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Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Architecture – Urbanism – Landscape Architecture

graduation projects


Contents

128

Foreword, Aart Oxenaar

3

‘Never Waste a Good Crisis’, Floris Alkemade

5

Architecture In your own hands, Machiel Spaan

11

Thermen Westpoort: Relaxing in an Industrial Landscape, Jeroen Atteveld

14

Camp’impériale en Maroc, Wilko de Haan

20

Temporary Stay on Neeltje Jans, Wouter de Haas

24

SCHOOL+, Bruce Kee

30

Urban Choreography: Performative Fragment for La Paz City , Stephanie Lama

34

AGROkoppel: Design for a Self-Sufficient Agrarian Company, Johan Rooijackers

40

Research Centre for Nanotechnology on the High Tech Campus Eindhoven, Carlos Saldarriaga

46

Ode to the Polder, Dirk Schlebusch

50

A National Asylum and Rehabilitation Centre for Victims of Slavery, Svetlana Tsygankova

54

Breeding Ground for Scientific Research, Jochem Verbeek

58

Knowledge Fabric: New Library for the Humanities Department at UvA, Sander Versluis

62

Urbanism Working on the city – Urban Renaissance, Rogier van den Berg NL 2100, René Blom

69 72

The Hidden City, Marijke Bruinsma

76

Urban Remix, Sander Dekker

80

Beyond the Jaarbeurs, Wicher Gielstra

84

Belief in the Street, Arjan Jager

88

Dynamic Living in a Changing Landscape, Eline Keus

92

Merwede Canal Anchored in Utrecht, Monique Lankester-Zoer

96

Deventer Gateway, Jasper Pijls

100

The Industrious Islands, Frank de Volder

104

Landscape Architecture It’s up to you! , Noël van Dooren Even More Coast, Niels Hofstra

Jury report on Archiprix 2010 nominations, Aart Oxenaar

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Academy of Architecture Master of Architecture – Urbanism – Landscape Architecture

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Research – Reflections – Projects  02

21 graduation projects 2008–2009

Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Architectura & Natura


2

Foreword


3

Aart Oxenaar

Director Amsterdam Academy of Architecture

With this graduation work the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture presents the results of the first major crisis in the lives of a young generation of architects, urban designers and landscape architects. The personal fascinations of students form the basis for the graduation work at the Academy of Architecture. Students write their own programme, choose their own mentor and commission members, and guide their design work largely on their own. This means that graduating is a process in which students have to discover themselves, as professionals, through research and criticism. And that can be an unnerving experience. Discussions with the mentors and commission members can lead to the realisation that what students propose is understood very differently by others; and continuing research can make students aware that what they plan and design doesn’t represent what they originally intended. With this strongly individual graduation process, the academy aims to convince students that architecture, urbanism and landscape architecture cannot be practised without reflection, without personal choices as regards content. With each project the student chooses an independent position within the discipline for the first time. As a consequence, graduation forms a turning point, a crisis, in the lives of students. They cease being students and realise they are becoming independent designers. And that, if all goes to plan, marks the first in a series of continual changes of direction and turning points, of professional and personal crises that shape the careers of designers. To continue to produce relevant work, they will have to rediscover themselves again and again. Viewed in that perspective, the deep economic crisis in which this new generation must find its position amounts to no more than an incident. An incident of significance for the context in which young professionals will practise their occupation. But a modest event in relation to the dramatic discoveries that each student, if all has gone well, will have made with his or her graduation work and the far-reaching personal development that they undergo as the final step in mastering the discipline. It is, in the end, about the power of one’s own fascinations and the ability to make these relevant for the assignments of our time. That, with a love of the profession, is what ultimately determines the success of the work.


4

‘Never waste a good crisis’*

* US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a speech to the European Parliament on 6 March 2009.


Introduction

Floris Alkemade visiting critic

5

This year’s crop of students has been an interesting one. They started their studies in an era of excess in which something like a world-wide Dubai started to emerge in architecture: extravagance as a generally accepted standard. But when the moment arrived for these students to formulate their graduation assignments, that remarkable period of roitousness had ended abruptly. An increasingly threatening change of climate combined with a serious economic crisis finished off the last little bit of belief in purely aesthetic considerations as guiding design principles. Architects were suddenly and urgently called upon to develop totally different responsibilities and principles, and that in a context in which money was once again a problem. Time, in short, for a contemporary form of crisis architecture. Detached from every form of moralism, that offers a remarkably exciting context: everything can now be different. To survive and to lend a new legitimacy to the profession, this moment must therefore be seized on to explore new directions. Architecture and urbanism are both in need of redefinition. The urgent character of the transformation alone offers tempting opportunities for renewal — architecture inevitably reduced to its essence, void of sentimentality and superfluousness. Architecture firms, however, appear to be struggling in these rapidly changing conditions. Work is in short supply, staff are let go, offices are going bust. The tragic paradox is that commerce can offer the fewest opportunities for researching and implementing fundamental innovations at precisely the moment they are most needed. Students are not unaffected by these limitations, and perhaps for that reason alone they are traditionally the group most capable of initiating renewal. So the question therefore arises whether the graduation work of this crop of students reveals developments that draw the contours of a new reality. The evolution of a crisis can even be read in the development of the height of a skirt seam. In the same way, is it possible to imagine we can distill an impression of the future and the crisis from the graduation projects? We can look at this collection of graduation schemes from that perspective. This time not assessing them on the basis of the usual criteria but, rather, measuring the extent to which this generation of students finds ways to deploy its characteristic lack of experience as a quality with which to explore new directions. On the basis of this system of classification we can broadly distinguish three groups in the twenty-one graduation projects presented this year.


Introduction

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We can call the defining characteristic of one group ‘serving the city’. The efforts within this group are primarily aimed at a careful and craftsmanlike restoration of the traditional form of the city. Irregularities in the city are erased, and urban coherence is aspired to or even enforced. The perimeter block is the perfect basic element. Nor is there any mercy for the idealist experiments of an earlier generation. The car-free centre of Zoetermeer, for instance, is no longer viewed as a possible solution but as a problem to be solved. A problem that, notably, is solved by introducing a traffic street that does not try to distinguish itself from every other traffic street in every other city. What is striking about this group is the lack of any urge to fundamentally renew urban design or even the city. Experimentation is systematically avoided; the city evoked does not differ substantially from the nineteenth-century city. Perhaps the great attention given in these projects to the collective use of public space points to a tentative form of idealism. A second group appears to have retained an undiminished belief in the healing and guiding power of architecture and urbanism. A society that can be shaped thanks to architectural design specifically tailored to that end. One direction within this group focuses on ingenious technical solutions. Clever structures provide new answers to old questions. Even so, the question of whether the assumed rationality of the technical solutions offered has lessened the importance of the architect’s longing to play with forms remains as large as ever. Another direction within this group examines what we can most accurately term ‘social engineering’. The architect knows what is good for people and society and his architecture aims not only to provide the right setting for the desired social interaction but also, and inherently, to exclude undesirable interaction. Big, idealistic gestures are made to accommodate outcasts or introduce a sense of cosiness in neighbourhoods. No anonymity in the city but a continuous village square with neighbours forced to care. Though perhaps naive, the interesting thing about this group is that we can detect an underlying idealism in the schemes. The essential question here is whether our era now needs or can even use such a paternalistic form of architecture. Here, too, answers seem to be offered to questions that are not the subject of discussion. The third and final group is perhaps the most characteristic of our time and can be classified as ‘escapism’. These are


Introduction

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the increasingly popular leisure projects so loved in the world of developers and graduates. Aimed at entertainment and occasionally reflection, these projects literally turn their backs on a world that has become too problematic and search for an unspoilt context. The empty polder and the view of the centuriesold and unchanging sea present themselves. The trek to the sea in particular is striking. The expected rise in sea levels is apparently no reason to run in the other direction but rather, seems to arouse a Freudian flight forward. One project even looks beyond the disaster and focuses on making the most of the new situation when a large part of the Netherlands is inundated. The body of water is no problematic issue but a liberation from current limitations. At last access in the Netherlands can be organised with a rational grid. Other schemes focus without too much ceremony on the sea, which offers the pleasure of uncomplicated views. Splendidly detailed beach pavilions in the dunes or in the form of hedonist gathering places for young people on the coast of Morocco in the spirit of ClubMed. Rainwater is collected on the roof, it must be said. Hedonism with a tinge of sustainability – how poignant an image of our times. Among this group there are two projects that feature an original form of opportunism. The last project deploys a sustainable low-tech principle of timber piles to reclaim land from the sea. In the process, a dynamically extending dune landscape becomes temporarily inhabitable. The second project exploits the unexpected aesthetic qualities of a waste-burning facility and makes use of it as a backdrop for a genuinely parasitic form of body and bathing culture. The two projects probably sketch the first contours of a new and appealing form of enforced pragmatism: reinterpreting problematic conditions as an attractive breeding ground for new applications. To summarise, three tendencies are discernible in these graduation projects: serving the traditional city; romantic idealism, and escapism aimed at entertainment. Despite the fact that the projects have mostly been elaborated with care and intelligence, there emerges an image of the architecture world as a cartoon figure who continues to run as he’s momentarily suspended above a deep chasm because it hasn’t yet dawned on him that the ground beneath his feet is gone. It’s more likely we’ll be faced with much more fundamental revolutions than those that surface in these graduation projects. For architecture that’s a position of luxury, because such changes only very rarely allow themselves to be enforced on us. Time now for a new generation of students who lay claim to the world with even less respect for existing conditions and even more arrogance. Now all can change; ‘never waste a good crisis’.


9

Architecture


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In your own hands


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Machiel Spaan head of Architecture Department

The Amsterdam Academy of Architecture educates architects and the ultimate test is the graduation project in wich it isn’t just knowledge and learning that are assessed but also the originality of the designer. Fostering this originality is very deliberately anchored in the academy teaching programme. During their education students are given the freedom to choose their assignments and develop their opinions. They are continually questioned about their personal positions in relation to the discipline. That personal quest of the student demands a critical examination of design projects and the process within which those projects were created. This reflection on the design process and consideration of the wider scope as well as the essential details of the project makes the student aware of his design strengths and the possibility of adjusting them. That enables the student to define his personal position concerning the relevance of the discipline in the current social context and he can develop his signature in terms of process, craft and imagination to the full. All this demands a constant dialogue between the designer and himself, the design, and the surroundings. For the final challenge, the student defines a graduation proposal in consultation with the academy. The assignment covers a subject and the context in which this subject can acquire meaning and identity. This context consists of a number of carefully composed elements such as location, programme and social anchoring, as well as a description of the design themes that the student wants to address, and the composition of the supervision panel. The personal attitude, way of working and character of the designer is particularly evident in the design themes. An individual attitude to the assignment and the chosen themes is essential in that respect. This is sharpened further in conversations with fellow students, staff, tutors and mentor. Every graduation year reveals a huge diversity of design themes, personal motives and desires. Every assignment is a journey of discovery and a quest for social and professional relevance; a search for structure on the basis of technology and repetition; a search for logistical truths; a search for the most suitable type. The aim of the graduation project is to express a design using architectural means. Students are encouraged to develop instruments for ‘traditional’ research into context, form and


In your own handsÂ

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materials. The student himself must learn to think, question, look, research and test. Personal experience can lead to new notational research and design methods. The search for personal opinions, the translation of principles to all scales of design, and the development of a design stance are key issues. The most important role of the tutor and the academy is to provoke and stimulate this process. An architect needs a personal attitude and opinion. Every designer needs an inner urge to go his own way, irrespective of fleeting fashion. A graduation project is therefore only successful if the student has learnt to question his own design constantly and explore the limits in the process. A successful design stems from a critical attitude and an individual way of working. The graduation projects of the latest generation of architects in this section show that such an approach is of the utmost importance. It is these young designers who question the world around them and, in their projects, formulate an answer that transcends the everyday. In that, the personal signature of the designer has an expressive, a substantive, a social, and an observational role.


Architecture

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Jeroen Atteveld

Thermen Westpoort: Relaxing in an Industrial Landscape

Graduation date 11 12 2008

The Waste Energy Company (AEB) is located in the port of Amsterdam. AEB incinerates household waste. The energy created supplies 16,000 homes in Amsterdam West with warm water and all public buildings in Amsterdam with power. But the important role played by AEB in converting waste into energy is unknown to most Amsterdammers. The addition of Thermen Westpoort to the AEB enriches the port of Amsterdam with a public function and allows people to learn about the world of waste in a relaxed manner. Thermen Westpoort could be the first Dutch bathhouse powered with energy through the burning of waste. Carbon-neutral bathing a stone’s throw from Amsterdam!

Commission members Rob Hootsmans (mentor) Rien Korteknie Joost van Hezewijk Additional members for the examination Jan-Richard Kikkert MarriĂŤtte Adriaanssen Nominated for Archiprix

Linking two totally unrelated building typologies, a wasteincineration facility and a bathing house, creates unexpected possibilities and encounters that can benefit both AEB and Thermen Westpoort. Countless are the impressions as you walk through AEB: the hissing and humming of engines, the scorching heat of

the ovens, and the wonderful view of the port. By orchestrating this excess of impressions and attuning them to the different programme elements of the bathhouse, one can enhance the experience of a visit to Thermen Westpoort. The programme of the bathhouse consists of baths, treatment rooms, saunas and a restaurant. The spaces of the different programme elements are introverted in character where bathhouse visitors require calm to relax, in the treatment rooms for example. Then there are spaces where bathhouse visitors feel they are very much in the industrial environment of the waste-burning process. Thermen Westpoort is incorporated ingeniously in the AEB building and uses the energy generated, the surplus, the waste products, and the exceptional industrial surroundings. The healing effects of light, smell, sound, and texture contribute to the ultimate experience of taking a bath in Thermen Westpoort.


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Architecture

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20 meter


Jeroen Atteveld

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01 Section of AEB and Thermen Westpoort 1 Car park 2 Treatment spaces 3 Restaurant 4 Sauna 5 Special baths 6 100-metre bath 7 Roof terrace with bubble bath

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03 Exploded view 1 Car lifts 2 Car park 3 Reception space 4 Treatment spaces 5 estaurant 6 Saunas 7 100-metre bath 8 Office 04 Model of Thermen Westpoort (Model by Complex3D)

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02 Plan of Thermen Westpoort 1 Car lifts 2 Reception space 3 Waiting room for treatment spaces 4 Treatment spaces 5 100-metre bath 6 Special baths 7 Roof terrace with special baths

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Architecture

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05 Interior of relaxation space in sauna 06 Model 07 Interior of 100-metre bath 08 Exterior of 100-metre bath

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Jeroen Atteveld

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Architecture

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Wilko de Haan

Camp’impériale en Maroc

Graduation date 15 12 2008

Camp`impériale is a design for a base camp on the coast of Morocco for outdoor-sport nomads engaged in all sorts of sports, activities and expeditions. The climate and the various landscapes and cultural highlights nearby create the perfect conditions for a memorable and active sport and travel destination.

Commission members Jaco Woltjer (mentor) Peter Defesche Marijn Schenk Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Paul de Vroom

The guests, who stay in or near the camp, want to experience outdoor life, sunshine, wind, and the surrounding landscape. They want an open building that provides the shelter and services they need. The building designed for them is an open architectural structure consisting of terraces on the sloping terrain covered by one big roof plane supported by columns. Located in, under and on this roof plane are different places and conditions created for the different programme elements, each exposed to the desired external influences. The treatment of this service roof (a `pimped` imperial) and the functions it facilitates create a life, tailored to enhance experience. The architecture is modest but radical, very layered and ambiguous, rich and meaningful. North African architecture has been carefully studied. A highly contextual building has been designed through the selective introduction, development and deployment of elements that

enable the programme to work and create space and architectural appearance. The project shuns cliché North African architecture for western tourists. The project questions, investigates and deals with different characteristics of primitive building archetypes that refer to outdoor life, such as the monolithic structure (cave) and framework structure (hut/tent) through the design of a building for a particular service. Abstracting and questioning which parts of the building belong to which category, or to which particular part of the site (referring to theories of Gottfried Semper, Frank Duffy and Steward Brand), results in different ways to design and construct the building by taking away or adding material to create spaces that vary in the degree of enclosure. Geological conditions and extreme climate conditions made it possible to develop a climate and installation concept for the building that makes it a self-supporting service shed. The building depends on the elements for its functioning, just as the guests are in practicing their sports. The idea of outdoor life and oneness with nature and the elements is stimulated. The project avoids the negative consequences of tourism in terms of landscape destruction, pressure on natural resources, and scarcity of potable water.


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Architecture

22 01 Situation 02 Model 03 Roof

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Wilko de Haan 04 A Lounge B Mixed-use space C Reception D Kitchen E Sporting equipment F Workshop G Safes H Oasis I Washing area J Toilets K Bathhouse

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04 05 L Vaporisation dome M Concrete dome above ‘the pit’ N Solar cooking using mirror bowl O Barbecue: coals and gridiron P Concrete grid above garden, sports equipment storage area Q Light dome, in hammam R Starting frame; roof terrace: wash + dry S Transparent hard synthetic dome; solarium in hammam above hot stone T Surface loss for the sake of vaporisation

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Architecture

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Wouter de Haas

Temporary Stay on Neeltje Jans

Graduation date 03 03 2009

The coast of Zeeland is characterised by the salty wind on the beach, the power of the surf that hits the islands, the shelter of the dunes, and the extensive sandbanks where birds search for food. The dynamics of the region, where nothing stays the same for a minute, are the result of a constant process of ebb and flow.

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Bruno Doedens Rien Korteknie Additional members for the examination Paul de Vroom Ira Koers Nominated for Archiprix

We have protected our country with an extensive Delta Plan. The crowning achievement of the plan is the Storm Flood Barrier. There’s a downside to the construction of this barrier, however, because it has altered the tidal flow in the Oosterschelde estuary. Mud flats and banks disappear owing to sand displacement beneath the water surface, leading to the loss of essential elements of the littoral zone. This erosion of landscape was exactly what this costly plan was supposed to prevent. Human intervention is needed to preserve the Neeltje Jans manmade sandbank! Moreover, sea levels are rising and storms are gaining in frequency owing to climate change. Consequently, more dune erosion is occurring and this important nature area, which also forms a buffer for the dam on the island, is threatened. The island must be

protected against this, particularly along the North Sea coast. This is possible by reducing the direct grip of the sea on the dunes. The Delta Works have made Neeltje Jans the most popular tourist attraction of Zeeland today. In 1986 Neeltje Jans ceased being a working island, and ever since there has been scope to develop the natural environment again. The island is located in the middle of the Zeeland delta on the border between the North Sea and the Oosterschelde. The power of wind and water is what determines the different conditions on and around the island. The location offers wonderful opportunities to expand Zeeland’s recreational network with unique accommodation facilities geared to the experience of this distinctive landscape. Linking recreation to the protection, maintenance and enrichment of nature areas creates new opportunities for interesting accommodation where people can increasingly escape from everyday life. Since Neeltje Jans already contains recreational functions, this location offers a splendid chance to boost Zeeland’s recreational network with accommodation that is in harmony with the new landscape.


25 01 Overview of interventions on and around the former working island Neeltje Jans. A Horticulture with cooking place on the former graving docks. B Nomads on the sandbank. C Helophytes in the dune filter. D Beach sentries in the North Sea.

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Architecture

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02 Models

04 A The pier anchors a mussel bed on the edge of the sandbar. B The rows of stakes are place perpendicular to the predominant wind direction and catch the sand. C At high tide the grid of the nomads remains visible.

05 A 2015: new supplies are added on the southern side. B 2016: the distribution of sand influences the formation of barrier beaches. C 2017: the first growth covering on the barrier beaches.

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03 A Erosion of the sandbar as a result of sand displacement. B Influences of the elements wind and tidal current. C Nomads influence the elements.

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Wouter de Haas 06 Impression of horticulture and cooking place

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Architecture

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07 Beach sentries in the North Sea ensure the growth of new dunes.

09 A Positioning of the beach sentries on depth lines. B Positioning of the beach sentries in a fan formation. C The density of the beach sentries influences the tidal current.

10 A 2015: growth of young dunes. B 2025: possible formation of a tidal gully. C 2050: development of the dune area.

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08 A Erosion of the dunes as a result of climate change. B Influence of the elements. C Beach sentries influence the elements.

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Wouter de Haas 11 Impression of nomads

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Architecture

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Bruce Kee

SCHOOL+

Graduation date 30 10 2008

More than one and a half million children attend primary school every day in the Netherlands. There they are challenged and stimulated to learn and develop their social skills. But it’s not just the primary school that plays a role in upbringing and education; to a large degree it is the whole society that nurtures and educates our children. And for that, more is needed than just a school building.

The Indische Buurt in Amsterdam Zeeburg is not a child-friendly place. Narrow streets, lots of traffic and little public space means that there’s not much space for children to play. SCHOOL+ is the place where pupils can live out their adventures, the place that offers them support and with which they can identify. Once they are adults they will look back on SCHOOL+ as the place of their youth.

Education is subject to constant change, including new requirements put on the design of the learning environment all the time. A range of different learning environments is gradually replacing the traditional classroom. The underlying thought is that pupils are stimulated to work more independently in this way.

Instead of one central community school, SCHOOL+ is a chain of six smaller schools, each with its own structure that cuts through various building blocks. A continuous green roof connects the schools to one another. Each school has its own themed space devoted to sport or drama for example. These spaces connect the schools and the park next to which they are located, and make it a small city for children with its own facilities.

Commission members Laurens-Jan ten Kate (mentor) Jan Richard Kikkert Kamiel Klaasse Additional members for the examination Ira Koers Bart Bulter

This development prompted the design of SCHOOL+. The SCHOOL+ project consists of six schools, each with its own teaching method and accompanying spatial theme. It is a community school in which the pupil is the focus and in which social participation, collaboration and talent development are particularly targeted. What’s more, the school wants to deploy these qualities for the benefit of the neighbourhood.

The SCHOOL+THEATRE has been elaborated in detail. This school boasts a theatre as thematic space and focuses on the individual qualities of children. For this, the school is spatially designed as one continuous floor plane that features learning balconies, concentration spaces, themed stairs, lounges and more.


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Architecture

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01 Urban diagram of Indische Buurt with possible solutions. A One big central community school. B Small schools scattered around the neighbourhood with themed spaces. C Small schools in a chain. D Schools connected by a roof landscape.

02 Complete roof plan SCHOOL+

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Bruce Kee

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03 View of roof SCHOOL+THEATRE 04 Street impression SCHOOL+THEATRE 05 Model SCHOOL+THEATRE 06 Plan and section SCHOOL+THEATRE

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Architecture

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Stephanie Lama

Urban Choreography : Performative Fragment for La Paz City

Graduation date 19 01 2009

‘A culture that focuses its interest on the centre may intensify its own purity, but its outlying regions are fated to decline. Let us direct our attention to the heterogeneous elements around us, the strange, suspicious and quirky, idiosyncratic things. Let us be alert to them, and cultivate a broad magnanimity.’ Kisho Kurokawa.

Commission members Moriko Kira (mentor) Laurens Jan ten Kate Chris Scheen. Additional members for the examination Jan Richard Kikkert Klaas Kingma

Inspired by the theory of noise, the intervention focuses on activating the surrounding dynamics to generate new urban scenarios. The project is an ensemble of three urban programmes in the centre of La Paz city: dance centre, parking landscape and public space; this combination invigorates the creative sphere of the city by luring the inhabitant into a journey of movement and physical experience. Each of the programmes is read as a dance that has a specific set of movements to compose the ensemble. In an analogy with the language of choreography they perform their own trajectory as they appear in the city. The building is a consequence of these three forces imploding into the plot, crossing it, and allowing the urban block to transform in time. The human body, as the prime instrument in perceiving space, is taken as the starting point for the composition of the building and its

relation to the environment. The dramatic geographic conditions and the constantly flowing movement of the city force the inhabitant to relate to the high and low plateaus of the landscape; the rooted city and the lifted city are choreographed to coexist in symbiosis. Dance in Bolivia is the strongest expression of popular culture and represents an excellent tool to eliminate social fear. The creation of a Dance Centre for La Paz introduced through this urban event could challenge this art to achieve greater developments and offer an energy outlet for the collective. This strategic location, where the cultural, commercial and educational networks meet, was the inspiration for the research aimed at discovering inventions capable of dealing with the city’s eclectic beauty. The composition of volumes and voids connected by delicate tensions invite the visitor to be transported in various performing moments, stimulating new ways of using the streets and reshaping the architectural image of La Paz. ‘Architecture is not just some theory to think with your mind, but rather something to decide with your whole body.’ Kikutate


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Architecture

36 01 Situation 02 Urban mutations 03 ‘Noise’ 04 Intervention process

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colonial gridiron

adaptation

urban outlet


Stephanie Lama

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05 Models 06 Movement diagrams 07 Structural system

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Architecture

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07 Section 08 Sky level 09 Street level 2 10 Street level 1

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Stephanie Lama

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Architecture

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Johan Rooijackers

AGROkoppel: Design for a Self-Sufficient Agrarian Company

Graduation date 20 08 2009

Besides being one of the most densely populated countries, the Netherlands is one of the biggest players on the food market. The most significant side-effects of large-scale food production are the depletion of natural resources, the disruption of ecosystems, and the big demand on space. If we want to continue producing our own food in the future, then we must reorganise agrarian processes now. The government created a catalyst for change through the attention it has given to the preservation of landscapes of cultural and historical importance and preserving unique nature, as set down in the Belvedere policy paper and the Ecological Main Structure (EHS).

Commission members Chris Scheen (mentor) Yttje Feddes Rob Hootsmans Additional members for the examination Paul de Vroom Holger Gladys

This adds to the pressure on the countryside and the agrarian sector. It also offers an opportunity for the sector to reorganise itself and, in the process, redesign the typology of buildings related to food production and their relation to the surroundings. Changes of this nature are imminent for companies in and around the villages of Griendsveen and Helenaveen. In the redevelopment plan for the Peel the function of some 40% of the existing 3020 hectares of cultivated land will change in an effort to save what remains of valuable bogland. My project contributes to the preservation and stimulation of peat moss and compensates for the loss of economic activities using, as a generator, a mixed

business occupying a minimal area but being big enough to supply food for the villages. The growth of peat is stagnating in the area owing to an excess of nutrient-rich water. Ideal for other plants, the water is used in food production and creates a symbiosis between economics and nature. After water is used for plants in glasshouses, for irrigation of farmland and the growth of algae, the by-product – pure water – is ideal for the moss. Three main typologies — the tent, the cave and the pit — are accommodated in a rationally arranged cluster oriented in an east-west direction for optimal exposure to the sun. The result is an optimal exchange of amenities and space and the creation of specific climate conditions. These strips are connected on one side by spits to the water route and are open on the other side for optimal exchange with the landscape. The structure of the building is a gradient of tree-shaped pylons. Together these are connected to one curving roof that constitutes the ancillary space for storage and service installations and the main space for use. Altering the position of the pylon in response to the incidence of light and to the sun, and the form of the intermediary space to functional requirements, result in a forest of continuously changing conditions that can be used flexibly. Flora and fauna can live here in a freely flowing space very similar to their natural habitat.


41 01 Agricultural land-use in the Netherlands

agriculture

02 Local production 130 hectares of cultivated land to support 2350 residents of Griendtsveen and Helenaveen

agribusiness parks

cattle breeding De Peelvenen plan area

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legenda trees new nature existing nature controlled water-table algae basin grass land drinking water agriculture horticulture greenhouse horticulture fruit growing farmyard height above water level (+NAP)

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03 Ecosystem, closed energy cycle

06 Use of site; planned according to ground moisture

04 Use of land, use of water

07 Isometric of site with built strips

05 Use of site, use of water

inlet

rain gietwaterbekken kas

landschap orientatie

regenwaterbekken

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gietwaterbekken alg

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zon orientatie

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oil press

manure fermentation

water retention

sheep

farm yard

cows

storage

04

grasland

510 20' 10" north

algae

plant water

water retention

oil press farm yard storage

pigs

turbine

chickens

sheep

crops

manure fermentation cows vegetables

greenhouse

pigs

plant water

chickens

market

crops

hoofd kanalen

5 0 50' 20" east topografie kavel

topography

sun orientation

06

wegen & zandwegen

07

grasland

vegetables

greenhouse market

algenkweek

hoofd kanalen

topografie kavel


Johan Rooijackers 08 Climate optimisation, C0-C5. Cross section of farm and water basins

43

08

C4.

C3.

C2.

C1.

09

E1.

D1.

C1.

B1.

10

E4.

D4.

C4.

B4.

09 Climate optimisation, A0-G0. Long section of animal wing 10 Climate optimisation. A3-G3. Long section of hothouse-plant wing 11 Specific conditions, grazing livestock 12 Specific conditions, indoor livestock 13 Specific conditions, hothouse plants 14 Basic spatial form Translating the spatial and climatological requirements into parameters makes it possible to optimise the traditional farm building. Output is improved without limiting future alterations. The resulting forest of pylons acquires a continually changing, modulated spaciousness and light penetration. Animals live here in a freely flowing space that replicates conditions in their natural habitat.

14

11

15

16

15 Solar orientation 16 Turning away from the wind

temperature 2008 (KNMI)

12

temperature 2008 (KNMI)

17 Turning away from the sun

17

18 Turning towards the wind 19 Mutual space, linked result 20 View of water basins, building and landscape woven together

13

temperature 2008 (KNMI)

18

maximum 0C minimum 0C average 0C comfort zone 0C

19

20


Architecture

44

21 View of livestock building 22 Flexible structure

21 A3 B1 C1 D1 E1 B2-E2

Open farmyard

B4-D4 C3

Lightweight hothouse Heavyweight storage shed

C4-E4

Rainwater reservoir

B1&C1

B1

C5

C1

C0

1 2 3 4 5 6

A0

Lightweight dairy building Heavyweight pig building Lightweight sheep building Heavyweight hen building

Passage from farmyard to land Sliding doors at entrances Half-paved transition zone Loading and unloading area Farmer changing room Grazing area beside buildings

View of basins

Roof plan

1

B2

G3 G0

2

B1

3

4

C2

pylon c1.1

5 1

C1

1

22

2

6


45

Johan Rooijackers 23 View of pig building 24 Flexible structure

23 Detail pylon c1.1

Curtain wall - Frames of flax/birch composite - ETFE sheet glazing Climate skin and rook - flax/birch composite sheeting - ETFE sheet glazing Structure - Flax/birch composite frames - Flax/birch composite gutters

Knot of separate frameworks

Connecting piece

Cladding

24

silo


Architecture

46

Carlos Saldarriaga

Research Centre for Nanotechnology on the High Tech Campus Eindhoven

Graduation date 23 04 2009

Nanotecture: From Soft Nano Structures to Adaptive Soft Architecture. In many different aspects of nature we can find a logic that defines a strong aesthetic. Nanotechnology is a science based on the control of matter at the scale of atoms and molecules. This science has a huge range of applications, from specially designed materials to intelligent microchips. At the scale of nanotechnology, where 1 nanometre is equal to 1 by 10 -9 metres, we can find very interesting natural and artificial structures. And at this particular scale we can see different patterns that repeat themselves and have a logic that organises them. By repeating the same element we can create variation by defining grouping rules.

Commission members Holger Gladys (mentor) Joost Hovenier Moriko Kira Additional member for the examination Klaas Kingma Ira Koers

The architectural design that I choose is an institute for nanotechnology research. The building is based on nanotechnology research and development. It contains research facilities, study rooms, office spaces, conference rooms, laboratories, exhibition spaces, a library and common areas. The idea of creating an educational programme draws on the fast development of education in the Netherlands at the moment. In 2007 there was a competition in the High Tech Campus Eindhoven to develop a building for this specific purpose. This gave me a solid starting point for a suitable location and programme.

The structure is a combination of steel columns and concrete walls in the main circulation cores. The steel columns are set in a grid of 10 by 10 metres. The beams are spaced at a maximum distance of 8 metres from each other. The building features panels that all have the same radius. This is the logic of nanotechnology applied to the architectural concept. This means I can offer new kinds of very specific spaces that have a strong logic. The facade panels are made of a light material (nanogel aerocel) that is transparent and acts as insulation if treated as an air chamber.


47


Architecture

48

01 Facade 02 Section 03 Level 2 04 Level 0

01

02

03

04


Carlos Saldarriaga

49

05 Model 06 Interior 07 Overview campus

05

06

07


Architecture

50

Dirk Schlebusch

Ode to the Polder

Graduation date 16 02 2009

Close to Amsterdam is Rondehoep, a polder created ten centuries ago and the start of a long tradition. The rare radial pattern of parcels, the meandering dike around it and the magnificently empty centre have altered little over time. The polder is of great cultural and historical value.

Commission members Rob Hootsmans (mentor) Bruno Doedens Herman Zeinstra Machiel Spaan Additional members for the examination Anne Holtrop Rick van Dolderen

But the surrounding countryside and social context have changed greatly. The countryside has become urbanised and the empty polder is ideal for water retention, an important natural area and a favourite area among holidaymakers. This fascination for the man and his drawbridge resulted in a series of small interventions that anchor the rationale for this very Dutch emptiness in society again. In the event of a calamity, four inlets channel water into the polder. The earthen beam through the dike and the glass cylinder in the grassland arouse a sense of wonder. The visitor can play with the culvert, follow the course of the water, and also drain the water work. The descent into the polder is the start of pathway to the other side.

Two posts are landed in the polder. The three arms make unreal shelters without wind, sun or rain. Rainwater and groundwater are in direct contact with each other in the shifted centre. The polder disappears. Shelter is found in vulnerability. The post sinks slowly into the peat until inundation causes it to float and to start drifting in the wind. There is a museum in the heart of Ouderkerk aan de Amstel, on the spot where the polder has disappeared owing to village expansions. One descends through a glass cylinder on the empty site. The centre has no scale, the edges are vague, the sky is infinite. In the dark depths the five works on display recall the sense of the polder. Intensely bright intervals in blue and green, misty frost to a burning horizon; what you can see here was always like this, something unique in this man-made land.


51

Ouderkerk aan de Amstel museum

inlet on Abcoude

scenic path inlet on Nes

post noord

inlet on Duivendrecht

post zuid inlet on south

scenic path


Architecture inlet

post

museum

52


Dirk Schlebusch

53


Architecture

54

Svetlana Tsygankova

A National Asylum and Rehabilitation Centre for Victims of Slavery

Graduation date 11 12 2008

The artificial, ecologically responsible island, located in the IJmeer, is designed as a rehabilitation centre for victims of slavery. Because of the favourable location in the future recreational section of the IJmeer, the institution and the use of the island can vary as needs require. Among the amenities provided are healthcare and education, but it is also possible to accommodate other ancillary services on the island. The typological concept of ‘the island’ is particularly suitable for the ambivalent requirements of the programme because of which both safety and openness are important factors.

Commission members Arnd Brüninghaus (mentor) Chris Scheen Tijmen Ploeg Additional members for the examination Rik van Dolderen Bart Bulter

The personal development of the rehabilitating patient is the key to the design of the living area of the centre. That is why the living unit ‘grows’ as the resident ‘grows’. It is assumed that all patients eventually recover and that their stay is therefore temporary. The visitor section of the centre is combined with the harbour (a refuge for ships during storm), which could result in a direct confrontation with the issue of slave trade. Various specialists who help victims or contribute to dealing with the problem of slave trade work in the centre.

The waterfront, positioned as a border between water and the island, forms the architectural link between ‘outsiders’ (society) and ‘insiders’ (victims). This waterfront offers the living area visual protection and, at the same time accommodates, various support services. The architectural representations of the three above-mentioned sections of the island contrasts with one another and each has its own atmosphere and tactility. The transparent, soft and natural looking living section creates a calm and humane environment. The sober and aloof visitor section and the harbour waiting room make people aware of the slave trade issue and even make it palpable. The architectural ‘conflict’ between the two sections of the island is intended as a criticism of the distance and attitude of exclusion adopted by society towards victims of the slave trade. The use of materials was inspired by the natural salt marshes that surround the island and is limited to timber and fair-faced concrete.


55


Architecture 01 Section 02 Night view 03 Island

01

02

03

56


Svetlana Tsygankova

57

04 Living unit 05 Entrance tower (public) 006 Entrance tower (victims)

04

06

05


Architecture

58

Jochem Verbeek

Breeding Ground for Scientific Research

Graduation date 31 03 2009

The building is a place where a group of researchers stays for a few years – living, working, meeting, sharing and discovering. The background to this scheme for a scientific breeding ground is the government plan to improve the position of the Netherlands as a country with a high level of expertise. To achieve this, the government wants to promote excellence and stimulate students to undertake doctoral research, thereby increasing the height of the knowledge pyramid and, hence, widening its base. The project for a hotbed of scientific research is aimed at supporting and shaping this development.

Commission members Tijmen Ploeg (mentor) Gianni Cito John Bosch Additional members for the examination Madeleine Maaskant Marc a Campo External engineering advisor: Moshé Zwarts

The chosen location is the area around the former Shell canteen, opposite Amsterdam Central Station on the north bank of the IJ. This location marks the end of a green zone that extends from the Ringweg to the IJ and forms the starting point of a planned boulevard. This location was chosen because Amsterdam boasts the greatest number of university students and the biggest public transport intersections in the Netherlands. The location itself is a stone’s throw from Shell’s New Technology Center, one of the biggest research centres in the Netherlands. The programme is primarily divided into two parts: a private part and a public part. In the private part is the core of the building: the living spaces and the workspaces for the researchers. The public section connects the private area with the outside world by means

of a congress area with exhibition facilities and a centre of expertise with workspaces for students and visitors. In the private area the researchers are grouped in what you could call a ‘critical mass’. Their space is arranged in such a way that only the most essential spaces are strictly private and all other functions are shared with the other researchers. This private world is divided into clusters that are more or less generic, but each cluster does contain one specifically unique function used by inhabitants of different clusters. The public section contains an exhibition area, a library, study spaces and a congress area, functions that bring the researchers and their work into contact with the outside world. The building consists of one closed volume folded upwards to create a space between the layers of the block. Contained inside this volume is the private programme; the remaining space in the volume contains the public programme. A direct visual relation is established between public and private by positioning them directly opposite each other and opening up the inner side of the volume. As a result, researchers and their work are part of the exhibition, as it were. From the IJ side the building is designed as an extension of the boulevard and from the park side as a pavilion. The building has a strong character of its own that is in harmony with the surroundings and offers a counterpoint to the icons along the banks of the IJ.


59


Architecture

60

keuken

wc pr

pr

wc

01

02

entree parkeergarage

03

0000+P

lift platform techniek

opslag kantoren

werkplaats kantoor sta

opslag expositie

0000+P

entree kantoor

audi

tori

um

keuken

techniek

0000+P

opslag auditorium

bar

C

C

wc staff

wc k ie

publ receptie

garderobe

ee entr rest /

0000+P

1000+P 1000+P

fie

st tsen

allin

iv g pr

cafe

ĂŠ

entr ee priv ĂŠ

entree publiek

01 2 0000+P

04

A

B

5

10

20m.


61 01 Situation 02 Level 4 03 Level 1 04 Level 0 05 Facade detail 06 Section 07 Interior

05

relax dome

living

experiment agro

library

living

workspace

workspace

experiment space

exhibition space

living

cafĂŠ

library

workspace

workspace

living

exhibition space

assembly hall installations

06

07

living

parking garage


Architecture

62

Sander Versluis

Knowledge Fabric: New Library for the Humanities Department at the University of Amsterdam

Graduation date 11 05 2009

Library Fabric The Binnen-Gasthuis was once a convent, hospital and orchard in a secluded part of historic Amsterdam. Today it forms the heart of the University of Amsterdam. A heart without a library. Characteristic of the area bordered by Nieuwe Doelenstraat, Oude Turfmarkt, Grimburgwal and Slijkstraat is a perimeter block enclosing a number of freestanding buildings that define a mixture of public, private and semi-private courtyards. Located in the most central of these spaces is the Crea Building, the former surgical clinic.

Commission members Jo Barnett (mentor) Arnd BrĂźninghaus DaniĂŤl Casas Valle Additional members for the examination Paul de Vroom Anne Holtrop

Proposal The building has a logical structure, and alterations were made to accommodate the new library spaces. Consequently, some parts of the existing building are hidden, some are exposed, and some are demolished to form the new complex. The result is a new combination of old and new, of past, present and future, in terms of both architecture and the library programme. It would be a shame to demolish a historic building with so much potential for redevelopment. All cities adapt and adjust as time passes and must be flexible when it comes to reusing existing buildings. Old and New The addition of a new layer to the Crea-building improves the relation

with the ground and, hence, to the surrounding public space. The new facade acts as a filter between inside and outside and influences interaction between the two. Each of the functions added (such as a private study space and the archive of the history department for example) has a different degree of openness, interaction and privacy according to needs. Outside Space The addition of a library to the humanities department on this site enhances the historic courtyard structure and alters the focus and orientation of the BinnenGasthuis. The proposal combines the surrounding buildings and their existing public spaces with a new square. The new square created by the library becomes one more in this series of existing public spaces. All squares have a different atmosphere, ranging from public to private and from green garden to a more solid urban plaza. These interconnected public spaces define the university location in the city and constitute the identity of the historic University of Amsterdam. The changing atmospheres and connections between the different squares introduce visitors gradually to the heart of the university, its library.


63


Architecture

64 01 Situation 02 Exploded view extension 03 Interiour 04 Section 05 Facade build up 06 Exterior and square

01

02

EXISTING BUILDING

ADDITION OF NEW FACADE LAYER

STUDY VOID


Sander Versluis

65

Facade gradients

03

04

CIRCULATION

10%

30%

50%

80%

90%

VOID / no function

VOID / no function

CIRCULATION

STUDY A

BOOKS

06

ZONE4 BOOKS

STUDY A

ZONE 5

05

80%

ZONE 4

EAST

ZONE 3

VOID / no function

OUTSIDE PUBLIC

SOUTH & WEST FACADE

ZONE 2

ZONE 1

NORTH & EAST FACADE

BOOKS

ZONE5 BOOKS

STUDY B INSIDE PRIVATE

ZONE4 STUDY

80%

WEST


67

Urbanism


68

Working on the city – Urban Renaissance


69

Rogier van den Berg head of Urbanism Department

The city is back again, that’s for sure. Many of the urbanism projects by 2008-2009 graduates are set in existing urban contexts. Former industrial areas, factory complexes, docklands and a trade-fair grounds are tackled. The projects by Sander Dekker, Frank de Volder, Monique Lankester-Zoer, Marijke Bruinsma and Wicher Gielstra all aim at enhancing the quality of city centres. The locations they deal with are the blighted parts of the cities. With wellconsidered interventions, they lend new identity to the city with their schemes or search for ways to strengthen existing qualities. The assignments not only address spatial structures but also adopt a clear position when it comes to urban programming. Wicher Gielstra recognises that only the congress area of the trade-fair complex in Utrecht possesses real potential so close to the city centre, and that this can be combined with other functions. Frank de Volder looks for a new living-working structure in the Eastern Inlands in Amsterdam, where there is space for small-scale commercial activity linked to water in the centre. Urban Remix by Sander Dekker introduces a strategy to slowly transform the Cartesius triangle in Utrecht from an extensive, abandoned area into an intensively mixed part of the city. Graduation is the ultimate test of a student’s skills. What is striking is that the complexity of the assignments isn’t shunned. They deal directly with the city, they are very feasible, and they should offer inspiration to those responsible for commissioning new developments in the Netherlands. The Deventer entrance by Jasper Pijls shows how a city-centre transformation can provide space for developments over the coming twenty years without extending the city further into the countryside. With this project Deventer acquires a new and lively centre linked to its historical centre, a new city entrance, and possibilities to accommodate commercial developments in a good manner. Arjan Jager works with the town centre of Zoetermeer and tries to connect the separated worlds of the automobile and the pedestrian to each other again, thus breathing new life into the ‘outdated’ concept for the centre of an overspill town. All these projects offer perspectives for a topical social question: can we create areas of quality within the existing urban area?


Working on the city – Urban Renaissance

70

In addition to working with the existing city, there is a search for new forms of urbanity. These link landscape conditions to new forms of living. For example, Eline Keus introduces a dynamic living landscape that moves in unison with the growing coastal defence line extending from the Hook of Holland to The Hague. And René Blom develops a future vision for the Netherlands that is half submerged under water. The search for a new identity in the city surfaces again in the scheme by Marijke Bruinsma, who proposes a Camille Sittelike urban design for the Oosterdok area in Amsterdam. A city in which to wander and discover. A powerful gesture that generates discussion immediately. The standard response to her project is: ‘Wow, but that will never work…’ That is the power of graduation work. It offers new insight into the city’s potential. Hopefully the renewed interest in the discipline of urbanism can help familiarise those who commission developments with such powerful interventions. The sky is the limit...


Urbanism

72

RenĂŠ Blom

NL 2100

Graduation date 17 06 2009

There’s a lot of talk about climate change and the resulting rise in sea levels and problems with rainwater. The effects of this rise will be even more dramatic owing to the sinking of the ground levels in the western part of the Netherlands. In my graduation project I considered the spatial consequences of climate change according to the most extreme predictions of the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI). I projected the effects in the year 2100. In less than a century we will be dealing with a different climate and a different social and economic reality. That reality will make different demands on the Dutch landscape.

Commission members Burton Hamfelt (mentor) Arjan Klok Joost van den Hoek Additional members for the examination Rogier van den Berg Ingeborg Thoral

These new conditions will change the appearance of the Netherlands. This makes the aim of preserving the current design of the Netherlands an unnecessary battle. It is more relevant to design the new shape of the Netherlands. And that is a different conclusion to the verdict of the Veerman Committee, in which preserving the current situation of all costs, regardless the upcomming changes, is the key issue. The design as reflected in the new map of the Netherlands in the year 2100 will strengthen the position of our country. NL 2100 proposes a new Netherlands: bring the water inside and ensure that the Netherlands becomes an attractive and distinctive water-rich base with a strong economic landscape, extensive leisure amenities, unique ecological opportunities, and exceptional residential environments.


73

Living

Solar Energy Park

Employment

Aqua Farming

Leisure Windmill Park

Brackish Water Nature

Infrastructure


Urbanism

74

2010

2040

2070

2100


René Blom

75

01 Conditions 5_Brackish nature - eco-tourism - super-eco living - aqua-farming

02 Assignments

7_Wetlands & super mounds

- on border between wet and dry

6_Super-agrarian - 350 hectare plots - super efficient

2_Sustainable energy + meat industry

4_Strategic freshwatersupply

+ recreation & living

1_Economic motor

- port + airport - cultural & service sector - tourism & recreation - energy - living

5_Brackish nature - eco-tourism - super-eco living - aqua-farming

02

Warmer mediterranean lifestyle Dutch richer, older and more leisure time stimulate tourism and leisure Rise in population demand for space (super urban and super suburban) More energy conscious and more independent facilitate production of clean energy (€) (€)

(€)

(€) VNG+ VNG+ (€) VNG+ (€) (€) VNG+ (€) VNG+ (€)

More conscious of food and more Independent more efficient primary food supply Drop in number of farmers transformation and increase in scale Resistant to flooding transformation of west Netherlands into a water landscape Enlarge fresh-water reservoir transformation and demand for space

(€) VNG+ (€) VNG+

New economic landscape demand for space

VNG+

Mobility problem demand for space

VNG+ VNG+ VNG+

01

Administrative redivision decisiveness

3_Rural suburbia

- Wooded - wide rivers & lakes - high-tech industry


Urbanism

76

Marijke Bruinsma

The Hidden City

Graduation date 29 06 2009

The fascination lies in the hidden place: what’s behind the wall?

Commission members Ron van Genderen (mentor) Hans van der Made Mark Eker Additional members for the examination Rein Geurtsen Katrien Prak Nominated for Archiprix

The new urban developments in the Oosterdok area of Amsterdam have changed it from a peripheral area into a very centrally located public space. As a result, Oosterdok now occupies a totally different position in the city, and will only become busier in the future. The paradox lies in the hidden navy dockyard as a spatial and programmatic ‘black hole’ in the Oosterdok. This is a problem for the Oosterdok as a public space, but at the same time this is also its strength. If the Oosterdok succeeds in deploying the secrecy as a positive quality, the potential of a new public space in the city can be realised and, consequently, it can form a unique addition to the city. For this reason the hidden quality of the navy dockyard is made public. After extensive research it was concluded that a public hidden place is a sequence of spaces each offering a different experience. The connections between the spaces are key to increasing the tension. What is remarkable about this project is that the design was made by designing the experience of the ‘spaces’ as moulds. Connecting the spaces results in structures that create possibilities for different routes. The building is a result of this, the negative mould so to speak.

The plan consists of a number of layers that reveal the richness of the plan. The five types of spaces each have their own atmosphere, programme and use, from central square to secret spaces. The secret spaces are the most hidden spaces. Moreover, these are also the spaces that always have a (spatial) link with the context. In addition, the plan is of great importance for the Oosterdok as a city structure. The silhouette is the translation of the image of the ‘city behind the wall’. The DNA of the hidden city makes the connection and increases the uniqueness. The addition of height accents at strategic and crucial spots creates a play of (in)visibility and attraction, from both inside and outside. The navy dockyard thus becomes hidden and public!


77


Urbanism

78

01

02

5

3

5

1 2

4

2 4 1

2

3 4 5

03

04

2 2

1

04 achterkamer

5

poort

te ontdekken

05 geheime ruimte

05 complete space special quality as surprise!

gang

moet je vinden onoverzichtelijke besloten vanuit de centrale ruimte; route naar geheime ruimte ruimte

archway to discover

03 centrale ruimte

pleinruimte, schijnbaar hoogtepunt van de ‘route’

04 backroom complex private space; route to secret space

passage

centrale ruimte is niet direct zichtbaar

passageway you must find it from the central space

02 voorruimte

onoverzichtelijke ruimte die ook de route is naar de centrale ruimte

03 central space space of square, ostensibly the highlight of the ‘route’

steeg

glimp zichtbaar van de volgende ruimte

mall central space is not immediately visible

01 entree

ontdekking bij orienteren; je kunt verschillende toevallig passeren richtingen op

02 forecourt complex space that is also the route to the central space

2

01 entrance orientation; you can go in different directions

archway chance discovery as you pass

poort

4 1

alley glimpse of the next space visible

concept

bijzondere kwaliteit als verrassing!


Marijke Bruinsma

79

01 The hidden place 02 Busy public space 03 Concept 04 Possible structure 05 Plan 06 Central space 07 Night silhouette

05

06

07


Urbanism

80

Sander Dekker

Urban Remix

Graduation date 30 03 2009

Located between the rail tracks from Utrecht to Amsterdam, Utrecht to The Hague and the Amsterdam-Rijn Canal is the desolate Cartesiusdriehoek. This business area is a blind spot in the city, both literally and figuratively. It is extensively used but you don’t go there unless you have to. The development of Leidse Rijn means that the area is now located in the middle of the city.

Commission members Luc Vrolijks (mentor) Kees Bentvelsen Berno Strootman Additional members for the examination Rogier van den Berg Ingeborg Thoral

The changed context offers the city of Utrecht a unique opportunity to build in high densities, mix residential and employment areas and make the public space the domain of pedestrians and cyclists once again. Designating the Cartesiusdriehoek as a citycentre transformation area will strengthen the position of Utrecht as an enterprising and creative city. In addition, it can contribute to the city’s aim to boost sustainability. A mixed urban programme of at least 5000 dwellings and 500,000 square metres of non-residential space forms the starting point of the transformation. A clear and

flexible framework for the design of pubic space is essential to accommodate this programme within the plan area. Three strategies are deployed to achieve this: - Strengthening the edges: introducing the canal boulevard and constructing fronts along the tracks. - Focusing on the ‘long lines’: a public space network that stresses the quality of space, that ensures access to the plan area, and that is well connected to the urban context. - Strengthening the four worlds: four areas, each with its own functional mixture, density and process of transformation. Strengthening the existing spatial qualities and adding new ones create good living and working conditions. The introduction of the canal boulevard means housing can line the water. The current structure of plots in the Tractieweg area is big enough for both employment areas and internal housing quality.


81


Urbanism

82

01 Development of the city 02 Potentials 30 minutes from Schiphol Strategic location between two city centres On the sunny sides of the ARK 03 Interventions Strengthening edges Emphasis on long lines Strengthening of four worlds 04 Plan

1900 01

02

03

1940

1960

1980

2000

2015


Sander Dekker

04

83


Urbanism

84

Wicher Gielstra

Beyond the Jaarbeurs

Graduation date 08 07 2009

The Jaarbeurs complex consists of three halls with a total surface area of 120,000 square metres. The halls constitute just a limited part of the total footprint of the Jaarbeurs. In addition to the tradefair halls and congress spaces, a large part of the site is devoted to parking. The ratio of built to unbuilt is about 1:3. In the past this was the perfect site for the Jaarbeurs: close to the station, close to the motorways, and on the edge of the city in an area dominated by commercial development.

Moving the Jaarbeurs offers the chance to create a new 50-hectare city-centre area. The plan for this 50 hectares forms an addition to the city centre and, moreover, a new centre for Utrecht West. A balanced relation between living, working and leisure forms the basis here. The plan must also facilitate a living environment where residents can spend their entire ‘housing careers’, from the cradle to the grave. This means that the plan must contain a variety of housing typologies.

Since then the city has expanded and the Jaarbeurs is no longer a peripheral location. The site occupies an increasingly central position within the urban network. In the past it was easy to reach the Jaarbeurs by car, but that is increasingly difficult owing to the growth of the city. If one considers the use of space and amount of space occupied in relation to its function and location, then it’s clear that the Jaarbeurs is no longer in the right place.

The plan consists of strips with building blocks on them, inspired by the structure of Utrecht city centre. The structure of the city centre makes a multitude of housing typologies possible. The building blocks consist of a ‘hard’ outer side with urban amenities and urban housing. The informal courtyards are intended for residential use and related amenities.

Commission members Rients Dijkstra (mentor) Martin Aarts Jeroen van Kesteren Additional members for the examination Henk Bouwman Ingeborg Thoral


85


N W O

ERKE RKEN RKEN RKEN RKEN NEN EN N N W WONEWONE WONEWONEWONEWO WONE NEN EN N N W N WERN WERK N WERK WO WONE WERK ONEN ON ER RKEN KEN EN EN EN N WONE WONN WONE W WONE WO WONEWONE O NEN NE NEN EN N N WERN N WER WONE WERK WONE WONEN NE NEN KE EN NEN E N WONE WO ONEW E

Urbanism

86

ER KEN WER W KEN

WE N WE N WE KE RKEN RKEN N ER WERK WERK KE EN

WERN W WE EN KE N N WER WER WER WER WER WE ERK ERK ER R KEN KEN KEN KEN KEN EN EN WE WER WER WER WER W K

N HOR ONEWER E ECA N KEN HORN WON WER HOR WO NEN RKE ECA EN KEN EC N WER HOR WON WER HO RECWONEN KEN ECA E A WO WER HOR W NEN KE WE

EN

N

N

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CA WER ONE

30m 7/1 0

30m 7/1 0

22m 5/7

*70

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25m 6/8

25m 6/8

22m 5/7

W NE ONE N W W ON O E

NW

EN NEN WO WIN WO WIN WO INK WONEWIN WO W NE KEL NE KEL N ELS N KEL ON NE N 19mS N N WIN EN EN WO WIN S W WO WIN S WO WIN WO WO KEL NE KEL NE4/6KEL NE KEL NE NE ES NE NW S NW SW NW EN EN N EN EN W N WO NWWO W WO W N ON NE N ON NE ON NE EN N WON W N E WO WO WO ON NE NE NE N N WOEN EN N NW WO ON WO W ON NE N ON NEN NE NE N WOEN EN W N WON WO ON ON N NE NE EN NE O NW N EN EN N WO WO WO W NE NE NEN NE NE EN N WON W NW WO WO NEN 13mON ON N EN NEN N NE EN N WO 3/4EN NW WO WO WO ON N NE ON ON NEN EN NW NW E EN N WO WO W ON WON WO ON NE ONE NE E EN NEN EN EN NW EN WO WO N ON O WO WO NE N ON EN N EN NE EN EN NW WO W WO WO NE NE N N N WO WO ON N N NE ONE N N WO N W WO N WO ON NE EN NE N EN N N EN N NW WO O ONEWO ON ON WONE EN EN NW EN WO WO WO NE NE ON ON N EN E NE EN EN WONWO WO W NE N O ON NE NEN NW N WOEN KEN KE ERK E RK W ON N NE N WOENE E O ON WO ON ON ON WO WO ON WO ON ON ON WO ON ON WO NE N NE NEN NE ON WO E EN E N EN EN N E N EN E EN N N E EN EN NE E EN EN NEN NE N WE WE N WE N WE WE W WE WE WE W WE WE N WE WE WE WE 22m RKEN RK RK RK RKEN RKE RK R KE RK RKEN RK RK RKEN RKEN RK EN EN EN EN 5/7EN RKEN KEN N EN EN EN WO WO N WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO WO NEN NE ON NE NEN ON NE NE ON NE NE NEN NE EN N NE ONE NEN NEN NEN NE N E N E E N N N

9m 2/3

NE

16m 3/5

16m 3/5

9m 2/3

22m 5/7

N WO ON NE NE EN EN N N WONWO N EN EN WO W ONE NE N N WON WO NE EN N NW W

10m 2/3

10m 2/3

13m 3/4

9m 2/3

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WO WO N EN NEN WO WO W NE NE EN N W N WO WO O N NEN NE N W WO WO NE NE ON N EN N WO ON WONE EN N N WO W WO NE N E EN N WO WO W NE NE N WO N N WO ON NE EN N WO WON22m NE 5/7 EN N N WO W WO ON NE NE EN EN N WO ON WONE W EN NE N N WO N EN EN W WO WE WE WE WE NE NE N RK RK RK RKEN EN N N KEN EN EN EN W WO W WO WO WO WO WO WO NE NE NE EN NE NE EN NE EN N WO N W EN NE EN N WEN WE N WE WERN WE WO W W N WE RKE RK RK R NE NEN RK RKEN RK KEN N WO EN N WOEN EN E W N WO WO WO WO WO ON NE ON NE NE NE NEN NE N EN N EN N W N WE N WE 25m N WE WE WO W W WO ERK N RK 6/8 RK RK RKEN NE N EN EN EN NE WO N WO W WO WO WO NE EN NE NE N N WO WO NE E 10m 2/3

16m 3/5

9m 2/3

6.75m 2m 4m

2m 3.5m

16m 52.5m

3.5m 2m 4m 2m 6.75m

6.75m 2m 4m

2m 3.5m

16m 52.5m

3.5m 2m 4m 2m 6.75m

4m

4.5m

5m 21m

2m

5.5m

32.5m 32.5 m 77.5 m

13m

2m 4m 24 m

5m

4m

4.5m

5m 21m

2m

5.5m

32.5m 32.5 m 77.5 m

13m

2m 4m 24 m

5m

03

4m

04

4.5m

5m 21m

2m

5.5m

32.5m 32.5 m 77.5 m

13m

2m 4m 24 m

5m

0.5m 7,5m

0.5m 2m 3,5m

17m 45m

3,5m 2m

7,5m

7m

4m

7m

7m

7m

4m

4m

85m 120m

95m

4m

7m


Wicher Gielstra

87

01 Routing during daytime: shopping and living 02 Routing during the evening: entertainment 03 Plan

Vrijstaande villa’s 04 : Vrijstaande villa’s Section between Canal Island and Central Vrijstaande villa’s n: Appartementen Station / urban villa’s n: Appartementen / urban villa’s n: Hofjes Appartementen / urban villa’s 05 HofjesThree possible infills for the courts Hofjes freestanding houses urban villas courtyards

06 Impression of courtyards

05

06


Urbanism

88

Arjan Jager

Belief in the Street

Graduation date 31 03 2009

‘Belief in the Street’ is a plan in which traditional streets and cars acquire a prominent and logical place in the city. Dutch cities want to banish the car further and further from the centre, but streets with cars are not only of value for the city but also constitute a stimulus for new developments. The new car streets in this plan are the most important intervention geared to redeveloping the now dilapidated city centre of Zoetermeer as a dynamic and lively area. High time that we can once again drive through a Dutch city!

Commission members Luc Vrolijks (mentor) Henk Hartzema Bart Stoffels Additional members for the examination Arjan Klok DaniĂŤl Casas Valle

Clever use of existing roads means that three new connections can link the city centre directly with the regional roads. This new street, Zoetermeer Avenue, makes the centre accessible in a wonderful manner, yet it also breaks open the closed, introverted structure of the city centre. Next to the existing car-free central area we suddenly encounter a lively shopping street that one can drive through. A new dynamism, in harmony with the

city, is added to the city centre in the form of this street. The second intervention is the city square, located in the city centre where car street, pedestrian promenade and Randstad Rail station meet. The Zoetermeer Avenue and the city square make use of the existing urban structure and form a powerful framework in which to develop living environments. As a result, the area acquires the mass needed for a well-functioning and lively centre. The addition of the car distinguishes the centre from other centres within the southern wing of the Randstad. No other city has a centre so easily and spectacularly accessible. In addition, the city acquires a recognisable and attractive face at last and it acquires an urban structure that can easily be extended. With the addition of streets conductive to driving, Zoetermeer shows that cars are accorded a prominent position in the city centre and that it has great faith in the street!


89


Urbanism

90

80

5

80

50

5

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

z 8 2

6

2 4

09

0

10

5

10

15

20

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Arjan Jager

91

01 The street as missing link between the regional road and pedestrian shopping area.

05 City square breaks open the centre.

02 Strategy: from ‘dead ends’ to a powerful framework. 03 Existing program. 04 Existing and new streets.

06 Three transport systems serve the square: the car, the pedestrian, and the Randstad Rail. 07 Doubling the number of houses is the key to more diversity in the centre. 08 Relocating the city square and city hall to the centre.

11

09 The Zoetermeerlaan has a continuous profile of 20 metres. 10 Profile of Europalaan up to Grote Dobbe with the Zoetermeerlaan as added link and the city square as connecting element. 11 Plan


Urbanism

92

Eline Keus

Dynamic Living in a Changing Landscape

Graduation date 03 03 2009

For me the dunes are a fascinating landscape. They protect against water inudations, and they offer a place for recreation and nature. The most fascinating thing about this landscape is that it’s always changing. The tops of the dunes can differ some metres in height each year. The tops move, they grow and shrink. They are alive, you could say.

Commission members Hans van der Made (mentor) Ron van Genderen Wijnand Bouw Stijn Koole Additional members for the examination Arjan Klok Rogier van de Berg Nominated for Archiprix

The Zandmotor Plan along the coast of Hook of Holland ensures that sand is once again brought to the foreshore so that the coast can grow in a natural way. I have taken this growth to create a living environment that is inextricably connected to the dune landscape. The result is a system of stakes that catch sand, create landscape and facilitate housing. The stakes are positioned in the most dynamic part of the dunes. As soon as the beach is high enough and parts of it are permanently dry, the stakes are placed on this dried section of the

beach. The sand remains between the stakes and forms a dune. Houses are placed on the stakes. The dune grows and rises above the stakes. The stakes and the dwellings threatened by the sand are taken out of the system and put back at the front of the stake machine. This means that houses are relocated every five years. Owing to the dynamics of the dunes it is impossible to plan the area in a set manner. This is where the true pioneers live. People who create their own place of living, and are prepared to change location often in response to the growth of the dunes. Each time they will innovate in the design of their home on the basis of the acquired knowledge about living in this landscape. In this new living structure you are inextricably linked to the surroundings; living and leisure flow smoothly into each other.


93


Urbanism

94

P P

P

P

P P

P

phase 0:0 (now)

P

P

phase 1:5 years

P

P P

P

P

P

P P P P

P P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P P

P

P

P

P

P

P P phase 3:40 years

phase 2:20 years P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P P

P

P

P

P P

P P

P

P

P P

P P

P P

P P

P

P

P phase 4:60 years

P phase 5: 70 years

P

P P

P P

P


Eline Keus

95

01 Housing density in winter. 02 Housing density in summer.

01

02


Urbanism

96

Monique LankesterZoer

Merwede Canal Anchored in Utrecht

Graduation date 16 12 2008

The Merwede Canal marked the western urban edge of Utrecht for a long time. The zone along the canal developed into an extensive and not very prosperous area of company buildings. With the construction of the Kanaleneiland and Transwijk neighbourhoods in the 1950s and ’60s the area became a more central location in the city. However, there has been no structural upgrading of the area, and it is now a peripheral zone right in the middle of the city. The zone is not directly connected to its immediate surroundings, and it forms a barrier in the city because of the absence of local lateral connections. The result is that Kanaleneiland is isolated from the city centre and the bordering Transwijk Park and the Merwede Canal are not easily accessible and are not used.

Commission members Roy Bijhouwer (mentor) Anna Vos Jeroen Geurst Additional members for the examination Pieter Jannink Rogier van den Berg

The ambition is to transform the industrial estate into an area that is part of the city both spatially and programmatically, and to exploit the potential and qualities of the Merwede Canal and the Transwijk Park. The extensive industrial estate is transformed into an urban and attractive residential area that forms a natural part of the surrounding urban fabric.

In view of the existing property rights, a phased implementation is possible. New small-scale routes connect the plan area, the Merwede Canal and the Transwijk Park to the surroundings. As an addition to the series of public spaces along the canal, the project adds an attractive space to the plan area (an urban water square) which works on the scale of both the neighbourhood and the city. The urban plan is marked by closed perimeter blocks set next to different types of public spaces (canal, park, residential street and green inner area). A notable aspect of the plan is the introduction of traffic-free green spaces. The green spaces bring the atmosphere of the canal and the park inside. Half-sunken and roofed parking garages are located on the inner courtyards. The public space in the area is raised by 70 centimetres with the material excavated to make the parking garages. As a result, there is a slight height difference between the ground floor of the apartments and the public area next to it, and at the same time the space along the canal is articulated with steps.


97


Urbanism

98

01 Location of plan area: a barrier in the city 02 Profile of Europalaan up to canal 03 Model 04 Half-sunken parking in the building blocks 05 Green inner environment 06 Edge of the canal

01

02

03


Monique Lankester-Zoer

04

05

06

99


Urbanism

100

Jasper Pijls

Deventer Gateway

Graduation date 17 12 2008

The historical city of Deventer, beautifully situated on the River IJssel, is about to take a number of fundamental decisions that will change its future and that of the surrounding landscape for good.

Commission members Rein Geurtsen (mentor) Huub Juurlink Kees Bentvelsen Additional members for the examination Pieter Jannink Rogier van de Berg

On the south-west side of the city there are a number of wonderful opportunities, yet also a number of potential problems. The city has always turned its back on the A1 motorway, a major European traffic artery, which passes by a short distance. The motorway exit at Zutphenseweg is intended as an entrance to the city. The reality, however, is that this entrance area has grown to become a chaotic industrial zone with poor orientation, many vacant buildings, and industrial buildings of little value. The IJsselfront and the abandoned harbours take no advantage of the opportunities and possibilities that they could offer the city. The city of Deventer has reached its limits. Around the city lie country estates and the water meadows of the River IJssel. To accommodate the planned development in the coming years, some of these valuable and vulnerable areas will be transformed into residential areas and business parks.

The design research focuses on the transformation of the city entrance to Deventer. The aims are twofold: to improve the entrance to the city, and to accommodate future developments within the current city boundaries. The entrance area of the city extends from the city centre to the A1 motorway and has a branch to the eastern part of the city. Owing to the concentration of many branches, service roads, parallel roads and cycle lanes in one boulevard and a wellorganised intersection, the traffic circulation and orientation in the city are improved. This intersection also forms the pivot of the transformation area. In the period that Deventer was a walled city one could watch all the gates of the city from the Bergweide. The new intersection of the city will be built on the spot where the Bergweide once was. The view of the church spires in the city centre will be restored by the new water square. Behind it is the harbour island with a mixed urban programme close to the city centre. Here water is the binding element between living, working and leisure.


101


Urbanism

102

NS station

01

02

11 living quay woonkade

1

2 harbour island east haveneiland-oost 2

2

7

3

6

5

4

33labour quay werkkade 77harbour island haveneiland-w est west

44labour quay south werkkade-zuid 66 sluice park sluispark

IJssel

55 south quay water square zuidkade waterplein 03


Jasper Pijls

103

01 Well-organised and rebuilt entrance to the city like in 1744 02 Increased density and transformation of the entrance area to the city 03 Quay profiles 04 Public space 05 Atmospheres

SFEREN

CENTRUM

hofjes

WONEN SPORTEN

STEEGJES

CULTUUR

ontmoeten SHOPPEN FLANEREN evenementen KADE WERKEN horeca sluispark roeien

FIETSEN

WATERPLEIN

ZELF BOUWEN woon/werk

KANTOOR

JACHTHAVEN steigers

particulier MIX USE

BEDRIJF

OVERZICHT PLEIN techniek Verdelen

VOGELS

science BOMEN CLUSTER Allee Eco

Recreatie

autarkisch

05

ENTREE

TERP

NATUUR

04

REPRESENTATIEF

zaken

Cradle to cradle

duurzaam nat & droog slagader

TERP

A1

beken


Urbanism

104

Frank de Volder

The Industrious Islands

Graduation date 22 04 2009

The Eastern Harbour Islands are located to the east of the centre of Amsterdam. They are bordered by the Kadijk streets and the rail line from Central Station to Muiderpoort Station. This old dockland area, founded by the Dutch East India Company, has had a turbulent history. For three hundred years the islands were a dynamic area in the city containing a mixture of housing, businesses, companies and port activities.

Commission members Andries Geerse (mentor) Hans van der Made Rob Hootsmans Additional members for the examination Pieter Jannink Katrien Prak

The urban renewal at the end of the last century brought this dynamism to an end. The islands are now dominated by monotonous and single-function city blocks. Owing to the recent development of the IJ banks, the islands now lie in the heart of the city. This repositioning offers an opportunity to allow the islands to be important in the city again, both programmatically and spatially. The possibilities for the islands are great. Improvements are there for the taking owing to the structure of land ownership, the existing spatial structure (the DNA), and the diversity in the existing urban grain. Activating the DNA of the islands leads to dynamism on the islands again. The dynamism consists of

a mixture of existing housing and new commercial activity. This activity is a welcome alternative in the centre of Amsterdam, which is increasingly dominated by housing and expensive law firms. Once the DNA has been activated the islands will consist of three spatial layers: The ridge, the banks, and the public network. The back consists of living. It is largely geared to replace the existing housing programme, now located along the banks. The banks become a place of employment. They are lined with economic activities that take the existing urban grain into account. In addition, the plots along the banks are accorded a large degree of freedom. As a result they become an attractive location for companies and an informal character emerges, which in turn strengthens and secures the dynamism of the islands. Thus the islands once again become a dynamic place full of activity, as befits a former port location.


105


106

Urbanism 01 Changed position in the city the developments in and along the IJ have put the islands in the middle of the city. 02 DNA deployed to regain dynamism A In the year 658, living and working on the islands B In the year 2008, living only because of urban renewal C Soon more life through living and working 03 Transformation of Wittenburg from existing situation into the new island A 1030 dwellings B 1030 dwellings, 8000 m2 commercial space C 1030 dwellings, 12,000 m2 commercial space D 1030 dwellings, 17,000 m2 commercial space E 1030 dwellings, 21,000 m2 commercial space F 1030 dwellings, 30,000 m2 commercial space G 1030 dwellings, 30,000 m2 commercial space

A

B

C

02

03

A

B

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D

E

F

G

H


Frank de Volder

107

05 The three key spatial elements of the islands A Backs B Private plots for development C Public space

A

06 Plan showing the many possibilities B

C

05

06


Landscape Architecture


110

It’s up to you!


111

Noël van Dooren

head of Landscape Architecture Department (2004-2009)

With just one graduate, the past year wasn’t exactly a peak year for the Landscape Architecture Department. But the near future looks bright. Ten to fifteen students are nearing the end of their studies and are well on their way towards graduation. So I very much want to write something for you, the next graduates and those on the road to graduation. Everything I’m about to say has been said already. But it might help to repeat it here, and who knows, it may make you aware. Because, in the first place, it is about awareness of what you are about to do and are doing. For it happens to be a big mystery: almost all graduates avoid doing what they learned in the previous years through blood, sweat and tears. Apparently, graduating feels so new and different that even the most talented student loses control of the design process temporarily. We would like it very much if you dare to use your intuition and start to design right from day one. Of course you first want to have everything arranged, learn more about the area, talk to people, read a book. But it would be so much better if you also started to design too, even if that feels like groping in the dark. That you tentatively drew a detail at the scale you hope to reach at some point, even if it feels like you’re in quicksand. That by sketching you begin to find out how big, tall, wide, deep that thing is that you’re going to make. We understand the inner resistance, the fear you might have. It feels like you’re putting an idea on the slaughtering block, certainly if you show it to your tutors or exhibit it. Anyone present could grab a knife, chop it to pieces and discard it. But even if the worst happens and some cantankerous panel member makes mincemeat of your idea, you entered into discussion with that tentative effort — a discussion primarily with yourself. Because, to a certain extent, by designing you show yourself something: That’s where I evidently want to go with what I know now. Nobody can take that away from you! I’m totally convinced that a discarded idea is never worthless. It activated something in you, a synthesising power, a keen eye. This will enable you to become selective, critical and receptive, precisely in the phase in which you talk to people, visit your site, study soil maps. To be receptive means that something can strike you suddenly as a discovery, an eye-opener. This is in contrast with ‘ordinary’ research. I do not exclude the possibility of making a discovery, but the chance that you go on for too long is too great. For research is never finished. If you’re focused you can search efficiently and save time.


It’s up to you!

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A detail design on the first day: that would save you a lot of stress in the final months. That stress will be there anyway, for life is hard. But all too often I’ve seen your predecessors, even the talented ones, fall into the pitfall of mulling for a long time over the primary idea, continually postponing drawing it accurately, and then having to produce the elaboration and the proof in a short space of time. Just barely graduating can be made easier, and graduating well can be made sublime. It’s particularly about the latter, in view of the prize list of the department of Landscape Architecture, which isn’t poor. Good can become sublime, so grab this opportunity! And now that we’re on the subject: could you please ask yourselves if it’s really necessary for landscape architects to make those over-designed presentation panels? Is that really necessary? And for whom then? Yes: it’s included in the study guide. Let’s say that it’s included there for those who don’t know better. But every one of you should actually have a better idea. That begins with an awareness that landscape is difficult to understand because of its scale, its timeframe, and its inconstancy. You can take it from me now that your design, too, will be difficult to understand. Choose an average nonprofessional; even an academy architect can be a good guinea pig. The guinea pig will say: ‘that looks interesting, but what’s it like exactly?’ The panel, with wonderful maps at different scales, is, for want of anything better, the best imaginable tool for explaining that a little. But it would be good if you would involve other positions. Perhaps the model is a better means, the medium of film offers more insight, living plants have to be brought into the academy; or you build an installation that is so big it has to stand in a field outside Amsterdam. You are the landscape architects of the future. With the many media now available to us, plugged and unplugged, you can ask yourselves freely how you want to communicate about landscape. Embrace that freedom with open arms! You can make nice presentation panels for many years to come.


It’s up to you!

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The situation that you should strive to attain as a graduate candidate is that all preparatory activity — the main idea, the detail, the presentation — all begins on Day One. If you do that, you will dismiss a lot along the way. Be happy with that! Know how to assess its value. Discarded material is interesting material. Document it. It might prove useful to you later. In that sense we can follow the example of some artists who understand very well that the artwork is not made at the end. The artwork starts on Day One. And for those who’ve already started: it’s not too late. Day One is a metaphor. Day One is tomorrow.


Landscape Architecture

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Niels Hofstra

Even More Coast

Graduation date 08 06 2009

My fascination with the various cultural landscapes of the tip of North Holland prompted this project, focused on substantial landscape renewal. The challenge in terms of water management in this region, aimed at combating saltwater seepage as well as ensuring sufficient supplies for intensive bulb farming, generates a magnificent network of lakes along the Westfriese Omringdijk, on the edge of the old land and the polders. Linking water management in this region to the former coastline results in a lake district of which there are just a few in the Netherlands.

Commission members Jeroen Bosch (mentor) Robbert de Koning Alies Rommerts Additional members for the examination NoĂŤl van Dooren Paul Achterberg

An analysis of the historical development of this landscape reclaimed from the sea and a study of various developments and design tasks in the region resulted in the idea of using the lake district to return to the natural transitions in the area. Combining former potential with current challenges leads to innovative insights into water issues that are specific to the region. By integrating the new water between the national monument of the Westfriese Omringdijk and the old stream on which the existing development is situated, the lake is connected seamlessly to the old villages and linear developments in the area.

As a result, towns and villages once located on the Zuider Zee, such as Schagen, Kolhorn and Winkel, will once again be located beside water. Old creeks in the polders are restored to life and irrigate the bulb-growing areas. The new water creates a magnificent new recreational area with a coastline that features a range of identities such as t e r p e n coast, dike coast and nature coast. Even More Coast offers space for an integral approach to different regional developments. Water can be deployed to create a network of water sports amenities of national stature; it can provide space for the Ecological Main Structure and a varied range of recreational facilities. New housing developments can be integrated on the basis of the new identities. Modern t e r p e n (manmade hillocks with dwellings on them), dike dwellings and harbours are incorporated easily into the plan. The project adds beauty to the lowlands in a remarkable manner.


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Landscape Architecture

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Niels Hofstra

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01 The coast as it was in the year 1500 as a source of inspiration for current problems with water. 02 Dynamic coastal zone marks the border between the old landscape and the new polders. 03 Water retention as motive for new leisure developments. 04 Differentiation along the coastal zone with new hillocks with housing, harbours and dike villages. 05 Nature development and experience along the new coast.

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Jury report on Archiprix 2010 nominations


Jury report on Archiprix 2010 nominations

Aart Oxenaar

chairman of the jury

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Archiprix is the annual prize for the best graduation work from Dutch architecture schools. The Amsterdam Academy of Architecture may nominate four projects for this prize. This year 21 projects were reviewed for selection. The jury consisted of the academy’s exam board: Marieke Timmermans, head of the Landscape Architecture Department; Rogier van den Berg, head of the Urbanism Department; Machiel Spaan, head of the Architecture Department; Aart Oxenaar, director; and visiting critic Floris Alkmade (former partner at OMA and now an independent architect). In the first round seven projects were selected on the basis of the problem formulated, the assignment elaborated, and the intervention designed. In alphabetical order, they are the projects by Jeroen Atteveld, Marijke Bruinsma, Sander Dekker, Wouter de Haas, Eline Keus, Jasper Pijls and Johan Rooijackers. In the second round the jury looked more closely at the level of design research, the consistency of the assignment elaborated (‘proof of study’), and the persuasiveness and originality of the design intervention. True to tradition, some discussion emerged concerning the intrinsic differences between the three disciplines in terms of their capacity to represent design interventions in such a way that they appeal directly to a wider public – in other words, concerning the ‘Archiprix factor’ of the projects. In the end, it was unanimously decided to nominate four projects: Jeroen Atteveld, Thermen Westpoort An almost visionary insight is required in order to provide, within such an unpleasant environment, the qualities of consumable relaxation as defined by the programme. This scheme makes intelligent and inventive use of the unsuspected technical and spatial qualities of a waste-incineration facility. This ‘system within a system’ not only creates a very special world of experience but also develops a new methodology in which a building grows inside an existing building like a benign parasite.


Jury report on Archiprix 2010 nominations

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Marijke Bruinsma, The Hidden City Working on the basis of public space, precisely depicted as an inverse mould of the built volume, this scheme succeeds in adding a very special quality to the city. Carefully arranged spatial sequences, series of squares, streets and alleys, form the basis for a labyrinthine residential world imbued with meaning. With sovereign contempt for the banal aspects of metropolitan life (parking not allowed), these are positioned very carefully on an isolated site in the heart of Amsterdam.

Wouter de Haas, Temporary Stay on Neeltje Jans This project exploits the physical possibilities of a number of typical elements of a flood landscape to identify and characterise four places along the edge between land and water. With strong, almost archetypal design and a simple though convincing use of materials, this plan succeeds in genuinely transforming a magnificent landscape with small interventions.


Jury report on Archiprix 2010 nominations

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Eline Keus, Dynamic Living in a Changing Landscape This project manipulates the natural movement of sand so that it forms the driving force for a whole new solution to one of the most dramatic themes of the Dutch landscape: coastal defence. A technical method is deployed to support an elegant, nomadic city. This moves with the shifting coastline until it finds its new form and disappears, literally, over the edge of the Netherlands when the driving force of the sand has done its work.


Amsterdam Academy of Architecture


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Master of Architecture – Urbanism – Landscape Architecture

Architects, urban designers and landscape architects learn the profession at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture through an intensive combination of work and study. They work in small, partly interdisciplinary groups and are supervised by a select group of practising fellow professionals. There is a wide range of options within the programme so that students can put together their own trajectory and specialisation. With the inclusion of the course in Urbanism in 1957 and Landscape Architecture in 1972, the academy is the only architecture school in the Netherlands to bring together the three spatial design disciplines. Some 350 guest tutors are involved in teaching every year. Each of them is a practising designer or a specific expert in his or her particular subject. The three heads of department also have design practices of their own in addition to their work for the Academy. This structure yields an enormous dynamism and energy and ensures that the courses remain closely linked to the current state of the discipline. The courses consist of projects, exercises and lectures. Firstyear and second-year students also engage in morphological studies. Students work on their own or in small groups. The design projects form the backbone of the curriculum. On the basis of a specific design assignment, students develop knowledge, insight and skills. The exercises are focused on training in those skills that are essential for recognising and solving design problems, such as analytical techniques, knowledge of the repertoire, the use of materials, text analysis, and writing. Many of the exercises are linked to the design projects. The morphological studies concentrate on the making of spatial objects, with the emphasis on creative process and implementation. Students experiment with materials and media forms and

gain experience in converting an idea into a creation. During the periods between the terms there are workshops, study trips in the Netherlands and abroad, and other activities. This is also the preferred moment for international exchange projects. The academy regularly invites foreign students for the workshops and recruits well-known designers from the Netherlands and further afield as tutors. Graduates from the Academy of Architecture are entitled to the following titles: Master of Architecture (MArch), Master of Urbanism (MUrb), or Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA). The Master’s diploma gives direct access to the Register of Architects (Stichting Bureau Architectenregister, SBA) in The Hague. The Academy of Architecture is part of the Amsterdam School of the Arts (AHK), as are the Theatre School, the Amsterdam School for Music, the Netherlands Film and Television Academy, the Academy for Art Education, and the Reinwardt Academy. The AHK, which was founded in 1987, offers a full range of bachelor’s and master’s courses in the field of music, dance, theatre, film and television, architecture, fine art and cultural heritage. The link with arts education underlines the particular importance that the Academy of Architecture attaches to the artistic aspect in the professional practice of architects, urban designers and landscape architects.


Colophon

Academy of Architecture Waterlooplein 211-213 1011 PG Amsterdam The Netherlands T +31 (0)20 531 8218 info@bwk.ahk.nl www.academyofarchitecture.nl Editorial board Aart Oxenaar Machiel Spaan Editor Klaas de Jong Translation Billy Nolan Copy editing John Lonsdale, Sacha Defesche Photography models Hans Krßse Graphic design Studio Sander Boon, Amsterdam Printing Pantheon drukkers, Velsen-Noord Binding Van Waarden, Zaandam Š 2010 Amsterdam Academy of Architecture Architectura & Natura Publishers, Amsterdam www.architectura.nl ISBN 9789076863986


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21 graduation projects features the work of students who earned their degree during the 2008-2009 academic year at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture. The projects by the 21 Masters of Architecture, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture are introduced by visiting critic Floris Alkemade. Amsterdam Academy of Architecture: Architecture – Urbanism – Landscape Architecture is a series that presents the results of research, reflections and projects at the academy. Designers and researchers at the school write about fascinations, questions and assignments dealt with in education and in professional practice.

Graduation Projects 2008-2009  
Graduation Projects 2008-2009