Page 1

News not nipples?

Hollie Borland

Protestors from around the country are campaigning for tabloid newspapers to ban the topless page three ‘tradition’. A new campaign, called No More Page 3, is now urging protestors to demonstrate their objections all over the country. Protests in London, Nottingham, Birmingham and Manchester have already been arranged. Launched in August, No More Page 3 have organised weekly protests outside the Sun’s Headquarters in London, under the slogan ‘News not boobs’. “Most of us can name three glamour models, but find it harder to name three female footballers,” says Lucy Ann Holmes, who began the No More Page 3 campaign in the summer. Holmes took action after reading a copy of the Sun in August, which celebrated the success of Olympic gold medallist, Jessica Ennis, but still the topless woman was the largest photograph in the paper. Page three of the Sun has been reserved for a full sized image of a topless woman since 1970. Some of the models, such as Katie Price and Jodie Marsh, have become successful in their own right in other fields, including television, music and fashion. Samantha Fox made her fame from the newspaper feature, appearing at the age of 16.

Continued on page 3

SPORT EXCLUSIVE

We talk volleyball with Olympian, Zara Dampney P25

FEATURES Is Chaplin themed pub the best in Britain? P19

Protestors stood outside The Sun headquarters in London to make a stand against page 3 RACHEL NYE

Tourism boss still backs multi-million pound reef Ben Fisher

Bournemouth’s Director of Tourism, Mark Smith, insists that the multi-million pound surf reef has been nothing but positive for the people of Boscombe. Following the closure of the

reef, baffled locals continue to question the £3million investment and its impact on the area. “The surf reef was a big development and its success can be measured by the reaction of the public,” Smith suggested, alluding to the uproar such an investment has created. “People new to the town don’t understand what Boscombe once was. It degenerated over 50 years and had large derelict parts with

redundant buildings, travellers and squatters. “It was the least desirable coastline in Dorset, if not the whole South Coast. Ten years ago, Boscombe had nothing but a negative image and failed ideas meant that nothing was ever going to be done.” First of its kind in the Northern hemisphere and one of just four artificial reefs worldwide, Smith

lauds the development. “The reef pushed boundaries, and it was an idea never done before, it was a new initiative. “There was sufficient enthusiasm for private developers to invest, and with Barratts Housing investing in the scheme, the area has seen total redevelopment as a result. “It’s a unique scheme with the reef at the very heart of it. The performance of the reef admittedly

hasn’t operated at the levels I would have liked. The waves aren’t as high as we’d like and our initial aspirations haven’t been met. “But there are bigger waves than before, and the surfing opportunities are there. And if anyone doesn’t agree, just ask the surfers who the RNLI have to keep clearing away from the reef.”

Continued on page 5


2 news

Thursday 6 December 2012

| The Rock

Uni drop-in centre for Winton THURSDAY DECEMBER 6, 2012

News

Mobile phones could cut cot deaths

8

Opinion Two thirds forward, one step back

14

Features

One woman at the centre of the abortion dispute

A site was almost bought on Cardigan Road, but the price was too high for the University DREW SLEEP

Drew Sleep

DEPUTY NEWS EDITOR Plans have been unveiled for a unique university centre in Winton. The Students Union are hoping to raise funds for the project. Bournemouth University hopes

to open a shop-like space, in order to interact with the community, as well as help students with any problems they may experience around Winton. Alan James, the General Manager of the Students Union at Bournemouth University said: “The idea came up about four or five years ago. The fundamental idea was to use a shop-front in Winton as a RAG charity shop and a point of contact for the local community

and for student matters. “We figured this project would cost a lot of money, £300 000 actually, I wrote to the Lottery to get funding, but sadly we didn’t get anything.” Ian Jones, the Community Culture and Sports Manager for Bournemouth University is hoping to secure funding for the project by other means. He said: “We really want to help be a part of the community and this project is

something I have been bringing up a lot to councillors. “Although this idea has been floating around for a while, I really want to get this going and get people talking about it. The major issue with this is ultimately the cost and finding the money.” Ian hopes to have the shop on or close to Winton high street. He said: “Location is key for this, we need a place where both students and the community can easily pop in. An ideal location was on Cardigan Road in Winton, however the place we had in mind cost too much.” As well as acting as a contact point for members of the Winton Community to interact with Bournemouth University, the shop would be a place where students could come for advice. Ian said: “It can be particularly hard for some students as it is their first time on their own in a house, and there are a lot of things to do, for example, put the bins out on the right day. “Also, a student may have a big issue with their house and don’t know how to go about it, the shop in Winton would be a place where they could go and get advice and guidance on almost anything.” Despite finding that obtaining funding for this project is hard, university staff are remaining optimistic that this is a project worth backing. Alan James said: “It will be good if we get this going because there are three wins in this really. A win for the community as they have a place where they can talk face to face with the University, a win for students because they would have a place to go if they have any issues and finally a win for the University.”

17

Self-destructing bouncers head for Baftas

Sport

Carrie Mok

The Rock reviews the F1 2012 season

27

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Graduates from Bournemouth University with links to BAFTA have finished filming an independent film in Dorset and Hampshire. Shooting for the upcoming film, ‘Doorways’ took place in Boscombe, Christchurch, Parkstone and in venues like Bournemouth’s Priva Nightclub. The film was written and directed by Steven Murphy of Breezeblock Productions. Production for the film started only nine months ago and the filming finished on Friday, November 23. The Members of Breezeblock are all from Bournemouth, having met either at Bournemouth University or a martial arts classes.

Doorways explores how in seven days the lives of the two bouncers are changed by torment, self-destruction and a path to self-discovery. The one bouncer, The Student, is on a path of self discovery and searching for his masculinity where the second bouncer, Craig, is on a path of torment and self destruction. The film culminates in a climax that will change the lives of the films main characters. Dominic Tomey, producer and managing director of Breezeblock Productions said: “Our film is different because the main thing is that there’s humour and dark sides to the film. I don’t think many films cover both emotions.” The producers of the film are also looking for any help they can get in order to finish the project. They accept donations from anyone interested and the film is sponsored by Bournermouth businesses such as Machine Martial Arts. Co-producer John Crissey III is a

Producers aim to have the film finished by Spring 2013 BREEZEBLOCK member of BAFTA and the makers of the independent film will be using this to their advantage. “We’re going to give the film to BAFTA and other industry experts to see their take on it and then submit the film to festivals,” said Dominic. “After that we’re looking to

distribute the film, whether to cinemas or as DVDs. We want to get the film out of the way first. After that we will probably try to do at least one film a year.” Doorways will be finished by Spring 2013 and the film will be released later next year.


news 3

The Rock | Thursday 6 December 2012

Noise complaints on the rise Tazz Gault

NEWS EDITOR Continued from page 1

Tenants will receive a warning letter from the council HOLLIE BORLAND

response from the landlord or agent has not resolved the issues. There are 1,020 known houses of multiple occupancies (HMOs) in Winton, Charminster, Wallisdown and Queens Park the council have said, which is where the main hub of issues stem from. The University is one of the first in the country to try a scheme like this, and they hope it will drastically cut the number of complaints the council and environmental officers receive. “When it comes to noise in the community, the issue that we face is that all students are adults. It’s not like when you’re at school and we can call up your mother – in fact, we couldn’t do that anyway because of data protection,” said Ian Jones, Community Culture and Sports Manager at Bournemouth University. “We could go around in circles – there’s one side of things where students are here to enjoy themselves, be safe and be part of the community. The other side of the story is that you have a member of the community who lives next to someone who parties until 4am and is constantly being disturbed. I had a brilliant one recently where two students almost ended up in a fight telling each other to be quiet,” said Ian. The University understand the issue needs to be addressed, and are

part funding the new community officer. They also contribute towards the Safer Neighbourhood Team. If enough complaints about one HMO are received, a letter will usually be sent to the tenants from the police, university and the environmental health officers. If one house or the people living there are a consistent problem, the police and council can combine their powers to reprimand where necessary. The university can also issue fines. The council have continually updated their plan of action to tackle such issues. Four years ago, an officer would patrol the Winton and Charminster every Friday and Saturday night until 3am, but this was quickly increased to five nights. “These noise complaints can lead to court or fines from the University, which they have done on occasions,” said Councillor David Smith. “It is just when students drink that there really become a problem, and it is just a minority causing them. Most students are fantastic people and are incredibly responsible. “We need to put pressure on from all angles, including from the estate agents to see more results. Students must respond and behave – in some respects it needs peer pressure to work. If students can tell their friends to be more sensible and quiet, the issue could be resolved,” said David. “We just want to say to students to please be considerate. We want you to enjoy yourselves but to think of your neighbours. When you are getting home at night, please try to do it quietly, keep your gardens tidy and recycle properly as you are now living as part of the community.”

The system has been developed so that the police and council now focus on individuals, rather than just the individual houses. “Certain groups were getting away with this sort of unacceptable behaviour because they were skipping houses,” said Sergeant Steve Houston, who is part of the Universities’ Safer Neighbourhood Team. “We now look at the individual rather than the house, but the way we deal with it is still the same. If the problem is so persistent, we can, if passed through court, close your property down for up to three months. That means we can board up your house and you are not able to return, but fortunately we have not had to do this yet.” The team are now working alongside the council on different ways to deal with these issues, including the distribution of ASBOs. They have begun using Acceptable Behaviour Contracts (ABC). This is a formal agreement in a written form which is made between the individual and the police and council. They are designed to allow the individual to change their behaviour and learn from past mistakes. “We will issue ABC’s if we feel it is needed to a house or individual which has had numerous complaints. IF you fail to take part you are actually one step closer to an ASBO, as otherwise it looks like the student is not happy to mend their ways,” said Steve. “I cannot stress enough how it is just the minority – we just want people to be more respectable. I would also love to try and encourage students to have silent discos – they’re more fun too.”

Half price deals on snakes and reptiles

Nikita Lewis

In the last five years, reptile sales have taken a dive and have forced shops to considerably lower their prices. One shop, Reptilarium, located in Boscombe has cut the prices of their snakes, amphibians and lizards by half, with an aim to increase sales. Larger snakes were previously sold for £500, but this has now shifted down to a mere £250. “We think the demand for snakes has decreased because not many people are after a certain species anymore,” said Andy Roberts, a worker at the store. “The good news, though, is that less people are returning their reptiles after they have bought them, which is positive for both the animals and for people like us who

take care of them as our job. “There is no guarantee that they are going to a good home, but if a person is willing to pay the price they are likely to care for them well. “However, if a person doesn’t look like they can look after themselves we have the right to refuse a sale,” said Andy. By lowering the prices, sales are able to remain active as more people can afford to purchase a reptile. A recent survey done by the RSPCA actually identified that more people own reptiles than cats or dogs because of restrictions in the home that prevent people from looking after larger pets. One common reason for traditional domestic animals being unavailable for people is down to health issues, such as allergies to pet hairs and Asthma. “We do get a lot of new and regular customers coming to the store, so many people you wouldn’t believe have reptiles in their homes,” said Andy.

Although demand for snakes have dropped studies show more peope own reptiles than dogs or cats J4XY0R


news 3

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Page 3’s birthday booby ban Hollie Borland

Continued on page 3

Protests are held weekly outside The Sun’s headquarters RACHEL NYE

Glamour model Nicola Rocco, aged 25, from Bournemouth believes Page Three is harmless. She said: “I pose topless and have never felt objectified. I think the petition signatories should maybe put their energies into campaigning against stereotyping in the workplace or underage sex and pregnancy. In my opinion, those things are a bit more important than a girl topless on Page Three.” Celebrities who back the campaign included Jennifer Saunders, Eliza Doolittle and Caitlin Moran, who tweeted: “Teenage tits aren’t news OR a feature.” Many MPs have also shown their support, but Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, has refused to join the protest, telling Radio 5 Live that to stop it would be “deeply illiberal”. As well as the full-page image in the newspaper, a ‘Page 360’ feature is available in the Sun’s iPad app. The application shows an enlarged image of the topless model. “She’ll pirouette to your command,” boasts

the Sun’s adverts. “I’m very concerned about the effects Page Three has on young people,” said Jo Cheetham, a PhD student and demonstrator outside News International. “We have to have free will, and I don’t want to suggest these women shouldn’t be having this career if they choose to do it, but I really object to it being normalised in a national newspaper; for these images to be legitimised by dissemination through a newspaper that so many people read.” The protests are not just aimed at women. Men are also encouraged to join the campaign. Assad Jassen, who has chosen not to disclose his occupation, believes Page Three is ‘degrading’ to women. “If you want that sort of thing, you can find it on the internet but when it’s in a national newspaper it’s upsetting. I don’t think it’s a selling point anymore either,” he said. Rachael Reynolds, the president of the Feminist Society at Bournemouth University said: “BU Feminist Society fully support the campaign and everyone I have spoken to about it thinks that it’s a great idea. “We are hoping to start some campaigning of our own in the immediate future, but for now, pretty much every member of BU FemSoc has signed the petition, and we fully encourage others

to as well.” Former President for Bournemouth University’s Feminist Society, Chloe Cook, attended the last protest. “We all sung chants together and signed a huge birthday card to give to Dominic Mohan, The Sun’s editor. When the card was turned over, which was designed by the organisers, it revealed hundreds and hundreds of pictures of women from The Sun, and on the other side, men from the sports section. Big letters over the top of the card said ‘Spot the Difference’,” said Chloe. “Security guards were standing on the inside of the door so they stopped us going in to deliver it to Dominic Mohan, and so we didn’t push as we were protesting peacefully. “I went along because I am sick of the way women are portrayed in the tabloid press. It is simply wrong to put pornographic images in newspaper and page three is something that should have been stopped before it started. You wouldn’t be able to broadcast those images on television before the watershed, so why are they in publications with that have no age restrictions? “Boobs aren’t news, and it tarnishes the British press to have objectifying images of women in newspapers,” said Chloe.

Confusion causes thrills, pills and headaches Sammy Jenkins

CHIEF REPORTER Confusion has been caused over the accessibility of emergency contraception from pharmacies in Bournemouth. The NHS Service Directories website states that Bournemouth Boots Chemist gives young women under the age of 18 the morning after pill for free, or aged 19-24 providing they take a chlamydia test first. However the pharmacy in store says different, and some have found that this is not always the case. The morning after pill is available to women within 72 hours of having unprotected sex to prevent them becoming pregnant. One women, aged 20, who wishes to remain anonymous, was left confused after she bought the morning after pill, Levonelle, from the Commercial Road Boots back in September. She said: “It was the last day I could take it and I had looked online to see who prescribed it freely.” The girl, who now lives in Southampton, was living in Bournemouth at the time.

“I went in and asked for it, and the pharmacist on-duty went to get it and said it would be £26.” She explained that it was embarrassing having to ask for the pill, particularly with people around. The information she had read online about the Boots services indicated that it should have been free. “I think it should be made a lot clearer about who exactly is entitled to free emergency contraception and where. Someone could have been in my situation but with no money, and then what would they have done?” Most leading chemists throughout the UK offer the morning after pill free to women, depending on their age. Carl, a dispenser at Commercial Road Boots said: “There are lots of different rules regarding this. It depends whether the pharmacist has had training or not to offer the free contraceptive pill.” He explained it usually takes a 1520 minute consultation, whereby the woman is asked to take the pill there and then. “If the pharmacist has done the training, and been signed up, then they can do it for any age, but that is a course they have to apply for. “It depends on the pharmacist on the day. Most of our pharmacists in this store have had training so they can prescribe to women of all ages.” If a trained pharmacist is not

working that day, they charge around £30 to buy the morning after pill over the counter. Another spokesperson for Commercial Road Boots Pharmacy Department was asked to comment on whether they had an accredited pharmacist on duty seven days a week. They refused to comment and said they could not answer any questions “because Boots is a company,” and suggested the questions were referred to Boots Head Office. Janet an employee for Boots General Enquiries was unaware that Boots stores provided a service at all and said: “I didn’t know we did a free service. I thought they all charged.” Lloyds Pharmacy also has a similar procedure for handing out the free emergency contraception. Alex Leong of Wimborne Road Lloyds Pharmacy said: “we do offer free emergency contraceptives and we have a pharmacy manager who is accredited to do that but she only works Monday to Friday and not weekends, “She is the only one who can issue emergency contraceptives for free but they have to be over 16 but if someone wants to come in and buy it and it’s a different pharmacist, they can buy the pill.” This makes the

Many women are confused about the pill’s cost FRANCES COMUNCIOPTION chances of obtaining a morning after pill for free quite uncertain, particularly on the weekends and during busy periods even though the NHS Service Directories website says differently.

People in need of free emergency contraception are advised to ring their local chemist to clarify whether they will need to pay or not, to avoid any confusion or any added complications.


4 news

Editorial Team Editor in Chief Julia Denni Editor’s Assistants Chris Fay & Alesia Robertson News Editor Tazz Gault Deputy NE Drew Sleep Assistant NE Hailey Hammer & Augustina Sukys Opinion Editor Oliver Hill Assistant OE Sinead Lambe Features Editor Vikki Hutton Deputy FE George Underwood Assistant FE Tom Beasley, Gabriela Vlahova & Giulia Rodilossi Sports Editor Jonny Byrne Deputy SE Tom Bennett Deputy SE Jasper Taylor Assistant SE Ash Hover Chief Sub Maisie Buchan Assistant Chief Sub Will Richards Head of Design N Briana Millett Head of Design O Shanae Staple Head of Design F Fran Tatman Head of Design S Rachel Currie Brand Designer Tom Allison Letters to the editor must be signed (including the course of Bournemouth University students, the working title and school for staff members, company name, or home address for individuals outside BU). Prior to the publication, letters will be verified for authencity by the editor. Anonymous letters will not be published. The editor reserves the right to edit all letters in regard to libel law, length, taste, grammar and punctuation.

Letters to the editor: jdennirocks@gmail.com Advertising: rocktheads@gmail.com

Thursday 6 December 2012| The Rock

Paid essay writing companies target Bournemouth students Hollie Borland

Websites offering to write essays on commission are targeting students at Bournemouth University. Students have become accustomed to receiving flyers from club promoters at the University gates but now they have begun to receive business cards from companies selling essays, claiming a guaranteed first or 2:1. Gumtree, an advertising website which is popular amongst students, has listed at least two essay writing services in Bournemouth within the last month. These services are not illegal, as they are advertised as ‘model answers’, aimed at aiding students to achieve the highest grade possible. However, the reality is that students submit the essays unchanged and pass them off as their own. The result is students cheating in their degrees. Fiona Cownie, Head of the Student Experience in the Media School, who also chairs the Academic Offences panel, believes these services are not cause for concern. “Despite there being people outside handing out business cards, in the time that I have been chair of the panel, I have not been made aware of there being any offences within the media school. It is less of a problem than you might imagine.” However, Cownie does stress the importance of submitting the model essays as their own has severe repercussions. If a student is caught cheating, “they would be asked to leave the university, and all the credit that they had achieved so far would be stripped from them, so it’s a very significant outcome.” Crownie says that “it is good for students to see good, well-crafted answers,” but adds that students “should not engage in that kind of activity.” The services are often based in London, but thanks to the internet, students from all over the country can purchase an essay with a fail-safe, high grade. Finding these companies, is as simple as entering the phrase ‘essay help’ into Google. One of the creators and CEO of Underground Pass, a service that offers personalised essays and dissertations to students, stands by the service’s legality. “We provide an essay and it’s down to the individual if they use it,”

Leafleters for essay writing services have been approaching students at Bournemouth University CRDOTX said the CEO, who wished to remain unnamed in order to avoid the “hassle if someone is going to chase [him] up”. As a third year student at Kingston University, he set up the business with his cousin, after seeing a niche in the market. “We have people who have PhDs and degrees in the specific areas - we have people in engineering, English, all kinds of degrees.” The CEO justifies the ethical side of the business by claiming that the company is providing a job for those who write the essays. “They’re out of a job at the moment and they’re happy to do an essay for about £400-£500. Well, that’s for a dissertation.” Recent years have seen an increase in pressure on students to succeed. In 2011, one in five new graduates were unemployed, whilst this September

has seen students’ tuition fees almost treble, with the Office for Fair Access predicting further increases in tuition fees for 2013. This year has also seen a nationwide upsurge in the number of companies offering to write students’ essays for a fee. But would the students of Bournemouth University use this service? Verelle Roberts who studies Business and Management said: “No, basically because they could be writing the essay for someone else, not just for me. And also, you may not know where they have got their references from.” Becky King, who studies Applied Geography said: “I don’t know if I would trust them enough to get me a good grade. Plus, I’d be scared uni would find out and fail

me.” But not all students were so resistant to pay for their essays. One Social Sciences student said: “I think I would pay a company to do my essay if I knew that there was no chance that the uni would find out. However, it would have to be done really cheaply, my finances are in a dire state. In retrospect, I wouldn’t pay a company because I don’t have enough money. I reckon the uni would find out and I couldn’t be sure that I would get a good mark.” A Journalism student said: “I don’t think I would pay a company to write an essay for me, at least not an entire one. If the stress was getting to me, and I had about 20 different deadlines, then maybe I’d consider paying for a detailed essay plan. But no, not a whole essay.”


news 5

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Boscombe surf reef still receives mixed reception Ben Fisher Continued from page 1

The Boscombe surf reef was designed to bring in surfers however, it has met strong criticism ZDRAVKO DIMITROV

Surfer, Adam Boden, said: “I have used it for bodyboarding when it was in use a few years ago and it was great fun - it needs the right tides and conditions to work properly it is not there to ‘produce’ waves, instead it is there to boost the waves already produced. “As I understand it at the moment, the council do not plan to remove the reef. Instead, they plan to open it up as a site for diving there is some great sea life around there and it is also really great for spear fishing”. Craig McCain, 28, of Boscombe slammed the reef. “It doesn’t work. It has done absolutely nothing to Bournemouth’s economy and is a waste of money. I create bigger waves than it does.” Smith touched upon the future of the reef insisting that it’s return is on the agenda for the New Year, highlighting the on-going insurance claim for damage to the reef, caused by a boat propeller in March last year. Since then, the council and lifeguards have warned against people using the reef. In April 2011, part of the reef,

constructed from giant sandbags broke away from the reef. It was announced earlier this month that the company who built the reef, has now gone into liquidation. The future of Boscombe is bright according to Smith, who is adamant that there is much more to come for the area. “Plans are in place for a coastal activity park, which is a twoyear plan. It will involve a Dive Trail and loads of other activities and facilities so that on any day, anybody can get involved. “It wasn’t my decision to build to reef, but looking at it again, I’d do it ten times over, without question. When you analyse the inputs and outputs, it has been a huge success. Nowhere else has improved an area, as it was, derelict and rundown, like Boscombe. “Fortunately the council weren’t required to find any money and it was a self-catered exercise, one that made total sense. I find it quite amusing how the reef is viewed.” “I would do the exact same thing again [build the reef] if I had the opportunity”said Smith. Smith says that despite the reef’s shortcomings, it’s still something to be proud of and adds another reason to come to Boscombe. “The reef is at the heart of the regeneration project and has reformed a down-and-out location, into a dynamic one. It works and there is no denying that,”said Smith.

Rangers to improve Bournemouth centre Hailey Hammer

ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR A new team hoping to making Bournemouth town centre safer have filmed an ITV advert to attract shoppers to the resort. The group behind the Bournemouth Business Improvement District (BID) aim to make the town centre a safer and more attractive area to spend time in. Since the start-up date on September 12, a huge number of antisocial incidences were reported. Within the first few weeks, an entire ring-binder file of incidents was compiled. The scheme took five years to plan before being put to use, and now has over 500 businesses involved. Each business gives 1.5%

of their rateable value, which is then invested into various projects aimed to improve Bournemouths business environment. The group behind the BID also hope the scheme will bring more shoppers to Bournemouth’s town centre’s after a fall of 9% since 2005. The scheme uses ‘town rangers’ to analyse what is happening and how the campaign can improve the town’s struggling centre. “A lot of people travel to Southampton and Castlepoint to do their shopping, but we want them to spend more time in the Bournemouth centre,” said Tom White, 23, one of the town rangers who hopes to make Bournemouth a more attractive place. Tom said the rangers tasks consists in presenting a friendly face to tourists, notifying the council on graffiti and litter, and other problems they may encounter. Any report they

make goes directly into the system via an iphone App, and they also have contact with police and several businesses over a radio system should there be any issues. Some of the rangers’ tasks are the same as the ones of the local police, such as being visible crime deterrents, but Tom says they do not conflict with each other. “The police mainly takes responsibility in the evenings, but they haven’t really got enough people to work the daytime as well. That is where we come in,” he said. In addition to the rangers, various marketing campaigns will be done in the future to attract shoppers to the city centre, starting this winter with an outdoor ice rink. Tom said he is proud to be part of helping the town. “I’ve lived here for 20 years, so it feels good to do something useful for the town.”

Town rangers Tom White, Helen Taylor and Malcolm Darke

HAILEY HAMMER


6 news

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

Election a ‘complete shambles’

Rachel Currie

Just 13% of Bournemouth residents turned up to vote in the Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) elections last Friday. The average turnout for Dorset stood at 16.8%, with West Dorset topping the figures at 21%. The lack of votes has been blamed on the government for not educating the public about the election, and knowledge of the new position still remained low by election day. Dorset’s new PCC, Martyn Underhill, feels the government’s failure cannot be ignored. “It was the lowest turnout in modern history and people didn’t know what they were voting for.” “We can’t move on from the mistakes that have been made by the government, there are lessons to be learnt,” Underhill said. “Advertising was poor, there

was no mailshot for the candidates and it was, as many people would support, an undemocratic election.” David Cameron has been forced to defend bringing in the new system of replacing the previous police authority with a single Police Commissioner. The elections cost a reported £75million and have had two years preparation behind them, yet some polling stations across the country saw as little as 10% of residents turn up to vote. Conor Burns, Conservative MP for Bournemouth West, took to Twitter to express his views on the election, saying: “I suspect we will live to regret creating these Police Commissioners. I regret voting for the Bill.” Underhill said he understood Conor’s reasons, but stands by the new system. “I think having a PCC is a good idea because it will help the public have a voice in how they think we should be making Dorset safer. We want to make the voice of the public heard,” Underhill said. The Electoral Commission (EC) originally slammed the lack

of advertising and organisation surrounding the election, projecting a national turnout of 18.5% - an optimistic estimation for many areas. A polling station in Newport, Wales, did not see a single voter. As an election regulator, the EC have launched an enquiry into what critics have called a “complete shambles” of an election. Chair of the EC, Jenny Watson, said that results were “a concern for everyone who cares about democracy”. Thousands went as far as declaring their ‘no’ vote as a deliberate act, by signing a petition online set up by a Dorset man. By the time of going to print, 5,266 people have signed the petition, protesting that they believe the PCC positions to be fundamentally flawed. The aim is to pursuade the government to bring back the Police Authorities system as a short term solution, saying that this was “far superior to the new PCC roles.” Find out more about the PCCs at: homeoffice.gov.uk/police/police-crime-commissioners

The elections last Friday saw an “embarrassingly” low turnout ACME

The role Dorset’s Police Crime Commissioner Martyn Underhill Despite the election having been and gone, many people are still unaware of the role of police and crime commissioner involves. Prior to this new position, an independent board called a Police Authority was in charge of ensuring effective policing in each area across the country. Dorset’s Police Authority was made up of 17 local people, including councillors, magistrates and members of the public. From November 22 the new police and crime commissioners across the country will take on the responsibilities of the previous police authorities.

Rachel Currie

The role includes: • Communicating with the public; particularly ensuring vulnerable people and victims of crime have their voice heard • Publishing an Annual Report explaining where targets have been met • Holding Dorset Police Force and the Chief Constable to account • Hiring and firing the Chief Constable • Setting the police budget and commissioning services within the area with police grants The main aim of the commissioners post is to improve the relationship and communication between the community and their police force through giving them an individual to speak with if they have any fears or questions about crime where they live.

Martyn Underhill has been elected as Dorset’s PCC UNDERHILL

Martyn Underhill beat three other candidates to the position of Dorset’s Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) when the count was finalised on Friday November 16. Standing as Independent, Martyn won 51,930 total votes, beating Conservative candidate Nick King into second with 34,451. Despite the low turnout of the election, Martyn is confident he has the backing of Dorset residents. “I can take comfort in the fact that I won a very good mandate in every area and won the election comfortably,” he said. Martyn aims to be a present figure in Dorset, saying “The people of Dorset should expect to see me being their voice and holding the police to account. I want to change the way victims are dealt with, making their journey quicker and easier.” As Detective Chief Inspector of Sussex Police, Martyn was second in command of the high-profile Sarah Payne murder investigation in 2000. During his 30 years in the police service, Martyn became an expert on child abduction, advising on the Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman case, as well as recently working on the April Jones case in Wales. 2002 saw Martyn introduce the Child Rescue Alert into Sussex

Police, a system later embraced by every police force in England and Wales and first launched nationally during the April Jones investigation earlier this year. After three decades in the force, Martyn retired in 2009 and moved to Dorset. He continued to campaign to make the community safer, bringing ‘Sarah’s Law’ into Dorset in 2010, which allows parents to ask the police if someone with regular and unsupervised access to their children has a record for child sex offences. Martyn is involved in the community in many ways. Among these are being a Lay Member on the Bournemouth and Poole Local Safeguarding Children’s Board, a visiting lecturer at Bournemouth University for the Applied Sciences School and a trustee for two Dorset charities, Bourne Free and Turn Your Back UK. One of his biggest priorities is to make sure those who suffer acts of crime are given an ‘empathetic, understanding and professional journey’. To ensure that this happens, Martyn plans to “set up a system that makes sure I’m representing the people of Dorset’s views. I will have forums across Dorset so that victims of crime can share their journey – that’s a very important priority for me.” To find out more about Martyn, find him on: keeppoliticsoutofpolicing.co.uk facebook.com/Keeppoliticsoutofpolicing @tosh599


news 7

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Oscar winner adds to his collection Tazz Gault

NEWS EDITOR

A Hollywood visual effects genius is more pleased with an honour from Bournemouth University than winning his Oscar. Paul Franklin was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Arts at the graduation for students this month, for his commitment to the University over the last 20 years. Paul, who has won an Oscar and a BAFTA for his work on the blockbuster film Inception, said that the award from the University was ‘more special’ than his Oscar. “This has been an absolutely amazing opportunity and such a great honour. Winning this award from the University is actually more special than the Oscar as it really is a once in a life time opportunity,” said Paul. Paul is co-founder of visual effects company, Double Ngative, which is now the largest in Europe and employs many graduates from the university who have studied Computer Animation. “Only 50% of our staff are from the UK, of which the majority are from Bournemouth University. There is a very unique atmosphere at the university – it has become a magnet for people who want to get into the industry. If it had existed back in the 70’s, I would have chosen it,” said Paul. “It is built around a team of quite unique educators who have a vision together of blending art

and science by using computers, making images to create worlds. I genuinely don’t think there is another course like this in the UK who can marry those two worlds together as well as Bournemouth.” Bournemouth is currently celebrating its 20th anniversary of university status, and Paul is one of the people who has seen its growth from the beginning. “I came to visit the university 20 years ago when it first started. There were only about 20 students on the animation and visual effects courses then, but now, 150 to 200 graduates are produced a year. What an amazing development,” said Paul. Paul has also been involved in other ground-breaking films such as Christopher Nolan’s Batman, where he worked on all three movies. He has also worked on three Harry Potter films, and his company is currently working on the remake of Superman, The Man of Steel. “When you start working in this industry, you’re not doing it for anything other than that you love what you do. I enjoy creating new worlds for others to live in and experience,” said Paul. “There have been stages in my career where things have gone wrong, but generally you get a feeling of how to steer things from a very early stage.” A love for creating new worlds has always existed for Paul, who, from an early age, showed passion for this field of work. “I have always been fascinated by certain TV shows and sci-fi stuff, but the thing that always interested me the most was comic books. I know now that they are not what kids go for – I have three children and they

Paul Franklin at the graduation ceremony after receiving his award from the University TAZZ GAULT much prefer video games and the interactive things. But, back in the 70’s, comic books were the place to get your fix of fantasy, and, unlike a TV show, you could see the drawings and imagine doing that yourself. “Compared to when I was a teenager, everything is now much

more accessible. You can make a movie on your iPhone rather than spending millions of dollars – in fact, my iPhone has 20 times the storage than the first visual effects system I used 20 years ago had,” said Paul. Tim Lee, Deputy Chair at

Bournemouth University also said how impressed he was with Paul’s work, and dedication. “The Work Paul has done is absolutely fantastic. We can’t thank him more for the wonderful things he has said about the university,” said Tim.

Belgium brew hits Dorset like an ‘alestorm Tazz Gault

NEWS EDITOR

Sunny Republic is the first in the UK to brew this ale SUNNY REPUBLIC

A Dorset brewery is the first in the UK to brew ale using a Trappiste yeast strain. Sunny Republic, based in Winterbourne Kingston, and imported the strain from Belgium to create Dorset’s own take on fruity Belgium beer. The new brew is called St White’s Ale. The brewery imports the yeast from Rochforte Abbey in Belgum to create a new beer which has a reputation as a winter warmer. “The Belgium yeast creates that funkifier factor,” said Brent Smith from Sunny Republic. “I had a brain wave to try something new. We are Bournemouth and Poole’s nearest local brewery, and we want people to know that.

Belgium beer has a very different taste to what people regularly drink, but it is perfect for this season with the Christmassy fruits and rich berry tastes,” said Brent. The first batch of St Wite’s Ale is already being shipped across the world, with around £5,000 worth of beer being sent to Sweden, Australia and soon Canada. Sunny Republic have been running for around six months after spending half a million pounds on creating a state of the art brewery. The company wanted to ensure that they were not in an industrial estate to maintain their brand image. “We converted a grain farm that was 108 years old. It took us a long time to get planning permission to do what we wanted, but we definitely think it was worth the wait. “We want people to realise that beer is connected to the ground, which is why we picked the location we did. If we brew beer that has different dimensions to it in like taste

and origin, then maybe people will think more,” said Brent. The company are currently considering brewing a second batch of the ale, despite it taking an extra six weeks to brew and costing £1,000 more than other beers to produce. “If you look at the world of food, people are now interested in what they are eating and why they are eating it, not just what it tastes like. We aren’t now just shadowing the French. The same thing is happening with beer, and we want to get people to think about what goes into their drink,” said Brent. The four main ingredients in beer are water, malt (which is traditionally malted barley) yeast and hops, which gives the final product its distinctive aroma. When shipping abroad, the brewery uses recyclable one-way containers to be good to the planet and keep in mind environmental issues. “It is not about making fancy beer but getting down to grass roots,” said Brent.


8 news

Thursday 6 December 2012

| The Rock

Mobile phones to cut cot deaths Tazz Gault

NEWS EDITOR

Falling asleep with a baby in bed can be dangerous

TAZZ GAULT

Dorset health experts are encouraging the use of mobile phones to prevent tragic infant deaths across Bournemouth and Poole. Four sudden unexpected deaths of babies were recorded last year. Although this is not considered to be any higher than other local authorities, health professionals are now concerned as two of these incidences involved the baby sharing a bed with the parent. The issue is thought to arise from mothers breastfeeding their baby and then falling asleep with them rather than returning the baby it’s cot. “A good idea that has come out of this discussion is to use your mobile phone – not to talk, but to set an alarm to ensure you do not keep your baby in the bed with you. Most times, it would be perfectly fine and safe, but this is about preventing the one time that it could become a tragedy,” said Reg Pengelly, Assistant Director for Safeguarding Children at NHS Dorset. A recent study showed that 54% of cot deaths were caused by the baby co-sleeping with their parent. The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (FSID) say that the safest place for a baby to sleep is in a cot, and they must sleep alone. A team of health visitors and midwives have worked in Dorset to develop a new scheme to teach mothers when it is safe to sleep with

their baby, to help raise awareness and to prevent such incidences. “We have produced 20,000 informative leaflets to highlight when it is safe to co-sleep with your child, and when it should be avoided. These will be handed out across all three local authority areas and the real exciting news from this is that the people involved from Dorset have been working with a national team,” said Reg. “From this, we have developed an e-learning programme that has now gone national. Dorset has purchased 25,000 licenses which will be available for every new parent free of charge, and we hope that these will last for around three years. We have also made it available in all of our public libraries for parents who feel they would like some assistance. “The great thing about e-learning is that you do not have to do it all at once - you can come back and carry on. Everyone can access it whenever they want in their own time so it is a very, very powerful tool and has a good place.” Various factors increase the risk of sharing a bed with a baby. These include consumption of alcohol, whether the parent is a smoker or on medication, tiredness, illness or if the baby was premature when born or severly underweight. Further research has shown that to lie down or fall asleep next to your baby on the sofa is ten times more likely to result in cot death. “At least two cases we reviewed last year were to do with alcohol, which is a real problem,” said Reg. “One of these cases was the result of a mother sleeping on a settee - or

sofa surfing. That factor as well as the drinking really heightened the risks, and tragedy resulted. This is preventable though if we can get these powerful messages across as far and wide as we can get it. “I am quite certain that in most circumstances there is no intention to harm the child, but such carelessness and neglect can cause death and we need to hold people accountable for that. We are not talking about a certain area of society either this sort of tragedy could happen to anyone.” Most mothers who breastfeed will naturally sleep facing their child to help protect the baby from moving up and down the bed, but can be dangerous as they are more likely to become overheated, suffocated or trapped. One national story that highlighted the dangers was of Vanessa Clarke, who suffocated two of her children when co-sleeping. “The problem arises when the baby cries in the middle of the night and wants a feed. Mum is happy to take the baby to bed with her which is perfectly understandable, but it can be dangerous. If we can have one fewer infant tragedy then this will have been worthwhile.” “The other point that I need to make really clear is that the figures in Dorset are not outside the norm, but that does not make it acceptable, and we know some of this is preventable.” To access the e-learning course, please visit http://nhsdorset.safeguardingchildrenea. co.uk. The password to access the programme is: Dorsetsafesleep

Journalists set to host fourth charity gig Drew Sleep

DEPUTY NEWS EDITOR Students, lecturers and graduates from Bournemouth University will be performing in a charity concert next week. The University is rallying performers to take part in the ‘Bamm Jam Charity Christmas Gig’, which will take place on Tuesday, December 11 at Sound Circus on Holdenhurst Road, Bournemouth. The concert is part of an annual tradition where students and staff from Bournemouth University will take to the stage to perform music all in the name of charity. Graduates from the University, ‘Daniel and the Lion’ will also be playing on the night. A member from the organising committee said: “This is less of a gig and more like a music festival. It is a celebration of the mightily

impressive talent we have in this university. We are talking to people who have toured and even taken time out of their studies to peruse careers as professional musicians. “It’s like Glastonbury but without the mud.” As well as being a traditional end of term celebration, the organisers hope to raise money for a special cause. The member of the organising committee said: “I think it’s the fourth year we have been doing these gigs and we have raised more than £20,000 in that time. We have done everything from buying a wheelchair for a severely disabled boy to raising money for children with cancer. “The main problem we have is deciding what good cause to give to – there is so many out there in these recessionary times.” Tickets to the event cost £3.50 in advance or £5 on the door. Advance tickets are now available and can be bought in the Media School on Talbot Campus.

Those taking part in the event are hoping it will be as much of a success as last year’s gig turned out to be LEE GILES


opinion 9

OPINION

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Editorial Religion finds new ways to spill blood

Julia Denni

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Savita Halappanavar‘s story has been heard around the world, from India to the United States, and has outraged women on every single continent. The ethical debate surrounding abortion is back in focus with the death of a 31-year-old pregnant

woman who was reportedly refused a termination by doctors, despite the fact that she was miscarrying. Savita complained of agonising pain, yet doctors refused her request for an abortion for three days because the fetus had a heartbeat. She died of septicemia a week after checking into the University Hospital Galway in Ireland. Her husband, Praveen, claims staff at the hospital told his wife “Ireland is a Catholic country,” and therefore doesn’t believe in abortion. To what extents should the main religion of a country affect the health of its citizens? Abortion is only legal in Ireland when a woman’s life is clearly put at risk as a result of her pregnancy. An amendment of the Irish constitution in 1983 states that the embryo itself, even at the point of conception, is

an Irish citizen, enjoying the full rights of every man, woman and child living in the republic. For over 20 years, Irish governments have consecutively failed to legislate on abortion, leaving the country as one of the last in Europe where the medical procedure is illegal. It is doubtful the tragic event is going to force the current coalition government in Ireland to remedy things with much needed legislation. I fear the politicians are going to stay glued to their out-dated state of mind, rejecting basic human rights for Irish women. The death of Savita has raised public awareness but abortion remains a polarizing issue. Back in 1992 the Irish authorities tried to ban a fourteen-year-old girl travelling to Britain for an abortion after she had been raped. Her lawyers won a legal

battle to leave. Savita could have been any us. The refusal of termination for her dying fetus is the reflection of the denial of an old-fashioned society failing to respect human rights. Irish law is forcing women seeking to terminate their pregnancy to go to Britain. The move is a drastic one, but it’s their only way to make a free choice without risking a jail sentence, however, it could lead to a deeper psychological trauma. A generation of women across Europe fought for the right not to put their lives in danger for the sake of religious dogma. Has their voice already been forgotten in Ireland? If I was a young woman in Ireland today, I would be unbelievably outraged that society does not trust and allow me to decide what is best for my own future.

Four more for Obama Ryan Burrows

Finance Students out of cash 12

Email

ohillrocks@gmail.com

Exclusive illustration for The Rock Barack Obama won the American residential election with 50.6% of the public vote Representatives. The fiscal cliff is frowned upon massively by Speaker John Boehner and the Republicans in general, due to the President’s insistence on ending tax cuts for the richest in society. The debate over this has all the hallmarks of ending up just like last year’s debt ceiling crisis. Two parties refusing to see eye to eye until the country is on the verge of economic meltdown, passing a watered-down bill for the sake of averting disaster, then claiming it as a moral victory for both sides rather than, as Nick Clegg would put it, a

He doesn’t have to face re-election ever again

Schofield On the naughty list 11

On the day after Barack Obama won the presidential election four years ago, amid the first large gusts of what would become a major economic hurricane, satirical newspaper The Onion delivered a headline that would become eerily prophetic of the President’s first term in office: “Black Man Given Nation’s Worst Job”. Fast forward four years and the same statement could still apply just the same. Mr Obama is still president, and will remain so for another four years. Yet, for all the fanfare over passing healthcare reform, equal pay for women and the killing of Osama Bin Laden, the nation’s economy has failed to fully recover from the effects of recession. Now, with the President back to finish what he started in 2008, it is clear that issues such as the high unemployment rate and tension over the looming ‘fiscal cliff’ (a series of spending cuts and tax increases set to be put in place to reduce the deficit) need to be addressed, and fast. The fact President Obama managed to win the election at all with an unemployment rate of over 8% is remarkable for anybody, even with an opponent like Mitt Romney. But the re-election of the president came with conditions. More jobs must be created, taxes must be changed, and companies must be regulated in how they spend money. These are all difficult things to keep on top of. Things are made a lot more difficult with the continuing presence of the Republicans leading the House of

‘miserable little compromise’. In a personal sense, it is not a big

SAM MATTACOTT

problem. Obama doesn’t have to face re-election ever again, and his reputation is such that he could point to the achievements of his first term to justify himself as one of the successful presidents. But for America as a nation, the threat of a weakened economy, and with its reduction in status as the world’s biggest superpower, is something that needs to be avoided. The country really does depend on how well the President can react to this crisis. Because, despite all those who think it cannot, the Unitied States is not too big to fail.


10 opinion

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

BBC scapegoated over scandal Aaron Golightly COLUMNIST

In January this year I spent a week shadowing journalists on the BBC’s Newsnight programme. I followed the recent revelation

over both failure to run the story exposing Jimmy Savile, and the botched investigation that incorrectly insinuated that Lord McApline was a child abuser, with interest. I realise in light of the allegations and the seriousness of the cloud that hangs over the programme that it is churlish to offer the ‘they’re good guys really’ tagline of support.

But in many respects it’s true. Whilst the dropping of the Jimmy Savile investigation was down to questionable editorial judgement, the shoddy investigation that lead to Lord McApline’s name being linked to child abuse is unfortunately just the price we pay for investigative journalism. As glib as it may sound to simply say ‘it was a mistake’

– it was. Nobody would have intentionally named anyone who wasn’t such to be a child sex abuser. The calls for retribution over both the journalist and the reporter have been significantly wide of the mark in my view. The furore has escalated into a debate over the future of the BBC. The Director General has already

BBC has come under fire after the Jimmy Savile cover up scandal and hinting that a former senior MP was a paedophile

SOAPBEARD

been dethroned and the Murdoch press is leading a crusade against the rest of it. Which is understandable. This affords them the perfect opportunity to slay, or at least inflict a body blow upon their greatest noncommercial rival. However the way the BBC themselves have covered this whole affair tells you precisely why they should come out the other side of this scandal unscathed, if not with the same personnel. Anyone listening to John Humphries’ interview on Radio 4’s Today programme a few days ago would have heard something you would never hear from any other broadcaster. Can you imagine Rupert Murdoch walking into the studios of Sky and getting a 20-minute grilling by Kay Burley over the phone hacking scandal? Or Paul Dacre being subject to intense questioning over editorial decisions at the Mail by a reporter employed by that paper? Of course you could not. Yet George Entwhistle walked into the studio of the station that he was in charge of, in a building where he was top dog, to be interviewed by a man who he would ultimately hold power of employment over. And he was savaged. The intelligence of those involved both at the top and on the ground in the BBC’s news division can sometimes be called into question. But at least over certain decisions, their integrity never can be and this is an attribute all to often missing from today’s doubted media. Fleet Street has used this as a cynical opportunity to dumb the painful and bittter memory of their own conduct during the phone hacking scandal.

Tiresome television hits all time low Sinead Lambe

ASS’T OPINIONS EDITOR The X Factor - a modern media phenomenon or an out-dated talentless joke? You all tune in to this monotonous show to watch hopefuls take a shot at the big time, whilst I cringe to watch Simon Cowell’s puppets dance around making a mockery of true talent. A Brand Driver study found that a third of all X Factor viewers have a degree, and a further 40% are postgraduates. Why are these so called academics tuning in to watch such droning rubbish? The show, which has lost viewers since the golden days of Sharon Osbourne and Cheryl, airs Saturday and Sunday in the lead up to Christmas with the hopefuls

wishing to gain a record deal and hit the number one spot. The X Factor is a capitalist money making scheme which has lost its mojo. Even the Big I Am Simon Cowell can’t find the time to make an appearance on his own hedonistic comedy show. Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not a hater of mediocre entertainment. Give me TOWIE anytime, at least that is intended to make you laugh at its shocking awfulness. The X Factor, is meant to be taken seriously. With the likes of Rylan Clark on the stage though can anyone say that talent is found and nurtured? And don’t get me started on the bigheaded egotistical replacement for the head judge - Gary Barlow. What was once an entertaining television programme has become a publicity stunt for the likes of talentless Tulisa, who struts about with an attitude and has petty arguments with her co-hosts on air.

Is that entertainment? The happy robots rarely sing their own songs, instead mimicking those of real artists, and are constantly mocked by the media or slated for their pasts. No real potential is portrayed, just desperate wannabes hoping to make the cut just to be told by Barlow they are talentless. Give me The Voice over The X Factor any day. Now that’s a true talent show headed by current and “down with the kids” judges as opposed to aged Walsh and stuck up Scherzinger. The Voice saw true talent grace the stage while the ‘coaches’ marked them then fought for their favourites based on substance over style, as opposed to the X Factor which is all about the image. The X Factor deludes and entertains the masses every weekend but I won’t fall for that, and I definitely will not be buying the single at Christmas.

The X Factor’s ratings fell by 2.3m viewers this year

SHERMANOZ


opinion 11

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Are you a ‘Do-er’ or ‘Don’t-er’? OPINIONS EDITOR

As I see it, there are two types of people in the world. There are ‘do-ers’ and there are ‘don’t-ers’. The latter tribe enjoy spending their evenings composing Facebook statuses and tweets about how many assignments they’ve been given by evil lecturers, and generally drone on about how life’s so hard for them. These people irritate me to the

destined to succeed in life. The other day I managed to stumble into the VIP section of BU’s graduation ceremony with The Rock’s News editor, Tazz Gault.

They do need a bloody good slap

Oliver Hill

point where I laugh and then my head explodes. This happens because 99% of the time the ‘don’t-er’ breed have very little reason to inflict such sympathy luring drivel upon others. They don’t have a weekend job. They don’t stay in uni working until the daylight has long been sapped from the sky and is soon to reappear. They don’t take pride in where they live and think to whip round with the hoover or clean the festering cooker hobs. They don’t have a brain. They do need a bloody good slap. Meanwhile the ‘do-ers’ will get up at 7am because they realise that one day, if they manage to become employed, this will be the norm. They come home from uni after the promotions ambush at the walkin entrance has long since retired. They work weekends to finance excursions to Milk and are part of one of BU’s many clubs and societies. These are the individuals that are

After bravely passing up the opportunity to quaff champagne and the mouth-watering array of food we bumped into the university’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Student Experience, Education &

Professional Practice, Professor Tim McIntyre-Bhatty. He gladly told us that this year 85% of Bournemouth’s graduates went on some form of work placement which make them far more employable when they look for a job. That’s an impressive feather for any higher education establishment to place in its hat. But before the ‘don’t-ers’ all breathe a sigh of relief and return to their beds I’d like to add something. What about the other 15%? It might seem presumptuous but I’m willing to bet that they were the ones who only ever did the bare minimum, thinking they could bump along the bottom, naïvely expecting to still be able to reach up high. I’m afraid this privilege always has been and always will be reserved for the ‘do-ers’ in life who are eager to go that little bit further in pursuit of their dreams. It’s these people who have the drive, hunger and initiative to get where they want to go in life.

Reformer needs reform Tom Beasley

When people are asked who their least favourite Tory politician is right now, they’ll probably say either David Cameron or George Osborne. However, lurking slightly further down the Cabinet is a man who has done more wrong than any at the top, in the shape of the Education Secretary, Michael Gove. Cameron and Osborne have doubtlessly made poor decisions, but Gove is fully committed to gradually dismantling progressive ideas and returning to what he sees as the halcyon days of our education system. If he has his way, children would spend every school day in a grey room reciting Wordsworth in Latin until they turn 18. His policies have repeatedly sought to undermine the role of the arts, like a British version of Glee’s cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester… with a terrifying amount of political power. This summer, he introduced his English Baccalaureate replacement for GCSEs. Yet again, this represented his need to marginalise arts subjects – which he considers “soft” – in order to place emphasis on more traditional subjects such as languages, Geography and History that were on the decline. For some, this was welcomed as a slightly neutered version of his initial idea, which was a return to

the two-tiered O-level/CSE format of old. However, his reforms are not progressive, as he claims, but instead a return to needlessly conservative, traditionalist values. He may be a reformer, but he certainly isn’t an innovator. A-levels are the latest qualifications to feel the force of the man’s sweeping reforms, as his department backs an Ofqual decision to insist that A-level exams can only be taken in June. This aims to limit what Gove and his supporters call a “resit culture” where students become blasé about exams because they will simply get another chance six months later. Decisions like this are another way to move towards a two-tier system where those who can handle the intensive subjects and examinations get to become part of the “elite”, and those that don’t pass are discarded like crisp packets. His A-level reforms fail to account for the bright students who struggle with exams and, coupled with his vendetta against coursework, this contributes to a type of education where a student’s grade rests entirely on one examination performance. It’s like an X Factor audition, only more important. Michael Gove’s problem is that he persists with reform merely for reform’s sake. A week without a significant announcement is for him a week of complete and utter failure. He is widely touted as a potential future leader of the Conservative Party and I’m willing to bet that this is what’s at the forefront of his mind as he stamps his immaculately polished shoes all over the Great British education system like a little privately schooled brat.

Reform: Michael Gove has scrapped GCSEs CONSERVATIVEPARTY

OFCOM scolds ITV’s Schofield Robyn Montague COLUMNIST

This Morning host Philip Schofield recently took it upon himself to interrogate the Prime Minister live on air by handing him a list of suspected paedophiles. What was most shocking about the ITV presenter’s actions wasn’t his unannounced ambush on David Cameron, but that he seemed to think Twitter was a respectable source to quote. As a journalist it’s in my nature to investigate and occasionally put people on the spot when I want answers, but there are rules to respect. I may only be a student but I know that reporting 101 is to ensure your sources are reliable and valid. The list contained names of several former senior Conservative politicians who have been accused of paedophilia following allegations of abuse in a Welsh care home. These names are, however, circumstantial and not to be waved around on television to an audience of 1.2 million people. The public relies on programmes like this as a source of information and are heavily influenced by what they see and hear. Fair enough This Morning is probably the Piers Morgan of news broadcast, but it is still a form of broadcast journalism. Philip Schofield made a statement claiming the on air slip-up was a result of a “misjudged camera angle”. Irrespective of poor preparation, he shouldn’t have had the list in the first place. But never fear, OfCom is here after Tory MP Rob Wilson requested an investigation into the incident to see if any regulations had been breached. The TV personality’s stunt has been somewhat shadowed by criticism towards Twitter as a rumour driven site. It’s almost like saying Facebook promotes stalking and Reddit is rude to religion. The web is a free source and can do what it likes, so take it with a pinch of salt. Twitter is a social networking site that is bombarded with internet trolls and stories like Justin Bieber has cancer, so using it to back a controversial statement is reckless journalism. It’s acceptable to hold the PM to account as a journalist, but to do it in a way that jeopardises investigations and the lives of the people who are involved has serious consequences.


12 opinion

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

Tories to be ‘toffs’ forever? Adam Trimby

Will Tories be ‘toffs’ forever? The simple answer is yes. Politicians always have and always will be middle class, detached individuals that you and I can just not relate to It’s not just the Tories that have this ‘toff’ status. Think of any MP and you’ll see what I mean. Well maybe not Caroline Lucas or the other members of the Green Party, they seem like a groovy bunch. But most politicians can’t help but try to show us just how normal they really are. It annoys me how politics has become more like a beauty pageant, fighting for face-time and good press, replacing the fact that they should be looking at how to develop and improve our country. I’d much prefer it if they used all of their expenses on a lifetimes’ supply of wool to pull over our eyes, rather than these second homes complete with moats that they so desperately need to house their transparent alter-egos. Remember when Mr. Osborne thought it would be a smashing idea to add 20% to our beloved Cornish pasties. Not too bad an idea really. We are in a recession after all aren’t we? So I’d rather they take money from the pastry corporations than out of the education system, but that’s another story. So the media spread ‘Tories Tax Pasties’ like Nutella on toast and Cameron gets a little image conscious. So he nipped on down

to see his good friend Gregg and orders the cheapest, working class lattice he can lay his marvelously manicured mitts on. He gets a little snap-happy for the papers with the usual suspects and hey-presto, Cameron’s one of the lads. The only problem is he couldn’t have looked more disconnected if he was snatching milk and calling himself Maggie. But it’s not all doom and gloom. If the suits weren’t so out of touch we’d have very little satirical comedy and let’s face it, running the country is no barrel of laughs. I for one wouldn’t want to do it. All that pressure, just one false move away from waking up with the proverbial horse-head on your pillow. Not for me thank you very much and you know what? I think most people feel the same way. Leave the politics and the stress to the elitists. They were simply born to do it. Even if some everyman that we could relate to comes along, wearing his hi-vis jacket from his building days, chances are we wouldn’t like him either. In my eyes Cameron could do better, so could Clegg, Miliband and Osborne (school boy error with that train ticket fiasco George). Then there’s Boris - beautifully batty Boris - the biggest toff of the lot; and yet he’s a comedian’s wet dream. No one cares about how well Boris runs London and I doubt anyone even knows a single one of his policies. But we all know he’s that floppy haired, bicycle riding looney toon that generates more laughs than Wylie Coyote and gets more cheers than Cameron. So be Toffs all you like. I think the country would be a duller place without them.

Exclusive illustration for The Rock Ex-PM Magaret Thatcher was often criticised for being out of touch with the public

SAM MATTACOTT

Students prematurely blow their loans Josie Pymm

A recent study by vouchercodes. co.uk showed students in the UK will be running low on loan money by the end of this month. The survey went on to say that students in Wales are the most budget savvy, by maintaining their loan money for 56 days, surviving up to December 4. This is something that I’ve pondered since becoming a student, how on earth do you spend that much money in three months? It’s not just a matter of ‘what on earth are you buying’? It’s a question of ‘how do you not notice that you’re running out of money’. Money is the most

important thing in a student’s life. Without money you can’t buy alcohol, therefore you can’t go clubbing and so you can’t get that hangover you were going to use as an excuse to not go to your 9am lecture the next day. The information in this study was based on the average £3,600 maintenance loan. Most people I know receive both this loan and roughly £1,000 a term in the form of a grant or a bit less from parents. Now say you deduct roughly £300 a month’s rent and £10 a week for food, you’d have £1,180 left over. Even with a serious shoe purchasing addiction, I couldn’t spend that much in three months without noticing. With today’s technology and the amount of help provided at the bank for budgeting and checking your balance I would have thought you’d realise after the

first couple of hundred pounds and stop buying stuff. Another point I can’t help but wonder about is that students are part of the higher education system. The clue is in the name. We all credit ourselves with being somewhat intelligent so letting over £1,000 just slip out of your bank account accidentally to me, is inexcusable. You got yourself to university; the government deems you responsible enough to be lent money at very reasonable rates, why are you squandering it on pointless purchases? The whole thing suggests that students are living a lavish lifestyle on the government’s money. If you want sit on a gold plated toilet and wipe your bum with cashmere then feel free, once you have a decent enough job to do so. We all know spending money is fun and student finance (however useless) is probably the best thing

about uni, but if you’re out of money by the end of November and all you have to show for it is a hangover, you have a problem. In conclusion, the whole issue is baffling to me. In my experience, budgeting is just a matter of not

spending your rent and food money. It’s a dull life skill, but it’s a vital one that you’ll need for important and terrifying life decisions like having a kid! Also, in case you’re wondering, you can’t buy a gold plated toilet seat for less than £100,000.

Students set to blow their loans by the end of November PFREVIEWS


features 13

FEATURES

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

What will be your next move?

MIC WERNEJ

The caps may have been thrown, but now the competition begins. Faced with bleak employment statistics, meet the insiders still willing to bet on a graduate’s odds

Robyn Montague

Signing off How a bill will change our online lives

15

BUtiful

A free space for creativity

19

In a time of economic austerity, graduates don’t need to dump their dreams of a career. Students across the county quiver with anxiety at the thought of graduating without a job prospect to delve into. Since the recession hit home, a flood of unemployment statistics have left degree divers struggling to stay afloat with limited job opportunities available. Over half of all UK 2012 graduates will struggle to find work according to the Higher Education Statistics Agency. It is arguably the most competitive time to be searching for employment but that does not necessarily target graduates alone. Students are confronted with terrifying data that leads them to question the purpose of studying higher education if it will only lead to a mountain of debt and an undervalued degree. Stories of graduates leaving university and having to settle for low skilled jobs that are underpaid for their qualifications is becoming a regular tale told. But how much is fact and how much is fiction?

Graduates

account for only

one in ten of the total number of

young people who are currently

Email

vhuttonrocks@gmail.com

unemployed in the UK

At the end of 2011, 18.9% of those graduating in the previous two years were unemployed, down from the high of 20.7% at the beginning of 2010. This seems like a scary figure, but when compared to those who decided against higher education, it’s not so extreme. Researcher for the Work Foundation, Dr Paul Sissons, believes the impact isn’t as significant as implied. “At the moment the main impact on graduate unemployment is the recession and the economy is recovering quite slowly, so obviously fewer employers are recruiting and that will hit graduates just as much as other people.” Although graduate unemployment rates are lower than before, looking at the total number of young people that are unemployed, only about 10% of those are graduates. Out of the long-term unemployed only 2.5% are university educated. Carl Freelove, who works for the website Jobs.co.uk, believes experience is the key to success.

‘‘I think the whole qualifications thing is great but a lot of companies are just after experience as it’s about money. A lot of costs can be saved through training and other expenses when you can have someone who can come in and get on with the job without as much supervision.” Carl attended university in 2002 and argues that the area in which you study impacts your chances of finding work too. “I’d say it was a struggle to find jobs back then, but it depended on the course. I did a web based study when the internet kicked off,” says Carl. “I know a lot of companies, especially marketing companies, that are looking for new blood to help with new projects, they may even look to take them on full-time.” Competitive markets, a struggling economy, and a large number of students graduating each year are all issues facing graduates but it’s not as bleak as it seems. Volunteer work is a useful way to improve your CV and your chances.

A lot of companies are looking for new blood to take on their projects

5%

of last year’s class became self-employed

22%

were working part-time within 6 months

Grad Stats

“I think it depends on determination, approaching companies to do unpaid work, whether on a part-time basis or not, is worth it,” says Carl. Alex Gill graduated from Bournemouth University last month with a degree in radio production. He believes that taking the course has improved his chances of securing a job in his chosen field. “It’s very difficult in the media industry to find work and it depends on what role you are after. It helps if your university is well-known for high standards of training, like Bournemouth. Most employers I’ve spoken to are impressed with my degree. “Throughout my course we were given ways to improve our employability and given realistic time-scales to expect when to find the jobs we want. We understood that we would be really lucky to find a job straight away.” Internships and work placements serve to improve your chances of employment. Most university courses have mandatory time allocated for students to carry out a placement in their chosen industry. Alex’s top tip? “A degree and a good level of actual work experience is what will set yourself apart.”

36%

will end up working ‘lowskilled’ jobs

4%

go into unpaid work or volunteering

£12,000 The average difference in annual

earnings

between university educated young people and non-graduates over the past decade


14 features

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

I’m a Politician, Get Me On Their TV Screens

What happens when PR and politics mix? Reality TV and comedy shows are the new communication tools being used by politicians to engage with the electorate in an innovative way. But are they all trying too hard? Tom Beasley

ASS’T FEATURES EDITOR Nadine Dorries MP has just entered the Australian outback as part of the most recent cohort of ‘celebrities’ – inverted commas necessary – taking part in the testicle-munching reality television series I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here. She has been suspended from the Conservative Party for not consulting the chief whip before flying out to Australia, abandoning her constituency business in the meantime. Defending her actions as an awareness move, Nadine claimed she would use the show’s 16 million viewers as a platform for her opinions, including controversial plans to lower the abortion limit from 24 to 20 weeks. She told the Sun: “If people are watching I’m A Celebrity, that is where MPs should be going.” This radical move is the latest attempt by a politician to find an innovative way to engage with the electorate. Media and politics blogger Steven Baxter says this is a necessary move for politicians in the modern era. “They have to go beyond their peers to reach as many voters as possible; there are only so many doors you can knock on in your constituency, even if you’re awake 24 hours a day.”

Since Barack Obama’s use of Twitter became a major issue in the 2008 US election, politicians have flocked to the social network in an attempt to get a slice of the success. It is now the political figures who don’t use Twitter that are the unusual ones, with even David Cameron jumping on board of late. There are, of course, downsides to a politician opening themselves up to voters. Baxter thinks this is something politicians just have to deal with: “If they’re going to use Twitter to be political, they’re

There are only so many doors you can knock on in your constituency, even if you’re awake 24 hours a day

going to have to be prepared for their tweets to be scrutinised by constituents and the wider public.“ Equally though, there is a lot to like about being able to converse directly with the electorate. It’s a purer form of communication than using the media as a middle man and that’s why politicians like it.

Twitter is by no means the only way politicians have recently attempted to make themselves more palatable to the public. Comedy panel shows such as Have I Got News For You have become a useful tool for politicians to escape their stuffy, corporate image and show their more light-hearted side. Boris Johnson has made Nadine Dorries has abandoned her duties as MP for a controversial stint in the jungle ITV multiple appearances, helping to draw yet more attention wishing to permeate every aspect of part of I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out on his persona, something that the social zeitgeist. Of Here. may well be the reason behind his Sally Bercow, wife of the The bushtucker trial element of the re-election and the whispers that he Commons Speaker and theoretical show allows the public a chance to could become the next leader of the future candidate for the Labour actively punish celebrities for having party. Party, is in many ways the queen the temerity to place themselves With Lembit Opik taking tentative of unorthodox methodology to upon the reality television pedestal. steps into the world of stand-up, it appeal to voters. Alongside her If the celebrity takes their seems that the line between politics active Twitter account, she has made punishment well, then there tends to and comedy is blurring slightly as appearances on Have I Got News be a grudging admiration for them politicians attempt to escape from For You and also, in 2011, entered the and politicians are definitely ripe for the stuffy, private school image that Big Brother house. She claimed at the the picking in this way. is ingrained into public opinion. time that taking part in the reality TV So Nadine just needs to push aside Whilst obviously it isn’t the best show was her way of “upsetting the the rats, chomp on the intimate parts idea for David Cameron to start establishment” but the only person of a kangaroo and act like it doesn’t firing off gags in comedy clubs, she actually upset was her husband. bother her. If she can manage that, it seems that comedy could be a Sally was the first contestant of then she may achieve her goal of very useful tool for creating a more the series to be evicted, showing that creating a platform for her opinions. light-hearted, positive perception of the public don’t always want to see It could vindicate her entire politicians across the electorate. politicians in a different way, even decision and it could even open the With the internet now if that might be how the politicians floodgates. In a few years’ time it commonplace amongst politicians want to be seen. could be Ed Miliband sat around a desperately trying to improve their Over on ITV, it seems that Nadine fire with a washed up pop star and a image, reality TV could almost act might do very well out of her Hollyoaks blonde. Now that would as the final frontier for politicians controversial stint in the jungle as be good TV.

Top tweeters of Westminster

A political dose of reality

John Prescott

An active user with 540,000 followers, he was slammed when he used this account to campaign during the 2012 mayoral election.

With over 160,000 followers, Mr “Two Jags” uses the profile to hold the press to account and champion environmental policy.

@MayorOfLondon

@johnprescott

David Cameron @David_Cameron

A recent convert, the PM has over 160,000 followers. He was subject to a flood of vitriolic abuse in the days after his account was created.

Alastair Campbell @campbellclaret

The Director of Comms for Blair’s government has 190,000 followers and is amongst the most opinionated political figures on Twitter.

SALIM FADHLEY

CATHOLIC CHURCH

KNLPHOTOS2010

Boris Johnson

George Galloway

Ann Widdecombe

Lembit Opik

The Respect MP appeared on Celebrity Big Brother, where he famously licked milk from the hands of actress Rula Lenska whilst pretending to be a cat.

Widdecombe became a fan favourite on Strictly Come Dancing for her comedic routines alongside her professional partner Anton du Beke. She made it to Week 10.

Lib Dem politician Opik entered I’m A Celebrity’s tenth series and became the third candidate to leave the show after Nigel Havers walked out and Sheryl Gascoigne was eliminated.


features 15

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

The goal is

control Protestors stand up against threats to censor information on the internet ROBERTO PASINI

Gabriela Vlahova

ASS’T FEATURES EDITOR According to the proposed Communications Data Bill, police and intelligence services will be given access to all types of private correspondence of the public to help them “save lives”. Their definition of such cases includes missing persons, kidnappings and other crimes where people in potential danger have to be traced. The defence comes in the concern that potential criminal offenders have now gone beyond simply communicating by phone and are using Facebook messages, Tweets, emails and even online games as means of interaction. The bill, however, could affect us all. It will extend the data storage of all personal correspondence to up to 12 months. That means that every email sent, every Facebook status updated, every Tweet published from everyone in Britain will be recorded for an entire year. Without the consent of a judge and the court, the Government will have the right to invade any citizen’s private correspondence.

As our lives are all digitised, does tackling terrorism justify invading our privacy? Can you remember the last time you rented videotape or bought a CD? Because I can’t. I have grown up in an age where the so-called mainstream media –TV and newspapers – are in decline and Facebook and YouTube is seen as the future. I am part of the generation that marks the transition, the link between the “good old days” and the “bright future” of technology. And I, myself, am a link. I wear a watch, which seems odd to those younger than me because it is a device with only one function. I also spend half my day staring at a computer screen with twenty open tabs, nervously clicking, with headphones on and a tune on max. I guess what changed was that people are not a passive audience anymore. We are not couch potatoes, we are sophisticated media users. We do not want only to consume, we want to be involved. We like to consume but we want to share. Everything develops so fast with the technology that the moment one thought of it, we received it. This freaked the media out. All of a sudden, instead of them giving us information, we started finding it

Last year, internet censorship plans in the form of ACTA and SOPA caused widespread controversy and media blackouts. Today, new legislation threatens to invade our online privacy. The difference is that this time, most of us are in the dark about it

out ourselves and picking whatever interests us. Therefore, media industries had to do something. First, they made users pay. What they failed to realize was that the proven method of making the highest amount of profit is not by putting taxes on. It is in offering free or low cost goods and services. Facebook, Twitter and video sharing sites are the most widely used social media channels by non-profits, at 73%, 56% and 49% respectively. The profits these online media companies generate are enormous, while they offer all the content for free. The amount of information shared and consumed through these websites everyday is hard to measure. It may seem as a paradox but the moneymaking companies are actually the ones offering free services. These companies do not make direct profit. They are winning through advertising revenue. People are not lining up for the latest album of Rihanna but her videos on Youtube have more than 100,000,000 views. This is ten times a Diamond Album. That many people would not have paid for it but companies found a way to make profit from the ones who do not buy. Then, they tried to regulate. Nowadays people have access to

more information than any other generation and they are using it. Therefore, this massive amount of information we have access to, has to be supervised so that its content is appropriate for the users. The European Commerce Register’s Forum became effective in 2003 and serves as a foundation of all telecommunications laws on a national level in the member states of the EU. It outlines several rules and regulations of electronic communications services and networks, which are expected to be adopted and enforced by the member states as a domestic law. However, the forum is responsible for regulation of these networks and services, their content is to be supervised at a national level, following the EU Audio-Visual Media Services Directive. It is agreed that the UK’s approach in establishing the Communications Act 2003 and creating the new regulatory body Ofcom best implements the EU framework. However, these were only regulations on a national level. TV, radio, newspapers and magazines can be regulated, but what about the Internet? People do not want only to receive, they want to share. The information stored online is

beyond a single government policy. Last year, our online freedom was threatened by SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act), PIPA (Protect IP Act) and their big brother, ACTA (AntiCounterfeiting Trade Agreement), restlessly trying to enforce copyright laws. These were directed to the biggest producers of content – not the multi-billion dollar companies but the users, who far out-number all the people running Google, Yahoo, Facebook, and the like. Clay Shirky, Adjunct Professor at New York University, summed up the proposals as: “taking a centuries-old legal concept, innocent until proven guilty, and reversing it – guilty until proven innocent. You can’t share until you show us that you’re not sharing something we don’t like.” Fortunately, none of these Acts was ratified but does that mean the threat is gone? Now, in the UK, the Communications Data Bill is trying to push its way through the users to the Home Secretary. As it proves, this is nothing new, but a constantly evolving attempt of control and regulation. But do we become more free or more easily controllable online? I guess only time will tell (and in the world of technology it probably will not take too long).


features 17

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

When Harry met Chaplin

How one man and one silent movie legend are breathing new life into Boscombe’s High Street, with the acclaim to prove that the critics are on side

Alys Penfold Appearing in the shadowy doorway in a long grey coat and carrying a briefcase, 41-year-old Harry Seccombe looks a little like Gene Wilder in Young Frankenstein. As the owner of Chaplin’s Wine Bar and The Cellar Bar in Boscombe, Harry’s entrance is met enthusiastically by his staff. He chats with them over a few business matters, requesting a cup of much-needed coffee and matching every inch of character that covers the walls of his venue. Chaplin’s has just won the ‘Overall and Best Community Venue’ award from the Best Bar None Scheme. After winning overall in the Bournemouth area last year, Harry and the Chaplin’s team were able to enter at national level. The awards ceremony took place at the House of Lords on the October 11 this year, and Harry says he was “chuffed” when Chaplin’s was announced as the winner. Harry says the award is “great for the staff, and shines a positive light on Boscombe too”. Walking into Chaplin’s off the bustling but neglected high street is like wandering into another world. Sixties music pours through the open door and you are invited in by the rather welcoming Charlie Chaplin statue outside. On a tour of the pub, or bar as

Clockwise from top: Harry with the bar’s mascot; the venue’s sign; music legends line the walls; words of wisdom ALYS PENFOLD it’s referred to in its name, Chaplin’s oozes a great deal of charm. Harry explains that the stairway, leading down to the Cellar Bar where live bands play every evening, and the large arch in the garden area, were saved from an old church that was about to be knocked down. Of course, Charlie Chaplin memorabilia sits on the bar and shelves which decorate the pub, while a flat-screen on the wall loops old black and white films, an ironic combination. Harry has only been the owner of Chaplin’s for five years, building the upstairs of the bar when he took over with the help of pub regulars and his fiancée Vivien Hoffman. The Cellar Bar downstairs has been there for ten years, although Harry says: “It really does look like

they’ve been here forever.” Harry previously lived in Boscombe and Chaplin’s was his local pub. It was the manager at the time that approached him about buying it. “He told me that the owner was selling up, and I couldn’t pass up the offer; I didn’t want to see someone come along and rip the heart and soul out of it.” Harry originates from West London, where from the age of 13 he worked in a family-run builder’s merchants. Having done his A-levels at just 16, Harry applied to start university early to study psychology. He was accepted by all five universities he applied to, despite being two years younger than the normal undergraduate. But instead, Harry took a year out, and went travelling around

Morocco, Spain and Greece. The reason? “One of the universities told me that they would circulate my picture around all the bars, as I wasn’t old enough to drink at the time. That put me off, I didn’t want to go to university and not be able to drink!” This passion has obviously continued into Harry’s later life, judging from his current profession. Harry’s motives spread much further than this though. “I’m a great believer in community” he proudly declares. Harry founded the ‘Pub Watch’ in the Boscombe area, allowing pubs and bars to update one another on any troublemakers in the town. “Boscombe is unfortunately an area that has a lot of problems, so we have to be on the ball.” In addi-

tion, Harry is part of the Boscombe Regeneration Group and is currently in the process of setting up a forum which enables the residents of the town to have their voices heard. He describes his on-going attempt to save the arts community centre in Boscombe, which is to be knocked down for additional housing. “Community is probably the main reason I’m here in the pub,” Harry clarifies. Boscombe is very lucky to have someone like Harry giving them support in more ways than one. West Ward Boscombe Councillor Chris Wakefield is extremely appreciative: “Harry is great as a local businessman, which the recent award proves, and he is putting something worthy back into our local community.” Once community is the subject of conversation, Harry cannot be stopped. “I think we all need to get back to being local and that’s the reason why I’m such a huge supporter of it all.”

When I found out the owner was selling the bar, I couldn’t pass up the offer


18 features

Thursday 6 December 2012 | The Rock

Leveson has spoken The report of the inquiry into press ethics and practices has been released, but how will it affect freedom of speech?

Tom Beasley

ASS’T FEATURES EDITOR Lord Justice Leveson published the report of his inquiry into the ethics and practices of the British press last week. Since November 2011, many prominent figures from the worlds of the press, politics and celebrity have given evidence to the inquiry, revealing the worrying depth of unethical behaviour within the media. The inquiry has been the catalyst for a wave of anti-press feeling across the country. Hugh Grant has gone from star of slightly awkward British rom-coms to mouthpiece for the movement against media dishonesty and underhanded tactics. In early 2011, a number of high profile claimants, including Sienna Miller and Andy Gray, received damages from the News Of The World for cases involving phone hacking. Then, in July, The Guardian reported that the paper had unlawfully accessed the voicemail of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler in a way that provided false hope to her family. This revelation outraged the public and led to David Cameron instigating the Leveson Inquiry. According to a YouGov poll conducted on behalf of the Media Standards Trust, 79% of people supported an independent press regulator which was backed up by law. The papers might be worried that this would be too tight a reign over free speech, but it would seem that the public – their

paying customers – won’t be able to trust them until they feel that there is a strong enough regulatory framework in place. In Leveson’s eventual report, he ultimately favours a new, robust independent body to regulate the ethical practices of the press –carrotand-stick incentive scheme with a clause that expressly guarantees press freedom. The free speech clause was repeatedly emphasised by Leveson during the inquiry that he fully appreciated the importance of free speech. In the evidence given by Michael Gove, the Education Secretary, there was a tense question of whether any further regulation of the press could begin to erode the principles of media freedom. Leveson’s plan aims to use the existing power of telecommunications regulator Ofcom to certify the new regulatory body. The system would remain opt-in, angering critics who see it as too similar to the Press Complaints Commission which failed to prevent the unethical behaviour which led to Leveson’s inquiry. However, under the new system Ofcom would be given backstop powers to enforce the conduct of publications that do not opt-in to the new form of regulation. This means that, even if Richard Desmond – founder of the company which publishes the Daily Mail, Star and OK! Magazine among others – chooses to keep his papers out of this framework, they will be accountable. The issue has split the coalition. Prime Minister David Cameron and his deputy Nick Clegg differ in opinion as to what the next step

What has happened?

should be to ensure the phone hacking scandal is not repeated. Cameron’s statement embraced aspects of Leveson’s plans, but rejected his call for the regulation to be backed up in legislation as it risks the infringement of free speech principles. Alternatively, the statements made by Clegg and Labour leader Ed Miliband both called for the results of the inquiry to be implemented in full. Cameron’s move has been seen as a huge political risk. His rejection of legislative power for the new press regulator has already invoked the ire of hacking victims and lobbyists, with the huge proportion of public that are pro-statutory regulation set to follow in the backlash. Free speech activists may be pleased, but overall it feels like a strange political move. His critics would be likely to say that this is simply intended to keep the press sweet to his government. The support of the media – particularly the Murdoch empire – is a huge asset to any government. The Prime Minister is being forced to walk a tightrope between placating the victims of phone hacking and preserving the support of the press. The shockwaves set into motion by the News Of The World phone hacking revelations and the subsequent Leveson Inquiry are set to reverberate around the world of journalism for a very long time. Whether or not the government decide to implement Leveson’s proposals in some form, there will certainly be a lasting impact. Statutory regulation could still happen, or David Cameron could stick to his guns and introduce an independent regulator without the backing of law.

THE REPORT’S MAIN PLANS New regulatory body INDEPENDENT of the press

Statutory UNDERPINNING to give the regulator backing in law Guaranteed clause to PROTECT freedom of speech Extra powers for OFCOM as a “backstop” form of regulation

THE REACTION David Cameron has rejected calls for a statutory regulator Celebrities such as Charlotte Church and Hugh Grant have publicly vented frustration with the PM’s decision Familly of Milly Dowler feel “let down” by the reaction of the government

“Hacked Off” or “Fighting for Freedom”

David Cameron @David_Cameron

“Letter from the Leader”

Nick Clegg

Ed Miliband

I support ‪Leveson recommendation for indep regulator with real power. New law governing press may curb free speech

We must implement Leveson’s plans for an effective new press watchdog, underpinned by legal guarantees

David Cameron set up the Leveson inquiry and now refuses to implement its central recommendation. Not good enough

@Ed_Miliband

Charlotte Church On Question Time

What about 3 or 5 years down the line when standards start to slip? That’s why you need statutory underpinning

In The Guardian

JK Rowling

@HackedOffHugh

Hugh Grant

Stephen Fry

Leveson’s recommendations would give everybody ... a quick, cheap and effective way of holding the press to account

Yesterday was good day for press barons & vested interests. Bad day for Dowlers & McCanns

It would seem David Cameron’s address is no longer Number 10 Downing Street: it’s now Flat 2, Rupert Murdoch’s arse

@stephenfry


features 19

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

It’s a BUtiful world

BUtiful Film Festival defies its university roots, becoming a place for young filmmakers around the world to display their work. Giulia Rodilossi speaks to the man seeking out tomorrow’s talent

On Monday November 24, the BUtiful film festival will open in Bournemouth University’s Kimmeridge House. The two day event will showcase films nominated for awards across a variety of catagories. Neils Michael Wee, head of the festival, says how he: “wanted to create a festival which would acknowledge true young filmmaking talents from around the world and give them a push in the right direction.” Wee talks about how a festival created and organised by media students at Bournemouth is a great advantage. “What better place to have a festival than a media school like the one at Bournemouth University? You don’t just get on a degree like this one by coincidence, so let’s show what we can do by helping others.” The festival received 282 submissions this year, with 44 hours of content from 43 different countries. Rather than a Student Film Festival, BUtiful could be identified as a young International Film Festival. Neils described it as: “a platform for the filmmakers, an environment for the festival organizers and a cultural event for

the local community. I can’t see why we couldn’t be a recognised festival.” The judging panel includes some prolific names, who, in addition to the awards, will select their favourite film from their category of interest. The animation category is being considered by Blue-Zoo, a multiBAFTA award winning animation studio. For the documentaries, the residing judge is The Family creator Paul Watson. Another competition judge is Bharat Nalluri, creator of the TV series Hustle and director of episodes of Spooks and Life on Mars. In 2006 Nalluri also directed Tsunami: The Aftermath, which was nominated for three Golden Globes and an Emmy. BUtiful is also in partnership with the Aarhus Short Film Challenge, a biannual international competition. The concept of the challenge is that potential filmmakers have only seven days to create a short film based on a random theme. While other festivals have stereotypical titles for their awards, the BUtiful have gone with something more original. There’s the Saliva award for excellent technical qualities, a Hush Hush award for films that deal with taboo subjects, and the K award for creativity. Inspired by Franzi Florack’s

Watersprite Festival, the Cambridge student film festival, Neils decided to create something that took place within Bournemouth University. “I saw what they managed to accomplish in just one year, and wanted to do the same thing,” he said. Franzi Florack, who also founded the International Student Film Organization explains why it is important to get interested about young film festivals. “Watching student films is like discovering the next generation of filmmakers. They really open your eyes to all the talent that’s out there.” That’s why the BUtiful team makes it a priority to reach out and establish a meaningful relationship with the industry. One short film, Bewilderbeast, was actually not the filmmaker’s submitted piece, but immediately excited the team when they came across it in his portfolio. Neils says: “It was so brilliant in every way that we felt the need to help the director to the greatest extent possible.” BUtiful even managed to get the director a few contacts in Los Angeles. “No promises of course, but we do our best.” This seems to be exactly the driving philosophy behind the whole BUtiful team.

A selection of the 2012 shortlisted entries Clockwise from top left:

Above As Below A young soldier during his first experience of war Heart Beat A gang member finds himself hanging upside down in an empty warehouse and struggles to remember how he got there

Dreamlands A fox faces execution for his crime Slug Invasion Slugs on a mission for one juicy flower To the Heart of the Matter A man anxiously practices his proposal to his girlfriend, while the coin-op that turns the world is running low on credit

We Are Police A turntable animation

November 24 4pm Animations 7pm Drama

The team have promised a wide variety of films, including a very promising one featuring True Blood’s star, Alan Hyde.

November 25

4pm Documentaries 7pm BUtiful Awards Night At the final event, the audience will vote for the winning film. The festival will end with a spectacular wall projection animation.

Screenings for all the entries in this year’s festival are free to attend. Book your free tickets: butiful2012.eventbrite.co.uk


20 features

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

Photographer of the Fortnight Bella Pangabbean

I started playing with image editing software when I was 14 and practiced digital imaging by myself. Later on, I was tempted to not only use images from photo banks but also edit them. It was two years later that I then became interested in photography, from the composition to the angle

of images and practicing different exposure techniques. To begin with, I didn’t have the proper equipment. I was trying to capture images using any cameras I had available to me, such as my mobile phone or a pocket camera. I got my first DSLR, a Canon EOS 40D, when I was 17. I’ve always

been particularly interested in people, through conceptual fashion and portrait pictures. I can communicate with my models and the relationship built is one of the most important parts of the work that I do. Whilst I was studying, I applied for an internship with a professional

One that inspires me Life is full of surprises and it never fails to make me excited with the magical beauty of its moments. One of those is shown in this photo. I shot the picture when I did an internship with one of Indonesia’s finest photographers, Anton Ismael, and then put it online. Later on, I received a message from a Romanian artist named Roxana Ioana Porumbacu asking for my permission to use the image as a drawing reference. A few months later, she sent me her drawing and named it “Asian Orchid”. I really appreciate the fact that my works can inspire and trigger others to interpret beauty in their own way. The memory of this event is so exciting and always motivates me to carry on with my work and challenge others to rediscover beauty.

My favourite photograph It is really hard for me to pick one of my favourite photos. I have been capturing images for almost five years now, and they all have special meaning to me, so this one is my recent favourite photo. I only took it a few weeks ago. I usually work with female models and I can count on one hand how many times I have worked with male talents. That makes me challenge myself to discover and explore the feeling of working with male models. The toughest part is finding how to achieve the coolness and classy value within masculinity. I think I managed to capture these characteristics of a man in this photo and I am really proud of it.

photographer. In the same year, I also won first place in a photography competition. I produced several conceptual photography projects, and from there I got the opportunity to be a Director of Photography, allowing me to expand my talent and passion to include moving images.


The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

features 21 An early photograph The title of this picture is “Canvas”. Canvas as a place to draw what we want; paint what we need. I wish I could draw, but the best thing I could draw would probably be a stickman or a smiley emoticon. However, I wanted to find a way to express the artistic side of myself through photography. My camera is my brush, the world is my canvas, my ideas are my colour palette, and here I am painting with the light. This picture represents what photography means to me. It is not just about taking pictures but more about making pictures. There was no editing involved in this image. It is shot using flash and blur technique - and yes, I did literally paint the talent’s face with my own fingers.

One that I treasure It took me about four hours on a wooden boat to reach this remote island. I did not use any underwater housing, so I got into the water with the model and risked my camera getting wet or even worse, dropping it. I put a lot of effort into taking this shot and maybe this is why it is so special to me. It also symbolises my belief that beauty lies in the act of sacrifice we make while searching for it. The choices we make are what our lives are built upon.


sport 23

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

SPORT

F1 driver’s Championship goes to the wire

Red Bull have already won the constuctors’ championship, but which driver will be crowned Champion on November 25? DEARESTRONNO

Andrew Cozens

Olympian

Zara Dampney talks Volleyball

25

Lacrosse

BU’s newest Varsity team

27

TRIVIA Who are the FOUR Spanish players to have won the Premier League? See if you’re right in the next issue

LAST ISSUE’S ANSWER: HERNAN CRESPO (5) NICOLAS ANELKA (5) ZLATAN IBRAHIMOVIC (6)

Email

jonnybyrnerocks@gmail.com

This season started with seven different winners of the first seven races, an unheard situation in Formula One. Six of the twelve teams in the championship have had a winning driver standing on top of the podium at least once. The championship lead changed between Fernando Alonso, Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel up until Race 7 in Canada. From there, Alonso began to dominate with remarkable consistency. Lewis Hamilton looked to be the closest challenger mid-way through the season, with Vettel always being there, or thereabouts. Hamilton began to fade at around Race 9 in Great Britain, becoming inconsistent in his point scoring amid rumours, and eventual confirmation, of a

move from McLaren to Mercedes at the end of the season. Alonso looked the most likely winner of the championship, having lead for so long, but then something remarkable happened. In a season where no one had won back-to-back Grand Prix’s, Sebastian Vettel won in Singapore (Race 14), Japan (Race 15), Korea (Race 16) and India (Race 17). He followed this up with a magnificent drive in Race 18 at Abu Dhabi by starting from the back of the grid - 24th - and fighting his way all the way through to 3rd position, just one place behind Alonso. This left Vettel with a ten-point lead going into the final two races. The first of which was a return to the USA for Formula One. On a bright clear day, 13:00 local time in Austin, Texas, Sebastian Vettel kept up his superb form and grabbed pole while his championship rival Alonso could only manage a disappointing 9th in qualifying. Fortunately for Alonso and Ferrari, Romain Grosjean suffered a grid penalty and was

demoted to 8th and so Ferrrari imposed a grid penalty on their second driver Felipe Massa. This meant that Alonso was now 7th and on the more important, cleaner side of the track and therefore set for a better start. He took full advantage of this and jumped straight into 4th. Vettel started well and led from the start, never more than 3-4 seconds from Hamilton. The German led through the pit stops but eventually succumbed to fantastic pressure from Hamilton on Lap 42. After Webber had to retire from 3rd, Alonso moved up, and despite some chopping and changing finished the race in that position. Vettel couldn’t claw 1st back from Lewis Hamilton, despite setting a fastest time on the last lap. The championship is now left in Vettel’s hands with a 13-point lead going into the final race in Brazil. Red Bull, who needed only four points before the race, won the constructors’ championship comfortably. Vettel’s 18 points from finishing 2nd secured their win.

There will only be one winner – Alonso or Vettel, two modern day greats. Both are two-time World Champions, with Vettel - the youngest ever winner - being the most recent and with the better car. Although, the forecast is a 40% chance of rain – Alonso’s speciality. So with 13 points difference it could go either way. History gives us no guide, neither has done fantastically in Brazil; Vettel with one win and one podium, Alonso with no wins and no podiums. However the latter has won his two world titles in Brazil. In terms of the teams, Ferrari has a better history but Red Bull have won the last three. This unbelievable season comes down to one race, two drivers and arguably the most unpredictable and exciting track of the 20 raced this season – Interlagos. If I had to choose one driver, my money would be on Vettel; he’s too good a driver, in too good a car, with too much of a lead. Also with more wins and poles this season he probably deserves it. Roll on November 25 in Brazil.

I’m all ‘four’ Freddie’s fight He’ll be knocked for six

Jonny Byrne

SPORTS EDITOR Why is everyone so cynical about Freddie Flintoff boxing? I really don’t understand. “It’s a publicity stunt,” I hear you say. Well since when has boxing not been about publicity stunts? Feuds between apparent ‘rival’ boxers has helped to sell the sport for years, so what’s new? Ok, Freddie was a cricketer and

now he fancies his chances in the ring. That’s no different to any other ‘athlete’ who takes up boxing as a way to keep fit later in life and has a knack for it. Let him have a go. I’ll certainly be watching and I can be damn sure that most of those bad mouthing the motivation behind the fight will at least catch bits of it on YouTube afterwards. Many sportsmen and women are talented in more than one sport. Fellow cricketer Ian Botham played football professionally in his youth. Freddie’s a big lad and who’s to say he won’t be able to put on a good show next week? We won’t know for sure until the fight is over, so for now stop all the boring pessimism and focus on the fact we might finally see Freddie put on his arse without the aid of booze.

Tom Bennett

DEPUTY SPORTS ED. Flintoff’s journey ‘from Lords to the Ring’ is obviously fuelled by money. He’s always been a big bloke you can see him throwing a decent punch - but I can’t see the merit in this one. He’s rarely been out of the spotlight throughout his cricket career and now his bowling has been battered and his batting has

been bowled-out, this is surely some attention-seeking attempt to thrust himself into the limelight once again. His Wikipedia page even describes him as a ‘professional boxer’. Reminds me of the time I went on the site and made myself the Premier League’s all-time top scorer for a few hours - seems fairly suspicious. A recent interview quotes him saying: “I got punched a lot!”… No sh*t, Sherlock, you’re training to be a boxer. That’s like Michael Owen saying: “I seem to get injured a lot!” What makes this worse is that it’s not even for charity. But even if it was for a good cause, £50 to see Flintoff hit the ground like a sack of potatoes after 20 seconds? Worth it? It’s time to raise his bat, trot back to the pavillion and retire after a more than respectable innings.


24 sport Ash Hover takes a look at this month’s sporting champ and chump Who cares that ‘it’ was over a week ago. Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s wonder strike against England engraved his name into the footballing Gods’ history books, and there is no way ‘Ibra’ is ever being rubbed off. The only player to have scored for six clubs in the Champions League became the first person to score a hat-trick against the Three Lions since Marco van Basten at Euro 1988, and in such style. Each of his four goals on the night were brilliant; from the simple leathered free-kick, to the sublime taekwondo-esque tekkers which astounded the world in the final few minutes - tekkers that John Motson voted the best goal he’s ever seen. Scoring more than one every two games throughout a 13-year-long career, and with a few seasons left in him, can Ibra get any better?

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

The Froch Factor Jordan Key

Imagine a man with a chin carved of the strongest granite. A will to win unrivalled by any sportsman, who can shatter an opponent’s hopes and dreams with one malicious shot to the ribs. Carl Froch is that man, not only that, he is ‘the’ man. So, with these divine

qualities why hasn’t he broken into the public consciousness like a Hatton, Bruno or Eubank? Last Saturday night 10,000 fans flooded the Capital FM arena to watch their man tear through another victim. Philadelphia’s Yusuf Mack was wiped out by ‘The Cobra’ who looked ominous in front of his home town support. This is just the most recent of Carl Froch’s legendary evenings. Three times world champion, his last nine fights taking on only the other elite

fighters in the world. After losing to Andre Ward, experts said Froch was done, past it, finished. He ignored the warnings and brought in unbeaten Lucian Bute from Canada. Froch was a big as a 4/1 underdog to win. Yet he stilled himself once again and showed the world that the sheriff of Nottingham would not lie down. He demolished the Canadian in five rounds, a most brutal display. Many rank him as one of the most exciting fighters in the world, myself included. I’ve watched his fights with

WINNER

A desire for redemption

Hatton caption SOURCE

LOSER

Stewart Downing: Middlesbrough legend, Aston Villa star, Liverpool…flop. The £20million winger became the Reds’ fourth most expensive signing when he joined 18 months ago, but after a season which saw a grand total of no goals and no assists, it looks like Downing is being shown the other side of the Anfield doors. A career that showed so much promise in his ‘Boro days, and led to the first of 34 international appearances, is now heading in the wrong direction after boss Brendan Rogers told the Englishman that ‘talent alone’ would not be enough to save his Liverpool career. With Roy Hodgson nurturing a new breed of youngsters into his England side, is Downing’s shortlived career set to be over? At 28, he certainly has time to turn it around, but his limp Liverpool days have put him on par with Eric Djemba’s Manchester United failure.

He had hit the canvas and lay motionless as an ecstatic Manny Pacquiao celebrated above him, staring through the blurred vision of a second knock-out defeat. Even Ricky Hatton’s most ardent supporter would have struggled to have seen a future in the sport for the 34-year-old, as Kenny Bayless held Pacquiao’s hand aloft at the MGM Grand on May 2, 2009. “After a lot of soul searching over the last couple of years, I have finally decided to confirm I will never box again and there will be no coming back.” Hatton spoke with the conviction of a man that had lost his fire, lost his inspiration and lost his fight when he confirmed his boxing retirement in July 2011. Although the stereotypical sporting comeback is never totally speculative, Hatton’s career was

Gerrard Caps 100 Steven Gerrard gained his 100th international cap for England in the friendly against Sweden, which the three lions lost 4-2. Jess Long takes a look through the scouser’s England highs and lows through the years

Ricky Hatton returns to the ring this Saturday after retiring in 2011. Craig Rodhouse looks at Hatton’s spectactular sporting comeback.

about to go completely off the rails. Following Hatton’s quick-fire second round defeat to Pacquiao, the Manchester fighter was left scratching his head as to where to go next. His decision. An unconventional return to the ring in Sheffield as he defeated wrestler Chavo Guerrero in WWE’s flagship Monday Night RAW

event in November 2009. Hatton, England’s best pound-forpound fighter in recent years had resulted to the theatrical spectacle of wrestling to engineer a return within the ropes, where did it all go wrong? It was a question that the sporting world was struggling to get their heads around, but things were to

HATTON v SENCHENKO 34

AGE

35

5ft 6in (1.68m)

HEIGHT

5ft 10in (1.78m)

65in (165cm)

REACH

70in (178cm)

Orthodox

STANCE

Orthodox

47

TOTAL FIGHTS

33

45

WINS

32

32

WINS BY KO

21

2

LOSSES

1

Given his debut by Kevin Kegan in 2000, in an international friendly against Ukraine. His career started with victory as England took the match 2-0

2000

fans, casual fans and even people who oppose combat sports, but all go away with big smiles on their faces. Froch deserves to be a name like Ricky Hatton, with similar heart on the sleeve passion and edge of the seat entertainment. Unfortunately it may be too late for the 35-year-old, who even the great Joe Calzaghe ran from. I urge you to spend one Saturday evening away from Match of the Day when Froch fights next, and then dare you to not fall in love.

soon get worse as drug and alcohol allegations further tarnished Hatton’s reputation. In September 2010, Hatton was admitted to a rehabilitation centre to help tackle a drink and depression problem. He was also photographed apparently snorting lines of cocaine in a hotel room, whilst reports also surfaced of a drunken night out where Hatton allegedly drank eleven pints of Guinness, along with shots of Sambuca and Vodka. Hatton had surrendered his greatness and the disillusioned fighter revealed that his girlfriend even had to prise a knife from his hands as depression took its toll and he attempted to take his own life. His fall from grace was spectacular, going from back page hero to front page villain in a matter of months. But the Hitman is heading back into the ring this Saturday as he aims to complete a sensational boxing resurrection. Hatton takes on the Ukrainian Vyacheslav Senchenko at the Manchester Arena on Saturday, with the Mancunian revealing his comeback decision was motivated by his desire for redemption amongst his family, friends and fans. And it seems as though the public are more than willing to allow Hatton to realise this ambition. Hatton’s comeback bought sold out in less than 48 hours. But despite Hatton’s revelations, the 34-year-old hasn’t chosen an easy route back into boxing’s good books. The 35-year-old Senchenko, despite entering the twilight of his career, is a former Welterweight World Champion and only lost this title in April when he suffered his first professional defeat. Whatever the outcome, Hatton is certainly on the right track to atoning for his previous misdemeanours and regaining his rightful place back amongst the British boxing elite.

Scored England’s second goal in the historic 5-1 annihilation of Germany in 2001

A groin injury caused him to miss the 2002 World Cup in Japan and South Korea. He did try to get fit for the tournament but decided playing may have repercussions for his later career

2001

2002


sport 25

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

The only way is Wessex Jasper Taylor

DEPUTY SPORTS ED.

During London 2012, it is fair to say a golden wave of patriotism swept through a proud nation. Being British felt great again and there was nothing more British than the location of the beach volleyball, Horse Guards Parade. Big Ben, the Houses of Parliament, the London Eye and the rather regal Horse Guards Parade building overlooked the venue. It’s a surprise foreigners didn’t saunter out with a cuppa, wish their friends tally-ho before walking a few paces to Buckingham Palace and confessing their love for our monarch. Amidst the momentous monuments was 2,274 tonnes of sand, 15,000 lively, ogling onlookers and two British ladies. One of those ladies was Zara Dampney. “It was unbelievable”, she begins, “I felt so supported and comfortable playing on Centre Court because everyone wanted us to do well and win.”

“We can compete with the best in the world ” Dampney was born in nearby Christchurch and begun her love affair with volleyball at Parkstone Grammar School. She represented Britain at just 16 years of age, whilst playing for Wessex Volleyball Club. Ten years later, Dampney found herself sat next to Shauna Mullin representing Team GB. “I feel

happy I have completed a huge goal of mine. I feel relaxed about that but now I’m finding my way, developing new goals and figuring where my next focus will be.” The duo finished up in a respectable 17th place but Dampney will be the first to tell you they could have done better. “We weren’t happy with the consistency of our performances. We have shown we can compete with the best in the world for a set or match but not enough to get a result at a major tournament.” The Olympics is not just about winning though. Just ask Hammadou Djibo Issaka, the rower from Niger who won the hearts of the world after finishing over nine minutes behind the race winner, and Dampney can find many positive effects the Games has had. “It was amazing for volleyball. I know numbers wanting to participate have gone up which is great and hopefully we’ll get more athletes at the highest level competing for spots.” The benefits weren’t just to the sport though, as a personal fan base for Dampney grew with each match. “I’m just a normal person playing a sport I love so it was a little weird to experience that but then I come home and all my friends and family are the same around me so it doesn’t last for long!” Since the Games though, Dampney has rejoined her childhood club, Wessex Rocare Ladies. “I had my break after the Games and missed the sport. I missed the competitiveness and the team aspect so I was keen

to get playing. I began at Wessex and some of my old team-mates are there so I wanted to play with them too.”

I felt so supported and comfortable playing on Centre Court

The Dorset side have a habit of nurturing the best volleyball players in the country and Dampney puts this down to the tight-knit ethos the club creates. “It’s like a family where everyone is friends and so it keeps the kids in the club and playing the sport, which is key when you’re a teenager and wanting a social life.”

At this point, thoughts dart a little further into the future, to a place that won’t have to import any sand: the golden beaches of Rio in 2016. “I hope to be representing Team GB but it’s a long way away. We will start training on the sand in January but we will be doing physical stuff before that. I am looking forward to getting back into it.” Dampney’s excitement about Rio will be shared by a lot of new, post-Olympic volleyball fans, as the sport’s popularity continues to grow. So don’t be surprised if the next time you visit your local beach you’re greeted by hordes of people squabbling over the last free court. Hmm, it’s beginning to sound more British already.

Dampney waves to the excited crowd at Horse Guards Parade MINKOFF

Gerrard saw his penalty saved by Portugal goalkeeper Ricardo, as England left the 2006 World Cup in Germany

He was one of the team’s only successes at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa after taking over the captaincy from Rio Ferdinand. His performance on and off the pitch was admired by many

This February he was overlooked as captain by Stuart Pearce during his time as caretaker manager. Pyscho instead chose Scott Parker to lead the side in a friendly against the Netherlands in February

2006

2010

2012

Gerrard was the only England player to make UEFA’s ‘best of Euro 2012’ squad following his performances in Poland and Ukraine

Devil's Advocate

Not a pain in the Arsene Jasper Taylor

DEPUTY SPORTS ED. Arsenal are a bit like the fat kid at school that gets picked on. Every year, the kid buys a new chocolate bar that he thinks will make him healthier but in reality just makes him fatter. In turn, the kid gets bullied even more (we don’t condone it, but we know it happens). Anyway, the point is, Olivier Giroud is not an unhealthy chocolate bar. And that is the premise of the rest of this column… The French front-man has been labelled the newest of Wenger’s flops up top, finding himself in the esteemed company of legends such as Nicklas Bendtner and Marouane Chamakh. I don’t think this is fair though, and the statistics seem to agree. In fact, it seems he’s not even too far off the talismanic, Arsenal prophet that he replaced – Robin van Persie. Let’s break down his statistics so far this season, correct as of the weekend North-London derby win. Giroud has played 984 minutes in total, although it might feel like a hell of a lot longer than that for some pessimistic Gunners. His time on the pitch has been effective though, with seven goals and four assists this season, which equates to being an integral part of a goal every 89 minutes. Some might say this isn’t prolific enough so let’s compare it to the league’s top scorer, Luis Suarez. He’s played 1418 minutes, scored 13 goals and managed 3 assists, meaning he has a goal-scoring impact every 89 minutes too. Anyone would think that, with the praise Suarez is receiving, he was some sort of Mother Theresa type figure on and off the pitch. Comparatively, the abuse Giroud receives would lead you to think he was sniffing cocaine off the chest of underage hookers every week but he’s statistically as good as the Uruguayan. When the big man does score a goal, it seems Arsenal don’t lose. In the six games he’s scored in, the Gunners have won four and drawn two. So maybe Arsenal fans should cut him some slack? He’s actually only statistically marginally worse than Van Persie was last season, with the prolific Dutchman scoring or creating a goal every 85 minutes. He was fairly cheap to at only £13million, half that of Suarez and a third of what Arsenal got for RVP. So, Arsene, gorge on that chocolate bar all you like because there’s many health benefits to it. And don’t listen to those playground bullies, they’re just


26 sport Ash Hover takes a look at this month’s sporting champ and chump Despite a rocky start, Stuart Lancaster cannot be praised enough this week as his Three Lions side ended New Zealand’s 20 match unbeaten run. Sports writers everywhere were forced to rethink their pre-written obituaries for the England coach after his side thumped the All Blacks 38-21 last Saturday, and although Lancaster hasn’t enjoyed the best of starts since guiding the team to four wins from five games as interim boss during the Six Nations, a win like this will do wonders for the spirits in the dressing room. Although still a while away, Lancaster would surely love to see out his contract, which expires in 2016, and enjoy a 2015 World Cup hosted right here, at home. For now, English rugby fans across the country are just happy to see Chris Ashton’s swallow dive back on the field. The defeats to Australia and South Africa can’t be completely written off, but inflicting the All Blacks’ heaviest-ever Test defeat by a northern hemisphere side makes Lancaster this week’s sporting winner.

WINNER

LOSER After three miserable years, where not a single point was scored, it looks as though HRT are set to lose their F1 drive for the 2013 season. A number of drivers, including Aryton Senna’s nephew, Bruno, all failed in scoring points for the Constructors Championship outfit whose highest ever result in F1 comes in at an uninspiring 14th place. At the 2012 Chinese Grand Prix, HRT set the undesirable record of having the most starts (39) without scoring a single point. I know people say it’s the taking part that counts, but somehow HRT never really thrust their way into the sport. The team owners put the it up for sale last week, but the deadline was missed, meaning they could become the latest F1 dropout, leaving just 22 cars on the grid for 2013. HRT now look to be following in the footsteps of the likes of Honda and Super Aguri, who were the last team to be forced to drop out of the sport in 2008.

Thursday 6 December 2012 | The Rock

Looking ahead - next year’s tennis Marcin Bryszak

The 2012 tennis season was a well balanced year, with variety in the shape of four different Grand Slam winners. Andy Murray finally joined the club, triumphing at the US Open. There was the solid comeback of Juan Martin Del Potro, who may be a Grand Slam contender again in 2013. But Rafael Nadal’s injury and absence since Wimbledon has provided something of an early anticlimax to the season. Rest assured, though, Nadal will be coming back, and possibly stronger than ever before. His aim - to make a return at the 2013 Australian Open. With Nadal there, we can breathe a sigh of relief and think about the upcoming year. In 2013 we will be seeing more of ‘The Spanish Bull’, but less of ‘The Swiss Maestro’ Roger Federer, who has decided to skip the 2013 Miami Masters. A sensible move, considering that Fed has a wife, and two little daughters, who travel with him around the world. There is also his age - Federer is 31 - which, in tennis terms, is old. He will be preserving himself and

practising more than last year to once again challenge for the biggest titles on the circuit. For Andy Murray, it will be yet more opportunities for success, and hopefully less opportunities to get frustrated with himself - often demonstrated vividly with moans, shouts and bruised knuckles, banging against the strings of his racket. No. This is new and improved Murray. This is Ivan Lendl’s Murray - a mentally stronger, more mature, piece of athletic magnificence. With the right attitude, and the right people by his side, there are not many players who can stop him from winning another one of these ‘Majors’. But, there is always Novak Djokovic with his Mr Fantastic-like flexible body. His agility gives the man a great ability to turn defence into attack from any position on the court with just one shot. There is also his mental strength, which if anything, is even more impressive than his athletic abilities. Yes, he did lose more matches last season than in his magnificent year of 2011, but ‘Mr Consistent’ still managed to cap off the year with a brilliant win at the ATP World Tour finals and clinch the year-end number one spot. I expect Djokovic to do even greater things in 2013. Completing a Career Slam with a

win at the French Open would be the greatest of them all. Other highlights of the year will include Juan Martin Del Potro continuing his strong comeback from a wrist injury, after an impressive 2012 season, where he won four titles and an Olympic bronze medal. He can bully other players with a massive serve and groundstrokes. This gives him a shot of winning the biggest of titles. The usual suspects who will trouble the top players are the relentless ‘rottweiler’, David Ferrer, ‘the giant’ that is Tomas Berdych, and ‘Muhammad Ali’ - Jo-Wilfired

Tsonga. Each on their best days can cause an upset. 2013 shall be a year of comebacks, where the intense rivalry will be renewed to give us some of the most wonderful emotions and entertainment. More 2013 comebacks: - After many players’ complaints about the quality of the blue clay, the red clay will be making a comeback at the Masters 1000 tournament in Madrid. - Where is Robin Soderling? He may never again play professionally after suffering from glandular fever since the summer of 2011.

Rafael Nadal has had a season tainted by knee injuries YANCARADEC

Bournemouth gets its first marathon Ben Fisher

Sport BU hope to be involved with the first ever Bournemouth Marathon, which will take place in October next year. Talks between Sport BU and organisers GSi events - who run the Edinburgh marathon - are at an initial stage. “We are trying to work a relationship with them and we’re hoping something more formal will come out. “There’s a reputation at stake with the University and they [GSi events] want us to assist, but in what capacity, that’s what we need to discuss,” said Barry Squires, Sport BU’s Head of Development. The 26 mile event will take place for the first time in the area, and will incorporate the Sandbanks peninsula and Bournemouth

gardens as well as both the Bournemouth and Boscombe piers into its route. Participants will be able to run up and down the piers in a unique twist to the international event. Squires said: “Obviously we’ve got students who are keen to volunteer and the community is there. We are now speaking to them about participation, whether it’s water stations or dealing with bag drops. “As a university that’s something we can offer. We have a responsibility to help. It will help student learning, students on events and tourism courses.” A half marathon, 10k, 5k, junior races and a unique UV Speed Light race through Bournemouth Gardens make up the Marathon Festival. The weekend-long event aims to raise money for MacMillan Cancer Support. The Sport BU chief added his excitement to which the event will impact upon local people. “It will only get bigger over time.

Looking at the Great South Run and how big that is, you can begin to understand how good it will be for the local community.” Squires did highlight one challenge which such a major event would provoke. “We need to look at our operations over that period, it’s the busiest time of the year for Sport BU, considering the new freshers influx at that time. “I’ve met with the main conference and events manager at the University, Nicole Wharf, and she’s been very supportive.” Squires is optimistic about the event, and the potential for Sport BU to be involved before highlighting that people have already signed up in numbers to the event. “Events like this will always need manpower, and we have that in students. “The marathon, which could attract some of the biggest names in athletics, will be a real coup for both the town and its university. “From a University prospective,

they’re always trying to broaden their reach, and it puts Bournemouth on the map. Some people in England don’t even know where Bournemouth is. “I think there will be a lot of pride for the people of Bournemouth,” Squires added. “Hopefully the marathon will kick-off more interest in the athletics and running clubs. We have a running club and the more members we can bring to that, fantastic. “The marathon will spike interest in running and we need to be able to supply the demand, which will occur. We don’t want runners to drop off, we want them to be part of an athletics clubs or taking part in a ‘Park Run’ – a national brand – which sees a route through the university.” The Sport BU chief also insisted that anyone thinking about taking part in the event, at whatever distance, must ensure they train. “They need to be able to know they are confident running that distance,” Squires said.


sport 27

VARSITY

VARSITY

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Despite only starting two years ago as a society, Bournemouth University’s lacrosse team looks set to be a successful squad this season BALL

Success as lacrosse team scoop funding and talent Maisie Buchan

Bournemouth University’s undefeated Lacrosse team are going from strength to strength. They competed in a regional league in the 2011/12 season and this year they gained the elusive Varsity status. The men’s team captain Dom Garcia and vice captain Jamie Morris want to give a better understanding of the sport, other than just ‘the one they play in American Pie’. Ben Piper, who had been heavily involved in the Wales international set up, started at Bournemouth University in 2010 and was disappointed to discover there were no lacrosse teams or clubs. After starting up the society, its potential for success grew quickly, as Dom explains: “SportBU picked up on the growing interest for the club and helped fund our first competitive year in 2011/12 in the regional league. It’s a sport we’re all really passionate about.”

Dom disagrees with the misconception that lacrosse is an unknown or alternative sport in the UK, and fears this could be down to a “preppy girls school reputation”, which is far from reality. Lacrosse is a field sport played in similar terms to football, except with the added use of the lacrosse stick to pass the ball and much more physical contact. “Lacrosse is technically the fastest growing sport in the country and participation is well into the tens of thousands nationwide. The sport is much bigger in the north compared to the south, with already established junior leagues feeding into its senior teams.” Jamie said: “Last year, we had only one or two people who knew the sport.” However, many of last season’s new players have stayed on. “The great thing about this year is that we have a very good balance of freshers to experienced heads. We can put out a full team of people who are experienced at the sport, and substitute in freshers one or two at a time, so that they do not feel overwhelmed by it all.” As well as an increase in participation, financing from

SportBU has greatly benefited the squad. Lacrosse equipment doesn’t come cheap and due to the nature of the sport, proper kit is essential, not just jumpers for goalposts. SportBU bought the team brand new matching team helmets and protective gear. “It really takes the pressure off the new recruits and allows them to learn the sport and take it at their own pace without worrying about shelling out for the necessary equipment,” said Dom. Although last season SportBU kitted out the team for their games, Dom agrees that “becoming a varsity team probably helped us in terms of new equipment from SportBU. But this isn’t to say it isn’t merited - last year in our debut season we managed to finish fourth in a league full of established teams. This year we are undefeated from our first four games.” He also believes the interest in the club comes from the desire to try something new. The team adhere to a punishing schedule, training four or five times a week. This dedication indicates why the decision to promote them to varsity was made. As Dom puts it, “the proof is in the pudding.”

LACROSSE: the season so far Western 2A

MEN’S TEAM P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

Aberystwyth 1st

3

3

0

0

35

9

2

BU 1st

3

3

0

0

19

8

3

Exeter 2nd

4

2

0

2

5

6

Western 2A

WOMEN’S TEAM P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

5

Glouc. 1st

3

1

0

2

-2

3

6

BU 1st

3

1

0

2

-15

2*

7

Southampton 2nd

2

0

0

2

-23

0

TABLE CORRECT AT TIME OF PRINT


28 sport

VARSITY

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

Netball girls make next round of cup Jess Long

Bournemouth University Netball Club Seconds are through to the last 16 of the cup with a 65-22 win against the University of West England (UWE). With a number of injuries and players out with illness, the team took a different shape than usual with a debut for Olivia Scott at Goal Attack. The girls settled into the game straight away with captain Rachel Ackerman controlling the game at Wing Attack and enthusiastically encouraging her team. Scott and Courtney Dobson were flawless in the shooting circle, converting the teams’ dominance into goals and this continued when Chantal Hamilton came on at Goal Attack later in the match. The new defence duo of Kayley Doyle and Olivia Gunningham were on fire in the circle and restricted the accurate UWE shooters to only a few goal-scoring opportunities. There was a slight disruption in play when Wing Defence, Carly Gale, had to leave the court due to

SPORTBU

VARSITY FIXTURES

WEDNESDAY

28

NOVEMBER

2012

an ankle injury, but her replacement Hannah Beard quickly settled into Bournemouth’s easy style of play. The final quarter saw the girls stretch UWE further, with the teams’ fitness allowing them to continue with high intensity, which was particularly prolific in the centre of the court with Gabby Grant. Ackerman received player of the match for the second consecutive game, after UWE praised her positive attitude throughout the duration of the match. Bournemouth firsts are also in the last 16 after they were awarded a bye following their opponents being unable to field a team.

Bournemouth’s netball second team are taking the BUCS cup by storm this season LONG

BADMINTON

5 DEC UWE Men’s 1st VS BU Men’s 1st

BU Women’s 1st VS Glouc Women’s 1st

BASKETBALL

BU Men’s 1st VS Cardiff Uni Men’s 1st 5 DEC BU Men’s 2nd VS Winchester Men’s 2nd 5 DEC Soton Women’s 1st VS BU Women’s 1st

FOOTBALL

BU Men’s 2nd VS Uni of Glos. Men’s 3rd BU Men’s 3rd VS Bath Uni Men’s 3rd 5 DEC Glouc Men’s 1st VS BU Men’s 1st 5 DEC BU Women’s 1st VS Exeter Women’s 1st 5 DEC BU Women’s 2nd VS Solent Women’s 2nd

GOLF

BU Mixed 1st VS Cardiff Met Mixed 1st BU Mixed 3rd VS BU Mixed 2nd

HOCKEY

BU Women’s 1st VS Plym’th Uni Women’s 1st BU Women’s 2nd VS Swansea Uni Women’s 3rd 5 DEC BU Men’s 1st VS Exeter Men’s 4th 5 DEC BU Men’s 2nd VS Solent Men’s 1st

NETBALL

BU Women’s 2nd VS Bristol Uni Women’s 3rd 5 DEC Plymouth Women’s 1st VS BU Women’s 1st

RUGBY UNION

BU Men’s 2nd VS Soton Uni Men’s 3rd BU Women’s 1st VS Wales St. Trin Women’s 1st

SQUASH

BU Women’s 1st VS Cardiff Uni Women’s 1st

TENNIS

BU Men’s 1st VS Bath Uni Men’s 1st BU Women’s 1st VS Bath Uni Women’s 1st BU Men’s 1st VS Bath Uni Men’s 1st BU Women’s 1st VS Bath Uni Women’s 1st


The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Intramural football round-up Tom Bennett

DEPUTY SPORTS ED.

A Luc Baldwin hat-trick ensured Lyme Regis continued their dominance of the Bournemouth University Intramural Football League, with an 11-0 thrashing of ‘AC a-little-silhouette-of Milan’ last week. Tristan Ward, Tom O’Reilly and Pat May also grabbed one each whilst there were braces from Casey Warwick and Marlon ClarkWard. It was CSKA BU who recorded the biggest win of the week and of the season so far as they annihilated Winton Wanderers, beating them 15-1. Twelve different scorers hit the net for CSKA, who are only two points behind leaders Lyme and remain unbeaten. Hurbeck are also keeping up the pressure on the leaders with a convincing 6-1 win over Multiple Scorgasms. A hat-trick from Aaron

Bowers was among the highlights of the Chapel Gate fixture. Adam Titmuss’ single strike could not prevent Corfe Cougars going wild against Mottingham Forest. The win puts Corfe in fourth place whilst Forest sit down in 16th hovering near the bottom of the league. A resilient performance from Bayern Neverlusen saw them hop past Zuvic Grasshoppers as two stunning efforts from Andrea Avellano and Lee Monk added to Paul Wiggins’ double. Dean Caslake and Joe Upshall netted for Zuvic. Elsewhere, a late strike from Tom Barry cancelled out Adam Carrick’s opener as Banchester United and Shiza Stars contested a draw at Wallisdown. Unathletico breezed past Vooventus and BAMMJ Buffalos won a scrappy fixture against Winton White Warriors. Deportivo Lacka Talent celebrated a 6-0 rout against Obi 1 Kenobi 0 and Dave Bland’s Love Machines FC defeated RAF Bournemouth. Caslake of Zuvic Grasshoppers remains the league’s top scorer with eleven goals.

Winning streak continues in BU’s sport hall Alex Smith

Bournemouth University basketball Men’s 1st team will be hoping to take their good form into the BUCS Basketball Trophy tournament when they host Cardiff University Wednesday November 28. 
The BU squad are top of the Western A table after four wins from four, and will be looking to book a place in the quarter finals when they meet their opponents later this month. The two sides met in the Welsh

capital in October, with the visitors claiming the points thanks to a 57-67 win. 
BU progressed into the second round of the cup with home victory over Exeter. 
The Badminton Men’s 1sts have also enjoyed a successful start to the season, setting the pace in the Western 2A division. 
They started the year by beating University College Plymouth St Mark & St John before seeing off both Southampton Solent and the University of Southampton. 
The team are scheduled to play the University of the West of England, as well as a Western Conference Cup last 16 fixture before the end of term.

sport 29

VARSITY

Varsity Results - 14th November 2012 HOCKEY

BASKETBALL BUCS Trophy

Exeter Uni Men’s 1st

71

BU Men’s 1st

64

BU Women’s 1st

Western Con. Cup

Exeter Uni Women’s 4th

3

1

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

Exeter 3rd

4

3

1

0

10

10

1

BU 1st

4

4

-

0

54

12

2

BU 1st

3

3

0

0

9

9

2

So’ton Solent 1st

4

3

-

1

61

9

3

UWE 1st

3

2

0

1

5

6

3

Exeter 1st

3

2

-

1

80

6

Bristol Uni Men’s 2nd

Western Con. Cup

BU Men’s 2nd

56

55

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

4

Winchester 1st

0

0

-

0

0

0

5

BU 2nd

1

0

-

1

-16

0

6

UWE 2nd

1

0

-

1

-28

0

FOOTBALL BUCS Trophy

2

BU Men’s 1st

47

Trinity St David Women’s 1st

32

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

BU 1st

3

3

0

0

54

9

2

Bath 3rd

4

2

0

2

3

6

3

Plymouth 1st

3

2

0

1

20

6

BU Women’s 2nd

Western Con. Cup

3

4

65

UWE Women’s 4th

22

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

Soton 2nd

3

1

0

2

-17

3

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

5

Soton 3rd

3

1

0

2

-42

3

6

BU 2nd

3

0

0

3

-6

0

Bristol Uni Women’s 2nd

4

BU Women’s 1st

0

UWE (Hartpury) 2nd

4

2

0

2

2

6

5

Bath 2nd

5

0

1

4

-5

1

6

BU 1st

4

0

0

4

-10

0

1

Winchester Uni Men’s 2nd

0

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

BU Men’s 2nd

4

Soton 1st

2

1

0

1

2

3

5

BU 3rd

2

1

0

1

0

3

6

BU 2nd

3

0

0

3

-7

0

BU Women’s 2nd

0

Soton Uni Women’s 1st

Western 2A

BU Women’s 1st

Western Con. Cup

Bath Uni Men’s 2nd

4

Western Con. Cup

NETBALL

4

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

SQUASH Western 1A

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

6

Cardiff 1st

5

1

-

4

-10

3

7

Swansea 1st

4

1

-

3

4

3

8

BU 1st

5

0

-

5

-20

-1

3

BU Men’s 1st

2

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

Western Con. Cup

Bristol Uni Men’s 2nd

3

Solent 1st

3

1

0

2

3

3

1

BU 1st

3

3

-

0

23

8

4

BU 2nd

3

1

0

2

-9

3

2

Exeter 4th

3

2

-

1

3

6

5

Soton 1st

3

1

0

2

-8

2

3

Exeter 3rd

3

2

-

1

7

6

GOLF

TENNIS Premier South

Cambridge Uni Women’s 1st

12

BU Women’s 1st

0

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

Bath 1st

5

4

1

0

40

13

2

Exeter 1st

5

4

1

0

36

13

3

BU 1st

4

2

0

2

0

6

BUCS Trophy

0

BU Men’s 2nd

Exeter Uni Men’s 2nd

12

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

Exeter 2nd

4

4

0

0

44

12

2

UBristol 1st

4

4

0

0

28

12

3

BU 2nd

4

1

1

2

-8

4

BU Men’s 1st

3.5

2.5

BU Mixed 1st

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

Exeter 1st

4

3

1

0

7

10

2

BU 1st

4

2

1

1

7

7

3

UW Newport 1st

4

2

1

1

3

7

Western 1A

Exeter Uni Mixed 2nd

4.5

BU Mixed 2nd

1.5

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

1

Bath 1st

4

3

1

0

8

10

2

BU 2nd

4

3

0

1

3

9

3

Exeter 2nd

4

1

3

0

3

6

BUCS POINTS

RUGBY UNION Western 2A

Exeter Uni Mixed 1st

Premier South

Bath Uni Men’s 4th

32

17

League

Cup

Indiv.

Total

24

Brunel

640

24

1

665

P

W

D

L

GD

Pts

25

Sheffield Hallam

629

6

0

635

6

UCP Marjons 1st

5

2

0

3

-36

3

26

Bournemouth

577.5

45

12

634.5

7

BU 1st

5

1

0

4

-55

3

27

Liverpool

629

0

0

629

8

UWE 2nd

5

0

0

5

-163

0

28

Southampton

573

18

27.5

618.5


30 sport

Thursday 22 November 2012| The Rock

A world of sport

Ash Hover examines what’s happening this week across the globe including Freddie Flintoff approaching the end of his journey from Lords to the Ring.

Boxing on Sky Now only just a week away, Andrew ‘Freddie’ Flintoff’s boxing career gets underway next Friday (30th) as he faces American novice Richard Dawson in a four-round fight in Manchester, which Frank Warren and rising British star Danny Price described as ‘car crash TV’. The 34-year-old has continually dismissed claims that it’s all a publicity stunt, but will Flintoff be able to make the transition from a four-day test match to a four minute fight? The world will be watching as he hopes to swap his fast-paced bowling for hard-hitting punches.

Cricket Australia Europa League Lazio welcome AVB’s Hotspurs to the Stadio Olympico tonight in a crunch Europa League tie. A win for the North London side would see them leapfrog the hosts into first place in Group J and all but secure progression into the knockout stages of the competition.

DP World Tour Championship

Australia go head to head with South Africa at the Adelaide Oval today in the second test match of the down under series. The first meeting was drawn as the tourists fought hard to keep the Aussies from taking all the spoils after captain Michael Clarke hit an unbeaten 259; the highest test score at the Gabba in Brisbane.

Rory McIlroy will be looking forward to ending the season in style at the DP World Tour Championship this weekend as the European Tour schedule comes to a close. The Northern Irishman has already sealed the Race to Dubai crown and also topped the US PGA Tour money list, in what has been a phenomenal season for the 23-year-old world number one.

From rubble to riches

Former Poole Town striker Charlie Austin celebrates a goal for his current employers at Turf Moor BURNLEY FC

Alex Smith

There’s a song Burnley supporters sing every time Charlie Austin scores: “He used to build walls, now he scores goals”. It’s a pretty simplistic summary of Austin’s rise from bricklayer to one of the most highly-rated players outside the Premier League, but it tells you all you need to know about the Clarets striker. He has found the net more than 100 times over the last four seasons, and already has 20 goals to his name this term. Austin even scored in eight consecutive appearances between September and October and his achievements haven’t gone unnoticed. “I always knew Charlie Austin could be a 20-goal a season striker, I just didn’t realise that season would be autumn,” one reporter tweeted. The 23-year-old also hit the headlines two weeks ago after he became Europe’s most prolific striker, ahead of the likes of Barcelona’s Lionel Messi and Real Madrid forward Cristiano Ronaldo. “I saw that on Sky Sports, sent him a picture and just said ‘that’s what dreams are made of’,” said Austin’s best friend and former team-mate Micky Hubbard. “It’s unbelievable what’s happened to him over the last few years. One

minute he’s playing up front for Poole Town and then he’s on telly and in every paper going. But he hasn’t really changed, he’s still the same old Charlie.” Austin’s story has been a remarkable one so far, but it’s not finished yet. He has been linked with moves to Arsenal, Newcastle, Fulham, Norwich and Reading in the January transfer window, and Josh McQuoid, who played alongside Austin at Turf Moor last season, believes he would be a success in the Premier League. “It’s up to him what he wants to achieve,” he explained. “There’s a lot interest in him now and I think he will get a move at some stage, if not in January then at the end of the season, but he has got the capability to play at a higher level. As long as he keeps his head down, I think he will do that.” It seems it will only be a matter of time before Austin is playing in the top flight and his former manager Tom Killick believes he can look forward to a successful future in the game wherever he goes. “What’s brilliant is that he’s going to make a good career out of it,” he said. “That’s what I hoped would happen when he went to Swindon but I don’t think anyone could predict how things would work out. “He might stay in the Championship for a couple of years or he might get a move to the Premier League, but whatever happens he has still done brilliantly.”


sport 31

The Rock | Thursday 22 November 2012

Cherries heroes are fan-tash-tic

Manager Eddie Howe’s return hasn’t been the only notable addition at Dean Court in recent weeks. Five members of the Cherries squad, including captain Miles Addison and former England goalkeeper David James, have been growing moustaches in support of the men’s health awareness campaign Movember. The players have teamed up with supporters to try and beat last year’s total of almost £700, and winger Josh McQuoid is pleased to see the club backing the charity. “It’s a great cause,” he said. “There are people in the game who have suffered from prostate cancer, and it’s important that we do our bit to try and raise awareness and some money too.” McQuoid has been in fine form this month, finding the back of the net on three occasions, but was quick to play down suggestions that his facial hair was a key factor behind his impressive performances. “There was a big picture of me in the paper the other day and I thought I looked like a gremlin,” he joked. “I don’t think my girlfriend would be happy if I kept it because she hates it. I think I will just grow my beard back at the end of the month.” To donate or for more information visit movember.com.

From the kit room Ben Fisher The changing-room is scattered full of shin-pads, muddy white socks, flash Nike trainers, football boots ranging 7½ to 13, as well as the trusted whiteboard. Red leather pew-like seating invites the Cherries’ playing staff into the dressing room, as does their immaculately laid out kit, all courtesy of 19-year-old Chris Jeffes (pictured). Despite his tender years, Jeffes has shown maturity in the role

after taking over from veteran kitman Mike Dowding last season. “I thought I was the youngest [kit-man] but at Yeovil, there’s an 18-year-old. I suppose I’ll just have to go for the longest serving then,” he said. Born and bred in Bournemouth, Jeffes has been at the club for three years but kit-man for just one. “I love the job. Not that many people get the opportunity to work closely with players they have supported. I get to travel with them, eat with them and there’s plenty of banter too.” Convinced that the bond isn’t down to the sheer volume of kit

on his hands, Jeffes continues to talk about the laughs he has enjoyed inside the club, and those that sometimes spill over into extra pressures and pranks. The biggest prank involving former Bournemouth manager Harry Redknapp. “I was told Harry needed a full kit labelled up and everything prior to the Yeovil game. I was panicking, rushing around into all sorts of different rooms. I didn’t have three key parts of the kit, so I was running down the club shop, I even rang JD Sports. “Obviously I was desperate to get hold of the stuff, how could Harry Redknapp come here and not have the kit ready for him? It was only when I checked my phone again and the manager told me - they’ve got you.” Jeffes grins as he explains that Iraqi goalkeeper Shwan Jalal even brought in dye for him to mix-up, in a bid to appease the match officials. “It was the wrong shade of green. He actually tried wearing them on Saturday,” Jeffes chuckles. Laughing and joking aside, Jeffes insists the job can be very stressful, especially in the lead up to a game. “I get stressed on match days, home games aren’t as bad at all as the kit is here and I can always grab it but on Fridays when we leave the day before a game on the Saturday, I can’t stand it. “I’ve never forgotten anything hugely important as of yet, just the odd pair of socks,” he added. Jeffes is a real professional. He’s meticulous and places the same sparkling silver training top down three times, before ironing out the minute creases with his own hands – only now, he is happy.

MacDonald eager to sign new contract Alex Smith

What a difference a year makes. Tweleve months ago Shaun MacDonald was enduring a nightmare start to his Bournemouth career, just a matter of weeks after joining the club. But, in recent times the Welsh midfielder has been a key player in the Cherries’ revival under manager Eddie Howe. “I started well and was enjoying a run in the team, and then I ruptured something in the joint of one of my toes and it kept me out for a while,” he said. “Things are a bit different now. I still want to play as much as I did, but things are more positive and I’m much happier because I’m in the team week in, week out.” The 24-year-old, signed from Swansea last summer, has turned in some efficient and industrious performances, which have

prompted praise from the Cherries supporters. “The fans are the people we want to keep happy, and I think we are all in it together,” he said. “They want to see us doing well and winning games, and we want the same. If we all stick together, then I think we can be successful.” MacDonald has just over six months left on his contract at Dean Court and revealed that he would be keen to extend his stay on the south coast beyond this season. “I think we are both eager to get a deal done as soon as possible,” he explained. “I’m in no rush and I want to concentrate on doing well for Bournemouth, and I will leave all the contract side of things to my agent. That’s what he is there for and to help me focus on doing well for the club. “This is an ambitious club and it’s no secret that we want to get promoted in the next few years. If we could get up into the Championship, then who knows what could happen from there?”

Shaun MacDonald joined the Cherries from Swansea last season SEEKER

A word from

Richard Hughes

Lights. Camera. Action. Hughes on his experiences of being a pundit. You hear a lot of retired footballers say there’s no substitute for playing, and it’s true. I imagine coaching would come a close second, but after that spending your Saturday afternoons in a studio as a pundit is probably about as good as it gets. I got the chance to do the latter while I was playing at Portsmouth, when I was asked by the club’s press officer whether I would like to be part of Channel 5’s Italian football coverage. I grew up in Italy, played for Atalanta as a teenager and continued to follow Seire A after moving to England, so it was a chance for me to share my views on a subject I’m very passionate about. It was something I came to enjoy very quickly and I built up a good relationship with Mark Chapman, who was the show’s presenter. A couple of seasons later the coverage moved to ESPN and I’m now part of their team. Football is an easy game when you’re sat watching in a studio or at home, but being a pundit has its challenges. Sometimes you have to be critical. I know what it’s like to be judged by journalists and commentators, but I think it’s important to be honest and say what you see. This season I have moved into co-commentary. It’s certainly a more involved role than being a pundit and you have far less time to form your opinions on the key moments in games. One thing I’m very conscious of is that I want to add to the viewer’s experience. I think there are plenty of pundits who detract from the game and sometimes I find myself watching with the sound on mute, but there are some very knowledgeable ones too. For example, Terry Gibson, who works for Sky Sports, is very enthusiastic, but his timing and reading of the game is also outstanding. I love football and I feel very fortunate to have been given a platform to voice my views, and it’s certainly given me a new found respect for the people who broadcast the beautiful game.


32 sport

Thursday 22 November 2012 | The Rock

Lewis is Grabban his chance to shine

I don’t believe it! Stroke of bad luck Darts fans have issued an apology to Ted Hankey after accusing him of playing while drunk - when he was having a stroke. At last Tuesday’s Grand Slam of Darts, he suffered an embarrassing 5-0 defeat to Michael van Gerwen, a match in which he missed the board twice. The 40-year-old reacted to his awful performance saying: “I was shocking. I have had the flu since Sunday night and couldn’t see out of my left eye.” Manager David Stevenson later revealed the results of a hospital scan, showing that Hankey suffered a stroke. Fans caught mocking Hankey earlier in the week have been forced into a grovelling apology. Bad karma?

Rocket Ron fails to lift off Andrea Avellano

Lewis Grabban is more than proving his worth in front of goal and has been paramount in the Cherries turning around their season AFCB

Jasper Taylor

DEPUTY SPORTS ED. Since rejoining the club last month, Eddie Howe has been getting the best out of his players. Perhaps none more so than Lewis Grabban, who looks like he is finally proving himself in League 1 and has his sights set on even bigger things. Grabban showed his delight at his masterful hat-trick to help the Cherries cruise to a 4-1 win over Oldham last weekend, “It feels good to get my first career hattrick and get the win as well.” The 24-year-old dominated teams in League 2 last season for

Rotherham, but some critics were doubting his credentials to perform in the next league up, with only three goals before his recent hat-trick. He is determined to carry on improving though, “I’m not getting complacent, I’ll just keep working hard on the training pitch, keep doing what I’m doing and not become lazy.” Howe was equally delighted at the striker’s match-winning performance against Oldham, “I thought he took his goals really well, I thought the second goal especially was a great, great finish.” The rejuvenated performances at the Goldsands Stadium have created an optimistic mood around the club and Grabban has set his sights on

promotion, “We have to aim for the Championship, there’d be something wrong if we weren’t. The players that we’ve got all have ambitions to be in the Championship, if not higher.” The Cherries are moving in the right direction since Howe returned, although the 34-year-old knows his team has a long way to go to reach their goal of promotion, “We’re creeping up the table but we’re not about to shout from the rooftops, we’re happy to go under the radar and just try to win as many games as we can. “We want to keep the momentum, game by game. We’re really pleased where we are at the moment but I’ve said all along we’re not getting

carried away, there’s still work to do. We’re not the finished article but we’re certainly going in the right direction.” Bournemouth next travel to Giggs Lane to play struggling Bury, before their potentially tricky FA Cup 2nd round away clash with Carlisle on December 1.

Turn to page 31 for the latest news on AFC Bournemouth

Ronnie O’Sullivan’s withdrawal from the 2012-2013 snooker season is a devastating blow for the sport, and could be curtains for his time on the green baize. The Rocket has pulled out due to ‘personal issues’, having suffered with glandular fever for some time now. There is also the more documented reason of the ‘onerous’ contract, which sees players travel around the world for 50 weeks of the year, playing in front of small audiences at most PTC ranking events. A crowd pleaser without a crowd never goes down well. Having recently separated with the mother of his two young children, O’Sullivan has stated that his priorities are with his young family, and who are World Snooker to argue against that? Many claim that his ‘genius’ is the biggest ticket in the sport, the most ‘naturally talented’ player the sport has ever produced. Ronnie is the easily most famous snooker player since becoming the youngest UK Champion at 17 in 1999 and the player who spectators pay good money to see. Has snooker lost its prodigal son? The answer to that question is, yes, and it hurts every bone in my body to say that.

The Bournemouth Rock – Issue 9  

The Bournemouth Rock is an independent quality newspaper providing a compelling mix of original news, sports, features and opinion. The dyna...

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