Page 1

F R E E E v e r y T h u r s d a y F o r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / S e p t e m b e r 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 9

Are state actions increasing the risk of cougars attacking people? by Rico Moore


news:

12

news:

17

Are state actions increasing the risk of cougars attacking people? by Rico Moore

Longmont resident gets life-saving treatment by Angela K. Evans

boulderganic:

To minimize his carbon footprint, climate scientist travels from Amsterdam to Boulder without taking a flight by Lauren Hamko

buzz:

One father’s story of immigration is the story of humanity by Caitlin Rockett

Chautauqua offers lessons in activism by Caitlin Rockett

boulderweekly.com

CLOG SALE $10-$40 OFF Colorado’s Best Clog Selection! comfortableshoes.com

23 47

nibbles:

Return to Tofu Town by John Lehndorff

community table:

Cozymeal’s trained, award-winning chefs want to teach Boulder County how to cook by Matt Cortina

departments

50

Dyertimes: Heartless no more Guest Column: Bicyclists against density Danish Plan: A tale from The Swamp Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Lab Notes: Experiencing research Overtones: Perth’s Psychedelic Porn Crumpets want to take you on a journey Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘Concrete boredom,’ by Oluwasalvage Archibon Film: ‘Official Secrets’ and unfamiliar heroics Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Drinking in German culture along the Front Range Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Open wide Weed Between the Lines: Minor cannabinoids could be a major deal Cannabis Corner: ‘Politico’ to put out a marijuana newsletter

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

facebook.com/boulderweeklymedia twitter.com/boulderweekly

BOULDER On the Downtown Mall at 1425 Pearl St. 303-449-5260 & in The Village next to McGuckin 303-449-7440 DENVER Next to REI at 15th & Platte at 2368 15th St. 720-532-1084

28

arts and culture:

7 8 8 10 19 27 31 42 43 45 52 55 57 59 61

21

KEEP CONNECTED

I

FIND YOUR RECIPE FOR SUCCESS IN 2019 www.escoffier.edu SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

3


Vote online in the annual Best of Boulder East County survey September 1 through September 30. TM

EAST COUNTY 2019

VOTE FOR US FOR

Best Dispensary and Best New Business

5290 ARAPAHOE AVE SUITE J. BOULDER, CO • OPTIONSMEDICALCENTER.COM

728 Main Street • Louisville • 720.484.6825 www.SingingCookStore.com

Please Vote For Us!

V

u www.bo

341 MAIN ST. • LONGMONT, CO • 303-827-3181 • LIKE US!

Mexican Restaurant New Restaurant American Restaurant Niwot Restaurant Appetizers/Tapas Overall Restaurant Asian Fusion Pancake/Waffle Bagel Pizza Bakery Place to Eat Outdoors BBQ Breakfast Brunch Burger Business Lunch Catering Chinese Restaurant Longmont colorado Doughnuts Fine Dining Restaurant wyattswetgoods.com Food Truck Gluten-Free Menu Ice Cream/ Frozen Place to Go on a First Date Yogurt Indian/Nepali Restaurant Restaurant Ambiance Restaurant Dessert Italian Restaurant Restaurant Service Japanese Restaurant Sandwich Kid-Friendly Restaurant Seafood Lyons Restaurant food

PLEASE VOTE FOR US

P O H S E P I P T S ing 9/1! t r E a t S B • OTE US lderweekly.com Sushi Restaurant Take-Out Thai Restaurant

VOTE FOR US! BREAKFAST / BRUNCH

drink

Bar Beer Selection Cocktails Coffee House Coffee Roaster Happy Hour Latte Margarita Microbrewery Teahouse Wine Bar Wine Selection

LAFAYETTE • LONGMONT BOULDER

www.tangerineeats.com

VOTE FOR US!

entertainment and culture

Art Gallery Bank/Financial Institution Festival/Event Live Jazz Venue Museum Music Venue Non-Profit Open Mic

PLEASE

VOTE F OR US !

VOTE

FOR US! L o n g m o n t • B o u l de r • We s t m i n s t e r Tattoos / Piercing / Jewelry www.tribalrites.com

4

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

BEST PATIO BEST AMERICAN BEST SANDWICH 1111 Francis Street, Suite A, Longmont, CO 80501 • 303-647-3755 www.longmontpublichouse.com

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


There is only one Best of Boulder™ East County Only in Boulder Weekly. All ballots must be submitted online.

Vote now at boulderweekly.com E V O T

F O R

U S !

578 Briggs St. Erie, CO • 303-828-1392 • www24carrotbistro.com Place to Dance Place to Play Pool Place to Wi-Fi Private School Public School (K-8) Public School (9-12) Sports Bar fitness and health

VOTE FOR US!

BEST BBQ

VOTE FOR US!

1225 Ken Pratt Blvd. Suite 124 • Longmont, CO 720-340-8004

www.simplyhomeconsignments.com

Alternative Health Care Provider Barber Shop Climbing / Parkour Gym Dance Studio Day Spa Dental Care Golf Course Gym/Fitness Center Hair Salon Lasik Services Martial Arts Massage Medical Facility Medical Marijuana Dispensary Nail Salon

Pilates Studio Recreational Marijuana Dispensary Tanning Salon Veterinary Care Yoga Studio retail

Auto Dealer - New Auto Dealer - Used Auto Detailing Auto Service/Repair Bicycle Shop Bookstore Car Wash Carpet/Flooring Computer Repair Dry Cleaner Farm Florist Furniture Store Gift Store Grocery Store Hardware Store Home Furnishings Hotel

Hydroponic Store Independent Business Kid’s Clothing Store Jewelry Store Kitchen Supply Store Liquor Store Mattress Store Men’s Clothing Store Music Store Natural Foods Store New Business Optical Store Pet Store Real Estate Group Shoe Store Stereo/Electronics Tattoo/Piercing Parlor Tire Shop Tobacco/Pipe Shop Toy Store Used Clothing Store Women’s Clothing Store

*List of categories subject to change.

Please

VOTE FOR US! 103 N. Public Rd., Lafayette, CO 303.284.6597 www.teocallicocina.com

PLEASE VOTE BEST Sandwich Dessert Ice Cream Food Truck

401 S. Public Rd • Old Town Lafayette 303-665-3287 • eatsandsweets.biz

Vote Fluid IV Lounge Best Alternative Health www.fluidivlounge.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

5


THAT MOMENT YOU

CREATE YOUR OWN PATH.

Life gets busy. Discover the options you need to reach your goals, on your terms. Own your journey. ce.colorado.edu • 303.492.5148


Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Cover photo, Mark Elbroch/Panthera September 12, 2019 Volume XXVII, Number 4 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

see DANISH PLAN Page ?

Heartless no more By Joel Dyer

T

hese are the words I wrote in November 2018 when I asked for your help to save the life of Victor, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala who needed a heart transplant: Unfortunately for Victor and his family, they live in what has become a pretty heartless and greedy country, where people like him are expected to simply give up and die, even though his condition is quite treatable. So, what exactly is it about Victor that makes him deserving of such horrendous treatment? Apparently, it’s because he’s brown, economically strapped and doesn’t have a Social Security number... How can the richest country in the world watch this father and husband wilt away just because he can’t come up with $10,000? What I

great nation would withhold lifesaving medical care just because a person doesn’t have the proper paperwork? Fighting Trumpism, arguing about the merits of the Affordable Care Act or getting angry listening to Rachel Maddow describe how kids are being torn from their mothers’ arms at the border can’t save Victor. But we likely can. What if we all just slow down and think a little smaller for a while? What if we stop being angry and just help one of our neighbors in need? If you can’t think of anyone to help, I’d like to suggest Victor. Well, you did it. In less than four days you, our readers, Victor’s neighbors, donated the $10,000 he needed to get the private insurance that got him on the heart transplant list. And I’ve never been happier to write anything in SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

my life than this next paragraph. Last month Victor received a new heart via transplant and is doing really well post-surgery. His children will now grow up knowing their father and his wife will continue to have the love of her life with her every day going forward. The family is still strapped for cash because they need insurance for at least another year while Victor heals before being able to return to work, but they are all together and once again have a future. Put a smile on your face, Boulder Weekly readers, you did a really good thing at a time when the madness of the world seemed to be threatening to make “happily ever after” a thing of the past. Today is a good day. I

7


Bicyclists against density by Gary Wockner

W

hen I arrived in Boulder in the mid-1980s, it had already become a “bike” town. The “Red Zinger Bicycle Classic” and “Coors International Bicycle Classic” were still household phrases, and Andy Hampsten and Davis Phinney were household names. You could ride your road bike south of town on the famous Morgul Bismark Loop, which was a relatively quiet ride without a lot of cars on it at that time. Many years ago I owned a bike shop, and I’ve been a bicycling enthusiast ever since. When I came to Boulder, I started working in a bike shop and threw myself into biking in Boulder County. I even wrote books on the topic, perhaps one of the very first books on local cycling, titled Gold Hill And Back: A Mountain Bike Escapade, in 1991. In the mid-1980s, Highway 36 going up to Lyons had some traffic, but it didn’t feel especially dangerous riding a bike on it. Once you got off 36 onto Nelson Road and other backroads, there were fewer and fewer cars. Boulder Canyon going up to Ned was pretty busy, but we rode it without feeling like our life was at risk, and the same with Flagstaff Road. Like it or not, when you’re on a bicycle, cars are the enemy. You avoid them, never trust them and always assume they don’t see you. It’s not personal — about the person driving the car, which I also have and drive — but cars injure and kill bicyclists, and the more cars, the more dangerous it is to the bicycle rider. It’s also true that bicyclists can be at fault and sometimes are. But as a general rule, if you love bicycling or just use it for transportation, you prefer fewer cars and less urban environments — it’s safer, quieter, less polluted and more enjoyable. Boulder used to be more like that. In the last decade, the radical push for “high-density growth” in Boulder, and the general pressure of population growth in Boulder County, have made Boulder a less friendly, less safe and less enjoyable place to be a bicyclist. More and more bicyclists are avoiding city streets and sometimes avoiding road riding altogether. “Gravel” riding, for rec8

I

reation, has become popular as a way to avoid cars and stay safer. Bicyclists also avoid cars by riding in the canyons, and the farther up you go, the fewer cars you compete with. Planning entire rides, and entire biking lifestyles, around avoiding cars and traffic is a big part of many bicycling conversations in Boulder. Just recently, an article was written in Outside Magazine about how bicyclists are increasingly abandoning Boulder ­— literally leaving town — due to the traffic and population growth, which is very sad and unfortunate. There are actions that Boulder can take to make the community safer for bicyclists: First, stop luring more people, more cars and more businesses — “high-density growth” — into Boulder. Population growth not only makes it noisier, more polluted and less safe for bicyclists, it degrades everything most Boulderites love about Boulder. Second, the City of Boulder has done a great job supporting bicycling safety by building separated bike paths and bike lanes throughout town. The draft “Boulder Transportation Master Plan” is out for comment right now, and I commented that Boulder should add even more bike safety features. Third, I’d love to see the no-car zone expanded in downtown — perhaps farther east on Pearl, and north and south to include parts of Walnut and Spruce Streets, with bike paths intermixed with pedestrian zones. In good weather months, I recreate by riding in the canyons or even farther uphill around Ned. In the winter, I avoid cars by sometimes doing Marshall Road loops and then up to NCAR. Or, I run more up Flagstaff and up the Anemone Trail and simply bike less, and then ride the canyons when the sun melts off the snow. For commuting, I still sometimes use my bike in Boulder, but I’d like to use it more. Improving safety features for bicycling and stopping high-density growth would make Boulder biking safer and a lot more fun. Gary Wockner, PhD, is an environmental activist and part-time Boulder resident. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

A tale from The Swamp By Paul Danish

I

’ve been spending the summer cleaning out a locker (aka the black hole) at an undisclosed location in north Boulder, which means I’ve been getting reacquainted with dozens of columns I wrote in the previous millennium. Some were pretty good, others deserve to be reinterred until the next millennium, and some are yarns that need to be re-told, because they contain cautionary tales for future generations. Like the following one, which I first wrote about in the Colorado Daily in 1992. It’s the sort of story federal bureaucrats tell to scare civil service newbies at office retreats, as they sit around the campfire roasting marshmallows and burning inconvenient memos and dossiers. I heard the story from Jim Gates (of Blessed Memory), who was the editor of the Colorado Daily in 196566. The year before he graduated, Jim was a summer intern at what was then called the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), now the Department of Health and Human Services. The intern program gave potential civil servants a chance to spend a few weeks working with real life federal

bureaucrats. As a result, Jim got to spend some time in the offices of the Social Security Administration. It was at one of the interns’ briefings that they told the story. A few years earlier, Social Security’s regional office for the Middle Atlantic States had moved from a rented office building in Manhattan that it had occupied since Social Security was created in the 1930s to a brand-new federal office building on Long Island. The move was accomplished with no more disruption than might be expected when someone moves out of digs they have occupied for 30 years. Or so it seemed, until about six weeks later as the bureaucrats were settling into their new home. That’s when their former landlord showed up at the loading dock with a large truck full of Social Security files. “You boys seem to have forgotten these,” he said. “Where did we leave them?” the chagrined bureaucrats asked. “At the bottom of the elevator shafts,” was the reply. “I found them when I started remodeling.” Social Security got a tiger team onto the case. It found that the files came from all over the mid-Atlantic

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

see DANISH PLAN Page 10


Boulder Pet Doors

Personalized Interventions and Targeted Transitional Services to Support K-12 Students in Reaching their Full Potential

Your Pets Opening To Health & Happiness

To learn more visit:

See why we’re consistently the TOP MOVER in Boulder County at

Kate Riedell, Ph.D., Director Specialized Expertise in Autism, Learning and Intellectual Disabilities and ADD/ADHD

400 E. Simpson Street, Suite G02 Lafayette, CO 80028 info@truelearningeducation.com 510-909-9939

boulderpetdoors.com

TAYLORMOVE.COM

Licensed, Bonded & Insured • Locally Owned & Operated by the Taylor Family

Call Today! 303-443-5885

Boulder Pet Doors

LONGMONT THEATRE COMPANY

ow many times a week do you work as a doorperson for your pets? Just settled on the couch to watch a good movie with your favorite person and a bowl of popcorn… and the dog wants to go out and chase the squirrels. My dog Rudy used to wake me up before the sun every morning to let him outside, but not since I installed my Hale Pet Door. I am so impressed with the quality of the doors I have become a dealer for Hale Pet Door across Northern Colorado, and would like to offer you more freedom and your pet more autonomy. These doors are manufactured in Canon City Colorado; they have extruded aluminum frames with reinforced corners and superior weatherstripping, along with the most flexible flaps for your pet’s comfort. Bill Hale was the first person to start installing pet doors in glass in the mid 80’s. At Boulder Pet Doors I offer many different models and installations that can be seen on my website boulderpetdoors.com in the photo gallery, and there is a link to Hale Pet Door to see the many products we have to offer. www.boulderpetdoors.com. Bernie Desfosses, Owner, or info@boulderpetdoors.com, Longmont. 720-507-5476

ovies return to Main Street as the New Trojan Movie House and Art Cinema opens! A historic Longmont landmark, located at 513 Main St., the art deco gem originally opened in 1939 as the Fox Theatre. In 1960 Richard W. Klein re-christened it the Trojan Theater and showed movies there for the next 30 years. In 1991 is was re-named the Longmont Performing Arts Center. In 2018, fulfilling Klein’s wish to see live stage productions and movies downtown again, LTC installed a movie screen and digital projector. Follow us on Facebook for showings. 513 East Main Street, Longmont, CO 80501 Call 303-772-5200

H

Mon Cheri Bakery & Bistro

C

ome in and experience Lafayette’s best-kept secret! Mon Cheri Bakery and Bistro has something for everyone and we’re serving up some of Boulder County’s best “homemade” dishes. Come in for happy hour, breakfast, lunch, dinner, or indulge in pastries from our bakery. Fan favorites like our giant biscuit breakfasts, enormous cinnamon rolls, delicious lobster rolls, and award-winning meatloaf are sure to make your belly smile. GF and Vegetarian menus are also available. Come in on the weekends for bottomless Bloody Marys and Mimosas and get to know this 5th generation Boulder County family. We’ll feed you and make you feel right at home, just as our family has been doing around here since we settled in Boulder back in 1903. Visit us at 211 N Public Rd, Lafayette. Call 303-664-1234. Online at moncheribakery.com

or call: 720-212-3111

M

The Drum Shop

F

or a wonderfully unique and enjoyable outing, please drop by The Boulder The Drum Shop is proud to carry the best selection of ethnic percussion in the Rockies. If you’re looking for a great selection of djembes, doumbeks, cajons & frame drums or if you’re not quite sure what you might want, owner Billy Hoke will be pleased to help you find the right drum for you. The Drum Shop also houses the areas largest selection of DW, Yamaha, Pearl, Ludwig, Gretsch, Tama, Sonor & Pacific drum sets and hardware. As well, there is a great selection of cymbals from every major brand and some nice smaller companies. The Drum Shop is proud to offer lessons by two of Boulder’s finest working drummers; Joe Morton and Christian Teele. The Boulder Drum Shop is working hard to be there for you. 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122 M-F 10-6, Sat. 10-5, Sun.11-4

Breakfast / Lunch / Dinner

HOMEMADE GOODNESS! 211 N. Public Rd, #110 • Lafayette, CO 80026 • 303-664-1234 www.moncheribakery.com

Mind Body Neurofeedback Bio-Energetic Wellness offers:

Neuroptimal Neurofeedback has proven

• Unique and Accurate Energy Profile

effective for children and adults with:

• Frequency Based Solutions • Pulsed Electromagnetic Healing

• Anxiety and Depression • ADD and Learning Issues

• Help with Chronic and Acute Conditions • Anti-Aging Benefits

• Mood/Emotion Regulation • PTSD, Trauma and TBI

Start your weekend FEELING GOOD the last Saturday of every month! WHEN & WHERE:

10:00-11:15am

Joy Om has been a Healing and Bodywork practitioner for 35 years

NES HEALTH PRACTITIONER, ADVANCED CERTIFIED ROLFER, CRANIAL THERAPIST, NEUROFEEDBACK PRACTITIONER

For appointment and complimentary energy scan, contact Joy: 303 449-8664 • joyom@indra.com mindbodyneurofeedback.com BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

7/27 • The Green @ The Boulder Civic Area* 8/31 • South Boulder Rec Center (lakeside) 9/28 • The Green @ The Boulder Civic Area* 10/26 • The Green @ The Boulder Civic Area*

www.dancewithadoc.org *1056 Canyon Blvd / back entrance of Boulder Main Library

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

FURNITURE COMES FULLY ASSEMBLED AND READY TO USE

NEW ARRIVALS DAILY! 3550 Arapahoe Avenue • Boulder 303.440.9011 • usedfurnitureboulder.com

I

9


Guns have recreational merit

This past summer I accompanied my 10-year-old grandson to summer camp at Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch near Elbert, Colorado, where my grandson qualified for the shotgun merit badge. I wish Carole Bayer, who wrote, “Guns are manufactured for only one reason: to kill,” (Re: Letters, Aug. 22, 2019) would have seen the joy on my grandson’s face as he gained confidence shooting at and eventually hitting the clays. Was the shotgun my grandson used designed to kill, or was it designed to bring joy to a young boy? Actually, firearms are not designed to kill or bring joy. Firearms are tools designed to safely accelerate a projectile, or in the case of shotguns, projectiles, to high velocity in a direction desired by the user. How the tool is used is up to the user. Yes, the firearm tool can be used to kill, but it can also be used to bring joy, save lives, hunt and win Olympic medals. My grandson is never going to forget the wonderful experience he had earning his shotgun merit badge at summer camp. That wonderful memory will be with him for the rest of his life. I urge young boys and girls to become Scouts so they too can earn the shotgun merit badge and take advantage of the other wonderful things Scouting has to offer. Chuck Wright/Westminster

Trump broke the law

Currently, 130-plus Congressional representatives have taken a stand against corruption and support an impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump. It’s imperative that every member of Congress recognize the danger of letting Trump get away with his criminal activity and publicly support an impeachment inquiry. It would be unconscionable to do otherwise. We’ve got the facts. Bob Mueller did not exonerate Donald Trump — not by a long shot. His investigation found extensive criminal activity and resulted in 37 indictments and at least 7 convictions or guilty pleas, including Trump’s national security advisor, personal lawyer and campaign chairman. Mueller uncovered over 100 secret meetings and communications between Trump’s team and Russia and their cronies — and found at least 10 episodes of obstruction of justice by Trump, in which he tried to bury the truth. Obstruction of justice is a serious crime. If anyone else did what Trump did, they’d be in jail. Mueller made it clear that the Department of Justice prevented him from indicting Donald Trump. No one is above the law in our country, not even the president. Mueller did his job. It’s time for Congress to do theirs. That’s why our

representatives must publicly voice their support for holding Trump accountable through a formal impeachment inquiry now. Doing nothing will only embolden Trump to continue breaking the law and will set a dangerous precedent for our democracy. That’s not the America I know. Linda Groenewold/Broomfield

We can do better on Boulder energy

We are 45-year Boulder residents, involved in church, community and networks we continue to be grateful for, across three generations now. We love Boulder and the clear investment made here in being a beautiful, special, values-driven community. In contrast, Xcel’s taking $20 million in after-tax profits out of Boulder every year is something none of our communities can afford. Just think if we directed that money toward local generation, low-income support, undergrounding, microgrids and more. Boulder’s RFIP (Request for Indicative Pricing) showed that we can reach 89% renewable energy by about 2024 and save about $40 million per year in power costs. Now, Xcel is in front of the PUC asking us to pay for hundreds of millions of dollars on expenditures on old coal and gas/fossil methane plants, and they expect to earn

10.35% return on equity for these expenditures. It’s unbelievable that this is still happening and allowed in 2019. We have to be adults, stand up and say it’s past time to change all this for the better. Xcel was over 70% fossil fuel in 2018 in Colorado (39% coal, 33% natural gas/fossil methane) Elsewhere in Colorado, Holy Cross Energy will be at 70% renewable energy in 2021. In the meantime, Xcel plans to stretch out its use of fossil fuels far beyond what pace and price of the market today. Xcel Energy has thousands of MW of wind, solar and storage project bids from 2017 and 2018 waiting to be developed at an average cost below 3 cents/kwh (renewables plus storage). Instead of expediting the transition, Xcel would have us stay on track for an 80%-plus chance of a 30-year Dustbowl this century. We can and must do better. That is going to involve moving away from an extractive utility that is currently asking for rate increases that range from about 5%-9% for most classes, despite having $551 million in aftertax net income from Colorado in 2018 — an 11.6% increase over their 2017 after-tax net income from Colorado. The better world — cleaner air and cleaner energy — is around the see LETTERS Page 11

DANISH PLAN from Page 7

region. They were dated almost from the day the office opened to the day it moved. The cases involved people in all walks of life, of all racial, religious and ethnic backgrounds, and of all income levels. The cases in the files had only one thing in common: They all involved difficult interpretations of the regulations. For 30 years, federal bureaucrats had been solving the hard cases by dropping them through the cracks. Literally. Jim told me this story when he returned to CU after the intern program ended. I’ve sometimes wondered since then if anyone in the federal government had the presence of mind to order a systematic inspection 10

I

of the elevator shafts in all federal buildings from time to time. The federal government has gotten a lot bigger in the last 50 years. There are a lot more regulations, a lot more beureaucrats, a lot more cases and a lot more elevator shafts. Of course, today most case files are computerized, so dropping a case down an elevator shaft isn’t an option anymore. But there’s always the delete key. And it’s a lot easier to blame the computer than to blame the elevator. So what happens when someone’s case file gets the shaft or is shot off into the Seventh Dimension or is otherwise deep-sixed in the Swamp or is strangled in red tape? SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Surprisingly, often the person’s Congressman comes to the rescue. A lot of what Congressional offices do is handle citizen requests for help in dealing with the federal bureaucracy. Nearly 1,000 Congressional and Senatorial staffers do nothing but deal with constituent requests for help in getting cases solved. Most of the cases involve Social Security, Medicare/ Medicaid and veterans benefits. Just guessing here, but I bet most of what they do is advise the bureaucrats they work with on how to resolve cases that involve difficult interpretations of the regulations — in a way that satisfies both the Congressman and the constituent when possible. I

As for the truly hard cases, the ones that leave Congressional case workers as flummoxed as federal bureaucrats, all six Congressional office buildings have elevators. And as for Jim, after he graduated from CU, he went to work in Washington D.C. for HEW. People did things like that in the ’60s. He labored there for several years, living on a houseboat docked at Buzzard Point, near where the Anacostia River runs into the Potomac. But one day in the early ’70s he repented of this colossal lapse of judgment, weighed anchor and sailed to Key West, foregoing the miasma of The Swamp for a life at sea free of case files. And elevators. BOULDER WEEKLY


VOTE

LETTERS from Page 10

corner. We just need to stop giving excessive amounts of money, which our communities need, to out-of-state, Wall-Street-traded firms, that put profits over people and the future we want and owe our kids. Marie Venner/Boulder

when we need it. So, what is the point of this little essay? Do not cut payroll taxes. It is a gift to reelecting Trump. Tom Moore/Boulder

Be best

A payroll tax cut certainly sounds good. (Payroll tax is just the tax paid to fund Social Security and Medicare.) It would cut the money taken from our paychecks. But that is money used, specifically, to fund Social Security and Medicare. Up to a point, both of these funds get money by taxing our income while we work. Any income over $133,000 is not taxed, and unearned income such as rents, capital gains and dividends are not taxed. We wouldn’t want to unduly burden the rich folks in our midst. Both these funds are ones that most of us will rely on. And, both these funds will be coming up short, some sooner, some later. The payroll tax isn’t quite keeping up with the demands of the two systems. Social Security and Medicare could easily be made solvent for the future by eliminating the $133,000 cap and collecting tax from unearned income. A payroll tax cut just weakens them. How does a payroll tax cut help reelect Trump? 1) Money, taken from Social Security and Medicare, will flow in DT’s already “wonderful economy,” 2) On Election Day we’ll remember that we got you a couple of hundred to spend. And we won’t notice that Social Security and Medicare are short funded for what they need to help us

I’m 50 years old, half-white, halfblack (identified black), and have always lived in white communities. I’ve comforted white people when they realized what they said may be offensive. White strangers have called me a “nigger” and meant the worst. But mostly, I have no idea whether people’s words and actions make them racist or not. So I don’t let people in quickly, have spent decades studying language, and am always looking for consistencies and hidden meaning in people’s words and actions. Trump has been consistent. He announced his run for president with, “Mexicans are rapists.” He didn’t say all Mexican’s are rapists, but he regularly demeans and dehumanizes them, like laughing and joking at his rally when someone yelled, “Shoot them!” Former FBI official Frank Figliuzzi mentioned Trump’s sending a message to neo-Nazis for raising flags after the racist attack in El Paso on August 8 (code for Heil Hitler since H is the eighth letter of the alphabet). “WINNER!” Conservative Ann Coulter tweeted, “Craziest thing ever said on TV: MSNBC regular Frank Figliuzzi claims Trump ordering flags at half-mast until Thursday was secret ‘HEIL HITLER!’ signal.” Figliuzzi responded, “Dear craziest person on TV, listen carefully; I clearly said I’m not saying Trump did this deliberately, I’m saying he needs advice on how extremists will interpret raising the flag on 8/8. He needs advice on putting out the fire he started. Are you part of that solution?” I’ve known racists would kill in mass under Trump’s watch since Charlottesville. It was never a bad bet, America’s always been home to murderous racists (it happened under Obama). But the hate-filled vitriol white conservatives use to dismiss Trump’s contributions (intentional or not), makes violence a sure thing. We must hold our leaders to higher standards. And vote. Curtis Griffin/Boulder

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

Trump won’t run again

It is my expectation that President Trump is going to do all of us a big favor and decide some time in early-tomid 2020 not to run for reelection partly because of a slow-down in the economy. When that happens, I hope that the Republicans will nominate someone of good character such as Nikki Haley or Carly Fiorina. Personally, I don’t know what I find to be more despicable about the guy — the way that he makes fun of and insults people’s physical appearance, or the way that he views women as sex-objects. Stewart B Epstein/via internet

Payroll tax cut?

NOW

COUNTY 2019

vote at www.boulderweekly.com

Cold / Flu? Consider A Proven Ancient Alternative

Southwest Acupuncture College • 6630 Gunpark Drive • Boulder, CO

Call 303.581.9933 to make an appointment

Oriental Medicine has been used effectively by billions of people for thousands of years.

VOTED BEST OF BOULDER 2013

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT

2.9% or

$179/mo. Lease Special

2019 Honda CRV LX AWD CVT

1.9% or

$259/mo. Lease Special

2019 Pilot LX AWD

1.9% or

$319/mo. Lease Special

CLEARANCE SALE TODAY!

710 S. Main St, Longmont, CO 80501 (303) 772-2900 • wwwFrontierHonda.com W.A.C. AHFC Fit #19298 2.9% x 36mo. or 3.9% x 60 mo., 36 mo./36000 mile lease , $2678 due + taxes; CRV #19347 1.9% x 36mo. or 2.9% x 60mo., 36mo./36000 mile lease $3078 due + taxes; Pilot #19293 1.9% x 36mo. or 1.9% x 60mo., 36 mo./ 36000 mile lease, $3478 due + taxes. Expires 7/31/2019

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

11


MARK ELBROCH/PANTHERA

Are state actions increasing the risk of cougars attacking people? By Rico Moore

T

he three cougar attacks on people in Colorado this year have made headlines around the world. This reflects not only how rare such attacks are, but also how unusual it is to have so many in one state in such a short period of time. The first occurred near Fort Collins in February, the second occurred near Kremmling in August and the third, and most recent, occurred near Bailey last month. The first two attacks were on adult men, while the latter was on an 8-year-old boy playing in his backyard. Young cougars were responsible for each of these attacks, a fact that may hold clues as to why these incidents have happened this year. Research suggests that young, especially male, cougars are more likely to have conflicts with people. Research also demonstrates that hunting cougars or thinning their numbers as a method of wildlife management can actually increase the number of young male cats on the landscape. Considering all three cougars involved in these attacks were young and two of them males (the other was eaten by scavengers to the point its gender couldn’t be determined), it raises the question: Is cougar hunting and/or wildlife management practices in Colorado actually increasing the risk for cougar attacks on humans? And, if so, who knows, and what are they doing about it? The possibility that hunting cougars can lead to increased attacks on people has been known for some time. According to the book Cougar Management Guidelines, published in 2005, “Sport hunting [of cougars] is occasionally proposed as a tool to reduce the risk that cougars will attack humans. There is no scientific evidence that sport hunting achieves this goal... hunting may shift cougar population structure toward young animals, which are more likely than adult cougars to attack humans.” The working group that created the guidelines was comprised of 13 professionals including two 12

I

Colorado biologists with the Colorado Division of Wildlife, the forerunner of today’s Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife (CPW.) Immediately preceding the aforementioned statement in the Guidelines it is noted that, “Sport hunting [of cougars] to benefit wild ungulate [aka big game] populations is not supported by the scientific literature... Any effort to control cougars should be part of an effort that addresses all factors impacting the ungulate population.” CPW’s controversial Piceance Basin and Upper Arkansas River Predator Control Plans, approved in December 2016 by the Parks and Wildlife Commission, called for the killing of cougars and black bears in an effort to increase mule deer populations (Boulder Weekly has reported on these controversial plans extensively in its “Off Target” series.) At least some of the body of research suggesting that increased cougar hunting leads to increased cougarhuman conflict was included in CPW’s literature review for these plans. A significant portion of such research, however, was omitted. And that may prove significant in light of the recent attacks. Implementation of the Upper Arkansas River Predator Control Plan has included killing a significant number of cougars in an area only 25-30 miles from where the young boy was recently attacked in Bailey. This proximity at least raises the possibility that there could be a connection between killing cougars in the Upper Arkansas River plan area and the attack on the boy. Dr. Robert Wielgus found during his research as director of the large carnivore laboratory at Washington State University that, “the areas where problems occurred — bad encounters [between cougars and people] ... were the heavily hunted areas.” Wielgus says they didn’t see those types of things in areas where there was less hunting. When asked if he thought the killing of cougars as part of the Upper

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

Arkansas River plan, which aimed to kill approximately 50% of the cougar population in one area less than 30 miles south of Bailey, could be linked to the attack on the boy, Wielgus responded, “Yeah, I do.” The Cougar Management Guidelines appear to agree with a subsequent research paper published by David Mattson, Kenneth Logan and Linda Sweanor, entitled, “Factors governing risk of cougar attacks on humans.” The study looked at 386 instances of cougar-human contact and found that “young cougars in poor condition are more likely than other cougars to threaten people.” The study adds, “There is evidence that densities of young, dispersing cougars are likely to be comparatively high where local densities of resident adults have been depressed by hunting, as long as other nearby and less-heavily exploited areas serve as sources of dispersers. Under such a scenario, heavy localized hunting of older cougars could increase rather than reduce exposure of people to close-threatening encounters with cougars.” CPW’s literature review for its two aforementioned predator control plans doesn’t mention this aspect of the Cougar Management Guidelines nor the research paper by Mattson, Logan and Sweanor. And it’s not just human attacks that are potentially increasing due to the harvesting of cougars. According to a 2013 study titled “Effects of remedial sport hunting on cougar complaints and livestock depredations,” researchers found, “The odds of increased complaints and livestock depredations increased dramatically (36% to 240%) with increased cougar harvest. ... We suggest that increased young male immigration, social disruption of cougar populations, and associated changes in space use by cougars ... caused by increased hunting resulted in the increased complaints and livestock depredations.” While CPW did include this 2013 research in its BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


literature review for its aforementioned predator control plans, it asserted that the researcher’s findings are not fully supported by data. Wielgus, who is a coauthor of the aforementioned 2013 study, says over a 20-year-period, he and his team collared hundreds of cougars throughout Washington state, and compared where there was cougar-human conflict and where there wasn’t. “At the time, the thought was, ‘Well, there’s too many cougars, and this super-abundance of cougars is causing increased conflicts with humans,’” Wielgus says. “But surprisingly what we found was that there wasn’t a super abundance of cougars, and it just appeared to be the case.” Wielgus says this is because when hunters were killing large numbers of resident cougars, “particularly older dominant territorial animals, like hunters typically select for,” other cougars would come in to take their place. “One of our favorite sayings — it was the truth — when you kill one older dominant male, three younger guys come to the funeral,” he says. Wielgus says that those older cougars don’t typically become old by having conflicts with people. So when these younger cougars would come in and vie for the older cougar’s former territory, they’d be more aggressive, “and you end up with three times as many cats as what you started with, except they’re young animals that are prone to get into trouble,” he says. “[W]hat we found was that this social disruption and killing the cougars was actually causing the problem. “Our findings, and the findings of other scientists that have actually studied it, are not very popular with many state fish and game agencies because it runs counter to belief,” Wielgus says. He compares it to the findings of Galileo. “You come up with stuff and the powers that be don’t like it.” Wielgus thinks the status-quo thinking of state agencies leads to a kind of treadmill, where more and more cougars are killed with the belief this will decrease conflict. “You kill more, and then immigrants come in, and then you kill more, and immigrants come in, until such a time when the population then collapses, but you wouldn’t see it, because the complaints and everything are increasing and increasing and increasing, until the female component of the population is wiped out, and then the cougar population collapses,” he says. Following their research in Washington, Wielgus says the state lowered the cougar hunting harvest rate to 12%, and he says, “all these problems have basically disappeared.” “And so over-harvest is what’s causing the problem,” Wielgus says. “I have no doubt in my mind that the attacks and so on that you’re seeing in Colorado are a direct result of over-harvest of cougars.” These findings appear similar to those of a 2016 research study by Kristine J. Teichman, et al., titled “Hunting as a management tool? Cougar-human conflict is positively related to trophy hunting.” In this study the researchers used “a 30-year data set on human-caused cougar ... kills in British Columbia, Canada,” and found that, “Individuals that were killed BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

via conflict with humans were younger than hunted cougars. “Accounting for human density and habitat productivity,” researchers continued in the study, “human hunting pressure during or before the year of conflict comprised the most important variables. Both were associated with increased male cougar-human conflict.” CPW cites this study in the literature it reviewed for the Upper Arkansas River plan this way: “Although only providing correlative evidence, such patterns over large geographic and temporal scales suggest that alternative approaches to conflict mitigation might yield more effective outcomes for humans as well as cougar populations and the individuals within populations.” In response to the correlative — rather than causative — nature of the study, Dr. Mark Elbroch, lead scientist in the Puma Program with the conservation group Panthera says, “As every good scientist is taught their first day of school, correlation is not causation. In defense of Teichman, when you’re looking at 30 years of data across a massive area, yes it’s correlation, but my god, that is one really, really strong pattern. “It’s certainly the strongest of all these studies, in my opinion, in helping bridge the gap to causation,” Elbroch says, “But it is still a gap, and so it’s easy for the skeptic, who is also a scientist, to continue to point at that gap and say, ‘It’s not a direct causation.’” Elbroch claims this is because researchers have never done the work necessary “to see the direct link between hunting and either increased risk to humans or increased risk to livestock. It just doesn’t exist.” But this may be for a good reason. “Can you imagine that research?” Elbroch asks. “It would be so controversial,” suggesting researchers would have to tell the public they were going to increase cougar hunting to see if they could link it to cougars killing livestock or attacking people. “No one would want to take the risk of actually making that link in the first place,” he says. In 2017, Elbroch published research in the journal Science, which he says looked at the social structure of cougars; how they share food, who they share it with, and how food moves through the community of cougars. He says the research described an interesting pattern: “larger [cougar] populations can no longer be thought of as gray masses,” he says. “They’re instead a mosaic of individual communities, and each community is governed by a territorial male. ... The whole structure was based on the territory of these males.” Consistent with previous research, Elbroch’s paper states, “Trophy hunting of carnivores may also increase human-carnivore conflict and disrupt a species’ socio-spatial organization.” Elbroch’s paper makes a potential analog to grizzly bear, stating they can “suffer social disruption for up to two years following the selective hunting of mature males in the population. ... Similar social disruption has been suggested for pumas under heavy pressure from trophy hunting,” the study states. Elbroch says his research using social network I

analysis, “which is fairly new to wildlife research, provides interesting insights and is the ideal way to test disruption to mountain lion communities caused by hunting.” As mentioned, the area near Bailey where the 8-year-old boy was attacked is to the north of CPW’s Upper Arkansas River plan area by about 25-30 miles. In its write-up for the plan, apparently referring to the aforementioned studies — at least the ones it included — CPW states, “There is also the perception that high immigration rates of sub-adult males will lead to increases in human conflict and livestock depredation. Some studies have indicated that harvest and subsequent increases in sub-adult males have correlated with human-cougar conflict. However, others have found that demographic class did not relate to human-cougar interaction. This management experiment will provide direct information on human-cougar interactions with respect to changes in cougar populations, age structure, and immigration rates.” So CPW admits that its “management experiment” in the Upper Arkansas River plan area will provide information on “human-cougar interactions.” Are these interactions, which include attacks on humans, really something that should be part of a CPW experiment considering there is already a fair amount of research indicating attacks could likely increase as a result of killing more cougars? And shouldn’t the public have been warned that this experiment was being undertaken since their welfare seems to have been part of the experiment? More recently, the CPW biologist leading the Upper Arkansas River plan published findings appearing to affirm some of the very correlations he and others previously deemed to be only “perception.” In a study published in April by Mat Alldredge, CPW carnivore wildlife researcher, et al., titled “Human-Cougar interactions in the wildland-urban interface of Colorado’s Front Range,” researchers found that cougars were able to live in wildland-urban environments “with minimal human-cougar interactions,” which the researchers conclude “suggests that maintaining older age structures, especially females, and providing a matrix of habitats, including large connected openspace areas, would be beneficial to cougars and effectively reduce the potential for conflict.” Elbroch says what is,“meant by having an older age class and more females... is reducing the hunt and reducing female harvest.” Similar criticisms of the predator control plans were waged against CPW by conservation groups in a letter prior to the approval of the plans in December 2016: “[K]illing mountain lions to reduce complaints and livestock depredations can have the opposite effect. When the stable adult mountain lions are removed from a population, the disruption causes social chaos in their society. ... The loss of adults encourages subadult males, naturally less skilled at hunting, to immigrate, and studies show that this see COUGARS Page 14

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

13


COUGARS from Page 13

influx is likely to be involved in human and livestock conflicts as well as causes increased infanticide on mountain lion kittens.” A close examination of the first cougar attack in Colorado this year, which occurred on Horsetooth Moutain, a part of Larimer County Open Space near Fort Collins, parallels the recent attack on the young boy in Bailey, and it appears to show that senior CPW officials may have been aware that cougar hunting could have played a role in the Fort Collins attack. It also appears to show the agency intentionally worked to keep discussion of such matters concealed from the public. On Feb. 4, on Larimer County Open Space — in the middle of Colorado’s winter cougar-hunting season — a man was trail-running when he was approached and attacked by what was later determined to be a 3-4 month old, 35-40 pound, cougar kitten. The man bludgeoned the kitten in the head with a rock and choked it to death as it held onto his hand with its jaws. The kitten’s two young siblings were found nearby in the following days, trapped by wildlife officials, and placed into wildlife rehabilitation centers, according to CPW. In response to international media attention, CPW held a press conference to disclose details of the attack. According to emails obtained via an open records request, a senior CPW official instructed CPW staff coordinating the media event to avoid discussion about the potential of the kittens’ mother not being sighted, especially questions suggesting it might have been killed by a hunter. “They may ask a question about the numbers of lions in Colorado, hunting of lions etc. They may want us to speculate on why we didn’t see any sign of the mother and I don’t think we want to get into that discussion,” said Mark Leslie, CPW Northeast Region Manager. “I’m hoping they don’t get too far in the weeds with the questions, but if I was in their shoes, I might want to know some of these,” he wrote. But despite wanting to keep reporters from asking those questions publicly, CPW was asking them internally. In preparation for the press conference, a CPW biologist prepared a map for Leslie and a CPW public information officer with the locations of all the cougars known to have been killed in the vicinity of the attack in the months prior to the attack, both male and female. So, it appears CPW was considering both the possibility that the kittens’ mother had been killed by hunters or killed for attacking livestock, or the young cougars moved into the area because a male cougar was killed for the same reasons. CPW public information officer Rebecca Ferrell responded in an email that CPW has, “no conclusive evidence of why these three young mountain lions were found in an area with no adult female presence. The only thing we can say with certainty is just that — the young mountain lions involved in/found near the Horsetooth Mountain attack were alone, 14

I

and we had no evidence of an adult female. This could be for any number of reasons, including death, abandonment or simply ranging away from her young — all of these potential reasons were offered at the time of the attack, but we have no conclusive evidence of any of them being the reason no female was found in the area. That is why we chose not to focus on questions about the mother — we simply do not and cannot know the answer.” Further circumstantial evidence seems to indicate CPW was aware of the potential for increased conflict with people by the killing of adult female cougars. For each of the females that had been killed in the Horsetooth area — potential mothers of the cat involved in the attack — straight lines were drawn with the mileage from the kill site to the attack site on the map CPW had prepared just in case reporters

hunter to know with any certainty if they are illegally targeting a mother cougar with kittens. Elbroch served as coauthor on a paper with Connor O’Malley that, based upon their findings, suggests delaying the start date of cougar hunting season until Dec. 1 of each year. This delay would avoid 91% of a cougars’ denning period, according to Elbroch and O’Malley. “Our research provides information to guide managers in aligning hunting seasons to mitigate orphaning kittens when they are youngest and most vulnerable, and provide hunters the best opportunities to detect and protect dependent young,” the study states. In 2018 alone, CPW killed 26 cougars as part of its Upper Arkansas River plan. Another 18 were killed in 2016 and 15 more in 2017. Again, this management unit is only 25-30 miles from where the attack on the boy in Bailey occurred. MARK ELBROCH/PANTHERA In the Game Management Units encapsulating Bailey, 14 cougars were killed in 2017-2018, including six males and eight females. When asked whether the agency believed the heavy harvest of cougars as part of the Upper Arkansas River plan increased the risk to public safety, CPW responded, “For the last three years harvest has been at or below historical quota levels. So we would not call this a ‘heavy harvest.’ Based on historical data, and the fact that human-lion interactions remain extremely rare, we have no reason to believe that risk was created or even escalated.” This, despite CPW’s own description in its management plan, which states, “This management experiment will provide direct informaasked the right questions. All three kill sites were tion on human-cougar interactions with respect to between 15-20 miles away. The sites of males killed, changes in cougar populations, age structure, and both by hunters and for attacking livestock, are more immigration rates.” numerous, and also exist well within a cougar’s range Further, the important term CPW uses is “historiof the attack site. cal quota levels.” Between 1993-2003, the average In Colorado, CPW uses cougar hunting as a kill rate of cougars relative to the quota was only 32% management tool, both to maintain estimated popuin the Upper Arkansas River plan area. lation levels and mitigate conflicts with people and After the cougar attack on the boy in Bailey, offidomestic livestock. cials from USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services killed Both female and male cougars can be hunted two young male cougars nearby in the following days during two different seasons, which essentially comafter they were reported eating domestic goats. DNA bine into one long season beginning Nov. 18 and testing by the University of Wyoming forensics laboending April 30 of the following year. This means ratory confirmed that one of the cougars was the one cougars can be hunted over five months out of the who attacked the boy, and was approximately 12 year. And all can agree that it can be difficult to tell months old, according to CPW. female and male cougars apart at the distances from According to CPW documents, all cougars capwhich most hunters are taking their shot, usually tured and killed as part of the Upper Arkansas River when the cougar is high up in a tree looking down, plan had genetic samples collected, presumably for while dogs are baying at them. Although mountain lions can give birth year-round, future DNA analysis. Similar material was also taken and analyzed from the cougar who attacked the boy “in the Rockies they exhibit a ‘birth pulse’ and most are born in summer or early fall,” according to Elbroch. It is in Bailey, confirming the attacking cougar had actually been the one killed. In order to definitively deterillegal to kill female mountain lions with kittens. “The mine whether or not the hunting of cougars in the absence of kittens with a lion does not mean it is a Upper Arkansas River plan contributed to the attack male or an unbred adult female,” according to CPW’s on the boy, CPW should test the two sets of DNA mountain lion hunting brochure. “Research has material to see if there is any match, and release the shown that young are close to their mothers about half the time.” This fact makes it nearly impossible for a results to the public.

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Nadya Tolokonnikova Co-Founder of Pussy Riot

Jeffrey Marsh Nonbinary Identity Activist

Rev. Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou Civil Rights Activist

Dave Archambault, Sr. Indian School Whisperer

900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

SEP 28 | 12:00 PM

coloradochautauqua

@colo_chautauqua

TICKETS: uforaday.com


Victor’s new heart

Longmont resident gets life-saving transplant

by Angela K. Evans

E

ver since Victor was diaghope. nosed with cardiomyopathy After that, says friend and and congestive heart failure GoFundMe organizer, Nick Robles, in 2005, he’s been waiting Victor started new medication and for a new heart. In early was being monitored better than August, he finally got one. ever before. Although he was first As previously reported, (Re: denied due to his lack of “long“Victor’s heart,” Nov. 21, COURTESY OF ESTELLA 2018), Victor immigrated to Longmont from Guatemala in 1999 when he was 17. Shortly after his diagnosis, he married Estella, whom he’d known in Guatemala, and the couple now has two young daughters, Ailin and Yaretzi. For years, Victor couldn’t afford the private insurance that would get him on a transplant list. According to Milliman Research, a heart transplant costs approximately $1.4 million, by far the costliest transplant surgery in the VICTOR waits for his new heart with wife U.S. term insurance coverage Estella by his side. With no way to and caregiver support,” afford a new heart, on May 3, Victor was Victor’s situation grew officially placed on the more dire in 2016, as his condition active waiting list for a heart transworsened, leaving him unable to plant through the United Network work and the family dependent on for Organ Sharing at the Heart Estella’s multiple fast-food jobs. Transplant Program at the Then late last year, a successful University of Colorado Hospital in community GoFundMe campaign Aurora. (He appealed the initial raised enough money to get Victor decision, citing community and private insurance starting Jan. 1, church support for ongoing insur2019, giving the family reason to ance payments and a list of caregiv-

WEEKLY EVENTS

er support that includes his wife, sister, sisters-in-law, father, cousin, pastor and friends.) By the end of July, his health was deteriorating. He had a hard time breathing and could barely walk. “I was thinking my heart really couldn’t go any longer,” Victor says. So at the beginning of August, he was admitted, once again, into the hospital, where he was told the doctors would give him three days to wait for a donor heart to become available. If that didn’t happen, they would install a heart pump as a temporary solution, something Victor was trying hard to avoid. On the night of the third day, Victor finally received some good news. A donor heart was available and he’d have transplant surgery the next day. “I started crying immediately when they told me. I was so grateful. I really didn’t want to go through the pump process,” Victor says. “I started crying from happiness because this is something I’ve

needed for so long.” On Aug. 7, Victor received his new heart. It’s only been more good news from the doctors since: his body accepted the organ, and he looks to make a full recovery. “Ever since the operation, it’s been easier not to worry,” he says. Although he’ll be on medication for the rest of his life, Victor says he already feels better. He can breathe easier, and he’s already going on walks around the block. He’s been told he can go back to work in about seven months, something he hasn’t been able to do for the last two years. “It’s humbling to think we can raise $11,000 and that can turn into being worth more than $1 million,” Robles says. “We feel fortunate that we were able to raise the money and Victor was able to access that service.” There is a financial toll, however, Victor says, and the family is still depending on community generosity and support. He still has his out-of-pocket maximum to pay off and monthly insurance bills. All of that pales in comparison, though, to the fact that Victor’s alive and getting healthier, Estella says. “The real significance is that he’s here with our daughters right now and he’ll be here,” Estella says through tears. “And thanks to God for making it happen and to the people of Colorado for helping us.”

Football Season Is Here!

Tuesday 5pm–9pm Prime Rib Night Wednesday 3pm–close $5 Burgers Night You can have a small draft beer addition for $5 more. We Also have a $9 Veggie Burger deal featuring the Beyond Meat Burger Thursday Ladies Night $5 specialty cocktails (change every week), $3 house red/white/ rose wines, $1-off draughts beers. Love Football? Watch the games with us. Full Sunday Ticket College and NFL games available. Drink and Wing specials during games. High School Sports Burger Battle Start Soon! 1111 Francis Street, Suite A, Longmont, CO 80501 • 303-647-3755 www.longmontpublichouse.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

17


BE MOTIVATED BE VISIONARY BE A CHANGEMAKER BE READY FOR BIG THINGS BE THE LIGHT

Make 2020 a ye  Magic

with The Dragо Dreambook + P l available at our Boulder Spa Location

303 219 1444 | 1521 PEARL STREET, BOULDER | THEDRAGONTREE.COM

|

www.dreambook .vision

6367 Arapahoe Rd. • Boulder 303.449.0011 McDonaldCarpetOneBoulder.com

18

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


NASA, GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

I

magine if you could testdrive your anticipated career before going through all of the effort and expense of obtaining the necessary education. It’s not possible for every job, but for sciences that require a graduate degree there is a nationwide program that offers a sneak preview of working as a researcher. Every summer, hundreds of undergraduate students from across the country come to Boulder to gain valuable research experience through this program. For some it will mark the beginning of a long career in their chosen field, while others may decide to move in a different direction. Whatever the influence on their future career paths, students almost universally consider a summer research experience in Boulder to be time well spent. From the year it was founded in 1950, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has supported undergraduate research assistants through grants to individual scientists. A more concerted approach called the Undergraduate Research Participation program ran from 1958 until it was eliminated by the Reagan administration in 1982. The program was resurrected in 1987 as Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and it has continued operating since then. There are currently a dozen active REU programs across Colorado, providing summer internships for students in astronomy, atmospheric science, biology, chemistry, computer science, ecology, engineering, space science and physics. The University of Colorado runs several of these programs in Boulder, but there are other comparable internships at local research labs like NCAR and NOAA. The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) has been running an REU program every summer since 2007. It now serves as an umbrella organization to connect summer students not only with university researchers, but also with scientists at the National Solar Observatory, the High Altitude Observatory at NCAR and the Space Weather Prediction Center at NOAA, as well as Southwest Research Institute, Space Science Institute, and other small research organizations. By partnering with these local institutes, the LASP program stretches the available funding to support more students than can be sponsored direct-

Experiencing research by Travis Metcalfe

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

ly by the REU grant from the NSF. This year the consortium supported a total of 27 students, with research projects related to the sun, stars, Earth, Mars, planetary atmospheres and engineering. “Having research experience, and demonstrating that you are good at it, is one of the things that graduate schools really look for in deciding who to accept,” explains Marty Snow, a research associate at LASP who has managed their REU program for the past decade. Snow grew up in Denver, but after graduating from Cherry Creek High School he went to Kalamazoo College in Michigan to study physics. In 1986, he spent the summer in Boulder as a research intern at the High Altitude Observatory, and he subsequently returned as a graduate student in astrophysics at the University of Colorado. His doctoral research used some of the earliest observations from the Hubble space telescope, and he has been working as a scientist at LASP ever since. During the first few years of LASP’s REU program in the late 2000s, Snow served as a research mentor for several students. When the original REU coordinator left LASP in 2010, Snow took over the program. His previous experience as both a summer student and a research mentor has helped him organize the program to work well for everyone involved. Students apply to the program each February with recommendation letters, transcripts of their grades and a few short essays describing their interests and motivations. The process is very competitive, with more than 400 applications this year for the 27 available positions. Scientists at research institutes around Boulder submit short project descriptions, and each is SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

matched with several potential students among the top-ranked candidates. Offers are sent out in March, and there is a coordinated REU acceptance deadline so those with multiple offers can choose their best option. The LASP program begins in late May and continues for 10 weeks. Students are provided with housing at the Bear Creek apartments, and they receive an allowance for food and transportation, along with a modest stipend. Everyone spends the first week in a “boot camp” with introductory lectures on a broad range of science topics, along with some basic computer training and a small group project to foster teamwork and build social connections. During most of the summer, the students spend the majority of their time working on a specific research project with their scientist mentor. But there are also weekly professional development sessions for the entire group, giving them an opportunity to discuss the culture of science and build their communication skills with short presentations to their peers. In the final week of the program, each student gives a brief seminar about their research project and prepares a poster highlighting the key results. Considering that the program can only accept the top applicants, it’s not surprising that many of the summer students go on to attend at least some graduate school, with about half eventually working toward a Ph.D. The experience working with scientists in Boulder is often the students’ first exposure to academics who are not university professors, revealing a possible career path that might appeal to them more than teaching. For those who decide that a career in research is not for them, the experience is all the more important, potentially saving them the time and debt from a graduate education that would not really serve their interests. “I would call the program pretty successful, not just in that it helps the students decide on their career paths,” Snow says, “but also that they come away with the idea that this was a very good way to spend their summer.” Travis Metcalfe, Ph.D., is a researcher and science communicator based in Boulder. The Lab Notes series is made possible in part by a research grant from the National Science Foundation. I

19


FROM THE DIVIDE TO YOUR DOOR!

INTRODUCTORY OFFER Free Two 5-Gallon Bottles of Water & One Months Rental on the Dispenser of Your Choice

Offering Glass Bottle Options

303.440.0432 • www.IndianPeaksSpringWater.com

LOOK FOR OUR SOLAR WATER CART AT BOULDER EVENTS

ADHD ≠

Do you or a member of your family have difficulty concentrating or focusing? Are you concerned about hyperactivity or impulsive behavior? Now there is a clinically proven alternative to medication. Research shows neurofeedback to be an effective, safe, non-invasive way to work with children and adults—without resorting to psychoactive medication. Help you or your child utilize and train the brain to improve performance. neuroAgility provides diagnostic evaluations for AD/HD and Brain Injury. We offer state-of-the-art training that is respectful and non-stigmatizing; we build on your strengths leading to a sense of self mastery. Kerri Honaker, M.S., LPC, BCIA, Clinic Director Earle Shugerman, MD 2501 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80302

Attention and Performance Psychology We accept most major credit cards. Insurance coverage may apply

www.neuroAgility.com

ANXIETY AUTISM SPECTRUM HEARING ENHANCEMENT

• Comfortable Office Setting in Central Boulder • Treatments Are Well Tolerated and Do Not Interfere With Usual Daily Activities • Non-Invasive, FDA Approved Procedure • No Anesthesia or Sedation Required

2501 Walnut, Ste. 207, Boulder, CO bouldertms.com • 303.449.0318

Now Participating With Several Major Insurance Providers

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

BRAIN INJURY

We offer an advanced medical treatment, known as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), to alleviate depressive episodes that have failed to improve with the use of antidepressant medication.

Richard L. Suddath MD Earle Shugerman MD

I

ADHD

303-417-1797

I T ’ S A N E W DAY F O R D E P R E S S I O N T R E AT M E N T.

20

ADD

A diagnosis of ADHD doesn't have to mean prescription medication.

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Get Salted Breathe Easier

Five years in two months’ time

New Extended Hours

To minimize his carbon footprint, climate scientist travels from Amsterdam to Boulder without taking a flight by Lauren Hamko

T

he most challenging part and your own happiness is very about spending nine weeks important, but is your own happiness traveling 6,400 miles on a cat- more important than the happiness amaran may not be the sea of future generations?” sickness, but the boredom of In January 2019, van Dijk left his being on a boat in the middle of the home in Amsterdam, traveling by Atlantic ocean with only three other train to the Canary Islands, where he people to talk to. crossed the Atlantic on a boat. Three However, for Joep van Dijk, a weeks after leaving the Canary 28-year-old geologist spe- COURTESY OF JEOP VAN DIJK cializing in historic climate research, the sea sickness and boredom was worth it if it meant minimizing his personal impact on the ongoing climate crisis. Actually, for van Dijk, it was far from boring; it was exhilarating. “You have no society around you. It’s just you, the water and simple life,” he says. Van Dijk began his journey from Amsterdam to Colorado after accepting a posiIslands, van Dijk reached Barbados. tion as a researcher at the On his way to a U.S. port, van Dijk Institution for Alpine and Arctic sailed to Georgetown, Nassau and Research at the University of Freeport, learning about the culture Colorado Boulder. of each island along the way. On one While the most convenient way of his stops, van Dijk even saved a to travel to Colorado from Europe is man’s life. by plane, one round-trip flight from “I saw this face in the distance and Amsterdam to Denver emits approxi- it went underwater. I was thinking, ‘No mately 2 tons of carbon dioxide way. Is this really happening right directly into the atmosphere. The avi- now?’” van Dijk says. “After one minute ation industry alone contributes of contemplation, I decided to jump in, about 2% to the total amount of and I swam over. It was this old drunk greenhouse gas emissions in the Frenchman. He almost died.” atmosphere. Six weeks later, van Dijk arrived So van Dijk made the journey by in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He took train, boat, bike, bus and even a little an overnight Greyhound bus to New bit of hitchhiking. Orleans. From Louisiana, van Dijk Van Dijk’s interest in the climate rode his bike through Texas, New began when he was 18, after he Mexico and Colorado, a 1,600 mile built a solar panel for his school. As course. he continued to observe the negaThe ride took three weeks and tive effects of the climate crisis, van van Dijk arrived at his destination, Dijk became increasingly cautious of CU-Boulder, on Sunday, March 31. his personal contributions to it. “My boss was waiting for me at “At one point I was like, ‘Screw the institute,” he says. “That was a this, I’m done,’” van Dijk says. “You good moment. We went to his place, have to make egoistic choices in life, I spent a couple of days there, drank BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

some beers, cooked some nice dinners. That’s when the whole Boulder adventure started.” Although the trip was long and grueling, he feels as if he personally grew and matured by five years in two months’ time. He learned how to listen to himself, to what he wants, and to not succumb to what others expect from him. Van Dijk says he also learned how to listen to others and understand people on his journey. “When you are with four people on a ship, you realize the importance of companionship and social interaction. In this world where everything is so individual, we often forget how important it is to have human interaction.” Apart from choosing not to fly, van Dijk makes decisions in his everyday life to ensure he is living sustainably. He is a vegetarian and lives in a co-op house. He and his roommates routinely buy products in bulk to minimize packaging and waste less food. He minimizes his plastic usage when possible and makes local and seasonal choices when shopping. “Every day you have to go against the system. It takes energy,” van Dijk says. Van Dijk filmed and photographed his adventure to Boulder and is making a documentary of his journey, which he hopes will encourage people to focus on minimizing their own personal carbon footprint. The film, Carbon Dioxide? That’s Not Right!, is slated for release in the spring of 2020. “Slow travel is not really slow,” van Dijk says. “Somebody told me the other day if you grew five years in two months’ time, is that slow travel? No, it’s not. It’s fast travel.” SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

• MONDAY MOMS

1 Parent/ 1 Child • 45 min Session $30

• WONDERFUL WEDNESDAYS Senior’s with ID • 45 min Session $20

• FIRST RESPONDER FRIDAYS 1st Responders/Military with ID 45 min Session $20

Check SaltOfTheEarthTherapy.com for Daily Specials

Skin Conditions • Acne • Eczema • Psoriasis Salt Therapy works wonders for the skin. The particles increase movement in the skin ion channels, which encourages regeneration of the skin. It also balances skin pH, reduces inflammation, and kills bacteria.

Respiratory Issues • Asthma • Allergies/Hay Fever • Chronic Bronchitis • Cystic Fibrosis • Emphysema • Sinus and Ear Infections Salt therapy has many positive effects on the respiratory tract. The salt particles break apart congestion in the airways, reduce inflammation of the bronchial tubes, and kill bacteria in infections. These benefits help to treat respiratory symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.

Well Being • Anti-Aging • Anxiety • Athletic Endurance • Cold/Flu Symptoms • Fatigue • Stress The body is naturally able to handle reasonable stress when it is healthy and balanced. An imbalanced body may not properly re-generate itself. The negative ions in dry salt bond with positive ions in the body to calm the muscles and inner nervous system, thus reinstating a normal balance into the body.

Schedule Sessions at SaltOfTheEarthTherapy.com

4520 N. Broadway Boulder CO 303-435-1039 I

21


RESTORE RELAX RECOVER BOULDER'S PREMIERE CBD SPECIALTY STORE CBD TINCTURES - TOPICALS E D I B L E S - P E T - VA P E S & M O R E .

Visit our new retail location at

2425 Canyon Blvd., Unit D, Boulder, CO 80302

GET 20%OFF ne your next on-li de co purchase, use

BW20

for our full line of products visit: M O O N M O T H E R H E M P. C O M These products are not for use by or sale to persons under the age of 18. Consult with a physician before use if you have a serious medical condition or use prescription medications. The statements and products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

22

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


THE HAKAWATI

PAINTINGS BY HELEN ZUGHAIB, COURTESY OF BMOCA

ONE FATHER’S STORY OF IMMIGRATION IS THE STORY OF HUMANITY Above: ‘Coming to America”

BY CAITLIN ROCKETT

Below: ‘Subhiyyi at Teta’s House’

ON THE BILL: Artist Talk with Helen Zughaib. 6:30

p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18, BMoCA @ Macky, Andrew J. Macky Gallery, Macky Auditorium, 1515 Pleasant St., Boulder. Free. ‘Stories My Father Told Me’ is on display at BMoCA at Macky through Nov. 24.

A

cross the Potomac, Helen Zughaib could see the Pentagon burning from her home in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 11, 2001. Soon enough, phone calls poured in from the painter’s family and friends in the Middle East. They called from Lebanon where she was born as well as from Jordan and Syria. They called to offer their support in the wake of a grisly national trauma, but neither Zughaib nor her loved ones could fully understand at that moment just how that trauma would manifest. see HAKAWATI Page 24

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

23


HAKAWATI from Page 23

The next day, Zughaib says a stranger spit in her face. It was then she began to understand the complexity of the trauma: To be of Middle Eastern descent in America was now to be an object of fear — and hatred. “Living in this town, here in Washington after 9/11, was such an eye-opening experience for me,” Zughaib says over the phone from the same apartment across the river. “All of a sudden people are looking at me and saying, ‘Where are you really from?’ What they’re really trying to get at is: Are you from the Middle East?” As the daughter of a Syrian immigrant who went on to work for the U.S. Department of State and a college-educated American from upstate New York, Zughaib had always lived with one foot in the West, one in the Middle East. Her art is a reflection of that duality, blending elements of Western artistic movements — the non-naturalistic color of Fauvism, the multiple vantage points of Cubism, the 24

I

cultural references of pop art — with foundational practices in Arabic art — the illusion of infinity that comes from regular tessellation, the hypnotic patterns of floral arabesque, the bluntness of two-dimensionality. So while the 9/11 attacks initially made Zughaib reluctant to discuss her Middle Eastern heritage, the pull of her artistic mission grew stronger. The need to bridge the gap between East and West was more essential than it ever had been. She looked no further than her father, Elia, for inspiration. Though he was reluctant, he agreed to work with her on the project. Weaving folktales from Elia’s native land with the story of his life — from being forced from his home in Syria in the early 1940s to finally immigrating to the U.S. during the Lebanese civil war in 1975 — Zughaib created a series of gouache paintings simply titled Stories My Father Told Me, now on display at Macky Auditorium through Boulder SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Museum of Contemporary Art. The collection took more than a decade to create, beginning in 2003 — at her mother’s suggestion — and ending in 2015 when Elia handed his daughter the 24th story and informed her that was the final installment. At 92, Zughaib holds on to the hope that he’s got another story or two to give. Once upon a time not so long ago, the hakawati — Arabic for storyteller — played a crucial role in Middle Eastern cultures. In villages and town centers, large crowds gathered to hear the hakawati share tales and folklore with wit and wisdom. Together, communities remembered their past, learned lessons, healed from traumas and came together as a united force, all through storytelling. Together, Zughaib and her father continue in the tradition of the hakawati so that the global community might remember, learn, heal and unite. As with all of Zughaib’s work, I

ABOVE: ‘CHARITY AND COMPASSION’ depicts the fable of an Emir who gifted a horse to a man who tried to steal it from him. Elia Zughaib shared this story with his daughter. “Do not say you stole the horse,” the Emir said. “Say that I gave it to you. Do this so that charity and compassion will not disappear from our community.”

Stories My Father Told Me creates a kaleidoscopic-version of reality. It’s a chore not to vocalize delight as you take in snaking vines of arabesque wrapped loosely around repeated geometric patterns built of contrasting blocks of color — a cheerful, Technicolor Tim Burtonesque world. It’s a childlike wonder her paintings inspire, but not without demanding adequate attention in return. Underneath the beauty of his daughter’s paint, Elia’s stories chronicle the root of human injustice, of the battles for power that have uprooted families for millenia, of the denial of home that has created a world of disBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


placed “others.” “It’s beautiful. It’s expressive,” says curator Jennifer Heath. Heath, an author and former arts reporter for the Rocky Mountain News, met Zughaib a decade or so ago while Heath was traveling with a show she curated called The Veil: Visible & Invisible Spaces. The show explored cliché and stereotypes about the Islamic veil through work by 30 artists from the U.S., Europe, India and the Middle East. Like Elia Zughaib, Heath’s father also worked for the U.S. State Department, meaning his daughter grew up around the world. She came of age in Afghanistan. Like Helen Zughaib, she understands both worlds. It’s what drew her to Zughaib’s work. “It has both the quality of reality and unreality at the same time, and that becomes sort of mystical and dreamlike, but at the same time she’s saying stuff,” Heath says. “She is talking about real politics — real politik — things that are actually happening on the ground. And she also had the wisdom to get her father’s stories. Not everybody has that, you know. People are suddenly rushing to the DNA departments to [find out] who they are, [but] she had the wisdom to [collect his stories]. “Stories My Father Told Me ... has this mosaic quality that is in [Middle Eastern] architecture, and it doesn’t look exactly like Helen’s. Helen has her own style and her own way of expressing things. But it reflects that. It resonates with that kind of storytelling. And it also talks about, to me, the fragmentation of what that world became. First, it’s close. It’s all about these communities, but at the same time you can feel the fragmentation to come” When Elia Zughaib was born, Mount Lebanon, the governorate where Beirut is located, was just a few years removed from a famine that had, by some estimates, decimated the population by as much as 50%. Tensions in the Levant rose with the fall of the Ottoman Empire and the rise of WWII. That tension trickled down through the generations, first driving Elia from his home in the ’40s, then displacing his children: first after the Six-Day War in 1967, then again after the Lebanese civil war in 1975. Helen Zughaib left Syria for Lebanon as a young child. She was then forced to leave Lebanon at age BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

16 and finished school in Paris before heading to college in the States. “I remember like yesterday,” Zughaib says of leaving Syria in the late ’60s. “I said, ‘When are we going to come back, Daddy?’ And he said, ‘You’ll be back in a week.” It was 35 years later that I did go back.” She returned in 2011 behind a showing of her work. The Arab Spring broke out just a few months later. If there’s something Helen Zughaib understands, it’s fragmentation.

But showcasing pain and loss is not the point of Zughaib’s work. It’s about compassion. “Yes, there are differences in cultures,” Zughaib says, “there’s a difference in language, there’s differences in religions. But are we really that different? And the answer is no, because ultimately we share the same desires and needs as human beings.” Zughaib began her Syrian Migration Series in 2011 as a way to humanize the Arab Spring and the

resulting Syrian war that led to the largest migration in human history. The collection parallels The Migration Series by Jacob Lawrence that documented the northern migration of African Americans in the first half of the 20th century. “Lawrence’s Migration, his 60th panel simply said, ‘And the migrants kept coming,’” Zughaib says. “He said that in 1940 and 1941 ... it was prophetic. And here we are. Do we not learn? Why do we repeat history?”

UPCOMING SHOWS

Saturday, September 14 - 2:30pm-6:30pm - Lafayette Brew Fest Friday, October 4 - 5:30pm-8:00pm - Millennium Hotel FAC, Boulder I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

25


Peruvian Chili Lime Seasoning Capitol Hill Seasoning

Smoked Spanish Sweet Paprika

Pike’s Peak Butcher’s Rub

Four Corners Peppercorns

30% off Gift Cards

bestofboulderdeals.kostizi.com Save on local dining, entertainment, retail and wellness.

26

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


The disorienting sphere of Australia’s psych-rock revival

Perth’s Psychedelic Porn Crumpets want to take you on a journey

by Kristy Guilbault

I

f you’re into psych-rock, you may be wondering what’s in the water in Perth, Australia. Home to Tame Impala and Pond, the city isn’t just the capital of Western Australia anymore. For decades, local artists were challenged by the city’s geographical isolation, which provided logistical and financial barriers to touring and promotion. It seemed that in order to make it big, you had to JOSH LUDLOW leave your hometown. But, in the mid-aughts, Perthbased bands honed in on their scene and began to garner international attention. Psychedelic Porn Crumpets is the latest addition to this growing list of psych revivalists. Equal parts intrigue and shock-value, the quartet’s name is an ode to the vast, perceptionaltering world of psych-rock. In 2009, frontman Jack McEwan (guitar, vocals) graduated high school and immersed himself in Perth’s music scene; Kevin Parker had just started releasing EPs as Tame Impala and his fuzzy, delayed guitar sounds clearly fanned the embers of a smoldering psychedelic scene. “The whole, like, psych scene stuff just became centered around Perth,” McEwan says. “Everyone wanted to be, like, slightly different, so that you just went and spiraled off in your own accord. You just couldn’t help but get inspired. It was great growing up there.” You can hear Perth’s influence driving every Crumpets song, but the band has devised its own intoxicating spin on psych-rock. Take for instance the group’s breakout single, “Cornflake.” The track pairs larger-than-life blues riffs, à la Jimi Hendrix, with lush reverb reminiscent of the Flaming Lips. This unlikely coupling creates sonic whiplash that has you headbanging one minute, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

and the next you’re contemplating the origins of the universe in a cerebral dream — which is precisely what drew McEwan to the genre in the first place. “[Y]ou can go anywhere, like, you don’t really have put a sort of single perspective on what the genre is,” McEwan says. “It stems from Radiohead to King Gizzard to Palm or even Grizzly Bear’s got some sort of psych tones to it. It’s so

broad, and there’s so much more dimension to sort of shape you across land, and be more creative while writing the albums.” For Psychedelic Porn Crumpets, bringing new music to life means looking to everything for inspiration: from film, technology and friends, to counterintuitively isolating themselves from music all together. One of McEwan’s favorite writing tactics is to separate himself from music for a few days, and let his subconscious write songs for him, once he returns. “You find a different world to sort of piece yourself back together, rather than I

just doing music all the time,” McEwan says. Crumpets’ most recent album, And Now For the Whatchamacallit, reflects McEwan’s process with songs as outlandish as the album’s collaged cover art. The album’s closing track, “Dezi’s Adventure,” is an invitation to follow the band down a stream-of-consciousness rabbit hole. “Lay down, breathe with the Earth, find a sound / Right on your doorstep there’s an adventure,” McEwan sings, reaching out a hand to the listener. Sgt. Pepper’s-style organ kicks off the hallucinatory escapade, before mixed meters and an omniscient voice-over take hold. “Dezi’s Adventure” initially clocked in around 12 minutes, keeping with the band’s maximalist approach, but was ultimately condensed to keep the saga relatively grounded. The modern state of psych-rock is unrestrained. Perth artists are a microcosm for the meandering genre; bands have found a way to reinvent the style a hundred times over, and Psychedelic Porn Crumpets look poised to do it a hundred times more. “When we’re on the tour, you do one show, and then you drive to the next place, you get in the hotel, you drive to the next place, you do a show,” McEwan says. “So you rarely get time to sort of step back and be yourself. So I think when you do go home, all you want to do is write music, because you’re not actually writing when you’re away. Even though you’re playing each night, it feels like you’re sort of far away from the instrument, which is a weird, weird bit of irony in that.” SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

9/14 DIXIE LEADFOOT 9/21 JACKSON CLOUD ODYSSEY

I

27


NADYA TOLOKONNIKOVA BY JONAS AUKERLAND

Voices of dissent

Chautauqua offers lessons in activism

by Caitlin Rockett “We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty. When the loyal opposition dies, I think the soul of America dies with it.” —Edward R. Murrow

F

or nonbinary activist and author Jeffrey Marsh (they/them pronouns), mere existence becomes an act of political dissent, whether they like it or not. “People who hate my guts based on looking at me or based on who they think I am, they won’t let me be nonpolitical,” Marsh says. “I have a quote unquote political Twitter to them because me just existing is a political act.” It’s “unfortunate,” Marsh says, that queer lives get politicized, but Marsh leaned into it. A gentle demeanor ­— nurtured by a 20-year Buddhist practice — drove Marsh to step into their role as a leader in nonbinary identity education and justice. Authenticity became Marsh’s 28

I

battle cry, kindness their strongest expression of dissent. Just in time for election season, Marsh will join three other scholars and activists on Sept. 28 at Chautauqua for “The Politics of Dissent,” a one-day educational summit on how to respond to the pressing societal issues of our times. When the event programming staff at Chautauqua talked about developing a one-day event for experts to dissect hot-button issues, Mark Nicolella, general manager of public events, knew right off the bat who he wanted to include. “I’d had the idea to try and bring in Nadya [Tolokonnikova] from [political art collective] Pussy Riot to do a standalone speaking engagement here at Chautauqua this summer,” he says. “So we kind of married those two concepts together to flesh out what is a full day of pretty cool speakers.” In August 2012, Tolokonnikova and bandmate Maria Alyokhina — both new SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

to different prisons, Tolokonnikova was mothers just barely into their 20s at the released in December 2013. time — were sentenced to two years’ “After I showed that I could really imprisonment for “hooliganism motivated stand for myself, then my life in prison by religious hatred,” according to The really changed,” she said in an interview Guardian, after an anti-Putin Pussy Riot with NowThis News. “It’s the same with performance at Moscow Cathedral of activism, the same with protesting, that Christ the Savior. Both were sent to you cannot just push the button and penal colonies, Alyokhina to Perm, Tolokonnikova to Mordovia. Both are everything will just change in a second.” She has not forced labor camps JEFFREY MARSH, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST reserved her critilocated near cism for Russian Siberia. president On Sept. 23, Vladamir Putin. In 2013, 2016, Pussy Riot Tolokonnikova released a song penned an open called “Make letter about the America Great abhorrent condiAgain”: tions of the prison “Let other and began a hunpeople in / Listen ger strike in proto your women / test. Stop killing black “My brigade in children / Make the sewing shop America Great works 16 to 17 Again.” hours a day,” she wrote. “From 7:30 Modern-day civil rights activist a.m. to 12:30 a.m. At best, we get four Reverend Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou can hours of sleep a night. We have a day speak to America’s grisly history of muroff once every month and a half. We dering unarmed young black men. The work almost every Sunday.” author/musician/theologian was arrested After being hospitalized and moved I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


25% OFF

REV. OSAGYEFO UHURU SEKOU, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

DAVID ARCHAMBAULT, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

in August 2015 outside the U.S. attorney’s office in downtown St. Louis, Missouri, during a demonstration against police brutality. When asked how to engage more people, those with privilege, the Reverend admits that’s not his goal. “I’m not that interested in them,” he says. “I don’t spend a lot of time trying to convince people. “The question for me is that for white brothers and sisters, when Tamir Rice was shot and killed in less than five seconds, did they believe that it was their child who was shot in less than five seconds? When India Clark or Kiki Herring, trans folks [of color] who were killed, did [white people] feel that they were a part of their family? Until they feel that, not as abstract intellectuals, but when you fundamentally can grieve in your soul for a mother who’s lost their child or for a child in a cage, then we gonna get some movement.” David Archambault has been working on creating movement in the educational system for Native Americans for decades. Born on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, Archambault argues that education in the U.S. has acted as a form of cultural geneocide for native BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ON THE BILL: Chautauqua University for a Day featuring David Archambault, Jeffrey Marsh, Reverend Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou and Nadya Tolokonnikova. Noon. Saturday, Sept. 28, Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, chautauqua. com/portfolio/university-for-a-day/

the purchase of a Big Daddy Club Mug, & get FREE COFFEE REFILLS EVERY MONDAY WITH THE MUG

GOLDEN on Route 93 303.279.1481 BOULDER at Meadows Shopping Center 303.554.0193

Expires 9/30/19

WE ARE BOULDER COUNTY!

Authentic NYC BAGELS in Colorado

INDEPENDENT & LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1993

LAFAYETTE 489 US Highway 287 303.665.5918 LONGMONT Prospect Village 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237

For advertising information call 303.494.5511 www.BoulderWeekly.com

people, effectively wiping out their languages and traditions. In a TedX talk from 2013, Archambault points to the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania, the first nonreservation Indian school funded by the federal government. “What happened to [these children] was fear was put in them,” Archambault says in the presentation. “They were being handled by people that had the ‘save the child, kill the Indian,’ type of thinking. Then they were made to feel inferior. They were spoken to in English so they didn’t understand what was going on and for their ineptness they were punished. There were two primary emotions going on for these children: fear and shame. Anybody working from that decision-making basis, it’s not going to go good.” The full-day event at Chautauqua promises heavy subject matter, but each presenter has optimism at the core of their message. “As far as I can tell from my experience of being a human being,” Marsh says, “hatred, discrimination, bigotry, judgment, jealousy… there are lots of things that are not our authentic nature as human beings.” I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

29


WWW.FOXTHEATRE.COM

1135 13TH STREET BOULDER 720.645.2467 JUST ANNOUNCED NOV 7 .................................................................................................. POLICULTURE NOV 8 ............................................................................................................... KLOUD DEC 8 ............................................................................................... JD MCPHERSON DEC 27 & 28 .................................................. YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND THUR. SEP 12 BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

THE JIVE TRIBE

BANSHEE TREE, CORDA VERA FRI. SEP 13 ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT: LOST IN A DIGITAL WORLD - ALBUM RELEASE SHOW

MANIC FOCUS

DAILY BREAD, DAILY DOSES, MIDICINAL SAT. SEP 14

WWW.BOULDERTHEATER.COM 2032 14TH STREET BOULDER 303.786.7030 JUST ANNOUNCED OCT 26 ........................................................ PHOUR POINT O + STEELY DEAD OCT 28 ........................................................ ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW NOV 15 ..................................... BRITTANY HOWARD OF ALABAMA SHAKES NOV 17 ................................. THE MUSIC OF WIDESPREAD PANIC FOR KIDS DEC 13 & 14 ................................................................. THE WOOD BROTHERS JAN 28 ....................................................................................... MIKE GORDON SAT. SEP 14 106.7 THE BULL, BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

LIVE ON THE BIG SCREEN - TICKETS ONLY $5! SUN. SEP 15 THE ROCK AND ROLL PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS

THE MUSIC OF REGGAE FOR KIDS

97.3 KBCO, WESTWORD & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

THUR. SEP 19

KING LLAMA

RETURN TO SEND’ER

JIMMY HERRING AND THE 5 OF 7 TUES. SEP 17 ROOSTER PRESENTS: PINK BEGINNINGS TOUR PART 2

PINK SWEAT$ PJ

WED. SEP 18 B2BS & BASSLINES

HAASY X SYRENNE

SNEAK B2B NOTLOC, EMERALD WELLS B2B CHARLIE WOODS, HARVE B2B AWAL, PARMAJAWN THUR. SEP 19 WAKAAN PRESENTS “DOUBLE VISION” TOUR

CHAMPAGNE DRIP + LUZCID TVBOO, EXO

FRI. SEP 20 INDIE 102.3 & WESTWORD PRESENT

PSYCHEDELIC PORN CRUMPETS MEATBODIES

SAT. SEP 21

PEEKABOO

PASHMONIX B2B ROSES & RUBIES, CLOCKWISE B2B K!NDLY WED. SEP 25 WESTWORD & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT: VINYL DESTINATION 45 TOUR

DJ JAZZY JEFF + DJ SCRATCH WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THUR. SEP 26 FANTASTIC VOYAGE & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

JUSTIN JAY DJ SET

MATCHSTICK PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

FRI. SEP 20 WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT CARAVELLE WORLD TOUR

POLO & PAN SAT. SEP 21

INDIE 102.3, WESTWORD, TWIST & SHOUT AND TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY SESSA

SUN. SEP 22 MINI LADD PRESENTS: DEMONETIZED TOUR

MINI LADD & BIGJIGGLYPANDA WED. SEP 25 103.5 THE FOX PRESENTS

TAB BENOIT ERIC JOHANSON

THUR. SEP 26

LUCIE SILVAS FRI. SEP 27 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

ADRIAN BELEW SAUL ZONANA

MON. SEP 30 SPONSORED BY GRAND CANYON TRUST

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE!

BETWEEN RIVER AND RIM, HIKING THE GRAND CANYON WITH KEVIN FEDARKO AND PETE MCBRIDE

DJ ROIT

FRI. OCT 4

FRI. SEP 27

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND, WESTWORD AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

WESTWORD PRESENTS

ZIGGY ALBERTS EMILY BRIMLOW SAT. SEP 28

MOONCHILD SKY POND

TUES. OCT 1

MOON BOOTS LIVE WED. OCT 2

RIDE

THE SPIRIT OF THE BEEHIVE SUN. OCT 6 CHANNEL 93.3 PRESENTS

COLD WAR KIDS SLOW CAVES

TUES. OCT 8 EXPERIENCE THE SENSATION TOUR

YUNG GRAVY

SAVAGEREALM, TIIIIIIIIIIP

RADIO 1190 PRESENTS

THUR. OCT 10

FRUTA BRUTAL, SUNSHINEMEDLEY PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

TODD SNIDER WITH VERY SPECIAL GUEST RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT

IIVX, IAM_JACKO, DERPSTRA

88.5 KGNU, BOULDER WEEKLY, GRATEFUL WEB & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

DAFNA

FRI. OCT 4

HE$H

SAT. OCT 5 INDIE 102.3, WESTWORD AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

SINKANE

FEAT. MAD ALCHEMY LIGHT SHOW THE JAUNTEE

SUN. OCT 6 CHANNEL 93.3 PRESENTS

BANNERS ELLEVATOR

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

FRI. OCT 11

SHAKEDOWN STREET

PERFORMS 10/11/80 WARFIELD THEATER (3 SETS!) SAT. OCT 12

JUSTIN WILLMAN TUES. OCT 15 FEELIN’ ALRIGHT TOUR 2019

DAVE MASON

THE DAVE MASON BAND, CARY MORIN

MON. OCT 7

SAT. OCT 19

“A VERY EMOTIONAL TOUR”

EVOKATION, MEREKABA MUSIC & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

EMOTIONAL ORANGES FEAT. CHIIILD

TUES. OCT 8

KALYA SCINTILLA: GAIAN CODE LIVE FEAT. YAIMA, PORANGUI, MARYA STARK & GUEST VOCALIST IRINA MIKHAILOVA (KAYA PROJECT)

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

MON. OCT 21

FLYTE

FRANK TURNER

JADE BIRD

THUR. OCT 10 88.5 KGNU, BOULDER WEEKLY, PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS CELEBRATING 20 YEARS GHOST-NOTE

FRI. OCT 11 88.5 KGNU & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

RANDOM RAB EARTHCRY, BLOSSOMN SAT. OCT 12 GREEN BALLOON TOUR

TANK & THE BANGAS ADIA VICTORIA

MON. OCT 14

PETER TOSH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FEAT. HALF PINT THE YELLOW WALL DUB SQUAD & SPECIAL GUEST ANDREW BEES (BLACK UHURU), KING HOPETON, SELASEE & THE FAFA FAMILY TUES. OCT 15

SONGHOY BLUES RAMAKHANDRA

WED. OCT 16 RADIO 1190 PRESENTS

TOO MANY ZOOZ THUMPASAURUS

NO MAN’S LAND

KAYLEIGH GOLDSWORTHY THUR. OCT 24

LIQUID STRANGER HYDRAULIX, TLZMN FRI. OCT 25

CAT POWER ZSELA

WED. OCT 30 INDIE 102.3 AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

DEVENDRA BANHART BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT THUR. OCT 31 88.5 KGNU, PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

SUNSQUABI NOBIDE

FRI. NOV 1

SPACE JESUS HUXLEY ANNE, MZG

NOV 5 ............................................................................... CANNIBAL CORPSE NOV 11 ................................................................................... HIPPO CAMPUS NOV 17 ............................................................................... BRUCE COCKBURN NOV 22 ............................................................... THE LAST WALTZ REVISITED NOV 29 & 30 .............................................................................. TREVOR HALL DEC 7 ................................................................... TRACE BUNDY + KAKI KING

THURS. OCT 17 PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: CRUISIN’ USA TOUR 2019

BUKU

OCT 18 OCT 20 OCT 21 OCT 22 OCT 23

30

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

ESSEKS, FRQNCY, YOKO B2B OPTIX

................................................................................ THE HIGH HAWKS ........................................................................ THE JAPANESE HOUSE ...................................................................................................... WALE ........................................................................................... CUT SNAKE ....................................................................... JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE

I

2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


COURTESY OF VIENNA TENG

VIENNA TENG — WITH EMANNUELLE SASSON. 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

see EVENTS Page 34

UNDOCUMONOLOGUES — WITH SOUND CIRCLE.

Inspired by the women who influenced the life of Marilyn f T2 o Monroe, this contemposy rary dance performance explores themes of self-exploration, social pressures and body image, with original music composed by Bob Barrick. The first piece of the show, ‘Preoccupied,’ explores communication presented through the use of phones of all sorts — a metaphor for finding one’s self preoccupied. This is followed by ‘Norma,’ a longer, more narrative-based work using contemporary dance to explore the side of a female starlet most of us think we know.

If you haven’t seen Motus Theater’s UndocuMonologues, you’re missing some of the most compelling performance art on immigration being done in the country. Change that on Saturday, Sept. 14 and head to Lafayette’s Arts Hub, where Motus Theater’s undocumented writers will share autobiographical monologues about their lives, hopes, fears and dreams. This performance will feature monologues by Kiara Chávez, Laura Peniche, Armando Peniche, Irving Reza and Reydesel Salvidrez-Rodriguez. Each monologue will be followed by a musical response by Sound Circle, a womens a cappella ensemble directed by Sue Coffee.

7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 720-432-2004.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

Nico l

C ou r te

e Project Dan c

as Es

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12 and Saturday, Sept. 14, Dairy Arts Center, Gordon Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

sito po

via W

ikimedia Comm ons

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

‘BODY LIKE SCRIPTURE.’

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 970-481-4605. on llingt We

Silen Wellington — a student of music composition and psychology at CU Boulder — is a musician storyteller, activist, and lover, among other things. Wellington likes to combine music with other art mediums, be that spoken word, visual art, ritual performance or storytelling. ‘Body Like Scripture’ premiered in February at CU’s Pendulum New Music concert series. This piece — Wellington’s first full-length solo show — explores the chaos of gender dysphoria. Expect a transgressive night of queer/trans performance art, electroacoustic music, spoken word poetry and ritual.

Cou r t es yS

T2 DANCE PROJECT: ‘NORMA.’

n ile

I

31


arts

LIVE MUSIC!

The Tune Up at Full Cycle Friday, September 13 7:30-9:30 PM

1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

BMoCA at Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., University of Colorado Boulder. ‘Helen Zughaib: Stories My Father Told Me,’ through Nov. 24. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. ‘A Passage from India,’ Arapahoe Ramp, through Sept. 30; ‘Under- & Overstories,’ Canyon Gallery, through Sept. 29. Bricolage Gallery, Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. ‘Potato People and Other Flights of Fancy: Gerda Rovetch Retrospective,’ through Oct. 5.

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12 7:00 PM

DREAM TO FLY 8:30 PM

LASER STRANGER THINGS FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13 7:00 PM

CAPCOM GO! THE APOLLO STORY

graphs, and documents detailing the museum’s 40 years of operation.

‘COMING TO AMERICA,’ HELEN ZUGHAIB

The Foggy Tops Bluegrass Band

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. ‘Clark Richert: Pattern and Dimensions,’ through Sept. 15.

MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31, 2020. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/event/ monumental/.

HELEN ZUGHAIB is an Arab-American artist living and working in Washington D.C. An ambassador for peace, Zughaib’s art illuminates the commonalities of all people. After 9/11, Zughaib persuaded her Syrian Lebanese father to recount his life as a boy, which culminated in his own migration to the United States. Zughaib translated his tales into the 25 pieces found in ‘Stories My Father Told Me,’ presented by BMoCA in the Macky Auditorium gallery on CU Boulder’s campus through Nov. 24. See page 23 for a feature on the exhibition.

Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. ‘Modern Habitat: Building Energetic Spaces,’ MacMillan Gallery: Will Day; Polly Addison Gallery: Margie Criner; McMahon Gallery: Arch 11, HMH, HouseFish, Pyatt Studio, SopherSparn, Renée del Gaudio Architecture and Workshop 8; Hand/Rudy Gallery: Davis Arney, through Oct. 15.

Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. ‘Working Artist Project,’ through Oct. 6. Artist duo Lyndsey Webster and Cory McKague invite anyone to join them as a working artist. They provide the supplies, you do the work. Be part of the culminating exhibit.

Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. ‘Eyes On: Erika Harrsch,’ Hamilton Building, through Nov. 17; ‘Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz,’ through Nov. 17; ‘The Incubation Effect,’ through Sept. 9; ‘Phantom Canyon: A Digital Circuit,’ through Oct. 16; ‘The Light Show,’ through May 2020; ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through January 2020.

Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit; ‘Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture,’ through Jan. 5, 2020.

Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. ‘Amuse Yeux: A Small Delight For The Eyes,’ through Sept. 15.

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. ‘40 years/40 artifacts’ includes objects, photo-

8:30 PM

Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. ‘Wild: Buffalo in Boulder,’ through Jan. 12; ‘Boulder Through The Decades,’ through Sept. 31; Google Garage, ongoing with changing activities; ‘PACK-IT-UP,’ through Sept. 23. Naropa University Nalanda Campus, 6287 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. ‘Fine Evident’ — by Cathy Ellis, Cube Gallery, through Sept. 29. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. ‘Photography by Mark Shegda’ and ‘Pastel Paintings by Teri Hoyer,’ through Oct. 26. University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June 2020; ‘Object: Color,’ through September; ‘Its Honor is Hereby Pledged: Gina Adams,’ through Nov. 2. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder. ‘Feathers and Flora,’ opened Sept. 4; ‘Genomics: Observing Evolution,’ opening Sept. 9; ‘Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez,’ Anthropology Hall, through Sept. 8; ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

INCOMING! 10:00 PM

LASER QUEEN 11:30 PM

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14

Bill Frisell Solo. 6:30 and 8 p.m. Bitfactory Denver, 851 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, 303-862-9367.

7:00 PM

INCOMING! 8:30 PM

LASER ROLLING STONES 10:00 PM

FISKEDM: ODESZA 11:30 PM

LIQUID SKY FLOYD: THE WALL SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 15 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

STARS AND PLANETS 3:00 PM

MAX GOES TO THE MOON 4:30 PM

WE ARE STARS

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 32

EVENTS from Page 31

LASER FLOYD: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON

I

Music

Caitlin Gill Album Release: Major (A High Plains Preview). 8 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Chris Trapper of The Push Stars. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Harr y Tuft and at Quinlan Cafe. 7 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Honky Tonk Happy Hour — with Adam Lopez. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. The Jive Tribe. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Jon Wayne & The Pain and Wake Up and Live: A Bob Marley Tribute — with Special Guests. 7:15 p.m. SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Waker. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

KISS: End of the Road World Tour. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

Events

Lafayette Farmers Market. 4 p.m. the 400 block of E. Simpson Road, Lafayette, 303-910-2236. Obb. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Open Mic — with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Pre-Conference Two-day Sacred Drum Making Workshop — with Adhi Two Owls. 10 a.m. Peaceful Meadow Retreat, 7075 Valmont Road, Boulder, 303-442-2490. The Songwriter Hour featuring Gabrielle Louise and JP Maxfield. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. I

Adultology: Hands-on Pasta Making. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Brent Morin. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Sept. 14. Conversations in English Thursdays. 10:30 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568. More info at thedairy.org. Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452. see EVENTS Page 34

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


September 13-15 • Pearl Street Mall

FRIDAY 5 P.M. - 10 P.M. | SATURDAY 10 A.M. - 9 P.M. | SUNDAY 10 A.M. - 5 P.M. LIVE MUSIC, BEER GARDEN, FIREFLY HANDMADE FALL MARKET, FREE CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES AND MORE!

PRESENTING SPONSOR:

SPONSORED BY:

PRODUCED BY:

For the safety and well being of humans and animals alike, please leave furry friends at home!

BoulderFallFest.com


EVENTS from Page 32

Garden Work Hour. 5 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 13

KICKING JACKSIE (SOLO) 8PM LONELY WHALE WITH SPECIAL GUESTS 9PM SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14

DELIBERATE KIN 8PM BILL SCORZARI 9PM SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 15

ALEX CASTLE 8PM CHARLIE WHITE 9PM DANIEL ONDARO 10PM MONDAY SEPTEMBER 16

DOMINICK ANTONELLI 8PM JESS WAYNE 9PM TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 17

BARRY OSBORNE 8PM ASHTYN BARBAREE 9PM WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 18

JAZZETRY NIGHT! FEAT. VON DISCO 8PM THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 19

LONE UNDERTONES 8PM LUCAS WOLF 9PM ROCCO FRATTASIO 10PM FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 20

LOUISE, LATELY 8PM DAFNA / SUNSHINEMEDLEY 9PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day

Genealogy: Find Your Ancestors’ Final Resting Place @ Meadows. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Great Indian Novel. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, Flatirons Room, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Mike E. Winfield. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Sept. 15. Pollinator Musical Stor ytime. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. T2 Dance Project: ‘Norma.’ 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Tabletop Gaming Club: Five-Minute Dungeon & Superfight. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 Music Blanco White. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Caribou Mountain Collective — with High Countr y Hustle. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637. Dan Bern. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Drag Eye for the Straight Guy. 7:45 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Exmag (Live Band) — with Recess, Alex Bowman, HU. 9 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. FatBoy SSE. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Felonious Smith Trio. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Gonzalo Teppa Quintet. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Incubus: 20 Years of Make Yourself & Beyond. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Jenn Clear y Acoustic Solo. 5 p.m. Pearl Street, 1340 Pearl St., Boulder.

I

‘TINY BEAUTIFUL THINGS’ details the period when novelist Cheryl Strayed worked as the popular online advice columnist Sugar. Drawing from her personal experiences, Strayed wrote the ‘Dear Sugar’ column to help those seeking guidance for obstacles both large and small. ‘Tiny Beautiful Things’ is about reaching when you’re stuck, healing when you’re broken and finding the courage to take on the questions that have no answers. Presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company now through Oct. 12 at the Dairy Arts Center.

All My Sons — presented by Upstart Crow Theater Company. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Sept. 14. Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21. Bright Star. Arvada Center for the Performing Arts, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Sept. 29. Dancing with Giants. The Elaine Wolf Theater, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Through Sept. 15. A Doll’s House/A Doll’s House Part 2. Denver Center Theatre Company, Ricketson Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Nov. 24. Erma Bombeck: At Wit’s End. DCPA Broadway, Garner Galleria Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Sept. 22. Ghosted: A Paranormal Mystery. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Through Oct. 27. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Nov. 17. Indecent. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Space Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets,

The Jerseys. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Kicking Jacksie (solo), Lonely Whale with special guests. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Lindy on the Rocks & Hot Night Fusion Weekend 2019 (Denver Jazz Festival). 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Lionel Young Duo. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune

THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 34

theater

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

Denver. Through Oct. 6. Les Miserables (school edition). Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Sept. 15. Miss Diagon. DCPA Broadway, Buell Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Sept. 21. Nunsense. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday matinees, through Sept. 29. Once. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Oct. 13. Pass Over. Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Oct. 12. Ring of Fire: The Music Of Johnny Cash. Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway, Lakewood. Through Sept. 22. Three Tall Women — presented by Firehouse Theater Company. John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Sept. 28. Tiny Beautiful Things — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. Dairy Arts Center, Grace Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 12.

Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Malaa. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Manic Focus. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. One Flew West — with Polar Bodies & Slopindigo: Benefit for the Can’d Aid Foundation. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Pokey LaFarge. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. see EVENTS Page 36

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Open Range Competition Teams Summer Day Camps Classes & Private Lessons

Target & Hunting Full Service Retail Pro Shop & Service Recurve & Compound

High Altitude Archery 455 Weaver Park Rd #500 Longmont, CO 80501 720-491-3309

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

35


EVENTS from Page 34

Rhythm & Roots. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-931-5856. The Soundpost Sessions: Alfredo Muro & Jim Deeming. 8 p.m. La Vita Bella Cafe, 471 Main St., Longmont, 720-204-4525. Stumble Monkey. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Tnertle — with LYFTD and Chewy & Bach. 5 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Trish Applegate-Loetz. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Wylie. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Events [UN] W.R.A.P. Dances That Don’t Look Like Dances. 7:30 p.m. Charlotte York Irey Theatre, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Through Sept. 15. Art Night Out. 5 p.m. Festival Plaza, 311 S. Public Road, Lafayette. Brent Morin. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Conversaciones en español. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Fridays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Firefly Handmade Fall Market. 5 p.m. Pearl Street Mall, 1303 Pearl St., Boulder. Through Sept. 15. Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Friday Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Randy Rainbow Live! 7 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 Music 303 Magazine Cover Challenge. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

FILMS Thursday, Sept. 12 ‘Eileen Gray: Designer and Architect.’ 5 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-444-7328. Local Filmmakers’ Showcase: Cinema Social. 6 p.m. Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. ‘Phoenix, Oregon.’ 2:30 and 7 p.m. Boedecker. Thursday Cinema: ‘Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors.’ 7 p.m. Boulder Public Library. Thursday Cinema L. Ashwyn Corris Program. 6 p.m. Boulder Public Library. Thursday Cinema Local Filmmakers’ Showcase: ‘Mondo Hollywood’. 6 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Friday, Sept. 13 Louisville Cultural Council Presents Silent Film: ‘The Doll and Young Mr. Jazz.’ 7:30 p.m. The Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-3354581. Drunk Cinema: Tarantino. 7:30 p.m. Denver Open Media, 700 Kalamath St., Denver, 720-222-0160. ‘Eileen Gray: Designer and Architect.’ 5 p.m. Boedecker. Movies @ Meadows: ‘The Iron Giant.’ 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. ‘Phoenix, Oregon.’ 2:30 and 6:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Tigers Are Not Afraid.’ 8:45 p.m. Boedecker. Saturday, Sept. 14 ‘The Big Lebowski.’ 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. 19th Annual HWNA Outdoor Cinemas. 6:30 p.m. Thompson Park, Longmont, 720280-7228. ‘Eileen Gray.’ 2:30 and 6:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Phoenix, Oregon.‘ 4 and 8 p.m. Boedecker. Sunday, Sept. 15 Film Screening: ‘Cuba’s Forgotten Jewels,’ A Tropical Story of Diamonds and Holocaust Survival. 6 p.m. Hub Ned, 80 Big Springs Drive, Suite 202, Nederland, 720-778-0089. ‘Girl Rising.’ 1 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Jay Myself.’ 4 p.m. Boedecker.

In ‘The Homeless Chorus Speaks,’ Susan Polis Schutz interviews 14 homeless members of San Diego’s Voices of Our City Choir. From women who have been abused and used to those battling addiction to people who just can’t afford housing to folks who need medical care, their stories are raw and relatable. They talk about their backgrounds, why they are homeless, the inhumanity of homelessness, their hopes and dreams, and what each thinks the solutions to homelessness might be.

Monday, Sept. 16 Boulder Rights of Nature Film Series: ‘American Chestnut.’ 5:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library. ‘Jay Myself.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Playtime.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. Tuesday, Sept. 17 ‘Jay Myself.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. Wednesday, Sept. 18 ‘Becoming Nobody.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Bunuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. ‘The Homeless Chorus Speaks’ documentary screening. 6 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 720-494-4673. ‘Jay Myself.’ 2:30 p.m. Boedecker.

Andy Hedges. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Bear and the Beasts, Anthony Ruptak, Automatic Iris. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Bettman & Halpin: Acoustic Americana Folk Concert. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Bill Scorzari, Deliberate Kin. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

36

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Envy Alo. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Farm to Fork Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Whimsy Farm, 7929 Valmont Road, Boulder, 303-562-3663. Gospel Showcase. 7 p.m. Heart of Longmont United Methodist Church, 350 11th Ave., Longmont, 303-774-7994. Homegrown Yoga Boulder. 9:30 a.m. Black Cat Farm, 4975 Jay Road, Boulder, 412-519-5634. I

Homevibe & eTown present Vienna Teng. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. An Intimate Evening — with Kristin Chenoweth and the Colorado Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Jimmy Herring and the 5 of 7. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. see EVENTS Page 38

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Boulder Vision Center

Tired of Wearing Reading Glasses?

To Benefit: WEDNESDAY SEPT 18, 2019 • 5:30 PM TO 7:30 PM The Avalon Ballroom: 6185 Arapahoe Rd, Boulder, CO Tickets $12.00 in Advance • $15 at Door

303-443-4545

• CONTACT US AT: 720-317-7230 • Tickets can be purchased at www.eventbrite.com • For more information visit www.facebook.com/events/2673970592829830/ • There With Care does not endorse any politically- affiliated organization.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Dr. Terri Oneby

Contact lens technology has improved to correct both distance and near vision, including those patients with significant astigmatism. The convenience and safety of one-day or disposable contact lenses are now available to correct presbyopia, or blurry near vision in those over forty. Come see if this new technology can relieve your Dr. Lowell Steinberg dependency on reading glasses.

or visit bouldervisioncenter.com

28th near apapahoe

- buffalo village

MOST MAJOR HEALTH AND VISION INSURANCES ACCEPTED

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

37


words RACHEL ELIZA GRIFFITHS

SAM DUCHAMP, a mediocre writer of spy thrillers, creates Quichotte, a courtly, addled salesman who falls in impossible love with a TV star. Meanwhile, his creator, in a midlife crisis, has equally urgent challenges of his own. Salman Rushdie’s ‘Quichotte’ takes the reader on a wild ride through a country on the verge of moral and spiritual collapse. The fully realized lives of DuChamp and Quichotte intertwine in wickedly entertaining portrait of an age in which fact is so often indiscernible from fiction. Rushdie will speak about and sign his new book on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at Unity of Boulder.

MONDAY, SEPT. 16 So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 17 Ethan Mindlin Jones. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Salman Rushdie — Quichotte. 7:30 p.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12

SATURDAY, SEPT. 14

Alan Lightman — Three Flames. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 13 Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 15

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18 Deva Arani — Integration Alchemy. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Richard Buckner. 8 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

EVENTS from Page 36

Low Cut Connie. 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488.

Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002.

Body Like Scripture. 7:30 p.m. Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 970-481-4605.

The Mighty Twisters. 10 p.m. The Dark Horse, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-8162.

Farm Fall Festival. 3 p.m. Good Life Refuge Farm Animal Sanctuary, 13759 N. 95th St., Longmont, 720-204-8525.

Dale’s Piano Playhouse. 3 p.m. Longs Peak United Methodist Church, 1421 Elmhurst Drive, Longmont, 720-545-7666.

The Movement — with Special Guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Free Gyrokinesis for the People Class. 1:30 p.m. Gyrotonic Bodhi, 3200 Valmont, Boulder, 303-506-3568.

No Kicks Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Master Gardener Seed Q&A. 11 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Eagle Claw — with Stone Disciple, Scepter of Eligos. 8:30 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

Oso Oso. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Pollinator Appreciation Month: Pollinator Field Journals. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120; 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Something Underground. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Strand Of Oaks. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Strings & Stories — with Covenhoven. 7:30 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. UndocuMonologues — with Sound Circle. 7 p.m. Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 720-432-2004. Events Barn Dance Fundraiser. 5 p.m. Medicine Horse, 8778 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 720-530-8002. Classics: ‘Beloved’ by Toni Morrison. 10:30 a.m. Zolo Southwestern Grill, 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-0444.

Tap Dance FUNdamentals: Shuffle Off to Buffalo. 10 a.m. Manhattan School of the Arts, 290 Manhattan Drive, Boulder, 720-561-5968. Western Views Book Club. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 Music Alex Castle, Charlie White, Daniel Ondaro. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Bill Scorzari. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327.

Ida Mae. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Kate Farmer. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Librar y Concert Series Presents: Nicolo Spera, Ten-String Guitar. 2 p.m. Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Lúnasa. 7 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 East Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. The Music of Reggae for Kids. 11 a.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Rick Steves: A Symphonic Journey with the Colorado Symphony. 2 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

see EVENTS Page 40

38

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Want a shorter path to

FEELING HEALTHIER, STRONGER AND MORE YOUTHFUL? IV therapy from Boulder Integrative Health’s IV Clinic can boost your immunity to colds and flu and increase your overall energy. You’ll likely notice a difference the morning after a treatment, which takes about an hour.

VOTE

COUNTY 2019

Nutrients delivered through IVs are absorbed more quickly and easily since they bypass the body’s digestive system, where nutrients are less likely to be fully absorbed. The nursing staff at Boulder Integrative Health’s IV Clinic will listen to your health needs, then customize a nutrient solution specifically for you. Typical solutions include rehydration, detoxification and boosters for stronger immunity, better focus and more energy.

NOW

Boulder Integrative Health is led by Carrie Ballas, a boardcertified Family Nurse Practitioner. Carrie has been practicing integrative, functional medicine in Boulder for more than 10 years. She leads the nursing staff that administers IV therapies in a beautiful, calming space within Boulder Integrative Health.

RECIEVE 25% YOUR FIRST TREATMENT

Scan this code to vote directly from your smart phone!

VOTING CLOSES MIDNIGHT SEPTEMBER 30

Email bihivclinic@gmail.com or call 303-459-4875 to schedule an appointment. Visit boulderintegrativehealth. com/iv-therapy for more background.

boulderintegrativehealth.com

vote at www.boulderweekly.com Boulder County’s only Best of Boulder™ Reader Poll

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

39


School Music Rentals

staff pick BUNTES BENTHEIMER WUTZI VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Boulder’s Local & Independent Source for School Music Rentals & Supplies for over 30 years

3101 28th St, Tebo Plaza, Boulder

303.449.0516

hbwoodsongs.com

Shovelers Needed Trident Commercial Snow Removal Reliably serving Boulder County since 1987

303.857.5632 “The Boulder Mountainbike Alliance ran ads recently in the Boulder Weekly to promote our annual Membership Party and Colorado Gives Day. The campaign was a huge success and BMA raised $34,320 - all going towards improving Boulder County’s trail system! The Boulder Weekly ads led to additional awareness of BMA and played an important part in this extraordinary fundraising campaign. Thanks Boulder Weekly!” Wendy Sweet President, Board of Directors Boulder Mountainbike Alliance

FARM FALL FESTIVAL. 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, Good Life Refuge Farm Animal Sanctuary, 13759 N. 95th St., Longmont, 720-204-8525. The Good Life Refuge operates from the principal that animals deserve respect, love and the best treatment and care possible. The Longmont-based farm provides refuge for abused, neglected and at-risk animals, especially farm animals. Their compassionate team finds homes for adoptable animals and cares for the non-adoptable animals that reside at the sanctuary. Head to the farm and celebrate The Good Life Refuge’s first anniversary on Sept. 14. Enjoy an afternoon filled with animals, exciting foods to try, health enhancement offerings and entertainment for kids.

EVENTS from Page 38

The Selecter: 40th Anniversar y Tour (1979-2019). 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Boz Scaggs. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Events

Dominick Antonelli, Jess Wayne. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Firefly Handmade Fall Market. 10 a.m. Pearl Street Mall, 1303 Pearl St., Boulder. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. JJ Williamson & Friends Live. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver, 303-307-1777. Longmont Electric Vehicle Fair. 11 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Meditation Circle with Horses. 6 p.m. Stagecoach Trail, Lyons, 303-271-5925. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 Music Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623.

40

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

Free Klezmer Concert — with Cookie Segelstein and Joshua Horowitz of Veretski Pass. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with Strand of Oaks & Special Guest. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Of Monsters and Men. The Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver, 720-577-6884. Tobi Lou. 7 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Events Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Pollinator Appreciation: All Ages Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


$10 off any service with ad! (exp. 10/30/19) Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

School Day-off Camp: Kablam Comics. 9 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Spanish/English Stor ytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Music

VIVA Theater at the Librar y. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 Music 3rd Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents: Los Chicos Malos-Salsa & Latin Jazz. 12 p.m. Canyon Theater, Boulder, Public Library, 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Ashtyn Barbaree, Barr y Osborne. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Deep Purple: The Long Goodbye Tour. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Hatchie. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Man Man. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Open Mic — with Andy Eppler at Grossen Bart. 6 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Pink Sweat$: Pink Beginnings Tour Part 2. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Sam Burchfield. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Vein. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Events All Ages Stor ytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. Reynolds Reading Pals. 4:30 p.m. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

u Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine w/ David Scrimgeour, L.Ac. u Classical Homeopathy w/ Kathy Thorpe, MA, CHom u Cold Nip, Supreme Immune Tonic, Kid’s Immune Tonic as well as natural remedies for the flu, sleep, digestion, and many more! u Full pharmacy with Chinese formulas, professional supplements & homeopathic remedies u Organic facials & extraordinary Massage

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 Art d’Ecco. 8 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

Gift Certificates Available! 728 Pearl St. Boulder - 303 583-0179 - sixpersimmons.com Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine: 303 413-9596 - www.davidscrimgeour.com

Bourbon & Blues — with Eef & The Blues Express. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. The Commonheart. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave, Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Gloria Trevi: Diosa De La Noche Tour USA. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Guest Master Class: Jacqueline Leclair, oboe. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Haasy X Syrenne: B2Bs & Basslines — with Sneak B2B Notloc & more. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Jazzetr y Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. John Prine — with the Colorado Symphony. 7 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Fast, Secure, ON DEMAND SINCE 1987, DBC HAS HElPED CUT DOWN ON POLLUTION AND TRAFFIC ALONG THE FRONT RANGE WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM | WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM/QUICKQUOTE | (303) 571-5719

MONKTON GUITARS The new “local guitar store” in Broomfield

Fall Lessons! Guitar, bass, ukulele, lap steel and violin/viola lessons

The Lovely Liberal Dance Party. 5:30 p.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 720-317-7230.

Beginner to advanced students

Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060.

Experienced teachers

Torche. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Witt Lowr y. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

All styles of music

Events Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

For More Info:

www.monktonguitars.com 303-484-1271

Btab @ Main. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club Junior Geologists Group. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Homeless Chorus Speaks documentar y screening. 6 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 720-494-4673. I

1501 W. 1st Ave, Suite A Broomfield CO 80020 Tues-Sat 10 am to 6 pm

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

41


BJARKI SIGURSVEINSSON VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Thursday & Friday sepTember 12-13

suicideGirls

Thursday sepTember 12

saTurday sepTember 14

jon wayne & The pain wake up & live – bob marley TribuTe

w/ projecT 432, arise rooTs, a-mac & The heiGhT

Friday sepTember 13

blackhearT burlesque

The movemenT

Thursday sepTember 19

TurkeyFooT

FeaT mike robinson (railroad earTh) w/ bowreGard (paTio seT), jackie & The rackeT (laTe seT), laney lou & The bird doGs (paTio seT)

Friday September 20 • dual venue! balloon pop

wax Tailor (dj seT), blockhead

liTTle people, yppah, naTasha kmeTo, arms and sleepers, & cnjr

saTurday sepTember 21

mark Farina & chrisTian marTin

w/ The bordas broThers & pruiTT

wednesday sepTember 25 re: search

The Geek x vrv

w/ poldoore, jordan polovina, jusTchill & chris karns (laTe seT)

Thursday sepTember 26

Trev rich

w/ kayla rae, ap, mi$FiTs & 100 packsavy

w/ richard vaGner

ill.GaTes

w/ ahee, GanGus & lowpro.

wednesday sepTember 18 re: search

mimosa

w/ Tsimba, GrymeTyme (laTe seT) & jordan polovina

Thursday sepTember 19

The Funk sessions

FeaT GeorGe Gekas (revivalisTs) w/ alvin Ford jr (preTTy liGhTs live), Todd sToops (raq), ed williams (revivalisTs), zack FeinberG (revivalisTs), michael GirardoT (revivalisTs) & rob inGraham (revivalisTs)

saTurday sepTember 21

The oTher broThers hiGh counTry TribuTe To The allman broThers band FeaT Todd smallie (jj Grey/moFro), mark levy (circles around The sun), rob eaTon jr (broTher’s keeper) & bill mckay (coral creek) w/ Tori paTer’s “waiTinG For columbus”

sunday sepTember 22

Friday sepTember 27

phony ppl

w/ jack cloonan band & doG ciTy disco

Thursday sepTember 26

eminence ensemble sunday sepTember 29

w/ rev. da iv

w/ For peace band & The ries broThers

w/ The wooks, laid back counTry picker & chelsea nolan

Friday sepTember 27

Thursday ocTober 3

saTurday sepTember 28

blueGrass Generals

Friday ocTober 4

kll bill (mr. bill b2b kll smTh) w/ FrequenT & craFTal

Friday & saTurday ocTober 11-12

The new masTersounds w/ GhosT-noTe

sunday ocTober 13

sTeel pulse

wednesday ocTober 16

biG k.r.i.T.

w/ rapsody & domani harris

Thursday ocTober 17

The collecTive

(FacTion ski Film denver premiere)

Friday ocTober 18

The main squeeze w/ jaden carlson band

saTurday ocTober 19

lucky daye

Tk & The holy know-noThinGs w/ TribuTe To jj cale & kind hearTed sTranGers

sunday sepTember 29

quando rondo

w/ swank sinaTra & kinG Tae

wednesday ocTober 2 re: search

luke The kniFe (oF loTus) & Friends w/ marc brownsTein (oF The disco biscuiTs & sTar kiTchen) casio caTs FeaT members oF TiGer parTy (laTe seT) & jordon polovina

Friday ocTober 4

sonGs oF ‘69

FeaT Tori paTer & Friends wiTh beneFiTs w/ pixie & The parTyGrass boys & dylan miles experience pater’S 50th bday party!

saTurday ocTober 5

The drunken hearTs w/ exTra Gold & bison bone

sunday ocTober 6

hoodie allen w/ jake miller

cycles presenTs

wednesday ocTober 9

an inTeracTive concerT & Game show experience

marTyparTy & vibesquad

The Game show Friday ocTober 25

sonic blossom

FeaT blueTech, spoonbill, dynohunTer, The librarian, lapa, janover, k+lab, phlo & paTrick skyler

saTurday ocTober 26

sTarT makinG sense (TalkinG heads TribuTe) w/ Graham Good & The painTers

sunday ocTober 27

berner

wednesday ocTober 30 re: search

bleep bloop

w/ sayer, liTTle snake & secreT recipe

Friday november 1

muzzy bearr w/ shooka

Thursday november 7

The TriFiniTy

(yheTi x ToadFace x mT. analoGue) FeaT oTTo von schirach

Friday november 8

skizzy mars saTurday november 9

anders osborne wednesday november 13

Tobe nwiGwe

saTurday november 16

collie buddz w/ kez namdi

sunday november 17

hillTop hoods

by Oluwasalvage Archibon

iya Terra

appalachia on The rocks

FeaT chris pandolFi & andy hall (The inFamous sTrinGdusTers), drew emmiTT (leFTover salmon), adam aijala (ymsb) & andrew alTman (railroad earTh) w/ pickin’ on The dead, meadow mounTain, winTer wonder women & banshee Tree

CONCRETE BOREDOM

re: search

w/ minx & jordan polovina

Thursday & Friday ocTober 10-11

kiTchen dwellers 10/10: GhosT Town driFTers

saTurday ocTober 12

joe herTler & The rainbow seekers w/ proxima parada

wednesday ocTober 16 re: search

planTrae & mour

w/ volo (laTe seT) & jordan polovina

Thursday ocTober 17

Thin air & phour poinT o Friday ocTober 18

FuTurisTic

saTurday ocTober 19

The hiGh hawks

My heart beats change to a speed I can’t endure. There is only one cure; return to a rustic life with nature, free from this jungle lunacy – ceaseless din, troubled streets, bustling and hustling. Men combats daily, dashing out of their homes early before the sky peels off its dark regalia and return when the kids are already asleep. Hurrying schedules, shoving within the transit layout, in morning and rushing evening, winding through the throng of commuters like one chased by demons. They say it’s greener on the other side, but these grains are infested with wild worms and strange reptiles. Thick dark fumes from exhausts of rotten cars and buses. Cacophonies of industrial generators and factories. Greenhouse gases-chlorofluorocarbons puncturing the O-zone layers and causing global warming. The bushman took a deep breath, eyes gently folded, his thoughts soar over his childhood and contemplate to go back to his rural home. City life holds no joy for him, only concrete Boredom.

FeaT vince herman (leFTover salmon), adam Greuel (horseshoes & hand Grenades), chad sTaehly (hard workinG americans), brian adams (deadphish orchesTra) & will Trask (GreaT american Taxi) w/ kind counTry

wednesday ocTober 23

maTTy maTheson Thursday ocTober 24

Tubby love & amber lily and Tierro band FeaT bridGeT law w/ buddha bomb & dj TreaphorT

saTurday ocTober 26

shawn james TexT cervanTes To 91944 For TickeT Giveaways, drink specials, discounTed TickeT promoTions & more w/ adrian eaGle

Oluwasalvage Archibong is a Nigerian lawyer and has previously been published in The Palm Magazine and Adelaide Literary Magazine.

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • Cervantesmasterpiece.com

42

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


IFC FILMS

HIGH ALTITUDE CRAFT PIES BUILT IN BOULDER

Bringing the traditional savory pie culture of New Zealand to America. We don’t use words like organic or natural, we just call it food. MEAT PIES

VEGGIE PIES

SWEET PIES

SIDES

BREKKIES

Steak & Ale Mushroom & Ale Apple Brown Butter Sausage Rolls Bacon Steak & Cheese Cauliflower Tikka Masala Pumpkin Ginger Mac & Cheese Nippers Sausage Roast Chicken Dinner Cowgirl 3 Bean Chili Cookie – coming Meatball Parmesan Nippers Green Chili Chicken Curry soon! & more...

TAKE AWAY • EAT IN • TAKE AND BAKE

For the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts. —George Eliot, Middlemarch

ON THE BILL: ‘Official Secrets.’ Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., Boulder. Opens Sept. 13.

O

n Jan. 31, 2003, Katherine Gun’s life changed. Gun, a translator working for the British intelligence agency Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ), received an email from Frank Koza. An email requesting assistance to spy on various United Nations offices so swing votes could be obtained. Votes the United States and Great Britain needed to go to war against Iraq and Saddam Hussein. Gun, in a moment of moral clarity, printed off the email and made sure it found its way to a reporter. Martin Bright was the recipient and his paper, The Guardian, ran the email above the fold — albeit with some damaging corrections. The rest is history but not without a twist. War was not averted, and only a select few came to Gun’s defense. The name Daniel Ellsberg still conjures the image of moral fortitude while Gun’s name has slipped between the pages of history. Official Secrets — from director Gavin Hood and based on the book The Spy Who Tried to Stop a War by Thomas and Marcia Mitchell — brings Gun’s story to the multiplex with an all-star cast and relentless forward propulsion. It’s a movie that opens with a sharp intake of breath and proceeds to hold it for two hours until Gun (Keira Knightly) finally and jaggedly lets it out. Knightly plays Gun in a state of perpetual tension. To be found out would jeopardize the well-being of her and her husband — a Turkish Muslim immigrant. To not be found out would jeopardize her co-workers and friends. On the other side of the email exchange is Guardian reporter Martin Bright (Matt Smith), who is just as righteous as Gun but exudes smugness where Gun bleeds terror. Director Hood employs a beautiful bit of crosscutting the day Bright’s story and Gun’s email is printed. Bright enters the Guardian offices to a standing ovation. Gun finds the paper at the local gas station. Bright is congratulated and told every major news outlet wants to speak with him. Gun retches in the toilet after she shows her husband the paper. But Gun is young and principled and stands by her actions. Representation comes when barrister Ben Emmerson (Ralph Fiennes), equally principled, agrees to defend her. His defense isn’t so much a defense of Gun’s actions, but an accusation that the British government acted illegally when it invaded Iraq. This constant shift between players gives Official Secrets more heft than most “based on true events” movies. Hood keeps Gun at the center of the piece but allows the story to move omnipotently from character to character, picking them up when needed and casting them off once their role is filled. To root the story in the real, Hood introduces bit players with on-screen text and sprinkles archival footage of President George W. Bush, Secretary of State Colin Powell and Prime Minister Tony Blair to fill in the gaps. It does the trick, and Official Secrets manages to engage without relying on blockbuster bravado. An anomaly in today’s movie marketplace.

Open Sunday through Thursday 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM Friday and Saturday 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM 105 North Public Road, Lafayette, Colorado (720) 845-2155

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION... In what year was the Shimano Deore II released? A) 1989 B) 2000 C) 1982

With moral authority

Last week’s correct answer was: C) Less than 1% in the US vs 30% in the Netherlands

’Official Secrets’ and unfamiliar heroics

visit

www.fullcyclebikes.com

by Michael J. Casey

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

to answer the question and be entered to win a prize!

PEARL STREET 1795 Pearl St. Boulder, CO 80302 303-440-1002

THE TUNE UP - TAP ROOM 1795 Pearl St. Boulder, CO 80302 303-440-1002

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

THE HILL 1211 13th St. Boulder, CO 80302 303-440-7771

I

43


44

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Brown Rice and Beef Bowl

PHOTOS BY STAFF

Five on Black 1805 29th St., Unit 1138, Boulder, fiveonblack.com

I

f you can’t quite decide what exactly you want to eat, but you know you want big flavor, head to 29th Street Mall’s Five on Black. The fast casual Brazilian eatery lets you build a bowl from your choice of grain, meat, veggie, sauce and garnish. We like a bowl with brown rice, churrasco beef, sweet potato, steamed collard greens, mango barbecue sauce and a wedge of lime that brightens and assembles all the dish’s elements. But really, it’s up to you. $8.95.

Baked Meatball Sandwich

Lefty’s Gourmet Pizza 364 Second Ave., Niwot, leftysgourmetpizza.com

I

f you haven’t been to Niwot’s classic red sauce joint, Lefty’s, then we don’t know what to tell you besides: go, now. It’s got classic New York-style pizza, calzones, pastas, lasagna and more, including a great sandwich menu. We opted for the baked meatball sub on a recent visit and were blown away. Tomato sauce and mozzarella cheese ooze between giant, tender meatballs, all packed in a long hoagie roll that’s toasted to perfection — it’s crispy, with a chewy interior and a healthy amount of flavorful char. The meatballs are juicy, and electrified by herb and onion additions. This is a great sandwich. $6.50$9.

Chile Colorado

Raza Fresa 7960 Niwot Road, Unit 11-D, razafresa.com

R

aza Fresa is a freshly decorated Mexican spot in Niwot, and it’s the kind of place you can have a few margaritas, enjoy a big plate of Mexican staples and have a good time with family and friends. The menu is long, but we found our way to the house specialties section and chose the chile Colorado. The meat of the day (shredded, tender beef in this case) is smothered and simmered in a cozy, slightly sweet red chile sauce and served alongside rice, beans and tortillas. $12.98.

Oktoberfest Märzen Lager

Left Hand Brewing Company 1265 Boston Ave., Longmont, lefthandbrewing.com

M

ärzen was made for autumn, and though we haven’t quite changed seasons yet, it’s starting to feel like it. So we’ll drink like we’re in autumn, and reach for any and every märzen and Oktoberfest brew we can find. And why not start with Left Hand’s excellent Oktoberfest Märzen Lager? It’s rich in toasted malts, with a refreshingly crisp backbone. Munich and Pilsner malts marry CTZ and Hallertau MittelFrüh hops for a faithful representation of the style. Prices vary.

The BEST East Indian Food this side of New Delhi Dinner:

Monday - Thursday: 5pm-9:30pm Friday & Saturday: 5pm-10pm Sunday: 5pm-9pm

5BOEPPSJ

Lunch Buffet: Everyday from 11:30pm - 2:30pm

619 S. Broadway • Boulder, CO 80305 • Table Mesa Shopping Center 303-543-7339 • TandooriGrillBoulder.com BOULDER WEEKLY

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

45


coffee – breakfast – lunch – tapas – dinner

5530 spine rd, boulder 303.719.1431 aperitivoboulder.com Executive Chef: Miguel Vazquez

46

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


return to

tofu town

‘That’s So Boulder!’ series needs to feature city’s culinary quirkiness

by John Lehndorff

I

n our last episode, Boulder was featured fleetingly on national TV when Michael Scott from The Office was moving here to marry, have four kids and sell organic paper supplies. There have been films set in Boulder. American Flyers starring Keanu Reeves was essentially Neo on wheels, and Catch and Release had something to do with Celestial Seasonings. The Stand, a 1994 Stephen King mini-series, took place here but it was apocalyptic, not quirky. Prior to that, Boulder’s major star turn was Mork and Mindy, a Happy Days spinoff that located an alien in Boulder living on Pine Street. Mork worked at the New York Deli, an actual Jewish-Buddhist deli I liked to eat at on the west end of the Pearl Street Mall. It was a joy to experience the brilliance of Robin Williams but, except for an opening montage, Mork and Mindy had virtually nothing to do with Boulder. You never saw anyone enjoy pastrami or babka while Allen Ginsberg sat at the next table sipping borscht and scribbling poetry. South Park may be doing the best job of lampooning Boulder, but overall none of these media efforts have properly depicted the city’s deep and the abiding eccentricities. Now Boulder’s elusive allure is being pitched in a new TV series to be called That’s So Boulder! despite a local ban on

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

excessive use of exclamation points. The Portlandia-like comedy about a group of friends is planned to debut in 2020 on one media platform or another, according to showrunner Tray Goodman. He visited recently to research local customs, scandals and people to mine for humor. You don’t have to look far to find something to make see NIBBLES Page 48

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

47


NIBBLES from Page 47

48

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

fun of in the People’s Republic. I am proud to have labelled Boulder “Tofu Town” in a headline years ago, a moniker a local soy curd company proudly adopted until it was bought by a conglomerate. This time around I’m hoping that Boulder gets celebrated and skewered properly, especially when it comes to food and drink. As a veteran observer of the local scene, I suggest the following recurring characters for the That’s So Boulder! series. • A 50-sometjing ex-geologist/physicist/software engineer who opens a gluten-free meadery that also does electric bike repairs. • An 80-year-old hippie triathlete who runs past you as you hike singing “Ripple” and sipping yerba mate. He and his wife celebrate National Naked Gardening Day every day in their front yard organic garden. They grow gourds. • A 40-something farmer-singersongwriter who tills kohlrabi, broccolini and Jerusalem artichokes for Boulder bistros by day and sings Americana songs onstage at night. • A character you never see because she’s part of the gig economy. A CU student, she works at a kava/kombucha/ CBD bar and drives for Lyft while trimming bud at a dispensary. She wants to be a social media influencer. • A 20-something dreadlocked Trustifarian who owns a Paleo-only wood-fired restaurant and wants to ban all car parking in downtown Boulder. • A 30-something artisan ghee maker who sells at farmers markets and metaphysical gatherings and dreams of selling out to Land O’Lakes. • Finally, That’s So Boulder! should include a cranky old pie-obsessed food critic/radio host, who complains about Yelp, hipsters and their damn noisy restaurants. Any serious Boulder show should also feature people consuming craft cider, granola, sprouts, kale, keto anything, avocado toast, green drink and fried Brussels sprouts. And don’t forget Taco Tuesday! Since the mid-1970s, Boulder has usually gotten the last laugh. A lot of the aspects of Boulder life other locales used to make fun of are now practices they’ve adopted themselves. The infant TV series has already trademarked That’s So Boulder! to put on keychains and hoodies. No doubt they will also have their own lines of

hard seltzer, elk jerky and plant-based Rocky Mountain “oysters.” If you have any complaints or suggestions for That’s So Boulder! please forward them to: tray@wecrushthebox. com

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

LOCAL FOOD NEWS Boulder’s artisan ice cream spot Heifer and the Hen was due to close recently until a new owner appeared, and the place is now scooping Burnt Honey, Vietnamese Coffee, White Russian, Salted Caramel Crunch and other favorites once again. … Acreage, the restaurant at Stem Ciders’ tasting room on a hill in Lafayette, has replaced its counter service with full table service. … Chef Bradford Heap has announced that Colterra, his celebrated Niwot eatery, will not reopen after a kitchen fire several years ago. … Boulder’s Growing Gardens offers classes in Canning and Preserving (9/12) and Latin American Street Foods (9/16). growinggardens.org ... Carbondale’s Distillery Inn boasts the only accommodations in the world housed in a working distillery. Marble Distillery makes quite decent vodka from Colorado grain and uses it to create two excellent liqueurs: Midnight Express (coffee) and Gingercello (ginger). A FARM-TO-FACE MASK The folks at Colorado’s Lily Farm Fresh Skin Care offer a Peach Revitalizing Face Mask recipe blending ½ a large ripe Palisade peach, 1 tablespoon fresh tomato juice and 1 tablespoon lemon juice. “Spread the paste over your face and neck, avoiding the areas around the eyes. Lie back and relax for 15-20 minutes. Rinse off with water, pat dry, tone and moisturize.” Or, you can add chopped chilies, cilantro and salt and call it salsa. WORDS TO CHEW ON “When I grow up, I wanna work at Alfalfa’s/ Where the cheese is dairy free!/ A birkenstocks, spandex, necktie, patchouli grocery store/ I’ll have a job, picking through the produce — no pesticides for me!/ I’ll be a working modern income socially conscious Boulder hippie.” — Leftover Salmon John Lehndorff is a pie expert who has written for the Washington Post, Bluegrass Unlimited and the Boulder Lampoon. He hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU.


] [ [ ] ][ ] [

Front Range Food for Front Range Families Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

fresh, authentic, tasty japanese food

LUNCH Tue-Fri, 11:30am – 2pm DINNER Sun, Tue-Thu 5pm–9pm Fri-Sat 5pm – 10pm. Closed Monday

AUTHENTIC JAPANESE CUISINE

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Follow us on instagram: Sushiyoshilouisville

I

Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Brinner!

BOTTOMLESS WINE WEDNESDAYS 4-8pm MORNINGGLORYCAFE | 1377 FOREST PARK CIRCLE, LAFAYETTE | 303.604.6351

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

49


PHOTOS COURTESY OF COZYMEAL

The new home cooking Cozymeal’s trained, award-winning chefs want to teach Boulder County how to cook

by Matt Cortina

50

I

A

nything that gets more people cooking and interested in local food is a good thing. The selfproclaimed Airbnb of home cooking, Cozymeal, thinks it can do just that in Boulder County (and beyond) with lessons from Michelinstarred chefs, or those who have worked in esteemed kitchens, in comfortable settings with friends and coworkers and other foodies around. The idea behind Cozymeal is to pair local chefs with individuals and groups looking for a low-key culinary experience. Classes typically focus on one type of cuisine, and they can be catered to small get-togethers, business functions, bridal parties, etc. The company launched efforts in Boulder County this summer, with several local chefs hosting classes in their own commercial kitchens or on location. Chef Mary Capone teaches Cozymeal classes in Boulder. She grew up in an Italian family, but after a Celiac disease diagnosis, she had to cater her cooking to fit her gluten-free diet. Whether folks abstain from gluten or not, Capone’s expertise in shaping classic Italian dishes to peoples’ dietary needs has found an audience in SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

Boulder. “We live in a hyper-health-food-conscious environment in Boulder that demands clean food, knowledge about allergies and how to feed the body well,” Capone says. “Teaching people how to restore and maintain their gut health, while eating food that is super delicious is what brings me joy.” Generally speaking, classes are geared toward cooks of all ability levels, but Capone says the food knowledge in I

Boulder County has allowed her the freedom to introduce new cuisines and techniques to those who attend classes. “Boulder foodies are very interested in learning new and healthy cuisines,” she says. “Students that come to my classes range from beginners trying to learn some basics to chefs that are interested in upping their game with new techniques and recipes.” Capone teaches Italian, French, pan-Asian, new American and Latin BOULDER WEEKLY


American/Mexican cooking courses, with an eye in all toward allergen-friendly and healthy cooking. Classes can last three hours, and feature multiple courses, all of which are consumed during the cooking process. And folks can bring wine and beer to some classes to enjoy alongside the meal (and during the cooking). Though grown from the same kernel, Cozymeal differs from other digitalage food businesses in that it connects people to people through food (instead of just food to people, often from some obscure source), says Chef Sydney Davidson, a Culinary School of the Rockies graduate who teaches culinary arts in Boulder County and for Cozymeal. The classes Davidson teaches can range from one to ten participants. “I love that people have a desire to learn how to cook at home,” Davidson says. “Having a real chef instructor sure beats those meal service kits.” Most of the food cooked in Cozymeal classes are sourced locally — just as private chefs in the area do the grocery shopping at local markets to prepare their foods. Jennifer Le, who works on behalf of the main Cozymeal operation, says folks on vacation who are looking for a sample of the local flavor in a unique setting have frequented the classes. The ultimate goal is to get people to have fun in a kitchen, regardless of their skill level. “It’s great for beginners who want to sharpen up cooking skills they already have,” Le says. Cozymeal keeps data on the most popular cuisines in the markets in which they operate. Spanish and Latin cooking classes are most popular in Boulder County so far, followed by Italian, which can include pizza- and pasta-making — processes that are surely easier with a little human, non-YouTube instruction at the beginning. The classes offered are determined by the Cozymeal brass, but feedback from chefs and participants helps drive new courses. “Italian cuisine (homemade noodles and pizza) and brunch seem to be the most popular choices in Boulder County,” Davidson says, adding that, “A farmers’ market trip and impromptu menu would be a ton of fun to implement. And I’d love to teach an Egyptian cooking class and holiday cookie decorating, and I hope someday the demand is there.” Le says Cozymeal is considering some cooking-adjacent courses like one BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

on etiquette, and one nebulously called, “How to impress your in-laws.” To get a sample of the Cozymeal offerings, go to cozymeal.com and look for the Boulder tab. Capone is teaching a class on simple gluten-free French fare, a gluten-free Tuscan-cooking course and a gluten-free bread course in the next few weeks. Davidson teaches traveling courses on Sicilian cooking, sweet and savory brunch, vegetarian comforts and classic cookies. Fees for the classes start at $65.

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

51


LEFT HAND BREWING COMPANY

Tour de brew: Oktoberfest

Drinking in German culture along the Front Range

by Michael J. Casey

F

rom tailgates to tailored beer dinners, there is a good deal of tradition in beer drinking. And when it comes to hoisting a stein or six, no tradition is as great, or as popular, as Oktoberfest. Dating back to October 1810 in the Kingdom of Bavaria, Oktoberfest was first a wedding: The nuptial celebration of Ludwig I and Crown Princess Theresa, held in the capital city of Munich. The entire city was invited, and a horse race marked the occasion. Beer was consumed — this was Bavaria, after all — and the festivities lasted five days. The wedding was such a hit; Bavarians decided to commemorate it the following October with the very first Oktoberfest, reenacting the previous year’s celebration while also boosting the local agricultural industry. The trend continued — except in 1813 due to the Napoleonic Wars — and by 1819, the citizens of Munich took over organizational duties and used the festival to help bolster the local economy. Five days became two weeks, and Oktoberfest was moved from October to September because the weather was nicer. The first Oktoberfest parade was held in 1887. By 1896, beer tents and beer halls — all sponsored by local breweries — were ubiquitous. In 1910, over 7,000 barrels of beer were consumed for the 100th anniversary. A trip to Munich’s Oktoberfest is something every self-respecting beer drinker should have on their bucket list. Nowadays, the fortnight festivities are a far cry from what they once were, as the races and competitions have been pushed aside to make way for 7 million visitors. But here in the Centennial State, that spirit and those traditions are alive and well. Most of your local breweries hold some version of an Oktoberfest, and many have already come and gone. Here are but two worth the trek. Longmont Oktoberfest (Roosevelt Park, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont) Fri., Sept. 20, 4-10 p.m., Sat., Sept. 21, 12-10 p.m. Hosted by the Left Hand Brewing Company, Longmont Oktoberfest is just as much a concert as it is anything else. Yonder Mountain String Band will headline, and there will be more food and fun than you’ll know what to do with. There will also be beer, lots of beer. So pace yourself, and start with Left Hand’s Oktoberfest Märzen Lager: It’s clear honey-gold in the glass with a wispy head, a clean tight nose and robust flavors of caramel and biscuit. It’s not too sweet and goes great with a brat. Seedstock Oktoberfest (Seedstock Brewery, 3610 W. Colfax Ave., Denver) Sat., Sept. 28, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. If you’ve never been to Seedstock, or sampled their wares, then, reader, correct that. Seedstock specializes in old-world recipes — their Düsseldorf Alt is a thing of beauty — and they’ll be celebrating in an old-world fashion. The music will be polka, the food will be German, and the activities will include stein hosting, hammer tossing and hammerschlagen (nail pounding). Dress in lederhosen or a dirndl, and the first pint is on them. 52

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


HELP WANTED GARDENERS NEEDED! Experience preferred, but not required. Must be reliable and punctual. Must have valid driver’s license/reliable transportation. Work performed throughout Boulder County. Fair compensation for the right candidate. Send resume to bloomboosters@gmail.com

Our New Location! 303.402.0122

Reach over 98,000 Boulder Weekly readers by advertising in Boulder Marketplace! 303-494-5511 ext.113 Email: jelkins@ boulderweekly.com

Stressed Out? Think Massage!

Call 720.253.4710 All credit cards accepted No text messages

HELP WANTED

3070 28TH ST., STE D. BOULDER CO 80301 thedrumshopboulder.com

OPEN 7 days a week

now hiring Finding it tough to find new employees?

Be where your next employee can be found. Advertise job openings in Boulder Weekly.

With more than 110,000 total active engaged readers each month, Boulder Weekly is where you’ll find your next great hire.

Host An Aura Party!

The Health Center is now hiring Full Time Budtenders at our Boulder location! Applicants must have a MED Badge; Key or Support. Prior industry experience not required, but definitely a plus. If you are a team player and are interested in working for a well respected company please send your resume and a copy of your MED Badge to boulderemployment@ thchealth.com. This position is for immediate hire.

Part-Time Q-MAP Overnight 10pm-6:30am Differential and a sign on bonus

HELP WANTED LAWN TECHS NEEDED! Experience not required. Must be reliable and punctual. Workday starts in Longmont. Fair compensation for the right candidate. Send resume to bloomboosters2@gmail.com

Contact Jennifer Elkins 303.494.5511 x113 jelkins@boulderweekly.com

PamPering relief nY StYle

California Blonde

www.belleStar.net • Labellestar12@gmail.com • 303-249-6958

Apply in person at: The Bridge at Longmont 2444 Pratt Street Longmont, CO 80501

All Natural Massage

• Hot Oil Massage • Relaxing Massage

Peggy McCarty 970-210-8908

• Shower & Sauna • All New Staff

$49/hr with this ad

Beginners to Pros, Family Music, Basics, Harmony, Songwriting, Improvisation

5290 Arapahoe Ave #A, Boulder Past Foothills, 2 traffic lights on right side.

720.565.6854

Open 7 days a week • Hours: 9:30am-10:00pm Visa & Mastercard accepted

Needing Your Emotional Support Animal With You? For eligible people who need their emotional support animal to accompany them at /or away from home, I am available to provide the documentation and counseling.

Now Accepting Preferred clientele No Texts

Call Elaine Lustig PhD • 303.369.7770

720-364-0840 BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

FREE!

Must work weekends PT Benefit Package offered.

VOICE, GUITAR, FLUTE LESSONS

INDULGE & UNWIND

YOUR PHOTO WILL BE

Part-Time Cook Involves 2 Day Shifts of 6am-2:30pm and 10:30am-7pm

HELP WANTED Rocky Mountain Gateway Restaurant Front & Back of House / Assistant Gift Shop Manager Help Wanted. Year Round, Full Time Positions with Housing Available. Apply in person. 3450 Fall River Rd. 970-577-0043 ext 2

Belle Star will come and take ten or more auras, read the photos and interpret the colors.

Our upscale Assisted Living Community is hiring for the following:

Licensed Psychotherapist & Board Certified PTSD Clinician I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

53


BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Hi, I’m your sales representative for

UnTherapy, a free program designed to provide healing strategies for people who are trying too hard. Forgive me for being blunt, but I think you could benefit from our services. I don’t have space here to reveal all the secrets of UnTherapy, but here’s an essential hint: every now and then the smartest way to outwit a problem is to stop worrying, let it alone, and allow it to solve itself.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: People in Northeast India weave long, strong suspension bridges out of the living roots of fig trees. The structures can measure up to 150 feet and bear the weight of hundreds of people. In accordance with astrological omens, let’s make these marvels your metaphors of power for the coming weeks. To stimulate your meditations, ask yourself the following questions. 1. How can you harness nature to help you to get where you need to go? 2. How might you transform instinctual energy so that it better serves your practical needs? 3. How could you channel wildness so that it becomes eminently useful to you?

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: If you climb to the top of Mount Everest,

you’re standing on land that was once on the floor of a shallow tropical sea. Four-hundred-million-year-old fossils of marine life still abide there in the rock. Over the course of eons, through the magic of plate tectonics, that low flat land got folded and pushed upwards more than five miles. I suspect you Geminis will have the power to accomplish a less spectacular but still amazing transformation during the next ten months. To get started, identify what you would like that transformation to be.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: In 1996, when Gary Kasparov was rated

the world’s best chess player, he engaged in a series of matches with a chess-playing computer named Deep Blue. Early on in the first game, Deep Blue tried a move that confused Kasparov. Rattled, he began to wonder if the machine was smarter than him. Ultimately, his play suffered and he lost the game. Later it was revealed that Deep Blue’s puzzling move was the result of a bug in its code. I’ll encourage you to cultivate a benevolent bug in your own code during the coming weeks, Cancerian. I bet it will be the key to you scoring a tricky victory.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: American hero Harriet Tubman

escaped slavery as a young woman. She ran away from the wealthy “master” who claimed to “own” her, and reached sanctuary. But rather than simply enjoy her freedom, she dedicated herself to liberating other slaves. Nineteen times she returned to enemy territory and risked her life, ultimately leading 300 people out of hellish captivity. Later she served as a scout, spy and nurse in the Union Army during the Civil War, where her actions saved another 700 people. In 1874, the U.S. Congress considered but then ultimately rejected a bill to pay her $2,000 for her numerous courageous acts. Don’t you dare be like Congress in the coming weeks, Leo. It’s crucial that you give tangible acknowledgment and practical rewards to those who have helped, guided and supported you.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote, “Some are born in their place, some find it, some realize after long searching that the place they left is the one they have been searching for.” I hope that in the last nine months, Virgo, you have resolved which of those three options is true for you. I also trust that you have been taking the necessary actions to claim and own that special place — to acknowledge it and treasure it as the power spot where you feel most at home in the world. If you have not yet fully finished what I’m describing here, do it now.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Earth’s species are going extinct at a rate

ago. Among the creatures on the verge of being lost forever are birds like the cryptic treehunter and spix’s macaw, as well as the northern white rhino and the vaquita, a type of porpoise. So why don’t we clone the last few individuals of those beleaguered species? Here are the answers. 1. Cloned animals typically aren’t healthy. 2. A species needs a sizable population to retain genetic diversity; a few individuals aren’t sufficient. 3. Humans have decimated the homes of the threatened species, making it hard for them to thrive. Conclusion: Cloning is an inadequate stopgap action. Is there a better way to address the problem? Yes: by preserving the habitats of wild creatures. Inspired by this principle, Libra, I ask you to avoid trying halfway fixes for the dilemmas in your personal sphere. Summon full measures that can really work.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Though patched together and incomplete, the 2,200-year-old marble sculpture known as the Winged Victory of Samothrace is prominently displayed at Paris’s Louvre Museum. It’s a glorious depiction of Nike, the winged goddess of victory, and is regarded as one of ancient Greece’s great masterpieces. For hundreds of years it was missing. Then in 1863, an archaeologist discovered it, although it was broken into more than a hundred pieces. Eventually, it was rebuilt, and much of its beauty was resurrected. I see the coming weeks as a time when you, too, could recover the fragments of an old treasure and begin reassembling it to make a pretty good restoration.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: “I’ve learned that I must find positive outlets for anger or it will destroy me,” said actor Sidney Poitier. That can be a dynamic meditation for you during the next three weeks. I think you will derive substantial power from putting it into action. If you’re ingenious and diligent about finding those positive outlets, your anger will generate constructive and transformative results.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: In 1905, at the age of 30, Lucy Maud

Montgomery wrote the novel Anne of Green Gables. It was a tale about an orphan girl growing up on Prince Edward Island. She sent the manuscript to several publishers, all of whom rejected it. Discouraged, she put it away in a hatbox and stored it in a closet. But two years later, her ambitions reignited when she reread the story. Again she mailed it to prospective publishers, and this time one liked it enough to turn it into a book. It soon became a bestseller. Since then it has sold over 50 million copies and been translated into 36 languages. I figure you Capricorns are at a point in your own unfolding that’s equivalent to where Anne was shortly before she rediscovered the manuscript she’d put away in the hatbox.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: The Toxorhynchites are species of large

mosquitoes that don’t buzz around our heads while we’re trying to sleep and will never bite our skin or suck our blood. In fact, they’re our benefactors. Their larvae feast on the larvae of the mosquitoes that are bothersome to us. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that you be alert for a metaphorically comparable influence in your own life: a helper or ally that might be in disguise or may just superficially seem to be like an adversary.

Premium Products at Smokin’ Prices Recreational & Medical 18+

Industry Employees Receive 25% Discount Off All Recreational Products Everyday

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Audre Lord identified herself as a black

writer, lesbian, librarian, mother, feminist, civil rights activist and many other descriptors. But as ardent as she was in working for the political causes she was passionate about, she didn’t want to be pigeonholed in a single identity. One of her central teachings was to celebrate all the different parts of herself. “Only by learning to live in harmony with your contradictions can you keep it all afloat,” she testified. These approaches should be especially fun and extra meaningful for you in the coming weeks, Pisces. I encourage you to throw a big Unity Party for all the different people you are.

7464 Arapahoe Ave A9, Boulder, CO (located behind KT BBQ, lots of parking) Hours: 10am – 8pm Monday – Sunday

unmatched since the dinosaurs died out 65 million years

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

55


OUR FLOWER OUR QUALITY YOUR LOW PRICES

Where Will The End Of Summer Take You? Home of the

Mix & Match Ounce ALL TOP SHELF BUDS. NO STRAIN RESTRICTIONS

nuhi Sugar Wax & Shatter 4G for

$55

THURSDAYS DAILY DEAL

4 for $20 Pre-rolls AVAILABLE EVERY THURSDAY ALL DAY!

CHECK OUT OUR NEW & IMPROVED

LOYALTY PROGRAM! EARN A POINT PER $1!

ORDER ONLINE WITH OUR LIVE MENU

www.thchealth.com

Text JOIN THC to (720) 513-3543 for Deals and Promotions

Mon - Sat: 8am - 9:50pm • Sun: 9am - 9:50pm Rec 21+ Happy Hours Mon-Sat: 8am-9am & 8pm-9pm, Sunday: ALL DAY

537 Canyon Blvd. Boulder, CO 720-532-8664 • www.thchealth.com

ALL SALES VALID 9/12/19 - 9/15/19


Dear Dan: My husband of nearly 20 years came out to me as bisexual about two months ago. He assured me he has no intention of looking outside our marriage for other sex partners. We’ve always had a kind of barrier sexually, and my body.) Using the dildo is no big thing, and I don’t understand why this feels so it seemed to fall away after he came out. different and difficult. We’ve since done all manner of things, —Pegging Feels Different including my using a dildo on him. (Thanks for all the tips over the years Dear PFD: You don’t about anal!) It has been a have to do anything about ROMAN ROBINSON fun and empowering expethis right now, PFD. Your rience overall. There is one husband only came out to thing I am having trouble you as bisexual two months with. He mentioned that ago! Your husband’s honhe’d like me to peg him esty pulled down that barriusing a strap-on. I mean, er you’d always sensed but of course he would, right? could never name, and He’d like to actually feel my that’s wonderful and excitbody against his. That ing. And you’re already would doubtless make the exploring anal penetration whole experience better for with him on the receiving him. But I’m having a hard end, which is something time wrapping my head many straight men also around it. Does this require me, even if enjoy. If covering your genitals temporaritemporarily, to change my body? I’m feelly with a strap-on makes you feel awking really vulnerable and insecure about ward or unwanted, you don’t have to do it it, like it means there’s something wrong — not now, not ever. But I can’t imagine with my body. I get panicky just thinking you think there’s something wrong with about it. (My husband has not done or the bodies of lesbians who use strap-ons said anything to make me feel bad about with their female partners, just as you

BY DAN SAVAGE

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

don’t seem to think holding a dildo means there’s something wrong with (or inadequate about) your hands. If covering your vulva with a strap-on makes you feel negated or undesirable, there are dildo harnesses that strap on to your thigh, not your crotch, and could provide your husband with body-to-body closeness during penetration while still leaving your vulva and clit accessible for digital stimulation. Dear Dan: I knew my little brother had an odd fascination with rubber that would likely become sexual. He would steal rubber gloves and hide them in his room, and there was a huge meltdown when our mother found a gas mask in his room when he was 12. My brother is in his 30s now and has a closet full of rubber “gear” that he dresses in pretty much exclusively. (When he’s not at work, he’s in rubber.) All of his friends are rubber fetishists. When he travels, it’s only to fetish events where he can wear his rubber clothing publicly. He will date only other rubber fetishists, which seems to have severely limited his romantic prospects, and he posts photos of himself in rubber to his social media accounts. I

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

read your column and I understand that kinks aren’t chosen and they can be incorporated into a person’s sex life in a healthy way. But my brother’s interest in rubber seems obsessive. Your thoughts? —Rubbered Up Baby Brother’s Erotic Rut Dear RUBBER: If your brother was obsessed with surfing or snowboarding and built his life around chasing waves or powder — and would date only people who shared his passion — you wouldn’t have written me. Same goes if he were obsessed with pro sports, as so many straight men are, or Broadway shows, as so many gay men are. The only “problem” here is that your brother’s obsession makes his dick hard — and to be clear, RUBBER, the problem is yours, not his. An erotic obsession or passion is just as legitimate as a nonerotic one. And even if I thought your brother had a problem — and I do not — nothing I wrote here would result in him liking his rubber clothes, rubber buddies, or rubber fetish events any less. On the Lovecast, are people actually using dental dams? (Spoiler: No.) savagelovecast.com. Send questions to mail@savagelove. net, follow Dan on Twitter @fakedansavage and visit ITMFA.org.

I

57


Boulder CBD Offers Local, Natural and Affordable Products What’s in a name? If you’re intrigued by the capabilities of CBD, there’s no better place to explore than Boulder CBD, a store whose name leaves no doubt about its contents. Boulder CBD is a one-stop shop located at 1750 30th Street that offers Colorado CBD products in every form imaginable—tinctures, salves, bulk flower and vape pens, edibles, sports recovery products, and, of course, pet remedies.

grown, CBD-rich Colorado Hemp within a couple of hundred miles of the store,” said Drew Searchinger, the Manager of Boulder CBD. “We love working with passionate small businesses that share our values—helping clients gain access to high-quality, local and reputable CBD products.”

ble to everybody. Whether you’re regularly using CBD or trying it for the first time, it shouldn’t be a cost-prohibitive item. It offers too many amazing benefits to be a luxury item.”

As if to put a point on the exclamation mark, she gestures to two large jars of bulk hemp flower. Searchinger takes a quick tour of the inviting and Greenhouse grown on the other side of the orchid-filled store to illustrate her point. “Nothing Continental Divide, the strains of Cherry Cherry in Boulder CBD costs over $100,” she says and Cherry Wine are pungent and closer in proudly. “We want these products to be accessiappearance to manicured cannabis than typical “Every item in the store is made from organicallyoutdoor-grown hemp. While rich in CBD—the strains test from 8.8-12.1% CBD—they must contain less than .3% of psychoactive Delta-9 THC to be Drift serves nearly three dozen tantalizing strains—from iconic Chemmy Jones and Blue Dream to new classics like Wedding Cake. Every strain on our considered high-CBD hemp shelves has two things in common: each is selected from a handful of Colorado’s finest artisan growers and none test below 20%. Care for another slice? and sold outside of a cannabis dispensary like Drift, the recreational dispensary next door to Boulder CBD.

Wedding Cake. Without the Calories.

PINEAPPLE EXPRESS (HAWAIIAN X TRAINWRECK) 23.11% $22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ BLUE DREAM (BLUEBERRY X SUPER SILVER HAZE) 26.06% . $28/8TH, $99/HALF, $179/OZ LEMON SKUNK (TWO SKUNK PHENOTYPES) 25.20% . . . . . $28/8TH, $99/HALF, $179/OZ WEDDING CAKE (CHERRY PIE X GSC) 26.30% . . . . . . . . . . . $28/8TH, $99/HALF, $179/OZ CHEMMY JONES (CHEMDAWG D X CASEY JONES) 33.18% . .$34/8TH, $125/HALF, $224/OZ

BOULDER BUILT LIVE DIAMONDS (CHEMMY JONES, 69.65%; GELATO CAKE, 68.55%) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32/1G CLUTCH LIVE RESIN (CRESCENDO COOKIES, 74.94%; GRAPE SORBET, 80.82%; TEQUILA SUNRISE, 74.23%) $30/G, $100/4G, $160/8G EQUINOX 500MG DISTILLATE CARTRIDGE (BANANA KUSH, 83.31%; TROPICAL PUNCH, 83.96%) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24/.5G EQUINOX 1000MG DISTILLATE CARTRIDGE (GOLDEN GOAT, 90.97%; PEACH COOKIES, 88.30%) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40/1G KUSH MASTERS WAX & SHATTER (CITRAL BANNER, 76%; GLUE COOKIES, 68.02%; TRUCKER OG, 69.24%) . . . . . $20/G, $70/4G, $100/8G

KUS H 1750 30TH ST. | BOULDER, CO | 720.612.4382 | MON – SUN – 9:00AM – 9:45PM SEE OUR DAILY MENU AT LEAFLY.COM/DISPENSARY-INFO/DRIFT-CANNABIX

0/

$2

Where the Budtenders Shop.

TER AT

$79/OZ

A ROTATION OF INDOOR-GROWN LARGE NUG FLOWER AND POPCORN. FOUR STRAINS ALWAYS ABOVE 20%. $89 FROM 11AM-8PM, MON-SAT.

S WAX & STER SH MA

G,

8G

FLOWER

LUCKY CHARMS (APPALACHIA X THE WHITE) 23.05% . . . . $22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ

CONCENTRATES

GOLDEN GOAT (ROMULAN X ISLAND SWEET SKUNK) 24.48% . .$22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ GRAPE PIE (CHERRY PIE X GRAPE STOMPER) 24.01% . . . . . $22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ

$70/4G, $10

0/

Though the doors to Boulder CBD just opened in August, the store’s owners have been involved in the cannabis industry since shortly after the passage of Amendment 64. “They’ve had a birds-eye view of the good, the glorious and the bizarre side of the cannabis industry,” said Searchinger. “We’re thrilled to channel all that experience into a brick and mortar business exclusively focused on working with our clients in a relaxed and informative setting, providing an array of wonderful products that address a lot of common medicinal needs.” Early sales trends indicate that customers are most eager to address pain, stress and sleep issues through the introduction of CBD. “Whether it’s a tincture, salve or an edible, it’s so gratifying to help folks transition toward all-natural remedies that bring relief. And we’re all looking for relief from something.” Boulder CBD is open seven days a week from 11AM-7PM and is located at 1750 30th Street, Unit 16, Boulder. (720) 531-3159


Minor cannabinoids could be a major deal by Seymour

D

id you know that cannabis doesn’t actually make THC or CBD? More accurately, it doesn’t make those compounds directly. Heat or light applied to cannabis activates cannabinoid acids that become neutral (decarboxylate, if we’re getting scientific) and, boom, you have THC and CBD, the most famous of the major cannabinoids, and the ones getting all the glory and research. BERBERINE 3D STRUCUTRE COURTESY MPLANINE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

But there are approximately 140 minor cannabinoids, and you can expect to see some of them popping up in products in the near future — if you haven’t already. Tetrahydrocannabivarin acid (THCV) is pretty hot right now. Medical marijuana resource website Medical Jane calls it THC’s “propyl cannabinoid cousin.” It’s basically a THC molecule with the end snapped off. Just like CBD and THC, THCV comes from a precursor acid, tetrahydrocannabivarin acid

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

(THCVA), which itself comes from cannabigerovarinic acid (CBGV). As for whether THCV gets you high, current science — scant as it is — says that depends on how much you consume. A quick biology lesson: All cannabinoids interact with the human endocannabinoid system, attaching to receptors that help regulate functions like appetite, mood, sleep, pain and memory. Humans have at least two types of cannabinoid receptors: CB1, which is in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), and CB2, which is in the peripheral nervous system, the digestive system and some specialized cells in the immune system. Lower doses of THCV act as a CB1 antagonist, producing no psychoactive effects, i.e., you don’t get high. But at high doses, the molecule changes behavior and activates CB1, giving you a buzz. But it’s not a buzz like the kind from good ol’ THC. It’s a lucid and energizing high, with only about half the duration of THC. There is plenty of buzz, however, around the possible medicinal uses of THCV. Because low doses of the molecule block CB1 receptors, some research suggests THCV could be used as an appetite suppressant without undesirable side effects such as anxiety and insomnia. In mice, THCV has regulated blood sugar levels and reduced insulin resistance; in vitro models have shown the molecule to have anti-epileptic properties; and British researchers found that it strengthened serotonin receptors and produced antipsychotic effects in rats. THCV may also help with panic attacks, bone growth and Alzheimer’s. Then there’s CBN, cannabinol, a mildly psychoactive minor cannabinoid that could stimulate

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

the appetite. CBN forms as cannabis ages — when acids in cannabis break down (specifically tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, THCA and cannabinolic acid, CBNA). Some people call CBN a sedative cannabinoid, but emerging research suggests the synergistic effect of THC and CBN actually produces intense drowsiness, not just CBN on its own. Further, lab tests have shown CBN might be capable of fighting off bacterial infections that have developed resistance to traditional treatments, like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a scourge of hospitals and prisons. Various research has shown CBN is capable of delaying the development of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a motor neuron disease, in rats and reduces intraocular pressure in rabbits. So while research is preliminary and meager, it’s clear that minor cannabinoids provide interesting new avenues for medicinal cannabis. But, as minor cannabinoids, both THCV and CBN are found only in trace amounts in most flower. There are, however, some THCV-heavy cultivars hitting the market, like California-based brand Flow Kana’s Pink Boost Goddess, with 18.7% THC and 4.24% THCV. The strain is marketed to those looking to reduce anxiety and avoid the munchies. Doug’s Varin is also selling concentrates, tinctures and flower with an emphasis on THCV. Mary’s Medicinals, found at dispensaries all along the Front Range, offers CBN capsules. With the Drug Enforcement Agency announcing its plan to “facilitate and expand scientific and medical research for marijuana in the United States” in late August, there’s hope that the body of research on minor cannabinoids can grow.

I

59


NOMAD EXTRACTS

GROWN BY OPTIONS

COLLEGE STUDENTS

BRING IN YOUR BUFF ONE CARD AND GET

CONCENTRATE SUPPLY CO.

CONCENTRATE SUPPLY CO.

10% OFF

GROWN BY OPTIONS

GROWN BY OPTIONS

All Flower Hand Trimmed! 1G SYRINGES

1 GRAM

STARTING AT

WAX & SHATTER

4 GRAMS

FLOWER OZ

EIGHTHS STARTING AT

$32.14 $16.07 $12.05 CSC WAX & SHATTER

STARTING AT

.5G DISPOSABLE CARTRIDGES

$48.21 $80.35 $20.09 5290 ARAPAHOE AVE SUITE J. BOULDER, CO • OPTIONSMEDICALCENTER.COM • 303.953.2852 A L L P R I C E S A R E P R E T A X . O F F E R S W H I L E S U P P L Y L A S T.


‘Politico’ to put out a marijuana newsletter By Paul Danish

T

he highly regarded Politico website is launching a marijuana newsletter called the Morning Cannabis, which is intended to help readers “navigate the complexities and constant changes in the cannabis industry.” The newsletter is free through Sept. 30; if Politico has decided on a price after that, it’s not obviously posted on the website. The second preview issue contains a couple of stories that suggest the newsletter is going to be a serious source of marijuana journalism. Let’s start with a Morning Cannabis exclusive. Two major federal health agencies — the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — are calling on the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to quit dragging its feet and license more facilities to produce research-grade marijuana. They also want licensed researchers to be able to buy cannabis products from dispensaries. Three years ago the DEA requested applications for additional research marijuana production licenses. It got 33 applications, and has been sitting on them ever since. One of the applicants sued the DEA last month. Now, Morning Cannabis says, the FDA and the NIH are in effect taking the side of the applicants against another federal agency. That sort of thing doesn’t happen very often, and it is a big deal when it does. Currently there is only one licensed source of research marijuana: the University of Mississippi. The pot it produces has been derisively called more like hemp than the marijuana available in dispensaries. Licensed researchers have to use the Ole Miss pot in their studies. They can’t buy what the public is buying. As a result, the NIH and FDA now “support enabling researchers holding Schedule I license for marijuana to obtain products from state authorized dispensaries,” just like normal people do. The agencies didn’t say it, but this could be a first step toward prying fed-

+

eral marijuana research regulation out of the hands of the DEA, which has compiled a decade-long record of sabotaging it. Morning Cannabis also had an update on the growing number of vaping illnesses and deaths that have been reported in the last few weeks. It turns out that many of the vape samples federal officials have tested contain THC, but the illnesses seem to be linked to black-market vapes rather than those from licensed dispensaries. The FDA is analyzing at least 100 samples of vapes sent to it by state health departments. Those studying the illness caution that several different compounds could be responsible, including vitamin E, which forms an acid that can cause lung damage when burned. If most of the vapes causing the problem are black-market products, they could contain any number of non-cannabis admixtures, one or more of which is more likely the cause of the illnesses than THC or CBD. You would think that if THC was the culprit, the malady would have turned up years ago and been much more common. Marijuana legalization advocates maintain that the outbreak of vaping maladies make the case for legalizing and regulating the marijuana market. Paul Armentano, deputy director of NORML, told Politico he’s never used a vape pen and “wouldn’t go near one”… “I don’t know what the hell is in those vape cartridges,” but also said just because some lettuce is contaminated, that doesn’t mean people stop eating lettuce altogether. • • • • Israel will have an election next week, and as was the case during its previous election last April, the candidate favoring marijuana legalization is the wild card who could determine the outcome. In last April’s election, Moshe Feiglin, an ultranationalist libertarian who had been a member of Binjamin Netanyahu’s Likud Party, went rogue, established his own political party, Zehut, and made legalizing marijuana the centerpiece of his campaign. He attracted the support of a lot of stoners, but didn’t get enough votes to win a seat in parliament. Netanyahu and Likud finished first, but Netanyahu couldn’t attract enough support from other conservative parties to form a coalition government. So after months of trying, he called new elections. This time Feiglin is back in the Likud fold. To get him back, Netanyahu promised him a cabinet seat. And he also promised to open the medical marijuana market for import. If Feiglin’s stoner supporters follow him into the Likud, they could provide a critical margin in what promises to be a glove-tight election.

LONGMONT’S BIGGEST DISPENSARY

Twin Peaks DISPENSARY medical and recreational

HUGE SALE! $18 WAX/SHATTER 1G $18 1/8 OZ FLOWER BUD NATTY REMS, THE CLEAR, OLIO, EUREKA, GREENDOT, BINSKE, VIOLA AND MORE! Expires 7/13/19

OZ $ 19 DISTILLATE 25 1/2 FLOWER SHAKE CARTRIDGES $ PRE-ROLL WITH $50 PURCHASE 1

$

Open 8am - 10pm Monday - Sunday • 900 S. Hover St. #A, Longmont, CO • 720-892-5969 Intersection of Hover and Nelson in Twin Peaks Mall •

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

www.twinpeaksdispensary.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

I

61


Area 420

10% Off Intergalactic Strains & Concentrates Cow Abduction Tee Select Alien Themed Glass Accessories *Valid through Sept 22nd

Stop by & see why

Life is Better at The Farm

*All offers are while supplies last. Discounts cannot be combined. Prices do not include tax. All promotions are subject to change. 21+ Recreational only.

M-F 8am-9:45pm SAT 9am-9:45pm SUN 11am-9:45pm


last word MIX AND MATCH OUNCES

ALL TOP SHELF BUDS. NO STRAIN RESTRICTIONS. ONE TIER PRICING.

$55 4G NUHI SUGAR WAX & SHATTER THURSDAYS DAILY DEAL: PRE-ROLLS 4 FOR $20

ORDER ONLINE WITH OUR LIVE MENU - WWW.THCHEALTH.COM VALID SEPTEMBER 12 - SEPTEMBER 15

WE JUST RECEIVED A HUGE SHIPMENT OF NEW SOFAS AND LOVE SEATS

3550 Arapahoe Avenue • Boulder 303.440.9011 • usedfurnitureboulder.com

537 Canyon Blvd. Boulder, CO • 720-532-8664 • www.thchealth.com • 21+

AWARD-WINNING ARTISAN CANNABIS & EXTRACTS SINCE 2009

All New Recreational flower strains are IN STOCK NOW! Come see the difference at Boulder’s longest running active dispensary. www.boulderwc.com

5420 Arapahoe, Unit F • 303.442.2565

Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

www.terrapincarestation.com See our ad below

Award-winning seafood at a reasonable price Atlas Valley Center, SW corner of Arapahoe and 95th

www.eatreelfish.com

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 59. THE

TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

Premium Products at Smokin’ Prices

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

Recreational & Medical

Industry Employees Receive 25% Discount Off All Recreational Products Everyday 7464 Arapahoe Ave A9, Boulder, Co (located behind KT BBQ, lots of parking) Hours: 10am – 8pm Monday – Sunday

Taste for yourself Ask about our 30 day free trial 303-604-3000 www.eldoradosprings.com

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122

Profile for Boulder Weekly

9.12.19 Boulder Weekly  

9.12.19 Boulder Weekly