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PREPARING GLOBAL CITIZENS


RONALD BAECKER

TAGLAB

DANIEL HILL ’51, ’60

ROBERTSON DAVIES

93

GRADUATE STUDENTS

RON DEIBERT

4,000

PIONEERED THE FIGHT AGAINST INTERNET CENSORSHIP

2,000 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

ARCHIBALD GOWANLOCK HUNTSMAN ’05 JOHN CUNNINGHAM MCLENNAN ’92, ’00

FIFTH BUSINESS

NORMAN JEWISON ’49

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT

ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

ROHINTON MISTRY ’82

THE DISCOVERY OF COSMIC RAYS

FROZEN FISH FILLETS

FARLEY MOWAT ’49

STEPHEN LEACOCK ’91

INVENTION OF FAST-

NEVER CRY WOLF

SUNSHINE SKETCHES OF A LITTLE TOWN

JAMES GUILLET ’48

DISCOVERY OF PHOTO DEGRADABLE PLASTIC

JAMES ORBINSKI ’98

DIGNITAS INTERNATIONAL

DAVIDSON BLACK ’06, ’09

A FINE BALANCE

CANCER DETECTION LAB ON A CHIP

MICHAEL ONDAATJE ’65

200,000 ALUMNI IN 174

DISCOVERY OF PEKING MAN

26,000 UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

WILLIAM LYON MACKENZIE KING ’95, ’96, ’97 ARTHUR MEIGHEN ’96 LESTER B. PEARSON ’19 PAUL MARTIN ’61, ’64

G8 RESEARCH GROUP

JOHN MCCRAE ’94, ’98

THE ENGLISH PATIENT

CANADIAN PRIME MINISTERS

MARSHALL MCLUHAN

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

AARON WHEELER

DEAD RINGERS

DAVID CRONENBERG ’67

4

THE MEDIUM IS THE MESSAGE

POLLUTION PROBE

300 + UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

SCOTT TANNER

MASS CYTOMETRY INVENTOR

HISTORICAL ATLAS OF CANADA

E.F. BURTON ’01, ’10 CECIL HALL ’36 JAMES HILLIER ’37, ’38, ’41 ALBERT PREBUS ’40

PIER GIORGIO DI CICCO ’73, ’76, ’90 DENNIS LEE ’62, ’65 DIONNE BRAND ’75, ’98 JOHN STEFFLER ’71 TOM BOLTON

LORNE MICHAELS ’66

SOPHIE MILMAN ’11

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE

JUNO AWARD FOR JAZZ

NORTH AMERICA’S FIRST 55 CANADA RESEARCH CHAIRS ELECTRON MICROSCOPE

POETS LAUREATE

FIRST OBSERVATIONAL PROOF OF A BLACK HOLE

STUDIES ABROAD AT 127 INSTITUTIONS IN 38 COUNTRIES

NEW GRADS EACH YEAR

5,500

INVENTOR OF G-SUIT

ALEXANDER LEVY ’10

STUDENTS FROM 160 COUNTRIES

WILBUR FRANKS ’28

MY VOICE ATOM EGOYAN ’82

W.G. BIGELOW ’35, ’38

FIRST SPACE-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION

JOHN DOUGLAS ARMOUR ’50 ALBERT CLEMENTS KILLAM ’72 LYMAN POORE DUFF ’87, ’89 JOHN HENDERSON LAMONT ’92, ’93 HENRY HAGUE DAVIS ’07, ’09, ’11 WISHART FLETTSPENCE ’25 BORA LASKIN ’35 JOHN SOPINKA ’55, ’58 ROSALIE ABELLA ’67, ’70 MICHAEL MOLDAVER ’68, ’71 ANDROMACHE KARAKATSANIS ’78

PETER MCCOURT ROWAN SAGE TAMMY SAGE

WORLD’S FIRST ELECTRONIC HEART PACEMAKER JAMES DRUMMOND

11

SUPREME COURT JUSTICES

RESILIENT CROPS TO CURB WORLD HUNGER

THE SWEET HEREAFTER

DICTIONARY OF OLD ENGLISH

39 COLLABORATIVE GRADUATE PROGRAMS

BOUNDLESS COUNTRIES


FREE THE CHILDREN

BILL REEVES, ’76, ’80

MOTION BLUR ANIMATION

MARIAN PACKHAM ’49, ’54

MARGARET ATWOOD ’61

BLOOD CLOT PREVENTION

THE TIPPING POINT

MALCOLM GLADWELL ’84

CRAIG KIELBURGER ’07

RHODES SCHOLARS

ANAND AGARAWALA ‘06

6

THE HANDMAID’S TALE

JOHN TUZO WILSON ’30

NORTHROP FRYE ’33

KAY WORTHINGTON ’83 LORI DUPUIS ’97

OLYMPIC GOLDS

97

THE ANATOMY OF CRITICISM

DAVID BERKAL ’11

OPERATION GROUNDSWELL

SANG IK SONG ’11 JE SONG SHIN ’07

BUMPTOP

S

NORTH KOREA RESEARCH GROUP


PLATE TECTONICS

NOBEL PRIZE

A&S

LAUREATES BERTRAM N. BROCKHOUSE ’48, ’50 WALTER KOHN ’45, ’46 JAMES ORBINSKI ’98 LESTER B. PEARSON ’19 JOHN CHARLES POLANYI ARTHUR L. SCHAWLOW ’41, ’42, ’49

CONTENTS

2 4 6 14 20

PREPARING GLOBAL CITIZENS INVESTING IN A NEW GENERATION INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION AN ESSENTIAL PLATFORM FOR SUCCESS BOUNDLESS POTENTIAL


PREPARING GLOBAL CITIZENS What are the big challenges facing us today? Water, food and energy that are secure and renewable. Biodiversity that is preserved and protected. Societies that are innovative and inclusive, peaceful and prosperous. How can we meet these challenges—and be ready for the ones we will face tomorrow? These are big questions. Answering them requires bold ideas. It requires creative, collaborative leaders from diverse disciplines. And it requires fearless citizens who make change happen. The Faculty of Arts and Science has a storied tradition of thinkers, visionaries and innovators who have enriched their communities and the world. Marshall McLuhan showed us the technologies we use have a profound impact on our consciousness and our societies. Northrop Frye (BA 1933) taught us literary criticism can re-forge the link between creation and knowledge, myth and concept, art and science. Chemistry Nobel laureate John Polanyi revealed why some molecules release light, changing everything from gas analysis to DNA sequencing to children’s toys. Arts and Science faculty, students and alumni have responded to humanity’s great challenges with breakthroughs, insights and solutions. The same spirit of creativity, ingenuity and determination animates our campus today and inspires us to believe the discoveries we will make in the coming decades will rival those of the past. And we are well on our way. Our chemists and physicists are developing sustainable energy solutions. Our biologists, Earth scientists and geographers are devising how to remediate the environment and feed the global poor. Our humanities scholars are preserving traditional Aboriginal cultures and charting the evolution of the English language. Our political scientists are

2 PREPARING GLOBAL CITIZENS—FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE

working with foreign governments and NGOs to craft solutions to seemingly intractable conflicts. And our philosophers, linguists and psychologists are casting light on the mysterious workings of the human mind. These are only a few examples of the stunning depth and breadth of original knowledge that is being generated across the humanities, sciences and social sciences every day by our top-flight professors, and that is attracting the best students from Canada and around the world. We want to ensure these talented young people have every opportunity to become catalysts of positive change in every walk of life. To inspire and educate the next generation of global citizens to meet the challenges of our changing world, the Faculty of Arts and Science is launching a $250-million campaign, as an integral component of Boundless, the University of Toronto’s unprecedented $2-billion campaign. Here, you will learn about the cornerstone of this effort: a $75-million component that will fuel innovation in undergraduate education and bolster undergraduate and graduate scholarship support. Thank you for joining us as we prepare our students to enter our extraordinary alumni community of thinkers, visionaries and innovators and make their own storied contributions in the years to come. Dean David Cameron, FRSC Dean & Professor of Political Science


“The Faculty of Arts and Science is a university within a university, where undergraduate and graduate students have direct access to world-class professors who are defining the state of fundamental and applied knowledge.� Dean DAVID CAMERON is a political scientist who has applied his expertise on federalism, French-English relations, constitutional renewal and national unity to help post-conflict countries rebuild and reform their governance structures.


INVESTING IN A NEW GENERATION Students are at the heart of our enterprise. Every year, the Faculty of Arts and Science educates 26,000 undergraduate and 4,000 graduate students. We offer these young scholars an education that challenges their assumptions, stirs their imagination and prepares them for leadership in the world. Upon graduation, they join our global community of 200,000 alumni in more than 170 countries, among whom are Nobel-winning scientists and humanitarians, prime ministers and Supreme Court justices, internationally-renowned authors, leading public intellectuals and heads of major financial institutions. There is no better long-term investment in the future health and prosperity of our society than an investment in the education of young people at a time of enormous personal growth and discovery. Through the campaign for the Faculty of Arts and Science, we will build on the core values that have made our student experience great: constant innovation in undergraduate education and a deep commitment to supporting undergraduate and graduate students through merit- and needs-based awards.

4


INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION With a goal of $75 million, our campaign to prepare global citizens will seek $25 million in new philanthropic support to expand our innovative undergraduate programs that promote interdisciplinary thinking, smaller learning communities, international experiences and hands-on, original research projects.

AN ESSENTIAL PLATFORM FOR SUCCESS: STUDENT FINANCIAL SUPPORT The remaining $50 million will support scholarships that provide access and opportunity to our undergraduates, and attract the best domestic and international graduate students. Professor Howard Yee, Canada Research Chair in Observational Cosmology, with Vanier Scholars Charles Zhu and Jackie Radigan at the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics’ observatory dome. Charles is researching supernovae that verify the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Jackie’s discoveries, and her work on substellar objects such as brown dwarfs, have attracted the attention of the international astronomy community.


INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION The Faculty of Arts and Science educates global citizens who are ethically grounded and critically engaged—original thinkers with a broad perspective, ready to face challenges that defy borders, boundaries and disciplines. With more than 300 academic programs in every major discipline across the humanities, sciences and social sciences, and with the vast majority of our distinguished faculty teaching in these programs, the Faculty is uniquely positioned to offer an unmatched learning experience, especially in the all-important first year of an undergraduate degree. The campaign for the Faculty of Arts and Science will seek $25 million in strategic investments in undergraduate teaching innovations such as first-year learning environments, international learning experiences and research opportunities.

6 INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION—FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE


FIRST-YEAR LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

Enhancing the first-year student experience through more small-group learning is a key priority for the Faculty of Arts and Science. As the largest university Faculty in Canada, one that is the size of almost every other Canadian university, we admit approximately 5,900 students a year. About 75 per cent of first-year students do not live in residence. This large segment of students living off-campus, along with the size of some core gateway courses, can pose a challenge for the successful transition to university life. To foster academic success and a sense of community, the Faculty has pioneered such small-class innovations as the “199 First-Year Seminars.” With a maximum enrolment of 24, these courses encourage critical thinking, sharpen writing skills, foster confidence in oral presentation and introduce research methodology. We also have 30 first-year learning communities (FLCs) which engage some 650 students, who meet outside class with peer mentors to discuss everything from time management and study strategies to programs of study and potential career paths. Our goal is to create more opportunities for our entering students to interact with peers and faculty members through small-group seminars, mentorship programs and other innovative learning environments. Gifts to the campaign will ensure that our Arts and Science undergraduates receive all the advantages of a large, research-intensive university, within a community that is inspiring, engaging and collegial.

8 INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION—FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE


THE SOCRATIC EXPERIENCE

In the Department of Philosophy’s Socrates Project, undergraduates are given a true Socratic experience: learn philosophy by teaching it to others. Senior students lead tutorials with their first-year colleagues in an introduction to philosophy course. In these tutorials, teaching and learning are inseparable. First-year students engage in philosophical debates which are moderated by the student leaders—who in turn benefit from the perspectives, insights and questions of the younger students. Now in its sixth year, the Socrates Project was awarded the University of Toronto Alumni Association’s Northrop Frye Award for achievement in linking teaching and research. The Faculty’s goal is to ensure permanent funding for this program.

Senior philosophy students like Howard Williams and Timothy Piggott participate in seminars and collaborate with faculty members on research papers. They then share their new knowledge in the tutorials with first-year students.


INTERNATIONAL LEARNING EXPERIENCES

Because they will navigate a knowledge economy shaped by globalization, tomorrow’s leaders must have unprecedented fluency across cultural, business, social and political spheres. Gifts to the Faculty of Arts and Science will help integrate international perspectives into the curriculum. These investments will provide more opportunities for students to learn a foreign language, study abroad, participate in an international field school or conduct research on global issues. The Faculty aims to double the number of our students who participate in a significant international learning experience. One example of innovative initiatives underway is the popular International Course Module (ICM) program, which began as a pilot project and has now become a continuing feature of our undergraduate curriculum. This program allows students to add a brief, academically rigorous, international component to an existing upper-level course. Students who cannot afford an extended stay abroad for a number of reasons now have the opportunity to benefit from a program of study “in the world.” Past ICMs are as diverse as our Arts and Science undergraduates. Students have studied post-earthquake urban reconstruction in China. They have examined volcanoes in Chile. They have learned first-hand how post-war Bosnian society is inching toward reconciliation. And they have traveled to the renowned Edinburgh International Festival to collaborate on an artistic residency. Although the Faculty has expanded the number and types of international learning opportunities available to our undergraduates, we require significant additional investments to meet the growing demand for these life-transforming educational experiences.

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“When I studied in Shanghai, I’d go to lunch with my Chinese colleagues, and we’d continue our discussions over bowls of noodles and cups of bubble tea. As the days went by, there was a greater willingness to understand each other’s point of view.” U of T student Rajin Singh (right) took part in a comparative politics course at Fudan University in Shanghai, led by Professor Joseph Wong, Canada Research Chair in Democratization, Health and Development and the Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation at the Munk School of Global Affairs.


UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES

The Faculty of Arts and Science is committed to ensuring our undergraduates have ample opportunities to engage in original research. We offer a host of initiatives that allow students from second year onward to participate in professors’ research projects— on campus, in the community and abroad—alongside teams of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Tim Harrison, professor of Near and Middle Eastern civilizations, graduate student Jim Roames and undergraduate student Alex Mullan examine artifacts from digs led by U of T archaeologists. 12


Research opportunities nurture curiosity, analysis, synthesis and deep disciplinary knowledge in our undergraduate students. Not only do students benefit from the intellectual rigour of academic research, they also develop valuable skills and competencies. They learn to reason independently, challenge conventional wisdom, unearth new avenues of inquiry, and follow their line of questioning to a successful conclusion—essential abilities for any career path today.

UNCOVERING NEW KNOWLEDGE Across the humanities, sciences and social sciences, a key research opportunity is the field school. This is especially true in archaeology, where fieldwork can unlock clues to past civilizations which then fuel intercultural learning. And because archaeology is always adapting and testing new technologies and analytical methods, the training offered during field and lab research gives undergraduates highly transferable skills. Archaeology at U of T has a long and proud tradition. Today, our archaeologists and material culture specialists—from fields such as anthropology, art, classics, geography, geology, medieval studies, and Near and Middle Eastern civilizations—are engaged in groundbreaking research across Canada and throughout Africa, Asia and Europe. The Faculty seeks investments which support student participation in this world-leading research.

EXPLORING THE EARTH AND BEYOND We will also seek new support for research expeditions that explore biodiversity and the impact of human-induced climate change, including at U of T’s own Koffler Scientific Reserve, a unique centre for near-urban research, education and outreach located on the Oak Ridges Moraine. In addition, new investments will support astronomy students, who will conduct their own intensive research and receive technical training at such international observatories as our Helen Sawyer Hogg 0.6 m telescope in Argentina. These are only a few examples of research opportunities for which the Faculty is seeking philanthropic support.


AN ESSENTIAL PLATFORM FOR SUCCESS:

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT FINANCIAL SUPPORT At the Faculty of Arts and Science, our students gain more than a deep body of knowledge in a specific field. They acquire core skills in critical and creative thinking, as well as a solid grounding in ethics and quantitative reasoning. They also have access to an incredible array of highly-regarded programs across the humanities, sciences and social sciences, as well as leading scholars who are defining their disciplines. In short, our students benefit from a world-class education within one of the world’s great universities—in the very heart of one of the most successful multicultural and multi-faceted urban regions on the planet. Every year, more and more talented, high-achieving students are applying to the Faculty. But global competition for this talent is fierce and we are falling behind in our ability to offer comparable funding. Living expenses and education costs continue to rise, while our peers—both nationally and globally—are offering ever-larger scholarships. The Faculty’s endowment (which funds student awards through its annual interest) covers neither our current commitment to student aid, nor the burgeoning need. Each year, the Faculty draws from its own operating funds to meet the need. To ensure the Faculty continues to attract the top candidates, our campaign will seek $50 million in new investments in scholarships for both undergraduate and graduate students. Combined with the past generosity of visionary donors—who include many of our remarkable alumni—this new support will strengthen our efforts to ensure that all qualified candidates, regardless of their financial means, can pursue their academic dreams at the Faculty of Arts and Science. Together, we will foster a culture of excellence and opportunity that emboldens our students to succeed.

14 AN ESSENTIAL PLATFORM FOR SUCCESS—FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE


“When I was doing field research in the Arctic, Inuit hunters and elders shared with me their traditional knowledge. I am now devising a less invasive, genetic method of determining the age of polar bears.� Pamela Wong, a PhD candidate in ecology and evolutionary biology, also works with U of T faculty from geography, Aboriginal studies and Princess Margaret Hospital.


OPENING UP OPPORTUNITIES: UNDERGRADUATE MERIT AND ACCESS SCHOLARSHIPS

With a total undergraduate student body of 56,000—of which 26,000 are Arts and Science undergraduates—U of T welcomes proportionally more students from lower-income households, and devotes more of its operating budget to bursaries and scholarships, than most other Ontario universities. The Faculty of Arts and Science is dedicated to giving talented, qualified students, from every socioeconomic background, access to an unparalleled undergraduate education within our vibrant intellectual community. To ensure we continue to attract and nurture outstanding students, our campaign is seeking new investments in both access- and merit-based undergraduate awards. A scholarship opens the door to countless opportunities for academic, personal and professional growth. Not only do financial awards give students precious time to focus on their studies, they also provide well-deserved recognition for a student’s hard work and achievements. Funding an undergraduate scholarship is a direct way to connect with today’s students and support tomorrow’s leaders. The full impact of student financial aid is measured not only by what the recipients accomplish during their studies, but also by what they give back to their professions and communities throughout their entire lives.

16 AN ESSENTIAL PLATFORM FOR SUCCESS—FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE


“Thanks to my scholarship, I was able to study in the Middle East where I could interact with people who are actually facing the issues I’m researching. That’s what the university experience is to me—the opportunity to go beyond.” A recipient of the Dean’s Student Leadership Award, Jothi Shanmugam majors in peace, conflict and justice, as well as criminology.


ACCELERATING SUCCESSFUL SOCIETIES: GRADUATE EXCELLENCE AWARDS

Graduate students—and the original research they undertake—are essential to U of T’s global standing, as well as Canada’s competitiveness in the knowledge economy. These emerging scholars are also vital to the recruitment and retention of our leading faculty members. In turn, graduate students contribute to the excellence of our undergraduates’ education, by serving as mentors and teaching assistants. Delving into the unknown, exploring uncharted territory and testing new hypotheses, graduate students play an integral role in cross-generational research teams. Together with their faculty supervisors, they challenge the status quo, push boundaries and, ultimately, create new knowledge and advance their field of study. The Faculty of Arts and Science seeks philanthropic support to endow graduate awards across the humanities, sciences and social sciences. This crucial aid will ensure that we continue to compete at a global level to attract the best graduate students. As well as building support for domestic graduate students, there is a pressing need for more financial assistance for international students. These individuals pay much higher tuition fees and are not eligible for most granting programs from federal and provincial sources. Unlike several other provinces, Ontario does not provide perstudent grants to the University for international students, as is the case for domestic students. As a result, although we receive hundreds of applications every year from some of the world’s top candidates, we can admit only a small number. International graduate students enrich the intellectual climate and infuse seminar discussions with global perspectives. After graduation, a number of these highly qualified professionals choose to become permanent residents of Canada, a significant boon to our country’s intellectual, social and cultural well-being and prosperity. With students from more than 160 countries, the Faculty is a vibrant, multicultural community. Private support for both domestic and international graduate students will encourage these talented individuals to join us as they advance knowledge and seek solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

18 AN ESSENTIAL PLATFORM FOR SUCCESS—FACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE


“I’m exploring the neurogenetic underpinnings of positivity and well-being. If we can understand how these emotions are generated in the brain, we can apply this knowledge to create healthier and happier individuals and societies.� Hans Melo is a PhD candidate in psychology. Originally from Brazil and Mexico, he undertook studies in physics, Buddhism and cognitive science in the US, Hong Kong and England before coming to U of T.


BOUNDLESS POTENTIAL The Faculty of Arts and Science is a portal to international knowledge networks and a pipeline for the ideas that power innovative, successful societies. Our scholars, our scientists and our alumni are stewards of an illustrious tradition of discovery, insight and innovation, which has advanced knowledge and understanding, uncovered solutions to societal challenges and improved the lives of countless people, at home and around the world. We seek to prepare global citizens who have the knowledge, leadership skills and global fluency that are essential to meet the challenges of the 21st century and beyond. We are dedicated to providing our students with the academic benefits of a large, research-intensive, urban university with unprecedented expertise across the humanities, sciences and social sciences, coupled with collegial learning environments which rouse curiosity, spark creativity and stimulate critical thinking. We invite you to join with the Faculty of Arts and Science as we enhance, strengthen and transform our student learning experience. With your generous support, we will nurture our exceptional students and prepare them to enter a network of extraordinary alumni and friends in leadership roles across every sector of society, in every region of the globe. Together, we will harness the boundless potential of our community to make groundbreaking contributions toward a more prosperous world.

20 BOUNDLESS POTENTIAL窶認ACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE


The Faculty of Arts and Science has educated hundreds of thousands of outstanding individuals who have gone on to leadership roles in every walk of life, in every part of the world. LESTER B. PEARSON ’19 NOBEL PRIZE WINNING PRIME MINISTER

VAIRA VIKEFREIBERGA ’58, ’60 1ST FEMALE PRESIDENT OF LATVIA

DANIEL G. HILL ’51, ’60 HUMAN RIGHTS CHAMPION

ANNE GOLDEN ’62, ’70 ADVOCATE FOR THE HOMELESS

MARGARET ATWOOD ’61 CELEBRATED AUTHOR

ROHINTON MISTRY ’82 MASTER STORYTELLER

MARGARET MACMILLAN ’66 GROUNDBREAKING HISTORIAN

DAVID BERKAL ’11 OPERATION GROUNDSWELL FOUNDER

ANAND AGARAWALA ’06 TOP 20 YOUNG TECH ENTREPRENEUR

ATOM EGOYAN ’82 PROVOCATIVE FILMMAKER

CRAIG KIELBURGER ’07 FREE THE CHILDREN FOUNDER

JASMEET SIDHU ’10 JOURNALIST AND ACTIVIST

PREPARING GLOBAL CITIZENS: INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES

As part of Boundless, the Campaign for the University of Toronto, the Faculty of Arts and Science has set a goal of $250 million to expand our global leadership across critical areas of knowledge and develop the talent, ideas and solutions for the defining challenges of our time. The cornerstone of this effort is a $75-million component to prepare global citizens.

INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

$25 MILLION

UNDERGRADUATE ACCESS- AND MERIT-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS

$25 MILLION

GRADUATE EXCELLENCE AWARDS

$25 MILLION

$75 MILLION


BOUNDLESS.UTORONTO.CA/ARTSCI

OFFICE OF ADVANCEMENT, FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 100 ST GEORGE STREET, TORONTO, ON M5S 3G3 TEL: 416-978-7253 advancement.artsci@utoronto.ca 22 INNOVATION IN UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION窶認ACULTY OF ARTS & SCIENCE

Preparing Global Citizens  

Faculty of Arts & Science

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