. That would appear to be a matter of course, but that is often not the case. This theme plays a major role in my graduation project. The project takes place in Centro Habana, a district in Havana, Cuba. The district is very inspiring to me, because the inhabitants are continuously searching for space on different scale levels; space to make places. However, the district still lacks a number of places, such as a good place for elderly people to live, where they can also determine their position within the district themselves. Centro Habana Centro Habana is an urban district in Havana and has an extremely high population density, approximately 49,000 inhabitants per km2, and a low housing density. As a result of the lack of space, people live close together and a kind of pressure cooker effect has arisen. This has led to creative solutions by the residents themselves in the search for space. Space to make places. The intense lack of space and the social cohesion that this entails are very inspiring. As a result of the high population density in the existing housing and the lack of maintenance, buildings regularly collapse. This leads to empty spaces in the district. These spaces have also been taken over by residents over the course of time and are often used as a supplement to the public space. Music The pressure cooker effect does not take place, however, on a cultural level. Cuban music culture has reached its peak, especially in Centro Habana. Many variations and new styles have been born, precisely because everyone lives so close together and everything belongs together. Music brings people together. Space for a place Architecture can bring people together, can help bring about a meeting and can give space to people in order to make places for themselves. I made use of the opportunities that exist in the district in my graduation project. The (public) space and qualities that the empty plots offer, and the culture and skills of the people themselves in order for them to be able to give shape to their space. In addition, the relationship between the private domain and the public space is defined in such a way that there is a clear transition and the inhabitants always have a choice in terms of how far they want to enter into the public space. In order to maintain the public space on the plot, the building is raised. Shadow is thus created, which is so important in Cuba in order to create space for activities. The building has been designed in such a way that the initial situation of the buildings gives the resident the freedom to use the space according to his or her own needs. The private outdoor space is the key to this. This gives the building an excess area, as a result of which a choice can be made to partly or completely close this off, whereby another building is constantly created. The facades will constantly change due to this, the building will come to life and will increasingly belong to the context. Graduation date 26 11 2014

66

Commission members Bart Bulter (mentor) Judith Korpershoek Johanna van Doorn

Additional members for the examination Marcel van der Lubbe Herman Kerkdijk


Sjors Onneweer

Current accommodation for the elderly in Centro Habana

A (partially) collapsed building

People on the street stay to watch a number of musicians who are making music

A hairdresser has found his own place on the corner of an empty plot.

A

B

Col贸n (district in Centro Habana). All the problems could be found most severely in Col贸n and it was, therefore, chosen as research area. The empty plots that arose over the course of time are highlighted in yellow.

Example of self-made modifications to existing buildings.

2 ways of modifying, horizontal or vertical expansion.

67


Architecture

Private domain

Collective places

(Semi) Public space

Design of relationship between building and public space

+ Mixing target groups and adding an extra programme (music)

Concept: raising the programme in order to keep the ground level accessible as a public space. Dividing the mass into various volumes so that light and air can always enter inside. An access ramp which connects the various volumes with each other. The buildings for the elderly as close as possible to the public space.

Initial situation of the building, completely accessible for wheelchairs.

Part of the balcony is closed off so that a 2 person bedroom is created.

Part of the balcony is closed off so that the living room becomes larger.

Part of the balcony is closed off so that the living room becomes larger.

Type 1

Type of building 1 Can be expanded horizontally in order to shape the building according to the wishes of the resident. Type of building 2 Can be expanded vertically in order to shape the building according to the wishes of the resident.

Type 2

Initial situation building. There is an excess area vertically which offers the opportunity to make an extra floor.

Examples of facade details

68

layer 2

layer 2

layer 1

layer 1

Development facade over the course of the years. The more people who expand, the more the facade will fit in with the context.


Sjors Onneweer

Section

Place on the ground level

Place along the route

69


Architecture Wind

Collective/Musical spaces Public route

1

2 3 2

1. (existing) Vegetable market 2. Place for the neighbourhood to meet each other 3. (existing) Cafe 4. Place for a hairdresser for example 5. Open (semi-public) place where one can retreat 6. Sheltered place where one is less visible 7 music studio 8 office 9. Access from access ramp to 1st floor of existing building 10. End of access ramp, place to meet each other 11. Classroom (theory) 12. Music studio 13. Second communal kitchen

8 4

5 7 6

Layer 1 (Ground level)

N

O

13

11

M

12 Plants on the ground level lend it extra quality of space. 10

I

L

H

9

J

K

Layer 4 + 9m. Identity and character is given to the various volumes by means of texture and colour.

The facade is made up of an arrangement of slabs cast on site and floors against which a prefab exterior wall system is mounted, as a result of which a connection can be sought with the facade rhythms of the buildings from the context.

70


Sjors Onneweer

(Scale model) Impression seen from the street

71


Architecture

Milad Pallesh Pairi Dæza

An ensemble where we, our parents and our children live with each other and can care for each other

Pairi Dæza is a reflection of the necessary idyll and the desire to be able to count on each other To be able to live with each other. Caring with and for each other. From son to father. From boy next door to woman next door. From grandson to grandma. This assignment is fed by the nurturing upbringing that we received and will ultimately pass on ourselves. Just like love is passed on, caring for each other is also passed down from one generation to the next. It is an indirect inheritance, which is not written down on paper. The moment has now come in our lives that we are no longer a concern for our parents, but will take care of them and their concerns. In the near future, our generation will have to deal with the consequences of old age. We, the children of our parents, are required to address these changes in the form of self-organised care - or: informal care. This assignment is focused on housing for the elderly, based on offering and accepting informal care. The question that is key to this is: ‘How can architecture play a role in stimulating informal care?’ The point of departure is the theory that in order to stimulate informal care, the emphasis must not be placed on the care but on the housing: a unique form of housing that stimulates social interaction and relationships on various scales, and places the emphasis on closeness and a small scale. Above all, caring for each other can once again become something natural by mixing different generations. The transitions of the various scales play a large role; tangible transitions both in space and light, as well as in material and tectonics. The public space is used as an intermediary between the scales, offers space for social interaction and is the link between the scales: from neighbourhood to ensemble and from residential quarter to home – and everything in between. The homes and neighbourhood functions wall in the heart of the ensemble: a communal courtyard garden, inspired by the elements and contours of the Persian garden. The Persian garden is, in turn, inspired by Paradise. This is how ‘Pairi Dæza’ arose, the old Persian word for Paradise, or walled (‘pairi’) space (‘diz’). An ensemble of 45 homes is created on the Zimmerterrein on the Bellamybuurt, divided across 5 residential quarters. They are placed in such a way that collective quarter gardens are formed, on which all front doors border. By keeping the routing, access and the distances between the front doors as short as possible, the social distance between the residents is reduced. The quarter garden will be collectively maintained per quarter, which stimulates collectivity and interaction. The home is also approached as a transition from collective to private, whereby the ‘public space’ is once again an intermediary. The public space is not used as outdoor space in this case, but is based on the traditional patio; the interspace that connects, opens up and brings together all the spaces in the residential space. This space is connected to the collective quarter garden, whereby the front door plays an important role. The front door as architectural element contributes to the transition of the different scales. Graduation date 11 05 2015

72

Commission members Jan-Richard Kikkert (mentor) Machiel Spaan Furkan Köse

Additional members for the examination Peter Defesche Micha de Haas


Milad Pallesh

73


Architecture

In the courtyard garden, from the seated square  –  View of water and seated elements, the shrubs, fruit trees and ornamental trees

Scale model ensemble 1:200

From the Kostverlorenvaart canal  –  View of Schimmelstraat, promenade and garden wall

Fragment public space - transitions and materialisation

Fragment facade - materialisation, tectonics and sculpture

74


Milad Pallesh

Zoning map

75


Architecture

In the quarter garden

Section - Residential quarter

76


Milad Pallesh

In the home, from the patio  –  View of the quarter garden

Plan home 1 (75 m2)

Plan home 2 (73 m2)

77


Architecture

Jeroen Schoots Believe in health

A building for church and healthcare

The churches are emptying. However, the church community In Utrecht Tolsteeg is an exception to this. As a young, growing church community, they are seeking out a new position in society. In fact, they want to be more open to fellow human beings. They come together more often than Sundays alone and through various activities, such as eating together with people from the neighbourhood. Nevertheless, the importance of contemplation and sacramental preparation remains. How can the church community strengthen its connection with fellow human beings and the immediate environment by means of a building? Position of the church A location for a health centre in the district has been sought for many years now. The most recent plans did not go ahead as a result of the crisis. The church community can find a place for the health centre that responds to the current changes in a society where the notion of care has become less natural. As a result of this, the community can play a clear role in caring for people, even if it is merely a passive cooperation. The church can become a building (as in earlier times) where belief and health will converge once again and be able to reinforce each other. This assignment is a response to the current demand for participation in the healthcare sector. The assignment is especially interesting because a short study revealed that people do not want to be confronted with a church when they go to a doctor. Connection and mediation The connection between the church and healthcare can be found in the character of the corridors. The building emphasises the symbolism of being in transit in life. The juxtaposition of belief and health sheds new light on the healthcare sector. The two strong corridors, designed as a fissure in a mass, give a sense of character to the route, and in this way the visitor can find his or her way to the difficult conversation with the doctor, or the festive gathering of a wedding. The fissures mediate between what can normally not simply be next to each other and ensures there is a gentle transition. There are three courtyards which enable mediation and connection between the church and healthcare. Through the intervention of courtyards, nature is brought inside, private space created as open spots for the visitor. They are structured through the fissures. A classical approach to typologies lends each courtyard its own character. All visitors will have a need for contemplation from time to time and this building offers considerable scope for that. That is possible in this building in different forms, made accessible and available to everyone without having to be a member of a church. This is even more the case if someone is having a difficult time. This building therefore has a unique and strong social and societal function.

Graduation date 09 04 2015

78

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Bart Bulter Dick Pouderoyen

Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Jan-Richard Kikkert


Jeroen Schoots

79


Architecture

church in the green space

church and healthcare next to each other

church and healthcare together

situation

1. gateway

2. filter

3. fissure

4. walls

believe in health

levels of mediation

new situation

draft divide

draft building

glass roof grass roof

Dutch Mental Healthcare Association (GGZ)

church

su

doctor

pp

or

tin

g

communal spaces

Dutch Mental Healthcare Association (GGZ)

brickwork Stack bond

concrete

wooden facade

pharmacy

doctor

waiting location

courtyard

physiotherapist

functions

brickwork

brickwork

concrete

wooden facade

emphasises the horizontal divides

add an extension in simple brickwork

divides with subtle vertical lines

soften the transition to the courtyards

stack bond

80

half-brick

planks relief

varnished oak


Jeroen Schoots

section silent courtyard

section herb courtyard

longitudinal section

81


Architecture

city entrance

green space entrance

doctors’ entrance

church entrance

82

doctors wing

pharmacy/physiotherapy practice wing

church hall


Jeroen Schoots

silent courtyard

herb courtyard

83


Architecture

Mark Spijkerman House of Power

The transformation of a former power station into dynamic sports centre

In the current society, there is an increasing need for a healthy and sustainable lifestyle. Sport is an important part of this. Sport is healthy for body and mind. Sport breaks down barriers between people, brings people together and provides energy. Fitness training has now become the most frequently practised sport in the Netherlands. The budget sport schools are sprouting up everywhere and the parks are increasingly filled with sporty people. In spite of these trends, it remains difficult for many people to find the motivation to keep active and to be energy-conscious. In addition, physical interaction is decreasing due to the rise of digital social media. Sport is particularly suitable for connecting social and physical aspects. Moreover, architecture can combine the spatial qualities of a park, the facilities of a fitness gym and sustainable techniques with each other. On the basis of a fascination for sport, redesignation and sustainability, I went in search of a contemporary architectural solution for a dynamic sports centre where the facets of a park and a fitness gym can be combined. A place with facilities where people from the surrounding area are invited to exercise, provide energy and come together. The former power station on the Hoogte Kadijk in Amsterdam was chosen as location, which can be found at a junction between various districts. The ‘House of Power’ will become the link between the various sections of the local community and will become a public place where each individual sportsman or sportswoman can enter without restrictions. The old power station will once again produce energy, generated among other things by the activities of the sportsmen or sportswomen themselves. In addition to passive energy generation, the building will generate energy and the surplus electricity will light up the approach routes around the building. Powered by the people, power for the people! Social energy will also be generated. Both the building and the public space will be transformed into a sports centre and will function as an attraction for the surrounding districts. During the transformation, the building will retain its rawness and architectural historical value. The hidden location of the current building will become recognisable as a result of a new principle building and thus provide optimal access for the sportsmen and sportswomen. The programme is based on the balance with which a sportsman or sportswomen can perform optimally. A mix between exertion, relaxation, nourishment and mindset. Each programme component has its own spatial and architectural identity. The building will be organised through a composition of routes, spaces and volumes. There are places to exercise actively, places to recuperate, places to produce oxygen and food, and places to focus oneself. The visitor will feel as if he or she is in a three-dimensional park, where one can find a good balance of sports and whereby the building will behave as a motor for its environment. Graduation date 26 02 2015

84

Commission members Gianni Cito (mentor) Marcel van der Lubbe Marijn Emanuel

Additional members for the examination Rik van Dolderen Judith Korpershoek


Mark Spijkerman

85


Architecture

junction of districts and sections of the local community.

sport as connection

transformation of closed factory to public sports building

transformation with new principle building and sports square

longitudinal section

eastern entrance, literally without restrictions for entering

86


Mark Spijkerman

exertion

relaxation

food

mindset

ENERGY BALANCE +18,000 KWH/YEAR House of Power, the place where one can get energy and which provides energy to light up the streets

87


Architecture

entrance exercise zone, with overview and dynamism

food and relaxation, above the new principle building

scale model exterior

88


Mark Spijkerman

entrance relaxation zone, with connecting strip on the southern side

mindset, in the ridge between the existing rafters

scale model interior

89


Architecture

Marijke van Suijdam The loop

A rehabilitation centre for spinal cord lesion patients in the city of Utrecht

Can architecture, in combination with the city, make a positive contribution to the rehabilitation process of a spinal cord lesion patient? Health care The influence of the environment on the recovery process is discussed within the public health sector with increasing frequency. A role which has become smaller over time due to the development of modern medical science. The focus is on the practicability of a building; architecture as a tool serving medicine. The rationalisation of healthcare and the international shift in the perception of disease have caused a change in this mentatility to come to light. Today, the matter is not limited to healing the human body, it also deals with the relationship between people and their environment. In my graduation project, I play into this shift. The person, the patient is central in the design. Design The rehabilitation centre consists of four different volumes. These volumes relate to the various psychological phases a patient goes through after a trauma. The positioning of the volumes and the relationship it creates with the city and the city-dwellers, also relates to this. The volumes function as separate building components but together they function as one complex. A three-dimensional web.The loop, connects the different volumes. This web penetrates the volumes and are, in addition to a connecting route, also a component of the rehabilitation programme. The loop also generates interaction and meetings with the city and the city-dwellers. The city and the architecture have been deployed to support and, where possible, accelerate the recovery process of the spinal cord lesion patient. This has led to a new kind of rehabilitation; the entire builidng revolves around rehabilitation. The city connects to this web and offers a programme to facilitate reintegration into society.

Graduation date 09 10 2014

90

Commission members Marcel van der Lubbe Ed. Bijman Rob Aben

Additional members for the examination Machiel Spaan Rik van Dolderen


Marijke van Suijdam

91


Architecture

Building block in the city of Utrecht

Building block level

Buildings to demolish

New situation

City as scenery

Edges of the building block

Buildings to demolish

Internal area in building block

Moving in public space

Obstacles in the city

Traveling by public transport

Using facilities

The square which embeds the rehabilitation centre in the city

92


Marijke van Suijdam

The model of Kerr (1976). which discusses phases/stages in the rehabilitation process.

The model of Kerr translated to the city and building level

Cutting up nursing ward into three different departments, causing the building to become a supporting element in rehabilitation and the psychological process.

Four different building volumes

Connecting the building volumes for efficiency

Connection by threedimensional web The loop

The loop penetrates the building volumes - The loop is extravert

Programme components have been designed as mass - programme components are introvert

93


Architecture

94


Marijke van Suijdam

The loop - supporting programme

The loop - exercise and sports

The loop - healing environment

95


Architecture

Egle Suminskaite Platform for science

Medical faculty in ‘Santariskes’, Vilnius

This design proposal was made for the medical faculty (MF) in ‘Santariskes’, Vilnius. At the moment, the MF doesn’t have well-designed spaces that fulfil their requirements. A new platform for science was established. The design of the MF was done in such a way that it should be inspirational and serve as a meeting place for students and professionals, locals and visitors. The location of the medical campus ‘Santariskes’, in the north of Vilnius was chosen. I have attempted to create a medical hub with a variety of participants: education, research, private businesses, residential areas. More diverse functions brings quality for the existing campus. Campus The most problematic aspects of the campus are that: the central zone is crowded with cars, as it has only one street for all traffic, parking spaces are dominating the area and green zones, there is no proper place for the public needs, it is monofunctional and there is no overall idea of greenery. Design solutions include: a new transport network, new parking structure, bringing greenery back to the heart of the campus, a place for a public programme, residential zone for various users, MF (science future) in the heart of campus. Building complex The profile of the building is designed as narrowly as possible. In this way, more space is left for the greenery. The main body is lifted, preserving the visual or physical continuity of the area. On the ground floor, the space for public use has been designed that focuses on the greenery. Departments are placed on one continuous line, as it is important to have interaction between them. Everything is framed by circulation space on top. In this way, it is involved more in the activity of the area. Each department has its own zone and, at the same time ,is integrated in the whole structure. Two main floors are underpinned by the continuous sequence of the stairs. The main programme and zone is for labs, which are designed on one side of the volume. Small offices are located on the other side. They are narrow, although very much orientated to the greenery outside. The middle zone is open through all floors and has light from above. The auditorium zone becomes the main entrance of the complex. The building is ‘established’ on the ground level in two transparent volumes. One of them is main entrance to the MF cafeteria, another one is an entrance to the conference centre. Two strips of different faculties are united here. The ground level is connected by two ‘lines’ of stairs with the top level. In the middle of this zone, the local library is ‘hanging’. It is an open and informal space which has visual and physical connection with all the area. The most important aspects that were used for building design: The shape (expression) of the building itself is not important, but what is happening in it; Research / learning - provide required instruments and well organised function; Meeting / interaction - circulation space visually / physically connected to all areas; One continuous flow - no dark corridors / open dynamic continuous space; Quality of space - visual relation with outside in circulation and working areas and visa versa. The colour white has been chosen. Platform for science as a blank piece of paper, where all the magic happens. Graduation date 25 09 2014

96

Commission members Laurens Jan ten Kate (mentor) Jo Barnett René Bouman Holger Gladys

Additional members for the examination Madeleine Maaskant Marc a Campo


Egle Suminskaite

97


Architecture

New campus site plan

EXISTING: Campus ‘heart’ crowded by traffic

Parking spaces are dominating the area

Monofunctionality (only hospitals)

Lack of overall landscape design

NEW: Creating street network (removing old)

Public transport and parking solutions

Public / residential functions in the campus

Medical faculty at the heart of the campus

98


Egle Suminskaite

View from the top circulation space

Area that unites campus

Position of the entrances

Approaches. Coming to MF by car

Approaches. Coming to MF by public transport

CORE

CORE

CORE

STUDY

CORE

TECHNICAL FLOOR CIRCULATION FLOOR

PUBLIC STORAGE/ SUPPORT FUNCTIONS

Principles of space organisation

Profile of the building

Public space on the ground floor

99


Architecture

Longitudinal section/elevation

Site plan

TECHNICAL TECHNICAL FLOOR FLOOR

INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL WORK WORK SPACE SPACE

CIRCULATION CIRCULATION FLOOR FLOOR

ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION

MEETING MEETING ROOMS ROOMS

WRITE WRITE UP UP ZONE ZONE

TEACHING TEACHING LABS LABS

PAPER PAPER WORK WORK SPACE SPACE FOR FOR SCIENTISTS, SCIENTISTS, PHDPHD STUDENTS STUDENTS

RESEARCH RESEARCH LABS LABS

STORAGE/ STORAGE/ SUPPORT SUPPORT FUNCTIONS FUNCTIONS

Programme / space organisation in department zones

100

CIRCULATION CIRCULATION FLOOR FLOOR

‘HANGING ‘HANGING OUT’ OUT’ ZONE ZONE

SEMINAR SEMINAR ROOMS ROOMS

PUBLIC PUBLIC

PUBLIC PUBLIC

Section of department area

CIRCULATION CIRCULATION FLOOR FLOOR

PUBLIC PUBLIC


Egle Suminskaite

INDIVIDUAL WORK SPACE

TECHNICAL FLOOR

ADMINISTRATION

CIRCULATION FLOOR

LIBRARY

SEMINAR ROOMS

ENTRANCE MF CAFE

PUBLIC

ENTRANCE CONFERENCE GARDEROBE/ SUPPORT FUNCTIONS

STORAGE/ SUPPORT FUNCTIONS

Programme/ space organisation in auditorium zone

Section of auditorium zone /main entrance zone

101


Architecture

Giles Townshend Reimagining Sheepscar

Transforming a post-industrial area in Leeds into a new neighbourhood

This project looks at the U.K. housing crisis through the lens of a proposal for the redevelopment of Sheepscar, a post-industrial neighbourhood in the city of Leeds. Leeds like the rest of the United Kingdom is currently facing a housing crisis on two fundamental levels: demand for housing far exceeds supply and the new houses that are built do not meet the demands of the majority of the people who would inhabit them. The council currently has plans to build 70,000 new homes in the city in the next 15 years, the largest number outside London and the south east. This has the potential to shape the city for future generations but at present there isn’t a clear vision of where these new houses should be built and what form they should take. Currently, new housing in the city falls broadly into two categories: large scale city centre apartment blocks or single family developer housing built on the outskirts of the city. As a post-industrial city which saw large scale demolition of workers housing and unused industrial buildings in the 1950s and 60s, much of the inner city neighbourhoods remain undeveloped. As an alternative to the creation of more isolated, monofunctional housing areas on the periphery, I have explored how Sheepscar, one such area located within short walking distance of the city centre could be redeveloped into a new urban neighborhood which combines opportunities for living and working in one place. The project consists of two main elements: an urban plan and a series of sub-projects: building and landscape types which inhabit specific parts of the structure. The approach adopted seeks to reveal the latent potential of the area, carefully uncovering its most distinctive elements and using them as the centre of the new urban structure. The central area of the neighbourhood maintains its role as the working heart through the retention and refurbishment of the most significant industrial buildings but is refined through the introduction of a series of new buildings which introduce dwellings creating a series of ensembles that combine new and old. The proposal celebrates the informality of the spaces created between these retained buildings and transforms them into a variety of public spaces. The core of the plan is framed by a new urban block structure which is carefully arranged to create a series of connections into the public spaces. A family of building types are proposed including houses and apartments which engage with a series of specific urban conditions. The buildings share a robust formal and material language which aims to create a distinctive character for the reimagined neighbourhood.

Graduation date 26 08 2015

102

Commission members Hans van der Heijden (mentor) Peter Defesche Job Floris

Additional members for the examination Paul de Vroom Bastiaan Jongerius


Giles Townshend

103


Architecture

Urban model

Urban strategy

Existing industrial buildings to be retained and integrated into new ensembles

Context plan

A sequence of neighbourhoods

104

Sheepscar as found


Giles Townshend

New apartment building with public ground floor next to refurbished sheds: living and working placed casually next to each other

A family of types: an example of some of the new buildings introduced into the neighbourhood

Mews houses street elevation

105


Architecture

Bus depot ensemble

Factory ensemble

106


Giles Townshend

Refurbished bus depot with new extension, a dialogue between new and old.

107


Architecture

Jim de Valk Swifterbant cemetery

Interaction between death and daily life

Introduction I live in a village without a cemetery. Swifterbant is located within the Dutch municipality of Dronten in Oostelijk Flevoland. Although a cemetery was deemed necessary within the borders of the village when Swifterbant was established, this was never realised. We are a community without a place for the dead; a place to commemorate and a place that reflects the history of a community. Swifterbant is a village in which you can live, but cannot be dead. The contrast with my country of birth, Tanzania, could not be greater. As a child, I grew up next to a cemetery; a cemetery that formed part of daily routes between destinations. A place where death and life were interwoven with each other. A place where the society lives on, even after death. Death and public space The underlying idea of the graduation project is that having their own cemetery will strengthen the community spirit of the inhabitants of Swifterbant. In death, the individual passes into the collective, the personal into the collective memory. This was strongly felt in the time that the dead were still buried within the city walls. The displacement of the dead to the periphery reinforces the taboo which shrouds death. Nature cemeteries and the scattering of ashes in nature are inclinations whereby the dead completely disappear from the social space. In direct contrast to this is the inclination to once again allow the cemetery to form part of the public space and to let burials be part of daily life again. A community without a place for the dead is deprived of a public space which completes the final phase of the lifespan of a society. Definition of the problem As a preliminary investigation, a number of cemeteries were analysed in terms of the commemoration of the deceased in relation to the public space. Design themes were distilled from the analysis in order to further specify the design assignment. The chosen location is a public park in the centre of the village. How can a cemetery be integrated in a public space? What does that mean for the quality of space and which interactions are desirable and which are undesirable? In addition to the cemetery, other programme components are also necessary. Such as an auditorium, a reception room and a public space. To what extent are these functions present in the village and what is the spatial and social relationship with the cemetery? Assignment The location, De Greente park, was a crucial inspiration for the original plan for Swifterbant and is still the heart of the village. The departure point for the design was to preserve the existing green structure as much as possible and to situate the buildings as objects therein similar to a sculpture garden. In order to prevent fragmentation of the greenery, the pavilions must be as compact as possible. The pavilions are architectural family of each other in terms of shape, material and construction, analogous in terms of tectonics, but different in terms of atmosphere. The design generates quiet places of reflection in the park, as a result of which an interaction arises between death and daily life.

Graduation date 19 11 2014

108

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Bart Brands Gianni Cito

Additional members for the examination Jan-Richard Kikkert Mariette Adriaanssen


Jim de Valk

109


Architecture

4 2

6

1 5 7

3

Map of de Greente park

Section of public space

Courtyard of the public space

110

7

1. Square

2. Auditorium

3. Village cafĂŠ

4. Public space

5. Burial chamber

6. Skate park

7. Playground


Jim de Valk

Auditorium and village cafĂŠ on the square

Section of auditorium and village cafĂŠ on the square

Entrance

111


Architecture

Auditorium

Funeral procession proceeds from the auditorium to the burial chamber

112


Jim de Valk

Burial chamber

Burial chamber

113


Architecture

Michiel van Zeijl The Thermae of Ockenburgh

A new life for the Ockenburgh country house in The Hague

Country houses and estates are the flowers of the landscape. And the birthplace of landscape architecture. They are places where people think about the landscape and architecture with great care and an almost philosophical reflection. A rich palette of spatial design tools have been developed by big designers like Marot, Zocher etc. Ockenburgh country house in The Hague illustrates, however, what has happened to many of these country houses in the Netherlands: when the last private owner disappeared, the park and the house fell into disrepair. The ideal of Jacob Westerbaen Ockenburgh was established in 1652, at the spur of a series of beach ridges on which the city of The Hague is also built, by poet and physician (but especially epicurean) Jacob Westerbaen. The proximity of nature and the peaceful effect that has on humans was an important quality. Following the example of favourite thinkers then, such as Vrigilius, Westerbaen thought that poetry and the cultivation of the land had a stimulating effect on the health of body and mind. In the meantime, The Hague has grown up to the doorstep of the country house. Between the city and the park, there is the ring road of The Hague, the International Ring Road. The dunes still lie on the south-west side. These facts make a wellness centre ideally suited as new function. Not in the classical way, a building in a beautiful landscape, but in the way that suits a country estate: an interweaving of culture and nature. The Roman bathing ritual for the future The components of the Roman bathing ritual form the point of departure. This ritual entails a fixed sequence of different baths, which are alternated with physical exercise. People have already bathed in this way for many centuries. In Ockenburgh, I incorporate every separate component of the bathing ritual spread out across the country house. Each component in a personal ‘park atmosphere’. This atmosphere is essential to the design of the bath. The six separate baths are like follies, as it were, in the park. They are connected by a route which spa visitors walk on in one direction. Accordingly, they follow their wellness programme. Two country houses is better than one Because Ockenburgh is loved by many people from the surrounding area, the park will maintain its public function. As a consequence, a field of tension is created between the guests of the wellness centre and visitors to the park. In the design I have, with spatial design tools that have been developed in the long history of country estate design, developed a solution for every place separately in order to remove this field of tension and sometimes to accentuate it. I have designed a personal entrance for the wellness guests and the park visitors. The old entrance across the avenue for visitors, as a result of which the country house is given a central spot as catering establishment, and a new entrance for wellness guests, which borders on the International Ring Road. They are received in the existing building on the north side. The wellness route starts from this building. A second country house with its very own organisation is thus added, as it were, to the existing public country house. These two worlds are carefully interwoven in the design. Moreover, the new baths, the differences in height in the park and the separation of the routes play an important role, so that Ockenburgh ultimately becomes, for both the wellness guests and the park visitors, a beautiful place once again, which otherwise would have been lost. Graduation date 11 11 2014

114

Commission members Rob van Leeuwen Bram Breedveld Dingeman Deijs

Additional members for the examination Mirjam Koevoet Paul Achterberg


Michiel van Zeijl

115


Architecture

country house

Ockenburgh: a place of beauty...

...and a place of decline.

country estate

public park

From country house (1650), to country estate (1916), to public park (2015)

Schiphol

A44 A4

INTERNATIONALE RING

A12

Ockenburgh

Porch A13 Apodyterium

Sudatorium

Frigidarium

Latrine

Cold plunge

There are many country houses around The Hague

Tepidarium

Calveus

Caldarium

A4 A20

Rotterdam The Hague Airport

Ockenburgh is easily accessible via the ‘International Ring Road’

+ The Roman bathing ritual as basis...

Design

116

...but interwoven with a country house.

The baths are spread across the park along a new path, interwoven with public paths


Michiel van Zeijl

Two country houses with a formal vista

Programme - a component from the bathing ritual occurs in every park atmosphere

Warm water bath in the woods: the woodland path

Experience and staging

Routes never cross each other at ground level

Warm water bath in the woods: the woodland path

Differences in height present are used at the spots where the network of paths cross each other

117


Architecture

Swiss bath with view of the surroundings

Vista from the rhododendron meadow

118


Michiel van Zeijl

View over the water, with view of the Swiss bath, the parterre bath and the reception building for the wellness guests

The parterre bath is in the large pond

119


Architecture

Lars Zwirs The European Embassy New Delhi, India

The world is becoming increasingly smaller due to a process of globalisation and technological developments. To ensure that the relationships between the different countries proceed peacefully, the diplomatic services maintain a dialogue from their various embassies. Using knowledge of each other’s cultures and conscious of each other’s habits and customs, work is carried out to improve mutual understanding from these advanced posts. The embassy building supports this dialogue. It calls for a hospitable, accessible and inviting building. However, the archetype has developed into the walled enclave with a defensive and distrusting character. Is there not another option? The design consists of a 52,000m2 large building in which a chancery, residences and conference centre are combined. In light of the tendency of an increasing amount of European member states to join forces, I set myself the task of designing a ‘European embassy’ in New Delhi, which represents the entire European Union. Like a city within a city, New Delhi is the green heart of the metropolis Delhi. The British architect Sir Edwin Luytens designed New Delhi in 1913. The parliament, the ministries and the embassy are included in one plan. It is best described as a large formal scenic garden, made up of broad axes. The trees packed together are like a green mass on these axes. The European embassy is located in one of these green masses.. When visiting the European embassy, the visitors enter the sculpture park, that is accessible from all sides. The foliage offers a cooling shadow against the burning sun. Walking past the fine art, the trees of the park change into columns; columns that keep the ground level clear by elevating the residences and chancery, so that the park can continue top run underneath the building. The gaps in the building allow the harsh sunlight to pass through up until the fountains. The glistening water creates a calm, relaxed atmosphere in the park. The air becomes cooler and more pleasant. The columns become thicker, the clearances become narrower. Arriving at the heart, the foyer unfolds. Welcome in the embassy. The foyer of the embassy can be entered freely by everyone and from all directions. There is access to the basement from the foyer. The basement, which is kept out of the ground, consisting of conference rooms, exhibition spaces and a theatre, enables cultural knowledge exchange. In addition, one can gain access to the chancery from the foyer via the columns. The chancery is a fabric that can absorb the various member states like a sponge. Each country can display itself, as it sees fit, around a light well. The residences are elevated above the chancery. As a result, a shadowy square is created on the roof of the chancery. A transition between the formal works and the informal homes occurs on this square, which is equipped with sports facilities. In this way, it becomes possible for the ambassador to receive his guests in his home directly from the chancery in a more informal setting, where the guests can enjoy the beautiful view from the living room over the tree tops of the hundred-year-old city New Delhi, while having a snack or drink.

Graduation date 21-05-2015

120

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Ashok Bhalotra Herman Zeinstra

Additional members for the examination Mariette Adriaanssen Jan-Richard Kikkert


Lars Zwirs

121


Architecture

New Delhi

New Delhi, government buildings

Shantipath, embassy district

New Delhi, formal axes structure

The sculpture park

Shadow up to the heart

Functional stacking

Vertical organisation

Safe zone

Transition square

Construction

Local red sandstone

122

Access


Lars Zwirs

Access

Foyer

Construction principal

Conference centre

Residences

Natural ventilation

Sports facilities

Water collection funnels in connection with wind towers

Chancery

A breathing facade

Theatre

Solar power plant

123


Architecture

The North-West lobby

The Dutch delegation

Flexibility, diversity and identity

Layer 2, Theatre

Layer -1, Conference centre

Layer 0, Sculpture park

Layer 1, Chancery

Layer 3, Transition square

Layer 4, Residences

124

Light well

Layer 5, Solar power plant


Lars Zwirs

Transition square

Roof view

125


Arjan Klok Head of Urbanism Department


Expectations Enormous expectations An enormous amount is expected of the modern-day urbanist: sociocultural feel for the most topical urban assignments, a complete and clear analysis of a problem, a well-organised and appealing concept, preferably a sophisticated conceptual train of thought, and then all of this incorporated into an accessible and lucid elaboration that displays the consequences on all scale levels, for all possible stakeholders and over a development period lasting decades. As if that wasn’t enough, there is also the expectation that all of this is represented in an elaboration that demonstrates the possible and/or desirable qualities of public space and architecture in a culturally-aware, discerning, sensitive and stirring fashion. In all possible combinations, the urbanist should make spatial proposals that connect and mediate, as well as accommodating matters of ‘national interest’, inventive ideas of entrepreneurs who think in ‘urban’ terms and that which ‘the neighbourhood’ considers to be important. Wishes that emanate from top-down, bottom-up and from the left-wing or right-wing political spectrum should be simultaneously served. Teamwork is a must The above-mentioned elements are too much for one man or woman, so teamwork is a must! First and second place in the most recent Eo Wijers competition were not won by a single person, but were jointly awarded to two teams of urbanists and advisers consisting of 4 to 18 people. In the case of third and fourth place, a total of 18 people were mentioned as authors of the work. In addition to this, the modern-day urbanists have to think carefully about their communication tools. What matters in the first place is to accurately indicate the position of the work within the sociocultural debate. A clear and above all hopeful and positive concept must ensue, which is elaborated on in concrete and expressive spatial proposals on the lowest possible scale. Both colleagues and stakeholders must be able to clearly see in the proposals ‘what it is all about’ or where it should lead. The proposals must clearly demonstrate what the options are and, last but not least, how these relate to the current situation in which the location finds itself. 127


Architecture

Everything else is relative, context-sensitive and particular to that time. If a plan manages to attract sufficient ‘fans’, it has a right to exist and thus sufficient energy as impetus for the long completion time that urban development requires. It is only this way that it is possible to create a city that is of value and therefore sustainable, this because it is close to the people. Great expectations Urbanists have a difficult but, above all, beautiful task. The age of the city has come. ‘Urban by nature’, the term coined by curator Dirk Sijmons during the Rotterdam Architecture Biennale of 2014, is the most striking interpretation that has recently been given regarding the phenomenon that human beings prefer, for all kinds of reasons, a more or less urban existence. Urbanist can develop well thought-out urban systems for these people, designed concretely in a functional but above all appealing system of public spaces where individual and collective feel at ease. It is great to see that part of the new generation of urbanists, as well as architects and landscape architects, approach the challenges that exist or arise in the urbanising society with verve. New concepts have been produced for a collective form of urbanisation, for example, of the Belgian or Brazilian urban landscape. Plans have been presented that demonstrate how large-scale infrastructure does not have to be seen as a problem, but can also relate to the surrounding urban context in a more natural way. There are even designers who, like mental mediators, provide new ways of looking at impossible problems like safety zones between neighbourhoods or the relationship between city and surrounding landscape. These are all beautiful products from courageous young designers who do not avoid the enormous expectations and even manage to transform them into a positive and hopeful outcome. Great!

128



Urbanism

Eric-Jan Bijlard Aveiro Lagoon Science Park Design strategy - Aveiro 2040

Looking 20 or 30 years into the future is completely normal for Dutch urban planners, but not customary practice in Portugal. Coincidence, lack of appreciation and the choice for economic gain greatly determines how a city develops. This is the case in Aveiro, where my graduation assignment takes place. Aveiro is located along a natural lagoon. The relationship between the city and the water has coped with the necessary ups and downs over the course of centuries. The city has known prosperous periods, but also, after a violent storm and being cut off from the Atlantic Ocean for over two centuries, extreme poverty. There is currently a danger of tension arising yet again with regard to the water. The city is once again in danger of being cut off from the water, the lagoon. However, this time the cause is not an accidental storm, but rather a lack of a new integral vision with regard to the urban and landscape development. In a vision for the city of Aveiro 2040, I have created a new unique type of urban landscape in which the city is once again directly connected to the lagoon. The natural transition is restored. I suggest making a radical turn in the orientation of the water landscape. Instead of a water link on the north side of the city, which has by now been blocked by motorway and railway tracks, I suggest creating a new water link on the west side of the city. The university is situated at that precise location. I am using the university developments as a catalyst for this transformation. A new high-quality living, working and recreational programme will be added to the city. Slow traffic movements like pedestrians, cyclists and boats will have priority over car traffic. New field laboratories will be set up in the water landscape for wetlands, typical agricultural customs and recreation. The public space from the city to the lagoon will be reconnected. The university campus will gradually transform into a Science Park where living, working and recreation go hand in hand.

Graduation date 27 10 2014

130

Commission members Hans van der Made (mentor) Henk Bouwman Daniel Casas Valle

Additional members for the examination John Westrik Bernadette Janssen


Eric-Jan Bijlard Aveiro 2014 Aveiro -- 2014

slopen laagwaardig bedrijfslocatie

Aveiro 2025 Aveiro -- 2025

nieuw scienceparc herinrichting parkweg

herinrichting ziekenhuis park

nieuwe woningbouw

sloop universiteit op campusknooppunt

herinrichting stadsloper

nieuwe aanlegsteiger

nieuwe woningbouw herinrichting lagune kanaal

nieuwe laguneplein

nieuwe infrastructuur

Aveiro 2040 Aveiro -- 2040

Design strategy - planning and development Aveiro

131


Urbanism

1000

90

1640

1755

90

Strategy concept - rotate focus on city and landscape development by 90 degrees

Masterplan structure - Aveiro region 2040

90

Infra restructuring fast / slow traffic routing

132

1808

buildings restructuring old / new

2014


Eric-Jan Bijlard Aveiro - 2040

Masterplan city structure

water restructuring waterline and acces to natural lagoon ‘ Ria de Aveiro’

green restructuring green axes and access to city with natural environment

133


Urbanism Aveiro - Lagoon Sciencepark

1. Detail of ‘Lagoon Science Park’

Aveiro - lagoon square 2. Detail of new waterfront city and lagoon ‘Ria de Aveiro’

134


Eric-Jan Bijlard Aveiro - Lagoon Sciencepark

1. Impression new waterfront ‘Lagoon Sciencepark’

1.

2.

Location of city plan details and impressions

Aveiro - lagoon square 2. Impression new waterfront - city and lagoon ‘Ria de Aveiro’

135


Urbanism

Geert den Boogert Boomerang Sloterdijk Sustainable city making

This project demonstrates how Amsterdam can grow in a sustainable way. This is possible by concentrating the expected population growth at strategic points, so that Amsterdam develops into a polycentric city. The aim of Boomerang Sloterdijk is a new centre around the Sloterdijk area of Amsterdam, which will connect the city centre, Nieuw-West and Noord with each other. The project will provide 60,000 new homes and 40% of the surface area for facilities and workplaces. This is comparable with Maastricht in terms of programme. The planning horizon is 2040. The point of departure is that a sustainable city uses raw materials and space intensively. This entails that people share space, facilities and products with each other. This means there will be slightly less for each person, but many more opportunities for everyone. You are the king of the city with just a bicycle and a phone. Necessary spatial preconditions for an attractive facilities city are a high quality of space, high density and a large level of adaptability. The point of departure of intensive use applies equally to the investments on the road to that sustainable city. Each investment and every development serves multiple objectives and is positioned strategically. They are significant for the new and the existing situation, as well as having an impact on the future. By urbanising ‘inside the ring road’, new residents benefit from the facilities in the city centre and from the existing ringfra (ring road infrastructure). At the same time, a new centre emerges that bridges the gap between the popular urban area inside the ring road and the avoided extension areas. Boomerang Sloterdijk brings the IJ river to the city, places the station in the city and turns the Westerpark into one big public green carousel, a unifying city park. But what makes the proposed development so different to previous growth in Amsterdam? Firstly: Amsterdam is not expanding spatially. New homes are created through transformation of areas instead of extension locations. This means that developments benefit from what already exists and that the city gradually grows instead of being built on a large scale. Secondly: the large investments are focused on raising the urban quality and the functioning of the existing network. The millions that have ended up in periphery rural infrastructure in recent decades, are now ending up in the infrastructure that is being brought underground in urban areas, the public space above it and the strengthening of the metro network. Thirdly: the city is focusing primarily on high-density flats with sufficient space and light. Buildings are eight stories high on average, blocks are relatively deep (60-75m) and 25% of the surface area is being developed. All target groups are going to live in stacked housing. The building block remains the point of departure, but with an even stronger contrast between the lively streets and peaceful green inner courtyards. The inner courtyards have a collective section, where trees guarantee privacy and a perception of greenness on the balconies. Finally: the sustainable city focuses on nature, movement and experiential value. Within the centres and in the urban region, the layout of the public space is focused on the pedestrian and the cyclist. Quality of space is essential. In addition, a lot of attention is paid to greenery and water. That is not only good for nature and pleasant for the resident. It also increases the natural adaptability of the city in the event of heat and rainfall.

Graduation date 01 01 2013

136

Commission members Ellen Marcusse (mentor) Ton Schaap Cees van der Veeken

Additional members for the examination Henk Bouwman Marco Broekman


Geert den Boogert

137


Urbanism

Towards a polycentric Amsterdam

Zoning map

Image caption

Schematic analysis Amsterdam conurbation

Transformatorweg 1:200

Existing

Analysis: divided area

Image caption

Image caption

Tracks inside the ring underground

Bring water in the region

Expand the park with entrance from the station

New buildings and transformation

Extend the metro to Central station and to Noord

P 8

4

1,8

3

8

Profile Transformatorweg (56m)

138

Contactweg door park 1:200 New cycling routes and bridge across

the IJ river

P 6,5

2,6

6,5

3

6,6

4

10,6

10

10

3

3

2,5

9,5

4

1

6,5

1

4

8,5

Profile Contactweg through park (27.5)

2,5

9,5

3

3


Geert den Boogert

Lively streets designed for pedestrians and cycling

Principle section

Public

Private

Collective

Private

Outdoor space by a spacious green inner courtyard

139


Urbanism

2015

2018

2030

2027-2032

2035-2040

Perspective 2040

140


Geert den Boogert

2022

2026

2030-2035

141


Urbanism

Tijl Hekking Lake for entrepreneurs Business case Randmeren

Imagine a warm summer day in June 2038. There are plenty of people taking part in recreational activities in around the Randmeren. The activity can be explained not only by the warm weather, but also by the fact that the Randmeren have been in the top 10 of the most visited recreational areas, together with areas like de Veluwe, the North Sea Coast and the Frisian Lakes. The Hekking Family visits the Randmeren for a day. The car is parked near Harderwijk and they rent a boat in the harbour. After a trip on the water they sail on to Elburg for lunch in the new regional restaurant. Here they can swap the boat for bicycles to explore the Flevoand coast line. The cycle on, because the bicycle ferry in Zeewolde leaves at four thirty for Harderwijk. Back in Harderwijk, they return the bicycles and eat something by the waterfront. I believe it is possible to realise this. Entrepreneur as a driving force On a national level in the (centre of) Netherlands, the Randmeren do not sufficiently profile themselves. This is why the recreational economic potential is insufficiently exploited. A vision of the Randmeren as a whole with the aim to establish a strong identity is lacking. This woud benefit both the public and the private parties. The assignment is to come to a differentiated economic, recreational urban development of the landscape, with local entrepreneurs as driving force. Focal Points as solution My goal is to reestablish water as economic support of the area. What used to be the fishery is now water sports and recreation. To boost water sports and recreation, investments are needed of both public and market parties. The question remains who will invest and when. To break out of that I created ‘Focal Points’. Within these Focal Points the entrepreneur is given the freedom to quickly play into the ever changing demand from the recreational user and to ensure an attractive entrepreneurial climate. The entrepreneur focuses on water sports and recreation and related functions to boost the identity of the Randmeren as a water sports and recreational area. The Focal Points are located within the existing recreation network or in favourable locations. This connects land and water routes and strategically expands and enhances the Focal Points with a new programme. Starting the future now The ‘every-man-for-himself-mentality’ must be broken. This goes for both the municipalities and the entrepreneurs. Cooperation is of vital importance, important for recreational activities on offer, but also to achieve cohesion in spatial development. The recreational user becomes more and more empowered and demanding. They have high expectations of experience and supply. Entrepreneurs and municipaities can offer this together. The Randmeren is a differentiated area with many different entrepreneurs, towns, history and nature. I believe that small interventions and making focal points at strategic points, a recreational area will arise which will feature in the top 10 of Dutch recreational destinations. This does not ony benefit the local entrepreneurs, but the entire region. The art is to start small, which every entrepreneur can do. The right programme in the right place and cooperation with other entrepreneurs. Together we will build a greater whole.

Graduation date 05 02 2015

142

Commission members Boris Hocks (mentor) Ellen Marcusse Matthijs Willemsen

Additional members for the examination Huub Juurlink Marco Broekman


Tijl Hekking

Wat Heb je nodig?

1. Nieuwe economische drager past vroeger

present nu

future toekomst

fish vis

city stad

city water recreation stadand & waterrecreatie

143


veiligheid

Cartogram Toeristengebieden in Nederland

ve ili g h e i d !

la ag

Urbanism

bed

re i g i n g w a t e r

bed

re i g i n g w a t e r

economisch belang

hoog

Cartogram Toeristengebieden in Nederland 2015 - toekomst hoog

la ag

veiligheid

conomisch belan g uw e nie

OPGAVE nieuwe relatie stad en water

01 Waddeneilanden

12 Groningse, Friese en Drentse zandgronden

03 IJsselmeerkust

14 Oost-Brabant, Noord- en Midden-Limburg

Problem: Randmeren area is not on 13the West-map! en Midden-Brabant 02 Noordzeebadplaatsen 04 Deltagebied 05 Meren in Groningen, Friesland en Noordwest-Overijssel

15 Zuid-Limburg

06 Hollands-Utrechtse meren

16 Amsterdam, Rotterdam (excl. Hoek van Holland)

07 Utrechtse Heuvelrug en 't Gooi 01 Waddeneilanden 08 Veluwe en Veluwerand 02 Noordzeebadplaatsen 09 Gelders rivierengebied 03 IJsselmeerkust 10 Achterhoek 04 Deltagebied 11 Twente, Salland en Vechtstreek 05 Meren in Groningen, Friesland en Noordwest-Overijssel

15 Zuid-Limburg

06 Hollands-Utrechtse meren

16 Amsterdam, Rotterdam (excl. Hoek van Holland)

07 Utrechtse Heuvelrug en 't Gooi 08 Veluwe en Veluwerand 09 Gelders rivierengebied

Assignment: water sports and recreation as new economic support

en Rijk van Nijmegen

's-Gravenhage (excl. Scheveningen en Kijkduin) 12 Groningse, Friese en Drentse zandgronden en Utrecht 13 West- en Midden-Brabant 17 Overig Nederland 14 Oost-Brabant, Noord- en Midden-Limburg en Rijk van Nijmegen

's-Gravenhage (excl. Scheveningen en Kijkduin) en Utrecht

Cartogram

17 Overig Nederland

199

10 Achterhoek 11 Twente, Salland en Vechtstreek

Cartogram

199

Vision: Collaboration between cities and entrepreneurs for a differentiated range of recreational activities

144

economisch belang

hoog

Solution: more freedom within the ‘focal points’ for entrepreneurs


Tijl Hekking

dorpen/steden aan de Randmeren gezamelijk belang is identiteit en samenwerking versterken

Vision: collaboration between towns and entrepreneurs in order to create recreational chains

Amsterdam 440.000

Almere 60.000 Utrecht 50.000

Large scale nature assignment

Urban pressure from the Randstad

Randmeren centrally located in the water network

145


Urbanism

Elaboration ‘Nature Experience’, possible final image

Atmospheric impression ‘Nature Experience’

• • •

Hiker Cyclist Inhabitants

• • • • • •

Sail boat Rowing boat Canoe Surfer Kite surfer Swimmer

• • • •

Motor yacht Motorboat Longboat Silent boat

• • •

Sailing competitions Historic fleet Surfing competitions

• • • •

Fish Birds Vegetation Nature lover

Target groups and users ‘Nature Experience’

146


Tijl Hekking

Elaboration ‘City and landscape’, possible final image

Atmospheric impression ‘City and landscape’

• • •

Hiker Cyclist Inhabitant

• • • • • •

Sail boat Rowing boat Canoe Surfer Kite surfer Swimmer

• • • •

Motor yacht Motor boat Jolly boat Electric boat

• • •

Sailing competitions Historic fleet Surfing competitions

• • • •

Fish Birds Vegetation Nature lover

Atmospheric impression ‘City and landscape’

147


Urbanism

Els Van Looy From burden to desire

A densification strategy for Flemish municipalities

Flanders is gradually becoming densely developed. Panic! Or maybe not, since we knew this already and we are also doing something about it. At least, we believe that is the case, but are we actually doing that? The densification assignment in Flanders is known. We know that a demographic growth of 13% is approaching in the coming years. Even if we do agree that we need to tackle the current densification differently. That is why the Team Vlaams Bouwmeester (Flemish Master Builder Team) is conducting studies. Through studies on a planning scale and more location-specific designs, the way in which this densification question can be tackled in a qualitative way is being examined. This works in the Flemish cities, but the knowledge is not filtering through to the municipal scale because the studies and specific projects are often too abstract. As a consequence, there is a tendency here to revert to familiar standard solutions, namely the building of apartments and parcelling. We Flemings have been building houses that are ‘too’ big and lots that are ‘too’ big, preferably in the open landscape, for centuries already. In the meantime, the Flemish urban area is expanding and the typical fragmented green spaces are disappearing one by one as a result of the local densification. The rural identity is disappearing, new districts are being built with a focus on the traditional family as target group, but due to a change in family composition an imbalance has arisen in recent years between housing demand and housing supply. Today, there is not enough emphasis on the current spatial, programmatic and procedural assignments on a municipal level. ‘From burden to desire’ shows the local players that densification does not only have to be a burden. With a different approach, the current densification assignment can strengthen the existing spatial qualities and tackle the problem areas in the urban structure. As a result of the reformulation of densification locations and the method of distribution across these locations, ways can be sought how to use existing spatial qualities in order to generate new housing qualities. As a result, more space is created for quality of living, public value and housing diversity. The case location is Mol-Ezaart. Currently, the densification pressure is notably tangible in this typical Flemish hamlet. In spite of this, people also opt for standard parcelling here. The case study shows that there is another possibility. I studied how a redistribution of the stated housing numbers could be integrated into additional densification locations without loss of the number of houses and with an improvement in the quality of living. The location-specific designs at the three chosen densification locations show how innovation can occur in a spatial and programmatic manner and which procedural changes are necessary for this. The reach of this study is wider than just Mol-Ezaart. The chosen densification locations ‘the field, the outskirts and the core’ also occur frequently in other Flemish municipalities. By distilling general principles from the design process, the knowledge can also be applied in other municipalities and housing developments. The proposed designs aim to show in a simple way that a big difference can often be made through carefully chosen changes. In short, that densification can also be a desire for Flemish municipalities! Graduation date 25 09 2014

148

Commission members Tess Broekmans Steven Delva Jeroen de Willigen

Additional members for the examination Miranda Reitsma Kirsten van den Berg


Els Van Looy

Green spaces as coincidental quality determine the identity today

New residential developments lead to the disappearance of these spaces

Time for a different approach, in search of a new form of densification!

149


Urbanism

Densification locations in Mol-Ezaart, the densification is tangible

Doing nothing means... using standard solutions

1

3

2

Redistribution of the housing assignment - 3 densification locations; the field (1), the outskirts (2) and the core (3), handling existing qualities differently

150


Els Van Looy

The field: existing situation

The field: current plan (standard parcelling)

The field: design proposal, a quantitative residential area with space for meeting and living ‘together’

The field: impression of a communal courtyard, collective green spaces lead to better quality of living in the district

151


Urbanism

The field: impression of the central green zone, this gives space for a public bicycle route and space for greenery, water infiltration, etc.

152


Els Van Looy

The core: new buildings at the rear of the church makes up the new events terrain, as a result of which it will also form part of the core

The outskirts: the Netepad will make the valley accessible for the residents and connect the core to the centre of the municipality

153


Urbanism

Luc Spee The amalgamation

Connecting, consolidating and clustering Utrecht & de Uithof district

De Uithof is a cluster of universities located on the eastern edge of Utrecht. The campus was created at the beginning of the 1950s due to a lack of space in the city centre. There are only a few university buildings located in the centre of Utrecht. However, de Uithof is still expanding: companies are moving into offices there and faculties are being relocated from the city. De Uithof has grown to 170 hectares, which is equal to the size of the city centre. The city of Utrecht currently has a housing commission of 40,000 homes, of which they are building 30,000 in the Vinex districts (areas designated by the Dutch government for future urban development). This commission is, however, actually a chance to further consolidate the city centre. Living in the city centre is becoming increasingly popular: residents find it fine to live so close to the city centre where there is a high concentration of facilities and parks. On a daily basis, 50,000 students and 20,000 employees pass through the Utrecht Oost area in the direction of de Uithof. De Uithof has a very strong appeal and that has consequences for the road network, public transport and bicycle network. Due to an increasing amount of faculties leaving the city for de Uithof, the campus is losing its connection with the city. Mixing university campuses with the city gives a positive boost to the quality of life in Utrecht Oost. The aim of this project is, therefore, to interweave the urban city with the university campuses in Utrecht Oost. In order to interweave these two areas, a new vision is needed for Utrecht Oost. The focus herein is connecting, consolidating and clustering (moving campus functions towards the city), making use thereby of the river de Kromme Rijn. Through strategic interventions in the profile and programme, the landscape will be joined to the city - campus connection. Important tools for this are shifting and adding to the programme, removing barriers, narrowing the profile and adjusting the roads structure. Part of this strategy is a gradual transformation of an intermediary zone to an urban area where the strong qualities of city, campus and landscape are utilised. By rolling out the lively interaction environment of the city centre across the route to de Uithof and, at the same time, extending the Uithof cluster towards the city, a connection will be created in Utrecht Oost on an urban level. Together with the meandering Kromme Rijn river, a lively area with an interesting mix of living, working, studying and free time will be created.

Graduation date 19 11 2014

154

Commission members Pieter Jannink (mentor) Jos Gadet Franz Ziegler

Additional members for the examination Ellen Marcusse Jaap Brouwer


Luc Spee

155


Urbanism

Ambitiekaart

Legenda

Legenda

Campus clusters

Campus clusters

Nieuwbouw

New building

Seperate cycle path in 2 directions Vrijliggend fietspad

2 richtingen

Current building Huidige bebouwing New tram location Nieuwe tramligging Access Ontsluiting

Ambition map

156


Luc Spee

157


Urbanism 1. Narrowing profile 2. Shifting programme 3. Removing barriers 4. Function to the 1st line 5. Extending plinth Starting point City

Point of departure Campus

Starting point Landscape

6. Bicycle connection 7. Adjusting roads structure 8. Clusters close to public transport stops

Draft: Connecting, consolidating and clustering

Tools

Programma - Studentenwoningen (30m2): 1800 - Appartementen (80-150m2) : 1500 - Woningen (grondgebonden): 100 - Voorzieningen (plint): 10.000 m2 - Kantoren: 30.000 m2 - 2 campus achtige scholen - 1 basis / middelbare school

Verdichten

Programma - 4 faculteitsgebouwen - Dependance bibliotheek (7.000m2) - Studenthotel: 230 kamers - Studentenwoningen: 1000

Verclusteren

-

Present Huidig

Appartementen 80-140m2: 500 Grondgebonden woningen: 35

Present Huidig

Plan Plan nieuw cluster

a b

a

Plan Plan

nieuw cluster

b nieuw cluster

Consolidating

Clustering

Campus cluster aan de Kromme Rijn

Stadspark aan de stadstraat

Cluster architectuur

Verdichting

Brede stoep

Zicht naar Krommerijn Studentenwoningen Programma Universiteit Bibliotheek dependance Studentenhotel Studentenwoningen

Stadspark Ontmoetingsplekken Hoofdontsluiting Fietsen langs de over dubbelzijdig Hogeschool-Universiteit cluster

Stadspark

Bouwregels Typologie cluster

Zoning map city park on the city street

158

-

Horeca

Horeca Parkeergebouw Appartementen

Harde eisen - Rooilijn naar fiets/tramstraat - Doorzichten naar de Krommerijn - Hoogbouw aflopend naar het water

Zoning map campus cluster on the Kromme Rijn

Studeren in het groen


Luc Spee

Consolidating, city street with view towards the Kromme Rijn

Connecting, switch point between city and de Uithof

Clustering, campus cluster on the Kromme Rijn

159


Urbanism

Sjoerd Wolbertus The Periphery Central

Building on a distinctive Lübeck on the Trave Fjord

The periphery is of vital importance for every metropolis in order to continue to grow. Optimisation of infrastructure is one of the most important tasks connected with that. In addition, the periphery is often frequently subject to economic and demographic contraction. As the largest port on the Baltic Sea, Lübeck has strong competition and the opening of the Fehmarnbelt Tunnel in 2021 will further reinforce the drop in transshipment figures. In the meantime, the number of inhabitants of the once so proud ‘Queen of the Hanse’ is steadily decreasing. As part of this project, leverage was sought for a favourable strategy for Lübeck as distinctive city on the Trave Fjord. In this project, the possibilities are shown for the city to tackle the changing international dynamics for qualitative growth. The development of the Lübeck is mainly based on planning policy and autonomous building developments. As a result, the city is becoming increasingly fragmented and the public domain is making it less and less inviting for Lübeck citizens to stay. That which makes Lübeck ‘unique (city on the Trave, stream valleys, industrial heritage) is increasingly falling into disrepair. This strategy will ensure that the contraction continues further, that the city becomes increasingly less liveable and vital, and that unique qualities are definitively lost. In the Periphery Central, the foundation is laid for qualitative growth. In order to achieve this, strategic choices are made for the urban traffic network, efforts are concentrated on clustering of port activities and the Trave and stream valleys from a powerful framework for the city. The design consists of spatial interventions between Altstadt and fjord, with transformation of the city entrance and Teerhofinsel as key projects. The restored Struckbachtal is the heart of the transformation that is created through a gradual transformation of the business area. Living on a stream valley and fortress determines the revitalised identity of this city district. In addition to the monumental city centre, Teerhofinsel is the second ‘jewel in the Trave’. This island is the gateway to the fjord and will soon be the place where city and fjord meet each other. From a closed military training ground to an inviting and natural destination for every Lübeck citizen and visitor. The restored Struckbachtal is the heart of the transformation of the city entrance, between the A1 motorway and Altstadt. The crucial intervention is the railway tunnel, with which a sharp cut is stitched through the city. Between St. Lorenz, the restored Struckbachtal and the banks of the Trave, missing routes can be created and space arises for new inhabitants. Industrial heritage is given new significance again with public functions and space for events. St. Lorenz can grow once again and the location on the Struckbachtal and Trave will definitively rescue the old suburb from its isolation. Outside the UNESCO-protected Altstadt, the rich industrial history of Lübeck will become visible and perceptible once again. Lübeck’s tangible past will be definitively safeguarded Building on a distinctive Lübeck requires time and patience, and strong coalitions of public and private parties. The city will have to lobby strongly to profit from regional assignments. By embracing the new course and through focused investments, Lübeck will slowly but surely become a vital and proud city on the Trave Fjord once again.

Graduation date 25 06 2015

160

Commission members Jeroen Ruitenbeek (mentor) Riëtte Bosch Hans van der Made

Additional members for the examination Kirsten van den Berg Rein Geurtsen


Sjoerd Wolbertus

161


Urbanism

Ports Lübeck Transshipment volume 2007-2012

LÜBECK

-25%

Changing international dynamics is putting economic position under pressure

Lübeck on the Trave circa 2015: no vision on added value for the city.

€ Changing international dynamics as opportunity

Spatial assignments

Ring road

City streets Compact ports

Powerful framework of stream valleys and Trave

162

Traffic network and city in balance


Sjoerd Wolbertus

Master plan

163


Urbanism

Restoration of Struckbachtal as support for city entrance

Struckbachtal connects city, Trave and countryside

City front St. Lorenz on Struckbachtal

Railway runnel binds, links and creates space for development

Struckbachtal, powerful support for the city entrance

164

Railway tunnel St. Lorenz


Sjoerd Wolbertus

New gateway to the city centre

Development process city entrance

Fortress: new life in the historic heart of the city

Cultural heart St. Lorenz

165


Maike van Stiphout Head of Landscape Architecture Department


Prepared for the future The graduate projects of 2014-2015 demonstrate the results of four years of interdisciplinary study at our Amsterdam Academy of Architecture. In addition to architecture; landscape architecture and urbanism also form part of the design solutions. The visualisation of these ideas is tantalising. The projects touch upon issues that are extremely relevant to modernday society. The students demonstrate their skills as designers in terms of infrastructure, shrinkage, regional identity, recreation and well-being. They have not only tested their skills in The Netherlands, but also in Belfast, Tokyo and China. The more skills they have, the better prepared they are to do the job. They have learned to translate aims into a physical and visual potential future, fulfilling an urgent need in this complex, fast-changing world. The future designer’s field of work is expanding to include mediation in a complex process, confronted with sweeping changes in society. These new masters show that they are prepared for this future.

167


Landscape Architecture

Jacques Abelman Urban L.A.C.E.

Infrastructures of abundance in urban Brazil

Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody. —Jane Jacobs The Urban L.A.C.E. project explores the potential of agroforestry to create a new type of infrastructure in rapidly developing urban areas in Porto Alegre, the capital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul at the southern tip of Brazil. The L.A.C.E. acronym stands for Local Agroforestry Collective Engagement. This strategy proposes adding a network of different scales and typologies of urban agriculture to the city. This multifunctional green infrastructure creates new economic opportunities, social networks and educational experiences, new modes of recreation and an additional urban food network based on native-species agroforestry. The project proposes colonizing public parks, private land, public land, urban fringe spaces and fallow land with indigenous food bearing tree species from the Atlantic temperate rainforest ecosystem. The trees are planted as orchards for intensive production, or in multi-species associations mimicking a natural forest. There are hundreds of fruit bearing and medicinal species in this region which are all part of the living cultural heritage of Brazil. The process of building a network of productive urban agroforestry begins with a look into traditional and nascent practices in the area, from farmer’s markets and the agroecology movement to guerrilla gardening and a growing interest in urban agriculture. Based on the actions, interests, and needs of stakeholders in the city, the project augments these actions into a large scale urban network. The design and visualization process of Urban L.A.C.E. asks if a new landscape infrastructure can be added to the city; in order to do so, many assemblages and alliances of stakeholders could potentially take place in the spectrum between bottom up and top down processes. Different scenarios are illustrated along this continuum, from individual actions multiplied into closely knit neighbourhood alliances to city wide transformation of public spaces initiated by the mayor’s office, changing the identity of the city. The Urban L.A.C.E. project has the potential to catalyze parallel processes of urban evolution with the landscape architect acting as a mediator. Based on dialogue, design, and the democratic ideal of inclusion, Urban L.A.C.E. works toward this vision for change as one piece of a complex process in creating the cities of tomorrow. This project was made possible by the generous contributions of the NHBOS Foundation for landscape architecture and the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Internationalization fund.

Graduation date 19 12 2014

168

Commission members Jana Crepon (mentor) Marieke Timmermans Han Wiskerke Rogier van den Berg

Additional members for the examination John Lonsdale Mirjam Koevoet


Jacques Abelman

169


Landscape Architecture 1

2

7

3

5

4

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

canopy / tall tree layer sub-canopy / large shrub layer shrub layer herbaceous layer groundcover / creeper layer

6. underground layer 7. vertical / climber layer

6

creating food forests: multi-layer agroforestry section using a palette of native food-bearing species

who produces?

who

distributes?

who consumes and where?

street beach park festival

street sellers

neighborhood coalition

$ neighborhood families and volunteers

individual consumers families

distribution network wholesalers

farmers co-operative restaurants foodbanks caterers small scale artisanal products

local store farmer’s market

municipal work program

urban agriculture: networks made of people

organizing stakeholders: short food production chains in the city short food supply chain (sfscs) is a term that describes a broad range of food production-distribution-consumption short food production chain: the network in action

configurations, such as farmers’ markets, farm shops, collective farmers’ shops, community-supported agriculture, solidarity purchase groups. more in general, a food supply chain can be defined as “short” when it is characterized by short distance or few intermediaries between producers and consumers.

5 major ecosystems within the urban fabric each with specific food-bearing species

tructure potential

ty logy al typology

new green infrastructure potential

ses nts buildings

high density urban typology current spatial typology

sity logy

mountainside forest favela mata dos morros medium density urban typology

ses ial spaces n

housing

e systems ned grassland/lawn

aluvial plains mata aluvial agriculture

forest soil / rock

2000m

high density urban typology current spatial typology

new green infrastructure potential

high steppe favela campo typology high rises apartments buildings

housing

high density urbanspatial typology current typology high steppe favela high rises campo typology apartments buildings

mountainside forest lowland forest and swamp mosaic favela mata dos morros mosaico medium density urban typology

warehouses industrial spaces lowland shady forest urban green mata com figueira

park lowland shady forest aluvial plains forest mata com figueira agriculture systems mata aluvial maintained grassland/lawn

housing

new green infrastructure potential high density urban typology favela typology

high steppe campo

lowland forest and swamp mosaic mountainside forest mosaico mata dos morros medium density urban typology

high steppe campo

mata com figueira

mosaico

mata dos morros

lowland shady forest mata com figueira

lowland forest and swamp mosaic mosaico

warehouses lowland forest and swamp industrial spaces mosaico urban green lowland shady forest

mountainside forest high steppe mountainside forest lowland forest and swamp mosaic mata dos morros campo

park

shrubland

grassland

warehouses industrial spaces urban green lowland shady forest mata com figueira

aluvial plains forest agriculture systems mata aluvial maintained grassland/lawn

systems forest r agroforestry

1: 20.000

lowland forest and swamp mosaic mountainside forest mosaico favela medium density mata dos morros urban typology

park

ture

N

new green infrastructure potential

high steppe favela campo high rises typology apartments buildings

170

native native forest ecosystems managed for agroforestry native shrubland

native grassland

agriculture

native ecosystems native forest managed for agroforestry native shrubland

aluvial plains forest agriculture systems mata aluvial maintained grassland/lawn

agriculture

urban green

aluvial plains forest agriculture systems mata aluvial

lowland shady forest mata com figueira

aluvial plains forest


ale es

s

hood squares et aleparks

lots ids

squares d/lawn plazas

Jacques Abelman

current spatial typology

new green infrastructure potential

high rises apartments buildings

high density urban typology

favela

favela typology

housing warehouses new green infrastructure potential industrial spaces

current spatial typology high rises apartments buildings

high density park urban typology

urban typologies

housing high density urban typology

high rises apartments buildings

new green infrastructure potential warehouses favela spaces industrial favela typology high rises high density urban lace newtwork potential map of new green infrastructure potential in porto new green infrastructure typologies urban typologies apartments buildings urban typology urban typologies large-scale park neighborhood squares neighborhood squares roads parks housing infrastructure hardscapes parks pocket parks pocket parks high density density high favela urban typology urban typology

favela housing typology warehouses industrial spaces large-scale medium density roads neighborhood squares parks hardscapes infrastructure parks parkways urban squares plazas urban typology pocket green avenues small plazas

linear urban spaces

medium density urban typology urban typology maintained grassland/lawn

medium density park urban typology

agriculture

parking lots urban interstices urban voids

maintained grassland/lawn urban green large-scale parking lots urban voids

informal settlements urban interstices

urban squares small plazas

agriculture systems native forest

native shrubland

native forest native grassland

urban squareshardscapes pocket parks small plazas plazas

infrastructure

urban urbangreen green

mountainside forest roads mata dos morros parks informalinfrastructure settlements

squares parks parks greenpocket avenues

linear urban spaces

urban interstices

existing parks

high steppe campo

native ecosystems lowland fores native for ecosystems managed agroforestry mosaico

lowland shady mata com figu

lowland forest and swamp mosaic mosaico roads infrastructure

aluvial plain mata aluvial

mountainside forest lowland shady forest agriculture shrubland systems lowland forest and swamp mosaic mata dos native morros mata com figueira native ecosystems mosaico managed for agroforestry

native and grassland lowland forest swamp mosaic native forest mosaico lowland shady forest agriculture systems mata com figueira parkways degraded forest large-scaleinformal settlements parkways green avenues urban squares informal settlements urban interstices parking lots green avenues linear urban spaces large-scale parkways small plazas exposed soil / rock urban interstices urban squares linear urban spaces native shrubland urban voids lowland parking lots green avenues shady forest small plazas urban voids linear urban spaces native ecosystems mata com figueira aluvial plains forest managed for agroforestry mata aluvial native grassland aluvial plains forest mata aluvial native ecosystems degraded forest managed for agroforestry exposed soil / rock

native ecosystems managed for agroforestry degraded forest augmenting the green infrastructure exposed soil / rock

current green spaces

plazas

mountainside mata dos morr

native grassland mountainside forest high steppe mata dos morros agriculture degraded forest systems campo exposed soil / rock

high steppe urban green campo roads parks nativesquares forest neighborhood large-scale infrastructure neighborhood large-scale maintained grassland/lawn large-scale parkways informal settlements hardscapes

agriculture urban green

parkways

roadsshrubland native

favela favela typology typology warehouses industrial spaces

structural elements of lace network park

green avenues agriculture linear urban spaces

native forest

alegre’s urban core

medium density

plazas

agriculture systems high steppe campo

agriculture medium density urban typology

current spatial typology

urban

urban green

favela favela maintained grassland/lawn typology new green infrastructure potential

current spatial typology

medium density urban typology

urban voids

linear infrastructure

aluvial plains forest mata aluvial informal settlements urban interstices

semiprivate green areas

of porto alegre

full potential of the augmented network

171


praça dos açorianos: social context

Landscape Architecture

procergs: office for processing of official government data

cidade baixa: alternative cultural neighborhood of poa. many students, shops, stores, restaurants, cafes, etc.

monumento aos açorianos: iconic sculpture of the identity of first settlers of poa

ESCOLA

$ centro administrativo do estado do rio grande do sul: main government administration building

concept: creating a showcase for the lace network

educar: school organization many schools in downtown centro area justice tribunal + Tribunal de Mediação e Arbitragem do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul

people take shelter / sleep on plaza during day

Escola La Salle Pão dos Pobres: social and educational projects for the poor

starting point: analysis of the site’s social and economic context

botanical plaza legend praça açorianos seedling banks

SOURCE

on plaza schools hospitals

maintenance done by municipal workers and work program

15m

12m

10m

8.5m

5m

PREPARE CONSUME

praça dos açorianos botanical plaza central kiosk PRODUCE DISTRIBUTE

municipal workers and work program

outdoor market food banks

TRANSFORM

municipal seedling center kiosk

native ecosystem plantings

ephemeral fruit market

small stands in market plaza local co-ops

site-specific narrative of urban agroforestry

c

c’ section through five ecosystem botanical gardens

illustration of agroforestry through the various zones of the city

172


Jacques Abelman praça dos açorianos: botanical flagship plaza for the urban core of porto alegre

municipal seedling center work program headquarters

b’

azorean monument lowland forest swamp mosaic

botanical circles

c’ fountain

fruit market

mountainside forest

b botanical gardens

lowland shady forest

aluvial plains

c

high steppe

173


Landscape Architecture

Marijne Beenhakker New perspective for the Hollandse Hout

How a boring and eroded polder forest quickly changes into an ecologically rich and significant area

With my project, I want to stand up for the forest areas in Flevoland. The forest is a relevant part of the Flevopolder. It stimulates the senses and offers shelter to human and animal in a rational, open landscape. Flevoland has a relatively large amount of forest on clayey soil. That is unique, due to the suitability of the soil as cultivated land. Forest on clayey soil can, if given the chance, develop into a an extraordinarily beautiful type of forest: lush, rich in species and structure, with many spring bloomers. 'New perspective for the Hollandse Hout’ is an example of a possible new phase for forests in Flevoland. The Hollandse Hout is a forest of approximately 850 hectares, which stretches like a solid block between Lelystad and the Oostvardersplassen nature reserve. It was designed at the beginning of the 1970s and was assigned a multi-functional purpose, with wood production as dominant factor. The forest was intended to be the future recreational area of Lelystad and a buffer to an industrial area (the current Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve). It is made up of a collection of irregular sections with monocultures, of which half are poplar. The intention was to gradually transform sections with poplar into sustainable deciduous trees species, and to make the forest attractive to visitors through structures grown over time. That never happened. The sections with poplars are now on the verge of collapse. The forest is boring, with hardly any open spaces, does not really belong anywhere and the forest experience is disrupted by motorised traffic. The unique potential of forest on clayey soil, as lush flowery type of forest, is being hindered by the current developments. In short: the forest area is in need of renewal. Design I visualised the genesis of the Oostelijk Flevoland area in a poetic way with an animation. It shows the transformation process from open water to fertile agricultural polder. Long polder lines, the planting of reed for drainage of the mud flats and the use of succession planting for the ripening of the soil were essential to this. Using a differentiated approach for the eroded poplar sections, I translated these elements in the forest. Within the grid of the current forest structure, part of the poplar sections are flooded and part is included in a new, agricultural business. In this way, variation and vitality is created, and the forest opens itself to the surroundings. The wet parts are located along a widened polder trail and consist of reed and alder. The new land is located on the polder road, which is marked by a rapeseed verge. The land includes an intensively and an extensively managed section. Along the meadows and existing broad grass paths, there is a extended, continuous forest border on the sunny side with an abundant white spring bloom. The long polder lines become fast routes for slow traffic; there are various trails from popular areas on the edges of the forest. A process has been devised for the transformation into a ‘natural’ forest mosaic for the remaining poplar sections. The development of this would take hundreds of years without intervention. By using an innovative method, whereby different forest development phases are imitated with new plants and shrubs, a direct alternation between closed and open, light/dark, wet/dry and warm/cold arises. The richness of forest on clayey soil is revealed here within the space of a lifetime. Graduation date 13 04 2015

Commission members Berdie Olthof (mentor) Karen de Groot Paul Roncken Special thanks to Ronald Buiting

174

Additional members for the examination Ivonne de Nood Mirjam Koevoet


Marijne Beenhakker

Recreational programme area around the surfing lake

Care farm with orchards/ tree-lined meadow/lane to stables Trail across the contours of former forestland Trek with alder and reed land; cabins at sea level; vista Almere / Lelystad

Shed and meadows with white-blooming forest border Polder road with rapeseed verge Existing broad grass paths with white-blooming forest border

Farm with arable land Tree-lined meadow with oak trees area around historic ship Trek along farm/tree-lined meadow/Knardijk

Visitors centre Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve

175


Landscape Architecture

Wet past: Zuiderzee

Polder lines: Knardijk

Soil development: planting reed

Polder structure of waterways, trails and roads

Productive landscape: rapeseed

Forest structure, divided into typologies Lelystad

Markermeer

er

ro

ad

tr a

il

new housing development Warande

po

ld

Hollandse Hout Oostvaardersplassen nature reserve

1. flooding along trail

Context

2. survey in new farmyard along the polder road

3. transformation into ‘natural’ forest mosaic

Shed and meadows on the polder road, with rapeseed verge.

Types of forest borders, along meadows and existing broad grass paths

A6

Tackling deteriorated poplar sections:

Kn ar di jk

176


Marijne Beenhakker

Fields with reed and alder along the broadened trail to the Knardijk. The inverted ridges with alder create a spatial effect in combination with the dyke and the water.

The Torenvalk trail with fast bicycle connection from Lelystad through the forest to the Knardijk.

177


Landscape Architecture starting point

‘forest development phase’ per eco-unit

‘forest development phase’ per eco-unit

new forest dense phase (35%) tree phase (55%)

poplar

maple tree

open phase (10%)

willow

beech

ash

existing sustainable forest

fir

maple tree

existing conservation

common oak

beech

30% thinning out

small-leaved lime

fir

50% thinning out

hornbeam

oak tree

open phase (10%)

hazel

Example elaboration ‘natural forest mosaic’ at plot level (based on the methodology of R. Buiting).

Existing section with sustainable hardwood - partially strong thinning out

‘Tree phase’ to be developed - leave several poplars as dead wood - in addition to existing sustainable forest to ease the transition

‘Dense phase’ to be developed from scratch - chopping down all poplars

T=0

T=15

Forest development over time

Image caption

Light, layered forest with sweet cherry (NW side)

Darker, more open forest with beech (SE side)

178

T=40


Marijne Beenhakker

Image caption

White-blooming forest border along existing broad grass paths and farmers’ fields that light up in the spring, as poetic element of forest on clayey soil.

179


Landscape Architecture

Mathé van Kranenburg Deep-Rooted

Avenue tree cultivation as calling card for the eastern Betuwe region

The graduation project ‘Deep-Rooted’ represents the relationship between humans with the eastern Betuwe region. The image of the Betuwe region as orchard of the Netherlands is well known, but the reality of large-scale infrastructure and unsuitable land uses has now almost outstripped that. The project focuses on the avenue tree growers who are developing the eastern Betuwe region into an attractive production landscape with recreational qualities, and at the same time are continuing to develop avenue tree cultivation into a future-proof form of agriculture. A better balance arises between the important landscape and economic incentives for avenue tree cultivation, and a livable region for inhabitant and recreational user. The growth of avenue tree cultivation and the recreational use has restored the image of the Betuwe region. The strategy to develop both cultivation and recreation is based on the avenue tree cultivation and the avenue tree growers. The growers, many family companies with strong roots in the region, are the active participants who use, form, maintain and experience the landscape. With an area of production of approximately 1,500 ha, the current region of the eastern Betuwe is the most important production area for avenue trees in the Netherlands, but also in Europe. By controlling the processes of cultivation and incorporating future developments, the landscape will be shaped to the avenue tree cultivation, but in a way in which spatial issues like nature, energy, water, accommodation and recreation are taken into account. The main intervention for the area is the Laanbomenlint (Avenue tree ribbon), a new infrastructure that serves as the basis for restructuring and driver for new developments. With respect to the area, it functions as an infrastructural connection with the world, a shop window for the cultivation and part of the sustainable area development. The ribbon is a combination of road/dyke/water, which is characteristic for the area and from the road it offers an impressive view and perception of the avenue tree cultivation as unique form of agriculture. The ribbon lies at the centre of the avenue tree zone, the area on the levees where avenue tree cultivation has traditionally occurred, and functions here as a stepping stone for an increase in scale and technological development. This region offers a perception of cultivation on a new scale and new extra large farmlands are developing here that are placing the region on the map as an example to avenue tree nurseries worldwide. An area of transition is located around the avenue tree zone, a small-scale and mixed area that is a continuation of the existing landscape and land use. This serves as an intermediary stage from avenue tree cultivation to other uses, and there is room in the region for existing functions and grounds to specialise, expand and/or downsize. Newly available grounds in turn offer space once again for the growth of the avenue tree cultivation. The Linge, the Netherlands’ longest river, nothing more than a discharge canal here, runs through the heart of the region. As a result of the growth of the cultivation, the river Linge has developed into a park zone in which recreational functions, cultural history, nature and water have been given the space to grow. The Linge park is being developed and completed by the avenue tree growers who can place their water storage here and where they can find a place for remaining and special trees. With these unique elements, the recreational experience in the region seamlessly blends in with the Betuwe region’s image of orchards, nature and small-scale recreation. Graduation date 25 06 2015

180

Commission members Nikol Dietz (mentor) Bruno Doedens Pieter Veen

Additional members for the examination Roel Wolters Marie-Laure Hoedemakers


MathĂŠ van Kranenburg

Linge park 181


Landscape Architecture

landscape typology

avenue tree cultivation in the Netherlands natural washlands small-scale levees

Betuwe acreage:

former Rijnstrangen washlands

companies:

1,500 ha = 40% of NL

Hemmen country estate zone

infrastructural central zone open basins

jobs:

130 800

national acreage:

3,800 ha

â‚Ź

production value:

â‚Ź100,000,000

growth since 1995:

+50%

Betuwelinie

Spanjaardsdijk

strategy

Laanbomenlint (Avenue tree ribbon) New infrastructure as basis for restructuring and driver of developments. Combination of road, dyke and water as regional access, shop window for the cultivation and part of the sustainable area development.

Avenue tree zone Zone with space for the increase in scale and (technological) development of the avenue tree cultivation.

master plan

laanbomenlint (avenue tree ribbon) new production and trading grounds (XL typology) new avenue tree cultivation plots increase in scale of existing avenue tree cultivation extensive forms of avenue tree cultivation Mixed zone with existing avenue tree plots grasslands with recreational, nature and water storage functions. forest

nature development area water safety area water buffer area Line / dyke of cultural-historical value Practical research Plant & Omgeving (Plant and Environment), Wageningen UR, avenue tree centre with regard to transshipment, trade and education recreational transfer point transformer station regional energy network

182

Mixed zone

Zone that is a continuation of the existing landscape and land use, intermediary stage from avenue tree cultivation to existing structures. Space for specialisation, expansion and downsizing of grounds.

Linge park

Park zone in which recreational functions develop and space is created for cultural history, nature and water.


MathĂŠ van Kranenburg

laanbomenlint (avenue tree ribbon) Visualisation Laanbomenlint (Avenue tree ribbon)

183


Landscape Architecture

existing roads

doubling and separation carriageways

design in ‘language’ of the river area

altitude for the purpose of (over)view and water storage

Pinched profile in villages, panoramic profile in agricultural areas

scale differences village and cultivation emphasised in plots and verges

connections of; links, farmlands and hubs

development Laanbomenlint (Avenue tree ribbon)

Infrastructural connection with the world

Shop window of the avenue tree cultivation

Water system for the eastern Betuwe region

sections Laanbomenlint (Avenue tree ribbon)

existing Linge

growth of avenue tree production plots

strip of land from Linge free from intensive cultivation

possibilities for water storage and leftover pieces of land with special cultivations

development Linge park

regional / recreational facilities with accommodatioln local / day recreation water recreation nature experience

section Linge park

184

accessibility through slow transport routes and new nature

emphasis distinction backland soil areas and levees

incentive east-west links, driver north-south links


MathĂŠ van Kranenburg

current nursery typology 14%

S

cultivation: graft & inoculation wood butt logs

0 > 3 ha

resale local nurseries

66%

M

cultivation: containers & pots rachises 1-3 years old: avenue trees <10-12

3 > 15ha

sale local and national nurseries and own sale

20%

L

15 > 150 ha

cultivation: containers & pots avenue trees >10-12 sale (inter) national nurseries and own sale

L

M

ex

ng

n do

w

ns

izi

io

lis

ns

ia ec

pa

sp

ex

do

sp

ec ia lis pa atio ns n io n w ns izi ng

at

io

n

S

S+

M+ Mixed zone

L+

XL avenue tree zone

land development

new XL farmland typology

185


Landscape Architecture

Judith van der Poel Watery Huzhou

Cultural landscapes as basis for a new green structure

Great changes are currently taking place in the city of Huzhou in China. Unique landscape and villages are disappearing beneath the violence of new housing blocks, that are rising from the ground in straight lines. The city will grow from 216,000 inhabitants to 980,000 inhabitants by 2030. Cultural landscapes The city has a rich history. The surrounding cultural landscape consists of many historic canals and fanciful, growth-covered ‘dykes’. Aound the year 700, the canals were dug in order to prevent floods from the large salt-water lake. Moreover, this meant that the water could be controlled and areas could in this way be irrigated during dry periods. The water cultivation was expanded and by placing many dams, they lived in perfect symbiosis with the water. All villages had stairs to the water, and because all transport was done using boats, there were few roads. As a result of later economic developments, this balance with nature was lost. The current human way of living has had a mostly negative influence on the water quality, due to a surplus of fertilisers, and urban and industrial pollution. Water pollution, air pollution and the ‘urban heat island effect’ is now the order of the day and will grow worse with the enormous urbanisation in the future. The urban planning vision of the government demonstrates a plan in which the existing landscape is not or hardly taken into account. All Chinese cities will consequently resemble each other. This is a big problem for the future identity of many Chinese cities. My assignment is to develop an alternative master plan for the future green structure of Huzhou, which is in balance with the unavoidable urban development. By incorporating the existing landscape in the master plan, the local culture will remain visible and the people will keep a strong bond with their environment. Moreover, the unique identity will attract tourists. The current water and dyke structure in this area forms the basis for the new green structure. The environmental problems are reduced by literally making space for green zones at strategic locations. The distances to the parks become considerably smaller, so that people can more easily make use of the green facilities in their neighbourhood. Parts of the agricultural regions will, as a result, be transformed into city parks. These will become unique parks by making use of local principles, traditions and activities. People The people in the region and their ancestors made the landscape into what it is now. I was, therefore, extremely interested in their story. Thanks in part to the Stichting NHBOS (NHBOS Foundation), I was able to visit the region. I had the opportunity to speak to the local population with the help of an interpreter. As a result, I learnt a lot about the local culture and the wishes of the inhabitants. They will also live in this city soon, so they are an important source of support for my plan. The centuries-old tradition of living with the water says a lot about the creation of the landscape and the local culture. In addition, the traditions offer sufficient opportunities to transform Huzhou into a lively city of water once again!

Graduation date 20 05 2015

186

Commission members Rik de Visser (mentor) Boudewijn Almekinders Bruno Vermeersch

Additional members for the examination Roel van Gerwen Paul Achterberg


Judith van der Poel

187


Landscape Architecture

Suzhou Taihu

Shanghai Taihu

Huzhou plan area

10km

50km

100km

10km

20km

Historic hydrographic chart 618-907

Location

5km

Master plan of the government for 2030, short distances, not relationship with landscape

Green structure in the master plan 2030, green only frames

Small-scale landscape ensures history

forms ecological connections

have economic importance.

Residential tower blocks north-south facing, each Chinese city will look the same

188

important part of the daily life

Water pollution, air pollution and ‘urban heat island effect’ is current problem

50km


Judith van der Poel

edible city

10 km2 vegetable gardens forests

40 km2 forest dykes

parks no more than 800m away

water

25 km2 wetland Layers of the master plan: water and dykes as park borders, reedlands purify the water, forests for air purification and recreation, vegetable gardens for local food

partial elaboration

2km

4km

10km

Master plan: green spreads through, connects purifies and feeds

greenhouses

rice fields

“I fetch oxygen plants from the river in order to prevent my vegetable garden drying out”

“the water in the village was used a lot in the past, now it is too dirty”

fish ponds

black mulberry trees

frogs vegetable gardens on dykes

“It is a shame that I have to move, mainly because the city has polluted air. I will miss the clean air”

“we built this fishing net ourselves, with friends. This is our hobby”

Interviews with farmers and inhabitants of the region

189


existing structures Building blocks

boulevards

residential tower blocks

harbours

industrial zones

rooms

buildings

Landscape Architecture

infrastructure

fish ponds

lakes

existing villages

rock zone

motorway

artificial mountain

main road

edible park

road & cycle path

edible water gardens

footpaths

water plant zone

partial transformation commercial zones

existing narrow dyke

transform into boulevards rock landscape

pavilion as staircase

transform into reedlands purifying reedlands

natural dykes as ecological connecting zones

framework

halophyte filter

water

rice fields

counteract existing fields

canal with dykes

Four layers

200m

20m 20m

Elaboration ‘In the nature’

190

100m 100m

1km

200m 200m


Judith van der Poel existing situation

Use existing structures and traditions for new urban functions, such as a living market water purification systems

existing situation

Use existing water cultivation for new water purification system

191


Landscape Architecture

Hannah Schubert Second Nature A slow, natural transformation as alternative to demolition

The Netherlands has hundreds of long-term empty buildings. Redesignation for other uses is not always successful. If something no longer satisfies, is not longer profitable and can no longer be made profitable, demolition is often the only option. This project is an exploration in the shadows; it is an alternative answer to demolition or redesignation in a time after the credit crisis. It is a project in which the force of nature is used to slowly transform a ‘failed’ building into landscape. After all, the ultimate fate of every building may well be that it once again becomes landscape – only it does not fit our notion of time to be able to imagine that and see the value of that. The uncontrollable and unpredictable character of nature is adopted as starting point for the directed metamorphosis of a building. The building that will undergo the metamorphosis is the Scheringa Museum voor Realisme (Scheringa Musem of Realism) in Opmeer, commissioned by the banker Dirk Scheringa and designed by Herman Zeinstra. The museum symbolises the failings of the system. The colossus, which has never been put into use, has stood empty in the flat, functional landscape of West-Friesland since 2009. It is a blind spot that villagers have never been able to discover. The design explores the possibilities of minimal interventions that can achieve maximum transformation. Villagers will be involved in the controlled ‘damage’ to the building – by strategically removing parts, light and moisture will penetrate the building, so that the natural processes can occur. Over a course of more than 50 years, the building will gradually be transformed in this way, and it will become an ecological refuge for the plants and species of animals that have increasingly less place in the arid farmlands of West-Friesland. The design focuses on three main actions, which follow one another and are closely connected. The first intervention consists of the removal of the surplus, still valuable material – in order to reveal the soft parts of the building. In the second phase, the building will be ‘modified’: this entails that the floor will be partially drilled open according to a preconceived pattern, so that plants can nestle in the cracks and the process of degeneration is utilised and directed. The last intervention focuses on the act of adding: in order to safeguard the liveability and accessibility in the future, a path is built using partially recycled material. The circular path will cut through all parts of the building like an endless trail, which will become a hybrid between architecture and landscape over the course of time. Moreover, the path will create a new connection between the historic ribbon development and the adjoining park, so that the Museum can once again become part of the village, and the daily walks that visitors can take. The path encircles the real wilderness; but once a year one will be able to set foot on this part of the path, and thus experience the overgrown force of the nature. The project is about time, decay and growth, about the celebration of transience instead of denying this. It is a quest for a hybrid form between architecture and landscape – a new reality, as a result of which a sense of value is created that goes beyond that which can be expressed in economic rate of return. The Scheringa Museum will become a green monument, a real-life ‘Museum of Realism’.

Graduation date 25 11 2014

192

Commission members Noël van Dooren Klaas Jan Wardenaar Jo Barnett

Additional members for the examination Marieke Timmermans Lada Hršak


Hannah Schubert

193


Landscape Architecture

pattern of drilled-open floor

zoning map: after 1 year

after 10 years

after 40 years

194

schematic representation of the transformation over the course of time ( 1 - 2 - 5 - 10 - 20 years)

step 1: removal (glass and soft parts)

step 2: modification (drilling open concrete)

step 3: addition (path)

step 4: accept the process of wilderness

zoom in detail: after 1 year

zoom in detail: after 20 years

zoom in detail: after 1 year

zoom in detail: after 20 years


Hannah Schubert

The bare building after 5 years, if not intervention would take place. The process of deterioration hardly occurs; an arid place - definitely no ‘beautiful ruin’, such as we know and value.

An overview of the interventions (drilling open the concrete floor and removing glass), and the consequence of this for microhabitats and weathering of the building.

195


Landscape Architecture

Approximately 15 years after the interventions in the building. There is not final picture, the transformation is a continuous and variable process.

196


Hannah Schubert

The process of transformation is consciously set in motion by ‘preparing’ the building where necessary, so that nature and time can do their work here...

197


Landscape Architecture

Gert-Jan Wisse Common Ground Belfast Dreaming of a no man’s land

Belfast bears the psychological and physical scars of recent history, particularly in the industrial city. The conflict that had a hold on the city during the last three decades of the 20th century has left behind a severely divided city, with metres-high walls as a testament. Sixteen years after the Good Friday Agreement, tentative signs of rapprochement are slowly becoming visible. Based on the suggestion of the Northern Ireland government that the ‘Peace Lines’ should be gone by the year 2020, this project explores the possible meaning and value of these vacant spaces, within the context of a city that would slowly move towards an integrated society. In today’s Belfast, it’s not only the so called ‘Peace Walls’, but also the vast emptyness that dominate the area. An emptyness created largely in recent history but that, when you look deeper, tells the story of the origin of Belfast. During the start of the industrial haydays of Belfast it was the flow of a particular river that provided the waterpower for the Linnen mill industry. After the introduction of the Steam Engine, the river lost it’s industrial function and was hidden away in tunnels. The start of ‘the troubles’ meant the start of the social and spatial segregation of the city. The walls that physically divide the city where built along existing barriers in the city: the factories. Due to this chain of events, the current ‘Peace Wall’ follows the exact same trajectory as the hidden river. The story of a river that became a wall. Understanding the ‘interface zones’ as former river valleys, rather than as dividing lines, brings the possibility of an urban landscape framework. On the scale of the city, park structures and a new network of pedestrian and bicycle infrastructures make connections between existing parks and infrastructure, and links the city centre with the surrounding landscape. Additionally, the former rear side of the formerly divided neighborhoods, become new front sides in the form of an urban river park. Transforming a dividing structure of this size will take time. A three-phase strategy will enable the transformation of the heavily-charged area immediately. By removing the unused infrastructure, and defining the interface zone as a park, an intermediary zone is created. Designating this park as a water management area, decreases the risk of flooding caused by the covered river and changes the atmosphere of the area drastically. Eventually the park will act as a catalyst for urban development. And when the area has grown into a true neutral zone, cuts in the wall will allow the park to become a future meeting zone for both communities: a Common Ground.

Graduation date 16 12 2014

198

Commission members Berno Strootman (mentor) Lada Hršak Patrick McCabe

Additional members for the examination Bruno Doedens Roel van Gerwen


Gert-Jan Wisse

199


Landscape Architecture

Blitz

550

Belfast, Northern Ireland

the Troubles

Good Friday Agreement

a new power sharing executive is signed

1998

2007

1968 5 october the day the Troubles started 1972 30 january Bloody sunday - 21 july Bloody friday

31 may Titanic leaves the slipway

Belfast was granted Citystatus

1911

inhabitants x 1000

50

1888

100

1690

150

Rebellion/ Plantation of Ulster

200

12 july 1690 Battle of the Boyne

250

1641

300

Large scale city redevelopment scheme - replacement to suburbs

350

1950

400

1920 Government of Ireland act - Partition Ireland/Northern Ireland

450

1941 Belfast Blitz Bombing of Belfast by Nazi Germany during WWII

500

Suburb inhabitants City inhabitants

0

1500

1600

1700

1800

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

the urban history of a conflict ; social and spatial segregation, drastic decrease of residents in the city centre, dramatic damage on buildings and herritage

occupation of Belfast based on two rivers - 1500

Watermill industry - 1800

industrialisation - 1900

Belfast Blitz - 1942

the Troubles - 1968 - 1998

2014 - ?

the story of a river that became a wall

Urban segregation ; conflict frontlines have become dividing lines

200

Rivers were hidden away in tunnels

1990

2000

2010

year


Gert-Jan Wisse

Intervention on the scale of the city; understanding the interface zones as forgotten river valleys creates possible meeting and developing zones

by defining the interface zone as an intermediary zone, carving breakthroughs in the wall and designating the zone as a water management park, the possibility of mutual use draws one step closer

201


Landscape Architecture

current condition

#1 Making space by removing unused infrastructure

defining intermediary zone, chance for cross connections

new urban river valley

#2 defining Intermediary zone change in water management

#3 developing new urban river park

Spatial interventions for transforming Interface zones: Peace Wall ; new edge ; new water course ; found objects ; peripheral conditions

Status quo transformed into new public space ; Common Ground

202

Periphery condition, park structure as the catalyst for urban development


Gert-Jan Wisse

void - existing situation

edge

tunnel bridge

river course

river course flood

‘Peace Wall’ - existing situation

wall walk

river quaywall

river overflow area

river overflow area flood

tunnel- existing situation

wall coupure

tunnel new public space

tunnel path

tunnel becomes overflow during flood

toolbox spatial interventions

Former river tunnels become new public spaces

New edge marking Common Ground

203


Landscape Architecture

Yuka Yoshida Re.CLAIM

In search of the space to reconnect with the Nihonbashi River

Changing people’s perception influences complex urban issues. I believe that the same can be said of complex urban landscape challenges we are facing. Re.CLAIM is a design proposal that aims to slowly change the perception of the Nihonbashi River in order to reconnect people to the urban river in the city centre of Tokyo. Since the 1960’s, Nihonbashi River, a river with a historically significant bridge from the Edo period (1603-1868), known as the epicenter of Edo (current Tokyo) culture, has been covered by the concrete structure of a metropolitan motorway. This is the result of the tight schedule to open the motorway for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, and the attitude toward the urban river during the postwar economic boom (1950-1970’s). There have been discussions about replacing the highway with an underground tunnel, yet by focusing the discussion on the national scale issues, such as the motorway, the desire to reclaim the river has been put on hold. Today, a massive concrete motorway covers 90% of Nihonbashi River, and the entire river is bounded by the concrete floodwalls to protect the lowland from the extreme high tide. In addition, rows of buildings are facing their backs to the river limiting the visual connection from the land. Even the few open spaces have no relationship to water. It is also vertically restricted by seven subway lines which are running just a few metres below the river bottom, and the Shinkansen high speed railway lines intersect at the location of the bridge to Tokyo Station. The under-utilised spaces along the river are making it even more difficult to feel the presence of water quietly running through the city. The negative perception towards the space under the motoway, have isolated the Nihonbashi River, both emotionally and physically, from the urban life of surrounding areas. For this complex but culturally and environmentally significant river, the design proposal of Re.CLAIM finds the smallest existing elements in the limited condition to make he Nihonbashi River more visible from the surrounding areas. Without knowing the destiny of the motorway, design can improve to influence the future of the Nihonbashi River. The under-utilised spaces along the river are opportunities for improvement, and change the way people experience the world under the motorway. Seeing the necessity to strengthen the floodwalls for the expected natural disasters serves as the catalyst for the project, which aims to start the change now. Showing the spatial quality of the neglected river will gradually lead to the improvement of the perception for a better future in terms of urban life and the connection with the Nihonbashi River.

Graduation date 16 10 2014

204

Commission members Maike van Stiphout (mentor) Paul Achterberg Boris Hocks

Additional members for the examination Joost van Hezewijk Nikol Dietz


Yuka Yoshida

Palette of reclaimed floodwalls

205


Landscape Architecture

HERE

Nihonbashi River, invisible from the sky

To k

yo

urban drainage M

opolitan Area e tr urban drainage

m en t ov e lm tida

Nihonbashi River and Kanda Watershed in Tokyo Prefecture

Nihonbashi Bridge in Edo Period (1603 to 1868)

Influence from Urban area and Tokyo Bay

Nihonbashi Bridge today

What can we do now?

Existing Condition

206

The unforseeable future of the metropolitan motorway


Yuka Yoshida

Effect Cause

Dividing Floodwall

Nihonbashi River

Connecting floodwall

Urban Activities

Urban Activities + Nihonbashi River

+ Life

support wall existing wall

1 year

5 year

10 year

20 year

Influence of the intervention - Reclaimed River Over time

207


Landscape Architecture

Existing

Reclaimed

Case Study I

Existing

Reclaimed

Case Study II

Existing

Reclaimed

Case Study III

Existing

Reclaimed

Case Study IV

208


Yuka Yoshida

Case Study II

Case Study III

Case Study IV

209


Archiprix 2016 Nominations Madeleine Maaskant Director Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


The Archiprix is the annual prize for the best graduation work from the nine Dutch schools of architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture. Being nominated for the Archiprix – and winning of course – has often proven to be an important step towards a successful career as a designer. The list of nominees and prizewinners from the last 35 years demonstrates that the Archiprix has been successful in this regard. Many laureates have left a mark on the appearance of Dutch cities, made an important contribution to the visual manifestation of residential environments or played a large role in the debate about architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture. Over the last eleven years, the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture has won nine first prizes and twelve second prizes and honourable mentions. Each year, the Academy is allowed to put forward four nominees, from the 28 graduation projects, for participation in the Archiprix. This year, the jury consisted of the department heads – Jarrik Ouburg (architecture), Arjan Klok (urbanism), Maike van Stiphout (landscape architecture) – as well as visiting critic Edwin Oostmeijer (property developer) and Madeleine Maaskant (director of the Academy and chairman of the jury). In total, 27 graduation projects were entered for the competition this year: fifteen in architecture, five in urbanism and seven in landscape architecture. In the first round, twelve projects were selected on the basis of their exceptional theme, the clarity of their approach and/or the convincing power of the design. The jury usually selects ten projects, but due to the overall quality of the graduations projects this year, the jury decided to consider all twelve projects. These designs were made, in alphabetical order, by: Jacques Abelman, Eva Engele, Sylvia Hendriks, Marjan van Herpen, Hein van Lieshout, Els Van Looy, Sjors Onneweer, Milad Pallesh, Hannah Schubert, Mark Spijkerman, Gert-Jan Wisse en Yuka Yoshida. In the second round, the focus shifted to a closer examination of the relevance of the problem addressed, the level of research and consistency in terms of how this research was conducted and applied, the development of the plan at different scales and its qualities as a design statement. Another assessment criterion was if it was apparent from the process and the plan that the designer was aware how the design relates to the reality outside the confines of the Academy.

211


Architecture

The following four projects were unanimously nominated for the Archiprix 2016 (in alphabetical order): Milad Pallesh - Pairi Dæza Pairi Dæza is an excellent project that combines urbanism, landscape design and architecture. The project is convincing on all scales. Milad Pallesh incorporates his cultural background in designing a new housing typology for the very topical and urgent political issue of our ageing society, as well as the desire and need to be able to care for each other. In his project, Milad Pallesh not only touches upon these subjects, but also profoundly investigates and, above all, designs solution for them. Hannah Schubert – Second Nature Second Nature is a very intriguing, unorthodox and original project about the transformation of a building that lies in our collective memory. Through minimal interventions, she gives maximum space for nature to take over the building. A new type of park typology emerges. It is not only the project itself, but also the embracing of decline that makes this project so topical. The visualisation of the project – the visualisation in time – is very elegant. Gert-Jan Wisse - Common Ground Belfast Common Ground Belfast is ‘the story of a river that became a wall’, according to the jury a better subtitle then ‘dreaming of a no man’s land’. At a time when walls are being built throughout Europe, Gert-Jan Wisse does the opposite. Like a surgeon carefully cutting away the so-called ‘Peace Walls’ in Belfast, he reveals the river as a binding element that connects previously divided neighbourhoods. The project combines a strong political statement with poetical and convincing solutions. Yuka Yoshida - Re.CLAIM Re.CLAIM is an intelligent and beautiful solution aimed at reconnecting the inhabitants of the city of Tokyo with the Nihonbashi River. The project makes very convincing use of all disciplines: architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture. By means of small-scale interventions in the under-utilised spaces along the river, Yuka Yoshida creates a spatial impact on the scale of the river as a whole. In this way, she reconnects nature not only physically, but also mentally, with the city.

212


Audience Award Votes could be cast for the audience award once again this year. Bert Verveld, president of the Executive Board of the AHK, announced the winner: Milad Pallesh with his graduation project Pairi Dæza, an idyllic ensemble ‘where we, our children and our parents live together and can take care of each other’.

213


Milad Pallesh Pairi DĂŚza An ensemble where we, our parents and our children live with each other and can care for each other (P72)

Hannah Schubert Second Nature A slow, natural transformation as alternative to demolition (P192)

214


Gert-Jan Wisse Common Ground Belfast Dreaming of a no man’s land (P198)

Yuka Yoshida Re.CLAIM In search of the space to reconnect with the Nihonbashi River (P204)

215


Colophon Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Waterlooplein 213, 1011 PG Amsterdam, The Netherlands T +31 (0)20 531 8218, info@bwk.ahk.nl, www.academyofarchitecture.nl Advisory Board Jarrik Ouburg, Maike van Stiphout, Arjan Klok Editor-In-Chief Klaas de Jong Translation Richard Glass Photography Hielke Zevenbergen (p. 4,9) Photography models Hans Krßse Graphic Design Studio Sander Boon, Amsterdam Printing Giga Print, Almere Š 2015 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


Amsterdam Academy of Architecture

Architects, urbanists and landscape architects learn the profession at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture through an intensive combination of work and study. They work in small, partly interdisciplinary groups and are supervised by a select group of practising fellow professionals. There is a wide range of options within the programme so that students can put together their own trajectory and specialisation. With the inclusion of the course in Urbanism in 1957 and Landscape Architecture in 1972, the Academy is the only architecture school in the Netherlands to bring together the three spatial design disciplines under one roof.

projects form the backbone of the syllabus. On the basis of a specific design assignment, students develop knowledge, insight and skills. The exercises are focused on training in those skills that are essential for recognising and solving design problems, such as analytical techniques, knowledge of the repertoire, the use of materials, text analysis, and writing. Many of the exercises are linked to the design projects. The morphological studies concentrate on the making of spatial objects, with the emphasis on creative process and implementation. Students experiment with materials and media forms and gain experience in converting an idea into a creation.

Some 350 guest tutors are involved in teaching every year. Each of them is a practising designer or a specific expert in his or her particular subject. The three heads of department also have design practices of their own in addition to their work for the Academy. This structure yields an enormous dynamism and energy and ensures that the courses remain closely linked to the current state of the discipline.

During the periods between the terms there are workshops, study trips in the Netherlands and abroad, and other activities. This is also the preferred moment for international exchange projects. The Academy regularly invites foreign students for the workshops and recruits wellknown designers from the Netherlands and further afield as tutors.

The courses consist of projects, exercises and lectures. First-year and second-year students also engage in morphological studies. Students work on their own or in small groups. The design

Graduates from the Academy of Architecture are entitled to the following titles: Architect, Master of Science; Urbanist, Master of Science and Landscape Architect, Master of Science.

217


2014-2015 Graduation Projects features the work of students who earned their degree during the 2014-2015 academic year at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture. The projects by the 31 Masters of Architecture, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture are introduced by visiting critic Edwin Oostmeijer.