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news:

How Trump’s racism causes violence by Joel Dyer

boulderganic:

Pristine wilderness locations are suffering from over-visitation, partially due to geotagging on social media by Lauren Hamko

buzz:

Ani DiFranco, Haley Heynderickx, The War and Treaty and more from the 29th annual Folks Festival by Boulder Weekly Staff

film:

Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz on making ‘The Peanut Butter Falcon’ by Michael J. Casey

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Consumers are buying more local food, but the trade war, weather and mental health issues in rural Colorado are impinging on the industry’s growth by Matt Cortina

Tour de brew: Adamant Brewing & Blending by Michael J. Casey

departments 5 7 25 32 34 37 47 49 51 53

The Anderson Files: NAFTA 2.no Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Boulder International Fringe Festival: A round-up of must sees in the upcoming Boulder International Fringe Festival Words: ‘Clichés’ by Lee Davidson Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: How to be submissive Weed Between the Lines: You’ve got to concentrate Cannabis Corner: Pot enters presidential politics with a bang

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Editorial intern, Lauren Hamko Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Director, Dave Grimsland Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama

August 8, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 51 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

NAFTA 2.no

By Dave Anderson

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lmost 1 million American jobs were lost to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), according to a narrow U.S. government measure. More are being outsourced to Mexico each week. The devastation of the Midwest’s “Rust Belt” is well-known but every state has been and is effected. That includes Colorado. Public Citizen, a consumer rights advocacy group and think tank, notes: “Colorado has had a net loss of more than 9,000 manufacturing jobs since the 1994 NAFTA and 1995 I

World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements went into effect. More than 30,000 specific Colorado jobs have been certified under one narrow government program, Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), as lost to outsourcing or imports since NAFTA. The TAA figure represents a significant undercount because the program’s scope excluded many types of jobs lost to trade. According to the Department of Labor, manufacturing workers who lose jobs to trade and find re-employment are typically forced to take pay cuts. Two of every five rehired in 2016 were paid less in their new jobs. One in four lost greater than 20 percent of their income. That means a $7,900 pay cut for the median-wage worker earning $39,500. With displaced manufacturing workers competing for jobs not exposed to AUGUST 8, 2019

trade competition, wages in fast-growing service sectors are kept down. The resulting broad-based middle-class wage stagnation has contributed significantly to growing inequality.” Trump promised to reform NAFTA or pull out of it. Negotiations were conducted for over a year in secret with over 500 “advisors” representing dozens of multinational corporations and investors in attendance. Then Trump rebranded it the USMCA (or U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement). It has better language about labor and environmental protections but there aren’t real enforcement provisions. Progressives have concluded that while Trump changed the name and his negotiators had agreed to some improved tweaks, this is the same old shit. see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 6

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In an analysis of the final draft, the Labor Advisory Committee (LAC), representing the Teamsters, American Federation of Teachers, SEIU and other major unions, said that the deal’s “incremental” reforms were wholly inadequate. The LAC made numerous recommendations for improving and enforcing labor standards (including rules adopted by the U.N.’s International Labour Organization concerning freedom of association, collective bargaining, discrimination, forced labor, child labor, workplace safety and health). None of these changes were made to NAFTA 2.0. If such standards were enforced, U.S. and Canadian companies would be much less interested in outsourcing jobs to Mexico. The LAC concluded that the NAFTA 2.0 text neglected “the basic fact that the United States’ market-fundamentalist, pro-corporate approach to trade and globalization fails socially, politically and economically.” The Sierra Club said NAFTA 2.0 “preserves a bad NAFTA rule that, in combination with a bad U.S. law, effectively bars the U.S. government from determining whether gas exports to Mexico are in the public interest. This automatic gas export guarantee facilitates increased fracking in the U.S., expansion of cross-border gas pipelines, and growing dependency on climate-polluting gas in Mexico.” The new deal also retains NAFTA’s kangaroo private tribunals for the fossil fuel companies which can be used to undermine Mexican climate and environmental policies. NAFTA 2.0 is significantly worse than the old deal in crucial ways. It has a I

provision that will guarantee long term high prices for prescription drugs. A headline in the June 23, 2019, issue of The Hill says it all: “‘Big Pharma’ is the big winner of the USMCA.” The op-ed was authored by Veronika J. Wirtz ,Warren A. Kaplan and Kevin P. Gallagher who are trade experts at Boston University’s Global Development Policy Center and School of Public Health. Their research examining similar previous trade pacts shows that the revised deal will increase the price of medicines and boost the power of Big Pharma. NAFTA 2.0 gives pharmaceutical corporations special monopoly protections so they can block competition from generic drugs and charge more in all three NAFTA nations. The authors point out that “the pharmaceutical industry is the most active lobby group when it comes to trade agreements. One analysis of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) — a deal that was scrapped — stated that it ended up having many of the same provisions for pharmaceuticals and biologics that the USMCA has.” The new text requires each nation to provide drug makers at least 10 years of “marketing exclusivity” for new biologic drugs derived from living organisms. These drugs now frequently cost $100,000 per person per year. This monopoly for brand-name drugs would ban cheaper “biosimilars” (i.e., generic biologics). NAFTA 2.0 needs to be fixed or killed. Congress will be voting on it soon. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Side effects of illegal immigration

Boulder Weekly: I love your work but I have always disagreed with what I see as a take on illegal immigration that ignores the fiscal reality of this mess, decades old. The latest round of violence is another symptom of this problem and yet, the issue continues to be led by the left and right extremists with no resolution in sight. Here’s my view, one from an independent, middle-class American. There are many Americans like myself that are sick of the give-away and disregard of our immigration laws. Liberals that openly disregard our immigration laws are to blame as much as white nationalists for this mess. I am a U.S. citizen of Hispanic descent and have no ill will for these poor folks, whose countries have disavowed, but there is a fiscal reality that has been ignored for decades and continues to be ignored by every single Dem candidate. Here’s my singular beef... Our public schools are taking the beating of this fiscal drain and yet, we have DeVos that is trying to siphon public funds to charter schools. How many illegals are charter schools taking in? In my opinion, ignoring our immigration laws is exactly like ignoring the enforcement of red flag laws. Both are illegal and if you can’t do the job, get the hell out. Michael Ortiz/Lafayette

merit in trying to restore the dignity of the American worker, but few are born with the funding to compete nor can all be innovators and entrepreneurs, and here the profit motive and arc of modern corporate capitalism are powerful forces standing in opposition to any future rising dignity for the average American. Donald Trump rode into the presidency on the economic and

racial anxieties of white America, promising to address their concerns. The great irony of this is that every fiber of his being — his ego, ambition and wealth — rests on his determination to be among the landed elite of the world, a drive coming it would seem from his own deep insecurity. His golf courses, resorts and hotels are built to cater to wealth. Nothing he has done in

his personal life has ever been directed to benefit the average American, particularly those whose skin is not white. That so many nonetheless stand solidly behind him indicates he has become the avatar not only of white identity but of the broad concept of America’s Manifest Destiny, including all its warts. Robert Porath/Boulder

The American worker

A current TV ad has people dancing and jumping for joy at having home furnishings delivered to their doors. This is precisely the Milton Friedman/Ronald Reagan supply-side (trickle down) economic theory: If people are able to buy the things they want (prompted by incessant commercial advertising), all is well in the economy. This is also the driver of global trade and the utilization of less expensive labor in developing (poorer) nations to manufacture affordable (and more profitable) goods. These were corporate decisions. The downside of shifting manufacturing overseas is that the resulting service economy here creates repetitive and less personally satisfying tasks that require few skills and are thus open to further cost cutting measures (lower wages and automation). There is BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Earl Turner has an ally in the White House How Trump’s racism causes violence

By Joel Dyer

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GAGE SKIDMORE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

t this point, most Americans are painfully aware that instances of gun violence, particularly mass shootings, are on the rise. Yet, as most of us seek solutions to this crisis, it is important to understand that not all such incidents are the same and as a result, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Understandably, the public outcry for more gun control has swelled in the aftermath of three mass shootings in the last two weeks in Gilroy, California; El Paso, Texas; and Dayton, Ohio. At this point, 34 people have been killed in these three shootings with that number poised to rise as several of the 63 wounded remain in critical condition as of this writing. So, would enhanced gun control have stopped any of these shootings? It’s possible, but we will never know for certain. For most people, that’s still reason enough to move forward with such legislation. After all, there have already been more than 250 mass shootings (defined as four or more people shot during one episode) so far this year, more than one per day. Based on that number, we can assume with certainty that at least some of those hundreds of mass shootings would not have occurred if more red flag laws, stricter background checks, a ban on assault-style weapons and closure of the gun-show loophole were in place. That said, the purpose of this article is to examine the growing violence attributable to white nationalists in this country and sadly, I do not believe gun control of any sort will have any bearing on this type of violence. We’ll have to look elsewhere BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

for solutions to this problem. I make this observation having spent much of the past 25 years researching and reporting on domestic terrorism. I’ve spent a fair amount of time in the company of people considered to be domestic terrorists — some racist, some not — and have written extensively about what I’ve learned. Here are a few observations. It’s far too late for gun control to have any meaningful impact on the organized racist right. It’s simply a numbers game. There are an estimated 400 million guns already in circulation among the 329 million people in the U.S. Approximately 10 million of those guns are what we call semiautomatic assault rifles. If all gun sales stopped tomorrow, the organized racist right would not find itself lacking for firepower. When I spent time with people in armed compounds around the country, it was abundantly clear that a lack of guns was not an issue. Everyone had several. There were often multiple long guns stacked by each window of the house in case the government or some other uninvited guest I

came calling. And shooting guns is pretty much a way of life for these people. Gun sales data reflects another conundrum for those who believe gun control will help. Every time there is a mass shooting that sparks an increase in gun control rhetoric out of Washington D.C. — I say rhetoric because such talk rarely if ever results in substantive gun control — sales of assault-style rifles skyrocket. The people I’ve met who are today viewed as a white nationalist threat already have three to a dozen of these guns in their possession. The thinking being that someday guns will be outlawed so better to stockpile them now while you can. In short, any serious white supremacist who wants to commit a mass shooting will have absolutely no trouble getting their hands on all the firepower they’ll need to kill people. Please note my use of the word “serious.” There is a new subgroup of violent white nationalists that I believe is unique and though it’s too early to say for sure, both the El Paso and Gilroy shooters may fall into this AUGUST 8, 2019

category. I think of them as school shooters lacking a school who find an alternative means of combating their debilitating obscurity by adopting what they see as a greater cause to justify their violent actions in their quest for notoriety. These young white males seem connected to white supremacist cells only through the internet where they have become radicalized in much the same way as ISIS devotees in this country who have never met an actual ISIS member. In such circumstances, it is possible that stricter gun control measures could make a difference. But it is far more likely that any person in need of a weapon for a racist attack can simply use their internet connections to secure one. There are just too many guns available for new gun laws to accomplish a decrease in these racially motivated murders. I believe that to understand what is happening today — how people are being radicalized — we need to understand the lessons from our past. There are many parallels between what is happening now and what occurred in the early and mid 1990s when the antigovernment movement swelled to an estimated 3 million adherents and resulted in a good deal of violence, including the Oklahoma City bombing. There are also some significant differences that make today far more dangerous than other times in our past. In the early 1990s, the U.S. Marshal’s Service and FBI agents botched the arrest of Randy Weaver on gun charges at Ruby Ridge, Idaho. Weaver had been set up as part of a sting operation designed to force him to become an informant on the nearby Aryan Nation’s compound, but he see VIOLENCE Page 10

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refused to cooperate. During the ensuing 11-day standoff, agents of the U.S. government wound up shooting and killing Weaver’s wife, Vicki, his 14-year-old son, Sammy, and the family dog. White racist organizations from around the country including leaders from radical Christian Identity churches saw Ruby Ridge as a golden opportunity to spread their message of hate. They gathered in Colorado and hatched a plan to create a national militia/antigovernment movement based on peoples’ fear that the government is willing to come to your home and murder your family in order to take away your guns. These early organizers realized that their racist views would limit the number of those who could be recruited to their new movement, so they made the decision to initially downplay their racist rhetoric and to concentrate on the threat to gun ownership and the constitution. With the help of the NRA’s paranoid one-world-government conspiracy rhetoric of the time, millions of Americans, mainly from rural communities hard hit by the farm crisis and other negative economic factors, joined in. From there, the racist right was able to further recruit members into their white supremacist ranks. In domestic terrorism circles, this process is simply referred to as the funnel. The idea being that the more people who are poured into the large end of the funnel, the more radicalized violent people, such as Timothy McVeigh, will drip out of the smaller end. In the early 1990s, it was the relatively small number of white nationalists and Christian Identity adherents coupled with a couple of million concerned, right-leaning gun owners who comprised the majority of folks being poured into the top of the funnel. But from there, news events like the government’s violent assault at Ruby Ridge and the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, were reinterpreted through a lens of increasingly paranoid and racist conspiracy theories. These theories tended to be built around the myth of a Jewish-led, one-world government intending to enslave white people and therefore needing to first confiscate AUGUST 8, 2019

all the guns. You get the drift. But for people who had been primed to believe these theories, they were a powerful force for pushing people deeper into the funnel of radical racism where, eventually, a few fully indoctrinated radicals dripped from the funnel’s small end. They were willing to murder innocents in their effort to overthrow the government and bring about a race war. There was no more powerful tool for pushing people deeper into the funnel than the book The Turner Diaries, a 1978 novel by white supremacist leader William Pierce writing under the pseudonym “Andrew MacDonald.” The book is often credited with giving birth to the modern white nationalist movement. McVeigh slept with the book under his pillow. He sold it at gun shows, and he had a well-worn copy in the front seat of his car when he was arrested in Oklahoma just miles from where he had detonated the bomb that killed 168 people including 19 children in the Oklahoma City federal building’s day care center. For people in the movement, The Turner Diaries has never been treated as a novel, but rather a blueprint for bringing about, and winning, the race war adherents believe is coming soon. The book describes a violent revolution based on race wherein the federal government is overthrown and non-whites, liberal politicians and race traitors (whites who intermarry or assist people of color in any way) are all systematically murdered. The book ends with what is, for white supremacists, a glorious vision of people of color and race traitors hanging from every electric poll from East Coast to West. In this gruesome story line, Earl Turner, the book’s white-supremacist protagonist, blows up a federal building killing children in a scene eerily similar to McVeigh’s real-life bombing. Turner and other characters in the book fund their race war by robbing banks and armored cars. It is no coincidence that such robberies have historically been the preferred mode for funding the modern day white-supremacist movement in their effort to create a white homeland. While The Turner Diaries is certainly a powerful resource for radicalizing people as they move through I

the funnel, it is hardly the only such resource. The book Might Is Right or The Survival of the Fittest written under the pseudonym Ragnar Redbeard is another tool. This book was mentioned in an online post by the Gilroy shooter shortly before he opened fire on people at that city’s Garlic Festival. Back in the ’90s, you had to be pretty deep into the antigovernment movement to fully understand its racist roots and the desire of its most radical adherents to start a race war. Many in the upper end of the funnel never saw race as an issue and never moved beyond gun rights and what they saw as an assault on the Constitution. The makeup within today’s funnel is different, largely thanks to Earl Turner’s new best friend, President Donald Trump. Trump has brought his own brand of racist conspiracy theories into the funnel mix and given them mass exposure as only a sitting president could. It’s a deadly combination. Let me quickly say it is not the intent of this article to frame our current crisis of racist violence in terms of Republican versus Democratic party politics. The goal is to simply examine how Trump’s actions and words are impacting today’s funnel of racist extremism and why the current era of racist violence has so much destructive potential. Whereas racist organizations, Christian Identity adherents and gun rights advocates were once the primary entrants to the funnel, today it is all of those plus the millions of cult-like followers of Donald Trump. If the 4 million people being fed into the top of the funnel in the 1990s could produce millions of antigovernment adherents, hundreds of armed militia groups, tens of thousands of white nationalists and a handful of McVeighs, what will pouring 20 million people into the top of today’s funnel eventually produce at the other end? And worse yet, in the 1990s, the racist component of the movement was tamped down, largely hidden from those who were primarily motivated by their fear of losing their see VIOLENCE Page 12

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right to own guns just entering the funnel. But today, thanks largely to Trump and the mainstreaming of his racist conspiracy theories, the fear of brown immigrants has largely taken the place of the fear of having your guns taken away as the principal point of commonality for those entering the funnel. It only stands to reason that if you pour five times as many people into the top of the funnel, then five times as many people willing to kill for their cause will eventually come out the small end. But it will likely be worse than that because, in the 1990s, people had to be slowly and methodically transitioned from the gun issue to the race issue by way of blame-shifting, racist conspiracy theories. But the millions of folks being poured into the funnel since 2016 are already primed to be racist via Trump’s fearmongering that often includes his fictional accounts of an ongoing invasion of brown murderers, brown drug dealers, brown rapists and brown MS-13 gang members who are said to be attacking our southern border. Trump constantly dehumanizes people of color whether they live in black urban communities in the U.S., his proclaimed “shithole” countries in Africa and the Caribbean, or are asylum-seekers fleeing violence in Latin American. He calls them breeders. He says they are an infestation looking to replace this country’s white population. And as a result, his followers are fertile ground for violent racist recruiters. Trump’s rallies are more blatantly racist than those of the infamous segregationist politician George Wallace a half century ago. Trump actually laughed when a supporter at one of his rallies suggested shooting immigrants as a fix to the president’s imaginary invasion problem. He laughs or grins in silence as his supporters chant “build the wall” and “send her back.” He has ordered brown babies be pulled from the arms of their parents

and caged in despicable conditions. He has established camps to hold Latinx people in cages so overcrowded and filthy as to be torture — no room to even lay down, no showers, soiled clothes, one toilet for more than a hundred people. He has publicly declared himself a nationalist. He has a 50-year-long track record as a racist from redlining his real estate holdings to calling for the Central Park Five to be put to death and then refusing to take back his pronouncement of guilt even after the courts declared the young black men innocent. He was the leader of the birther movement against our nation’s first black president. He has surrounded himself in the White House with racist advisers like Stephen Miller. He has defended white nationalists in Charlottesville even after they killed an innocent young woman. He took weeks to finally distance himself with a wink and a nod from the endorsements and praise of racist leaders such as David Duke of the KKK. He even regularly retweets racist conspiracy theories he finds on the internet. And starting in early July, he launched a re-election strategy that has so far included some of the vilest and most blatantly racist things that have ever been uttered in public by a president of the United States, including slurs against a famed civil rights leader and women of color elected to Congress. He has called them communists, racists, idiots, haters of America, and has told them to go back to where they came from. In short, he has painted targets on their backs and without having to say the words, invited his funnel full of radical racists to pull the trigger. His campaign has created, paid for, and launched more than 2,000 ads on social media eluding to the president’s false claims that we are being invaded by murderous, raping, brown criminals at our southern border. And what has happened since he launched this racist re-election campaign with its invasion ads? A lot of

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


people have died. It appears two of the most recent mass murderers were motivated by their racist ideology. One of them drove 10 hours to El Paso to stop Trump’s imaginary invasion. The El Paso shooter appears to have posted an online mission statement on a white supremacist forum explaining why he was going to shoot people. His post used Trump’s language to hit most of the president’s racist talking points. This cannot come as a surprise to Trump. He can’t claim to be ignorant of his power to motivate people to kill those he declares the enemy, the other. When he declared the press the enemy of the people, pipe-bombs were mailed to journalists by one of his rabid supporters. When he declared Democratic leaders in Congress the enemy, the pipe-bombs came to their offices. When he disparaged the men and women who came to his rallies to protest, they were beaten by his followers while Trump egged on the violence promising to pay for any legal fees incurred. And thanks to researchers, the president now knows with absolute certainty that in the cities where he holds his rallies, hate crimes increase in their wake. So please don’t try to claim that Donald Trump is ignorant of the impact his racist rants and tweets are having. Like The Turner Diaries and other conspiracy theories, Trump’s racist words and actions are pushing thousands of people deeper into the funnel of white racist extremism. When the president’s words dehumanize people of color or when he leads his racist chants at his rallies, he knows who is listening. When the president’s policies and actions cause the torture of migrant men, women and children by way of overcrowded conditions and family separation, he knows who is watching. And when he declares that the biggest threat to America and our way of life is the ongoing invasion of our country by violent criminal immigrants at the southern border who are trying to replace the white people in this country, he knows exactly what he is asking his most extreme followers to do — commit acts of violence. It is no accident this violence has increased with the launch of his racist reelection campaign. It is Trump’s BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

twisted strategy and he will continue to incite violence with his racist words and actions so long as he is in office. As for those of us in the media, we need to talk about this elephant in the room. We have to stop questioning whether Trump is a racist and start reporting that Trump is a racist. We can’t continue to try to normalize this president every time he manages to stumble through a teleprompter speech calling for unity. We know who Trump is. He has been telling and showing us for five decades. He is a racist, white nationalist who believes that racism is a valid path to continuing to hold onto his power and he doesn’t care who or how many get hurt in the process. He is sick and we have known this since 2015, but he has always been the ratings-enhancing car wreck from which the media can’t look away. Just think about the lack of context in reporting in recent days. Just this week following the El Paso shooting, Trump has suggested multiple times we should do something on gun control so long as it was linked to immigration reform. In other words, we should do something to address both causes of the El Paso mass murder: guns and too many brown people. It’s truly outrageous. And finally, there is another reason that the current Trump-fed funnel of racial extremism has the potential to produce so much violence. There is now a growing funnel on the other side of the racial spectrum, something that did not exist 25 years ago. Whether black, brown or white, there are a lot of people who are not willing to sit back and allow millions of people to be caged in tortuous conditions, threatened with having their love ones arrested and deported, or shot to death in a Walmart or at a local food festival. These people too are being increasingly radicalized by the current racist discourse. As a result, the potential for tit-for-tat violence at this point is very high. And if both sides are lured into Earl Turner’s and Donald Trump’s race war, this thing is going to get very bloody, very fast. Joel Dyer is the author of Harvest of Rage: Why Oklahoma City is only the Beginning. He has been previously subpoenaed to testify before the Senate Subcommittee on Terrorism. I

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names carved into rocks and trees along trails and at popular photo spots.” Newcomb faced a harsh realization when it occurred to him that he was contributing to the influx of people visiting places based on what they saw online. “If you go on social media you’ll see so many people who say they love nature and the outdoors, but really don’t properly take care of or appreciate these places that are so often

Pristine wilderness locations are suffering from over-visitation, partially due to geotagging on social media platforms

by Lauren Hamko

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pening up Instagram, my feed is flooded with images of breathtaking locations from around the world. From oceans to mountains, from wedding photographers to rock climbers, the pictures create a sense of wanderlust. Luckily, for me and other Instagram users, finding these incredible locations has been TY NEWCOMB (@EYE.OF.TY) made easy with geotagging, the simple process of adding a location to the photograph. Users are able to click the location and see a map, pinpointing the exact coordinates of each location. But as a result, the secluded and pristine wilderness locations going viral on social media platforms, especially Instagram, are suffering from over-visitation, disrespect and damage. In response, some influential Instagrammers are consciously limiting their use of geotags in order to protect and preserve the locations they share with the world. Ty Newcomb, a photographer based out of Boulder, has been traveling as an Instagram TY NEWCOMB has influencer for the past three started tagging his years. On his Instagram, (@ incredibly fragile photos with generic locations, like eye.of.ty,) which has 179,000 ecosystems when Colorado, in order to followers, he has recently they visit,” help preserve some of taken a step back from revealNewcomb says. the wild places he photographs. ing exactly where places are “People hopping via geotags, instead marking barriers and fences, photos with general tags like trampling on deli“Utah” or “California.” cate vegetation and cryptobiotic soil all “Some of the places I visited just in order to get slightly better photo a few months ago that were comperspectives. It’s incredibly frustrating pletely desolate are now suddenly and gives every other photographer a flooded with people and look wildly bad image and name.” different from how they did before Local governments and federal social media blew their cover,” agencies are also trying to raise Newcomb says. “I’ve seen trash in awareness over the harm geotagging secluded and remote areas, people can bring to an area. In late 2018, ignoring permit systems for trails and the Jackson Hole Travel and Tourism backcountry camping, Instagram Board began a campaign urging visiBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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tors to tag their photos responsibly, creating the location tag, “Tag Responsibly, Keep Jackson Hole Wild,” for visitors to use when sharing pictures from the area. Colorado itself is experiencing over-visitation in some of the state’s most loved locations. Hanging Lake is a hike right outside of Glenwood Springs. About a mile up the side of a mountain, hikers stumble upon a crystal blue lake backed by waterfalls. The city of Glenwood Springs and the U.S. Forest Service have implemented a permit system in order to protect the fragile ecosystem of the lake, as it has been suffering from an influx of visitors. The new system caps the number of visitors at 615 per day. According to the U.S. Forest Service, around 1,000 people were visiting the lake per day last year. “We want to share a story that there’s a lot of places to experience that aren’t just the popular posts seen on social media,” Phillip Yates, spokesperson for the City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks, says. “It’s a balancing act. Social media is a great tool to motivate and get people outdoors, and it promotes inclusivity in the outdoors, but we also need the support and encouragement of the public to help preserve and protect our wildlife and plant habitats.” There is not a simple solution to over-visitation, and in many ways it’s more about how people take care of the places they are visiting than it is how many people visit. However, removing geotags from photos on social media seems to be a step in the right direction. “It’s not that I don’t want people visiting our parks and pristine wilderness locations,” Newcomb says. “But sadly, it seems your average person has no idea how to visit nature and wilderness without making a mess of the place and expecting janitors to come clean it up. So yeah, if you want to visit the spots I visit now, you have to work for it a bit more.” AUGUST 8, 2019

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KEN LAU

That familiar feeling The 29th annual Folks Festival

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usicologists may argue about how to define folk music, but let us offer this simple suggestion: Folk music is a feeling more than a sound. Listening to folk music, whether it’s about love or death or sex or politics, feels like coming home after a long day at work. It feels like the first cool rain of spring or the first bitter wind of winter — it’s familiar. It’s part of us, of the seasons of our lives. The Folks Festival is about tapping into that familiar feeling. It’s about remembering that real people with real stories are at the heart of music. The beauty is that those stories often reflect our own personal narratives of love and loss and joy and despair. Suddenly, we feel less alone. We feel connected. We feel like we’ve come home to a house we didn’t know existed.

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For three days each year, Planet Bluegrass Ranch becomes a 5,000-person “summit on the song,” a celebration of the power of songwriting. It gives us great joy each year to highlight some of the musical acts that will take the stage at Folks Fest because we truly believe that music, when shared together in an otherworldly setting like Planet Bluegrass, reminds us of what’s right in the world, of how similar we all are. This year we bring you stories from artists who have graciously — perhaps sometimes painfully — opened up their worlds to us so that we might all feel less alone. From the raw, political musings of Ani DiFranco to the whimsical explorations of Haley Heynderickx to the powerful communitybuilding gospel of Yasye Barnwell, there is as much to be felt as there is to be heard at this year’s Folks Fest.

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ON THE BILL: The 29th Annual Folks Festival. Aug. 16-18, Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons. For full schedule visit: bluegrass.com/folks/ lineup/main-stage

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


LAURA CORTESE AND THE DANCE CARDS BY LOUISE BICHAN

Laura Cortese and the Dance Cards by Caitlin Rockett

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oing to Berklee College of Music was bittersweet for Laura Cortese. It was the perfect place for this lifelong fiddle player, surrounded by other passionate musicians. But she couldn’t afford it — until after her dad passed away. “One of the last conversations I had with my dad, he took me to get my trunk, the trunk I was going to take away to college, to UC Santa Cruz,” she says, “And he was like, ‘Why are you going to UC Santa Cruz? You want to be a musician.’ And we had this very clear conversation about who I was and what I wanted to do.” When she received some inheritance in the wake of her grief, she knew how to honor her dad. Boston opened up Cortese’s musical world in an organic way. It’s not Nashville, and it’s not LA. “It’s such a rich and very authentic music community where people are really making art that they believe in,” she says. “Boston’s not an industry town. So [people are] there to be part of a community, not there because someone might see them and sign them.” Cortese went on to perform with Uncle Earl, Band of Horses and Pete Seeger, co-founded the Boston Celtic Music Festival and released several solo albums before forming Laura Cortese and the Dance Cards, a singing string quartet that puts an alternative spin on traditional folk sounds. Cortese is progressive in her message, as well, openly discussing her privilege as a cisgender, straight, white woman and the relative protection that provides her in the world. The song “Pace Myself,” off the quartet’s debut album California Calling, is a slinky, bassand glass harmonica-driven reflection on the way that Cortese — and countless women before and after her — have learned to move through a world that demands they be a little less emotional, take up a little less space. The video features femmes of all types, musicians and regular folks, just being themselves, singing, sometimes dancing. Mentors, often other women, helped Cortese understand her power, and how to harness it. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

“I was consistently told that I felt things a little too strong or expressed them a little too loud and it took a while to be able to reframe those things that were said to me,” she says. “And it isn’t that you need to be quieter or that you need to be less angry, but you need to refine the message so that it is actually making change happen. Being a white, cisgendered, straight woman, I have the upper hand, I have more options than other women in our society. I really do get to see FOLKS FEST Page 18

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FOLKS FEST from Page 17

ni DiFranco’s been callin’ it like she sees it for the past 30 years. Honesty is her brand, sharing her modus operandi. Her version of punky folk weaponized raw political stances and even rawer personal experiences like abortion and abuse. Throughout her career, DiFranco has maintained a level of vulnerability that has allowed a generation of women to hear their own experiences reflected back to them in a world that often marginalized them. So, as a self-proclaimed and seasoned “oversharer,” it came as a bit of a surprise when DiFranco found herself panicked as she sat down to record the audio version of her recently released memoir, No Walls and the Recurring Dream.

“When I sat down in front of the microphone in the recording studio for four days, 9 to 5, reading this book that I had just written, I felt trapped and super exposed and like I wanted to run,” she admits. “I sort of got through the recording of the audio book, but afterwards I was sort of reeling from the experience and trying to unpack it, and I realized that my writing process involves pretending I’m alone and that there is nobody listening and that there will be no repercussions, that there is no reaction. It’s only me now and I just have to get this out. I guess there was something about pushing even further in this memoir, into the realm of intimacy with strangers — self exposure and shit like that.” DiFranco has done a lot of looking back lately, not only to produce No Walls and the Recurring Dream, but also to produce the No Walls Mixtape, a collection of 16 stripped-down versions of classic Ani songs. She’s taken a reprieve from sharing her own story as she worked on The Prison Music Project with singer/songwriter Zoe Boekbinder. The album is a collection of songs, poems and raps by nine currently or previously incarcerated artists at New Folsom Prison (Sacramento State Prison). “There’s about 15 pieces on it, and you get to the end and you feel like

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

walk relatively unscathed through the world and do have a platform. With [the video for ‘Pace Myself,’] I wanted to try to not just tell my own story but see if I could make space for people that were less heard, less noticed or told even worse things.” Laura Cortese and the Dance Cards, Friday, Aug. 16, 12:45 p.m.

Ani DiFranco by Caitlin Rockett

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HALEY HEYNDERICKX BY EVAN JAMES ATWOOD

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High Altitude Archery they’re just like me, you know?” DiFranco says. “That’s like me in there and I’ve messed up too. And where would I be without a second chance?” Profits from album sales will benefit arts in prisons (Boekbinder began the project while doing volunteer programs at the prison) and reentry programs for people being released from prison. And between all this — memoirs and mixtapes and criminal justice reform advocacy — DiFranco remains a devoted mother to a son and daughter. Motherhood has helped her learn what to say yes to (anytime the kids want to play) and broadened her understanding of what she was put on this Earth to do. “I’m kind of queen feminist, stomping around the world, you know, that’s much of my mission in this world,” she says. “And I feel like my feminism was deepened in a profound way by the process of being pregnant, of giving birth and then of being a mother. Even my most essential mission was really deeply informed and continues to be.” Ani DiFranco, Friday, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.

Haley Heynderickx by Angela K. Evans

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s we chat on the phone, the softspoken Portland singer-songwriter Haley Heynderickx is sitting in her yard, looking at the chubby, not-yet-reddened tomatoes. And the snap peas, the snap peas she’s particularly proud of. Recently, “I got to go to my first barbecue and bring snap peas, which felt BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

like an odd victory watching people eat snap peas in front of me,” she says. “All the clichés have come true.” She pauses to scare off a recently arrived neighborhood tabby cat who is wagging its tail at the bird bath in a threatening way. “You know how some cats have a look of a murderer in their eyes...” she explains. Heynderickx hit the indie folk scene in 2018, with her debut LP I Need To Start A Garden, a collection of refreshingly sincere work backed by her intimate classical guitar picking style. The lyrics are both introspective and existential, with a little tongue-in-cheek humor thrown in. When she wrote the album, Heynderickx didn’t have a garden, let alone a home that could support one. Nor was she taking very good care of herself, she admits. It was a darker time of life, she says, and she sat down to write the songs as “an act of therapy,” a way to exercise patience and kindness with herself. “To be able to start a garden means you carve the time out of your life to take that meditation for yourself and to be with nature,” she says. “And I think that’s one of the hardest things to do is just say no to a couple things. Work a little less, be kind to yourself. These are not natural things in the Western world on our autopilots anymore.” Heynderickx never thought she’d be a full-time musician. It’s not that she didn’t want to — she even learned a classical guitar audition piece to study music in college but never went to the audition — it’s just that no one ever “said it was a

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FOLKS FEST from Page 19

good idea,” she says. “Sometimes it feels good to just write Her career is somewhat of a happen- for yourself and you know when songs stance, birthed, in part, by the kindness are just for you,” she says. “And you of friends who invited her to open for know when songs could be a ripple effect them at bars during “small mental break for other people and those are the ones downs” in college, she says, despite the you want to share.” fact that she was underage. Haley Heynderickx, Saturday, Aug. “I just finally felt joy for the first time 17, 3:30 p.m. Heynderickx will also be an as an adult through music,” she says. instructor at the Song School Aug. 11-15. She first started singing at the age of four, bribed by her mom with Kraft singles to perform karaoke at Filipino parties. Her mom, she explains, is a rambunctious Fillipina, which contrasts the quieter, introverted Heynderickx, who enjoys silence and solitude, especially while writt its most basic, making art is about ing music. following what’s luminous to you “To be able to create and feel at and putting it in a jar, to share with peace and to feel like I can talk with my others,” writes Ben Folds in his new, and creative, I have to be very alone,” she first, book: A Dream about Lightning says. But then, she takes the songs on Bugs: A Life of Music and Cheap the road, singing them in front of hunLessons. dreds of people And art, BEN FOLDS BY ANTHONY SCARLATI each night, talkFolds maining to dozens of tains, is worth fans about them fighting for. afterwards, rareThe last ly finding a time I saw moment to herFolds live, he self. performed with It’s an odd the Colorado Symphony contradiction to Orchestra on live she says, Nov. 12, 2016, but we all live a just days after life of paradoxDonald Trump’s es. We all know election. we’re going to Performing his die, yet try to Concerto for make each day Piano and in this life meanOrchestra, Folds didn’t sing any of the ingful. She wishes she didn’t have to rock songs that made him famous as part charge for shows, that her art could be of the trio Ben Folds Five. Nor did he play free, but charging for shows has given any of his numerous solo works, most of her the most financial stability she’s ever which showcase his iconic storytelling experienced. The irony in her first album talk-sing style. But his dynamism still is that its success has given her the space and time to actually start a garden. shone as he sat at the grand piano center stage, his fingers bouncing over the “The paradoxes makes me laugh at keys with force. the tension that’s all around us,” she After the standing ovation, acknowlsays. “And I think the tension is what creedgment of the conductor and multiple ates a lot of the beautiful art around the bows (standard in any symphony perforworld.” mance) Folds grabbed the mic to speak. She recently witnessed a hummingHe made an impassioned plea urging the bird tuck its beak in too-tiny a flower, causing it to break off the stem and sit on audience to continue supporting the symphony and all of the arts amid rumors of the bird like a top hat. As she watched it drastic funding cuts to the National float around the yard in panic, Heynderickx began writing a “really dumb Endowment for the Arts. I can’t remember exactly what he song,” she says. said, but what I do remember is the way It may become her next hit, or it may the bearded rock singer from North never see the light of day, reserved for Carolina engaged the diverse audience herself and unshared with the rest of the — everyone from seasoned symphony world.

Ben Folds

by Angela K. Evans

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ticket holders dressed to the nines to jean-clad Gen Xers and millennials lifting up their drinks in agreement. This is a guy who can speak the language of the people, who can make us laugh and think all in a matter of seconds. Folds’ career has been anything but conventional over the last two and a half decades or so. He’s following a winding path of writing, recording and touring both with Ben Folds Five and on his own, interspersed with collaborative projects as varied as writing the arrangements for William Shatner’s Has Been, or music for lyrics written by book authors like Nick Hornsby and Neil Gaiman. His last release was 2015’s So There, a collection of chamber pop ballads with the yMusic ensemble and a piano concerto performed with the Nashville Symphony. All along the way, Folds has continued to tour, playing all of his hits as well as often improvising songs on stage. Recently, he made headlines by performing a mostly instrumental piece aimed at the Speaker of the House Mitch McConnell in New York. Entitled “Moskow Mitch,” he sang the tagline and trending Twitter topic due to McConnell’s blocking of election security bills, with a stutter in the style of “My Sharona.” But Folds doesn’t just make impassioned speeches or sing about politics. He’s committed to seeing funding for the arts, arts education and music therapy continue and advocates through his work with the Americans for the Arts Action Fund. He’s also hosting a podcast, ArtsVote 2020 with a quest to interview every Democratic presidential nominee about how arts and arts education have personally influenced them, and seeking to understand their vision for advancing the arts in the future. While he has acknowledged this may not be the most pressing issue of the day, or a topic that will make its way to the debate stage, Folds is committed to keeping the arts a part of our everyday life. As he said in a press release announcing the podcast, “The more work I do as an arts advocate, the more convinced I am of the importance of investing in the arts, not only for its obvious cultural benefits, but for the positive measurable impact it has on our economy and on how our children learn in school, as well as the health and wellbeing of all those who come into contact with the arts.” Ben Folds, Saturday, Aug. 17, 9 p.m. see FOLKS FEST Page 23

AUGUST 8, 2019

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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BOULDER WEEKLY


FOLKS FEST from Page 21

Dr. Ysaÿe Barnwell and The War and Treaty by John Lehndorff

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t can be confusing for former Christians — your card-carrying liberal agnostics — when they have to admit that they really miss gospel music. They secretly love singing in the congregation, the power of the choirs, hymns and chants. They feel a little sheepish when they get misty-eyed during gospel songs at bluegrass festivals. Secretly, they know all the words. These folks miss the feeling and the healing, not necessarily the sin and religion, and now there is solid science showing why. Research indicates that singing in groups triggers the release of serotonin and oxytocin, the bonding hormone. Communal singing can even synchronize heart beats. It makes participants feel better, especially when they are singing about good news, which is literally what “gospel” means. That deep feeling will be shared on Sunday, Aug. 18 at the Folks Festival in two very different guises: One quieter and brainier, one loud, emotional and raw, and both deeply soulful. Both Dr. Ysaÿe Barnwell and the remarkable couple that forms The War and Treaty manage to lift willing hearts of all spiritual persuasions. The day starts with a folk music icon who last graced the stage eight years ago with the African American a cappella ensemble she helped found, Sweet Honey in the Rock. Attendees need to come ready to sing, even if they think they have terrible voices and it’s too early in the a.m. to think, never mind harmonize. Barnwell is a professor, author and composer/arranger, but her greatest gift may be in building vocal communities. She leads workshops that get people in touch with their own voices by singing together. Barnwell teaches what she calls “sacred songs,” the African American spirituals, uplifting hymns and songs from the Civil Rights era. She has a preacher’s zeal for inducing reluctant singers to harBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

THE WAR AND THE TREATY BY DAVID MCCLISTER

baptize themselves in the cold rushing creek running alongside the site. The Trotters’ sets are less concerts than tent revival meetings — but without the hell fire and damnation. “There is a misconception that gospel means shouting and screaming and moaning. It belongs to the spirit. Religion is something that man created,” Trotter says. “We suspend the ideology and extend an invitation to the spirit. That’s what I love, when everybody feels like they’ve had church without feeling bad,” he says. It harkens back to Trotter’s childhood. “I just remember as a child watching my mother sing in church and seeing people’s reaction to the music — the tears and the joy. I learned that music has an emotional place in our lives. I think that music DR. YSAYE BARNWELL COURTESY OF YSAYE BARNWELL speaks to a part of us as humans that is not being touched very much anymore,” he says. The band’s inspirations are wideranging. “My musical heroes include Nina Simone and Al Green. Pete Seeger is definitely one. Of course, Sweet Honey in the Rock and my favorite artist of all time, Mr. Ray Charles. I love the spirituality of Aretha and Johnny Cash’s story,” he says. The War and Treaty arrived at its band name during a heated marital monize and feel that rush. But it is notadisagreement. “We’re passionate people. bly spiritual, not dogmatic. Tanya and I were arguing about me A different sort of catharsis — the good news of love — takes over the festi- changing the name of the band again. val in the evening. The War and Treaty is She said, ‘Calm down, this is not a war and we’re not here to sign a peace treanot a sit-on-the-tarp-and-politely-clap ty.’ I said, ‘That’s the name.’ She liked it, acoustic act. It’s a full blast, stand up, too,” he says. sweat, moan and smile kind of electric Michael Trotter says it’s time for the band. Fronted by Michael and Tanya Trotter, next generation to testify about hope. “It’s our turn to figure out how to fight hate who met in Afghanistan, The War and and build love. I love Nat King Cole Treaty stew somewhere in the midst of soul, gospel and Americana. “It’s our duty because he always fought it with joy, with a smile,” Trotter says, adding that he is to give everything we have every night not discouraged by the daily horror on the when we walk on stage,” Michael Trotter says. They face the audience with larger- news. “I am absolutely hopeful that things than-life emotional vulnerability, leaving can change for the better,” he says. the audience spent and experiencing a Likewise, Barnwell boils it down to transcendent communal hug. four guiding principles in her biography. The duo’s debut album, Healing Tide, • To whom much is given, much is produced by Nashville’s Buddy Miller, required. includes guests like Emmylou Harris. It’s • As one door closes, another door opens. packed with rousing, direct anthems • Everything matters. including “Love Like There’s No • Say Yes! Tomorrow” and “Are You Ready to Love Ysaÿe Barnwell: Sacred Songs. Me?” They are evangelists of affection. Sunday, Aug. 18, 11 a.m. The War and The War and Treaty’s “Down to the Treaty. Sunday, Aug. 18, 5 p.m. River” will likely send festival-goers to I

AUGUST 8, 2019

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


COURTESY OF HIGH ROAD TOURING

see EVENTS Page 26

Indigo Girls.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

5:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9, Steinbaugh Pavilion, Louisville.

Don’t miss the last Louisville Downtown Street Faire of 2019, featuring soulful blues guitarist Samantha Fish. Fish is currently touring material from her sixth solo album, ‘Kill Or Be Kind,’ set to be released on Sept. 20. The album explores themes of vulnerability, like on the track “Bulletproof,” and the tightrope walk it often takes to achieve dreams in “You Got It Bad.” Indie rock band The Still Tide will be opening up for Fish. Grab a cold drink, peruse the arts and crafts, let the kiddos burn some energy at a plethora of kid’s activities and soak in the last of summer’s glory. JK

EN

2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 11, Acres of Opportunity Ranch 4338, N. 109th St., Lafayette.

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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Colorado Brazil Fest is the largest festival of its kind in Colorado, and also one of the largest in the nation. The festival is hosted by Boulder Samba School, which is dedicated to promoting the heritage of Brazilian music, dance and culture. Kick the festival off with free performances by Boulder Samba School’s Bateria Alegria and special guests Luciana Da Silva, Tânia Santiago, Bella Diva, Samba Colorado and Capoeira Canavial. But the fun doesn’t stop there. On Sunday, Aug. 11, from 1-5:30 p.m., Boulder Beer Company will host an outdoor Brazilian barbeque and samba jam. There are more events in Denver and Broomfield. Get tickets and more info at coloradobrazilfest.org. N AI

FACE TO FACE: EQUINE THERAPY FUNDRAISER FEATURING FACE VOCAL BAND.

LOUISVILLE DOWNTOWN STREET FAIRE.

GA F

6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9, Pearl Street Mall, between 13th and 14th streets, Boulder, 303-960-8972.

ALYS SE

COLORADO BRAZIL FEST: SAMBA ON THE MALL.

6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9, Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

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VIA

The Healing Hoof Foundation presents FACE Vocal Band in concert at Acres of Opportunity Ranch to benefit veterans with PTSD and abused children in our community. This is a funfor-the-whole-family day featuring animals, food trucks, a local business marketplace, face painting, temporary tattoos and more. Healing Hoof is a nonprofit operating out of Boulder, funding local equine therapy for those who need it but cannot otherwise obtain it. Visit healinghoof.org for info and tickets.

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LIVE MUSIC!

arts Abstracted Facts — Digital systems in design, painting and sculpture. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1.

The Fists of the Proletariat The Tune Up at Full Cycle Friday, August 9 7–10 PM Happy Hour till 7pm No cover 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tuneupboulder.com

Amuse Yeux: A Small Delight For The Eyes. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through Sept. 15. Clark Richert: Pattern and Dimensions. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 15. Climate Ribbon. Boulder Public Library, Arapahoe Ramp, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Aug. 28. Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17.

Fiber Art by Dianna VanderDoes. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Sept. 6. Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing exhibit.

12:30 PM

Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit.

7:00 PM

Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change.

8:30 PM

The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9.

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS BELLA GAIA - BEAUTIFUL EARTH LIQUID SKY: DAVID BOWIE

THE CLIMATE RIBBON, featured along the Boulder Public Library’s Arapahoe Ramp, is an interactive story-sharing project. People write what they love and could lose due to climate change and add it to the wall. Come add your story and check out what others have written, through Aug. 28.

A·MAZE·D. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 1.

Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17.

THURSDAY AUGUST 8

COURTESY BOULDER PUBLIC LIBRARY

Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18.

of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8.

The Light Show. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through May 2020.

ReLove: Colorado Mosaic Artists Group Exhibit. Bricolage Gallery, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. Through Aug. 17.

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. The museum has numerous permanent and temporary exhibits.

Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture. Longmont Museum, 350 Kimbark St., Longmont. Through Jan. 5, 2020.

MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/ event/monumental/.

Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 25.

PACK-IT-UP. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 23. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum

Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through January 2020. Watercolor by Anne Gifford. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Sept. 6.

FRIDAY AUGUST 9 8:00 PM

EVENTS from Page 25

9:30 PM

THURSDAY, AUGUST 8

INCOMING! LASER THAT 80’S SHOW 11:00 PM

LASER QUEEN

Backstreet Boys: DNA World Tour. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

SATURDAY AUGUST 10

‘Bella Gaia: Beautiful Earth.’ 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. More at colorado.edu/fiske/

1:00 PM

WE ARE STARS & LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 8:30 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 10:00 PM

LIQUID SKY: PRETTY LIGHTS SUNDAY AUGUST 11 1:00 PM

LIFE OF TREES & HABITAT EARTH 2:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES 4:00 PM

INCOMING! 7:30 PM

COSMIC KIRTAN CONNECTION

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 26

Music

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Billy Joel. 8 p.m. Coors Field, 2001 Blake St., Denver, 303-292-0200. Danny Shafer Duo. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Jd Simo + Charley Crockett. 8 p.m. FMQB Free Outdoor Stage on the Hill, 13th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, Boulder. Keane + Tyler Childers + Jade Bird. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with Molly Tuttle & Special Guests. 5:45 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Songwriter Hour featuring Rebecca Folsom and Mark Oblinger. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

AUGUST 8, 2019

Summer Music Series. 7 p.m. Georgia Boys BBQ, 250 Third Ave., Longmont, 720-999-4099. Z-Cry of Luv: Jimi Hendrix Tribute. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Events Aerial Dance Festival 2019. 9 a.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Through Aug. 9. Dave Chappelle & Jon Stewart. 8 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway. Knights of Valour Jousting. 7 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Suite 200, Longmont, 720-864-6460. Open Mic — with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 Music Abear — Jerry Garcia Memorial Weekend. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Big Head Todd & The Monsters + Pete Yorn + Willa Amai Featuring Linda Perry. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Clare Thérèse. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Commonheart featuring special guest James Casey (Trey Anastasio Band) — with Two Faces West and special guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Erisy Watt. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Fast Heart Mart. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Felonius Smith Trio. 7 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids & Solids, 1555 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 303-485-9400. Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Many Mountains. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Mark Oblinger High Water Line Album Release Concert. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 212-777-6727. see EVENTS Page 28

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


words THURSDAY, AUG. 8 AFTER A LIFETIME in book publishing, Peter Guzzardi had edited a remarkable group of diverse authors. Yet everything he’d learned from working with them felt oddly familiar. One day it suddenly became clear: all that wisdom had its roots in a film he’d watched as a child, ‘The Wizard of Oz.’ Guzzardi will speak about and sign his new book, ‘Emeralds of Oz: Lessons from Over the Rainbow,’ on Monday, Aug. 12 at 7:30 p.m. at Boulder Bookstore.

Mark Pleiss — April Warnings. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, AUG. 9 Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SUNDAY, AUG. 11 BAFS ‘Second Sundays’ Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

MONDAY, AUG. 12 Peter Guzzardi — Emeralds of Oz. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, AUG. 13 Kate Leddy and Bri G. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. The Living Poets Society Poetry Bookclub Meeting — Best American Poetry 2018. 7 p.m.

Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Erica Witsell — Give. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 26

Music and Movement. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849.

Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

Dave Coile’s Co-Writer Showcase. 6 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Neal Francis + Wilder Woods. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Fun on the Farm: Worms: Cow-a-Palooza. 9:30 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Ute Highway, Longmont, 303-776-8688.

Free Opera in the Park. 7 p.m. Boulder Bandshell, 1212 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 303-731-2036.

Nijal Brix Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Joe List. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Aug. 10.

Hooligan’s Holiday & Infestation 303. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Passafire — with Of Good Nature. 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488.

‘Land through the Lens’ Exhibit Opening and Show. 5 p.m. The Great Frame-Up, 430 Main St., Longmont.

Jerry Garcia Memorial Show — Peak2Peak. 2:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Scarab: The Journey Experience. 8 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303665-2757.

Lust in Space, a Bowieburlesque Show. 7:30 p.m. Speakeasy, 301 Main St., Longmont, 443-603-6233.

Jukebox Hero (Live Music). 8 p.m. Liquid Mechanics Brewing, 297 N. Highway 287, Suite 100, Lafayette, 303-908-6036.

Shane Smith & The Saints. 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666.

Mutton Bustin. 3 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Suite 200, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

Soul Sacrifice: A Tribute to Santana. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Pro Bulls Tour. 7:30 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Suite 200, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

Little Song Circle for Infants and Toddlers: Second and Fourth. 9:30 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-443-3934.

Unlimited Gravity (EP Release) — with FunkStatik, MZG, Mom N Dad and special guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

SPARK! Tours for Individuals with Memory Loss. 10 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

The Well Intentioned. 10 p.m. LOCO Gastropub, 380 Main St., Longmont.

Views at the Muse: Salsa & Soul Rooftop Fiesta. 5 p.m. The Boulder Museum, 2205 Broadway, Boulder, 609-284-514.

Zac Brown Band: The Owl Tour. 7 p.m. Coors Field, 2001 Blake St., Denver, 303-292-0200. Events Art Night Out. 5 p.m. Festival Plaza, 311 S. Public Road, Lafayette. Cosplay and Costumes Camp. 9 a.m. Museum of Boulder at the Tebo Center, 2205 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-449-3464. Evening at the Museum. 7 p.m. Nederland Mining Museum, 200 N. Bridge St., Nederland, 303-258-7332.

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 10 Music The ‘Cats. 7 p.m. Por Wine House, 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville, 720-666-1386. Bitterroot. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Corrosion of Conformity —with Crowbar, Quaker City Night Hawks, Lo-Pan. 6:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

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Lost Dog ensemble. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Melodime. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Mo Lowda & The Humble. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. The Mother Hips — with Grant Farm. 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Noche de Peña. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Pushing Chain. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. RESPECT Vol 7 (Women’s Wrestling). 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. see EVENTS Page 30

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


- EDUCATIONAL ADVERTISEMENT -

Why Haven’t Senior Homeowners Been Told These Facts?

Keep reading if you own a home in the U.S. and were born before 1957. It’s a well-known fact that for many senior citizens in the U.S. their home is their single biggest asset, often accounting for more than 50% of their total net worth. Yet, according to new statistics from the mortgage industry, senior homeowners in the U.S. are now sitting on more than 6.9 trillion dollars* of unused home equity. With people now living longer than ever before and home prices back up again, ignoring this “hidden wealth” may prove to be short sighted. All things considered, it’s not surprising that more than a million homeowners have already used a government-insured Home Equity Conversion Mortgage or “HECM” loan to turn their home equity into extra cash for retirement. However, today, there are still millions of eligible

Although today’s HECM loans have been improved to provide even greater financial protection for homeowners, there are still many misconceptions. For example, a lot of

for everyone, they can be a real lifesaver for senior homeowners. The cash from a HECM loan can be used for any purpose. Many people use the money to save on interest charges by paying off credit cards or other high-interest loans. Other common uses include making home improvements, paying off medical bills or helping other family members. Some people simply need the extra cash for everyday expenses while others are now using it as a “safety net”for financial emergencies. If you’re a homeowner

Request a FREE Info Kit & DVD Today! Call 1-800-791-1598 now. homeowners who could benefit from this FHAinsured loan but may simply not be aware of this “retirement secret.” Some homeowners think HECM loans sound “too good to be true.” After all, you get the cash you need out of your home but you have no more monthly mortgage payments. It’s a fact: no monthly mortgage payments are required with a government-insured HECM loan; however the homeowners are still responsible for paying for the maintenance of their home, property taxes, homeowner’s insurance and, if required, their HOA fees. Another fact many are not aware of is that HECM reverse mortgages first took hold when President Reagan signed the FHA Reverse Mortgage Bill into law 31 years ago in order to help senior citizens remain in their homes. Today, HECM loans are simply an effective way for homeowners 62 and older to get the extra cash they need to enjoy retirement.

people mistakenly believe the home must be paid off in full in order to Our new Reverse Mortgage infomation guides & DVD are now available qualify for a HECM loan, which is not the case. In fact, featuring award-winnng actor and paid AAG spokesman, Tom Selleck one key advantage of a HECM is that the proceeds will first be used to pay off any age 62 or older, you owe it to yourself to learn more so existing liens on the property, which frees up cash flow, that you can make an informed decision. a huge blessing for seniors living on a fixed income. You may be pleasantly surprised by what you Unfortunately, many senior homeowners who might be discover when you call AAG for more information better off with HECM loan don’t even bother to get today. more information because of rumors they’ve heard. That’s a shame because HECM loans are helping Homeowners who are interested in learning many senior homeowners live a better life. more can request a FREE 2019 Reverse In fact, a recent survey by American Advisors Group (AAG), the nation’s number one HECM Mortgage Information Kit and DVD by lender, found that over 97% of their clients are satisfied calling toll-free at 1-800-791-1598 with their loans. While these special loans are not

*Source:https://www.mpamag.com/market-update/senior-home-equity-has-grown-to-6-9-trillion-112295.aspx A reverse mortgage increases the principal mortgage loan amount and decreases home equity (it is a negative amortization loan). AAG works with other lenders and fnancial institutions that offer reverse mortgages. To process your request for a reverse mortgage, AAG may forward your contact information to such lenders for your consideration of reverse mortgage programs that they offer Reverse mortgage loan terms include occupying the home as your primary residence, maintaining the home, paying property taxes and homeowners insurance. Although these costs may be substantial, AAG does not establish an escrow account for these payments. However, a set-aside account can be set up for taxes and insurance, and in some cases may be required. Not all interest on a reverse mortgage is taxdeductible and to the extent that it is, such deduction is not available until the loan is partially or fully repaid AAG charges an origination fee, mortgage insurance premium (where required by HUD), closing costs and servicing fees, rolled into the balance of the loan. AAG charges interest on the balance, which grows over time. When the last borrower or eligible non-borrowing spouse dies, sells the home, permanently moves out, or fails to comply with the loan terms, the loan becomes due and payable (and the property may become subject to foreclosure). When this happens, some or all of the equity in the property no longer belongs to the borrowers, who may need to sell the home or otherwise repay the loan balance.V2019.04.17 NMLS# 9392 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). American Advisors Group (AAG) is headquartered at 3800 W. Chapman Ave., 3rd & 7th Floors, Orange CA, 92868 (Regulated by the Division of Real Estate; to check the license status of your mortgage loan originator, visit http://www.dora.state.co.us/real-estate/index.htm) These materials are not from HUD or FHA and were not approved by HUD or a government agency.


EVENTS from Page 28

The Rolling Stones: 2019 No Filter Tour. 7:30 p.m. Broncos Stadium at Mile High, 1701 Bryant St., Denver, 720-258-3000. Sal & Swing Shift. 7 p.m. Collision Brewing Company, 1436 Skyway Drive, Longmont, 720-996-1850. Shane Smith & The Saints. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

theater STEN PORSE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Timmah Ostdiek. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Unauthorized Absence. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Events Blackgrass Metal Fest. 2 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Demolition Derby. 5 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Suite 200, Longmont, 720-864-6460. Fiber Fest 2019. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Heritage Lecture Series: The Evolution of Preservation. 2 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 11 Music Colorado Brazil Fest: Outdoor BBQ and Samba Jam. 1 p.m. Boulder Beer Company, 2880 Wilderness Place, Boulder, 303-960-8972. Cosmic Kirtan Connection. 7:30 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Crik Wooder (Acoustic). 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Decrepit Birth. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. George & Me: Bill Bartus performs George M. Cohan. 7 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075. It Happened When: a show about falling in love with performing. 7 p.m. Boulder Piano Gallery, 3111 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-449-3177. karaj lost coast. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. KARINA ‘La Voz’. 7 p.m. Su Teatro Cultural & Performing Arts Center, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, 303-296-0219. Kindo. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Layers of Pink. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Music Of The Beatles For Kids. 11 a.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

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As You Like It. University Theater, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through Aug. 10. Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21. Chicago. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Studio Loft, 1345 Champa St., Denver. Through Aug. 25. Emma. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Aug. 18. Fame The Musical. 7 p.m. The Spark Theatre, 4847 Pearl St., Suite B4, Boulder. Through Aug. 10. Fairfield. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington St., Golden. Through Aug. 18. The Great American Trailer Park — presented by Equinox Theater Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through Aug. 31. It’s Not Me, It’s You — presented by The Second City. Denver Center for Performing Arts, 1345 Champa St., Garner Galleria Theater. Through Aug. 25. King Charles III. University Theatre Building 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through Aug. 11. The Last Apple Tree — presented by The Catamounts. Semper Farm, northwest corner of 92nd Avenue and Pierce Street, Westminster. Through Aug. 11.

Patio Blues & BBQ with The Lionel Young Band. 2 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Strings & Stories with Grahame Lesh. 6:30 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Events Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Boulder Market. 11 a.m. Central Park, 1236 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 720-272-7467. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Truck & Tractor Pull. 4 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Suite 200, Longmont, 720-864-6460.

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THE LAST APPLE TREE is an original, site-specific musical celebrating the legacy of one farm homestead in Westminster, Colorado. Audience members will travel in small groups around this farm, once owned by the Semper and Allison families, and now belonging to the people of Westminster. Through original vignettes by Jessica Austgen and new music by Bonnie and Taylor Simms, travel through time, celebrating how one piece of land can carry generations of memories and promise for the future. The Catamounts presents ‘The Last Apple Tree’ Aug. 8-Aug. 11, cityofwestminster.ticketspice.com/thelast-apple-tree Les Miserables (school edition). Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Aug. 10-Sept. 15. The Merry Wives of Windsor — presented by Longmont Theatre Company. Appearing at indoor and outdoor venues across the northern Front Range. Through Aug. 11, longmonttheatre.org Mixed Taste. Seawell Ballroom, Denver Center for Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver. Through Aug. 21.

PORSE Nunsense. Jesters Dinner Theatre,STEN 224 Main St., VIA WIKIMEDIA COM Longmont. Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday matinees, through Sept. 29. Our Town. — presented by CenterStage Theatre Company. Starting at Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville. Through Aug. 11. Richard III. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Aug. 17. Romeo and Juliet. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, University of Colorado. Through Aug. 10. Shorn. Theater Company of Lafayette, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. Through Aug. 17. Tarzan The Musical. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Aug. 25. Twelfth Night. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, Boulder. Through Aug. 11.

MONDAY, AUGUST 12 Music Bluegrass Potluck Live Music. 6:30 p.m. La Vita Bella Cafe, 471 Main St., Longmont, 720-204-4525. Dan Martin. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Jazz Workshop and Jam Session. 6:30 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Judy Collins. 6:30 p.m. Denver Botanic Gardens - York Street, 1007 York St., Denver, 720-865-3500. Pushing Chain. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. see EVENTS Page 33

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BEN FOLDS • VIOLENT FEMMES • ANI DIFRANCO JOSH RITTER & THE ROYAL CITY BAND MANDOLIN ORANGE • ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES THE OH HELLOS • THE EAST POINTERS • PATTY LARKIN THE WAR AND TREATY • THE STEEL WHEELS HALEY HEYNDERICKX • GASOLINE LOLLIPOPS • ELLIS THE SMALL GLORIES • DANIEL RODRIGUEZ LAURA CORTESE & THE DANCE CARDS • KIRA SMALL SON OF TOWN HALL • SONGWRITER SHOWCASE YSAYE BARNWELL: SACRED SONGS • & MANY MORE

FOLKSFESTIVAL.COM • 800.624.2422 BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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FRINGE FEST COURTESY OF BOULDER FRINGE FEST

It’s Fringe Fest time in Boulder once again (Aug. 14-25), a time to celebrate independently produced performance arts of all stripes, from magic shows to musicals to dance troupes to cabaret and everything in-between. New this year: Kid’s Fringe. As usual the lineup of shows is extensive and intriguing, so grab an All-Pass ($190) and, well, see it all. But if you can’t see it all, here are a few shows we think you shouldn’t dare miss. Most shows are at Pine Street Church, 1237 Pine St., Boulder. The Gospel of Sherilyn Fenn (PG-13) — Brad Lawrence (New York, New York). The Parlour, Pine Street Church, Aug 15, 17, 18, 23, 25. Tickets $10-12. This is the true story of how Brad Lawerence survived his childhood in the ’80s, through the rise of the moral majority and methamphetamine, the terrors of nuclear destruction and coping with the suicide of a sibling by escaping into pop culture. It’s My Penis and I’ll Cry If I Want To (PG13) — Jamie Black (Chicago). The Playroom, Pine Street Church, Aug. 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, 23. Tickets $13-15. Trans actor Jamie Black gives you a lesson on why gender norms suck. Black’s show explores different relationships where gender norms were thrown out the window. The Thousandth Night (All ages) — Sean Yael-Cox (San Diego). The Playroom, Pine Street Church, Aug. 21-25. Tickets are $6-8. It’s occupied Paris, 1943, and an actor has been arrested for distributing subversive material. When his train is sabotaged by members of the French resistance, he’s got one shot at freedom. Playing 38 characters from ‘The Arabian Nights,’ Yael-Cox examines complicity and self-preservation. CRAPSHOOT! Or Why I Voted for Trump: a love story (PG-13) — Todd Blakesley (San

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Diego). Fellowship Hall, Pine Street Church, Aug. 15, 16, 18, 19, 22, 23. Tickets are $8-10. Actor Todd Blakesley plays Al Stone, a political naif who’s never voted before the 2016 election. Encouraged by his multiethnic coworkers, Stone decides to vote this time around, and casts his ballot for the candidate who impresses him most. Janice: Not Your N Word (R) — Michael Anthony jones (Boulder). Fellowship Hall, Pine Street Church, Aug. 15, 17, 19, 22, 24, 25. Tickets are $8-10. Naropa University Kerouac School graduate poet, DJ and dancer Michael Anthony jones brings this multidisciplinary piece back to the Fringe for a second year. He addresses issues of marginalization via class and race as they play out in contemporary America and in communities like Boulder. Puppetry with Viewpoints Workshop — Katy Williams. Rocky Mountain Theatre for Kids, 5311 Western Ave., Suite 135, Boulder. Monday, Aug. 12, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Cost: $40. Ages 9-14. Kiddos to learn the basics of puppetry using household items. Everybody leaves with their very own puppet. Mix-Tape (Vol. 1) — Boulder Fringe and Band of Toughs. Fellowship Hall, Pine Street Church, Aug. 24, 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Surprises abound, for audience and performers alike, in this multidisciplinary collaboration. Hip-Hop Workshop — Block 1750 (Boulder). Fellowship Hall, Pine Street Church, Aug. 17, 8:15 a.m.-noon. Free. Block 1750 is offering this free hip-hop class for Fringers of all ages. For a full schedule of events, visit boulderfringe. com.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EVENTS from Page 30

Taj Mahal Quartet & Marc Cohn with Blind Boys of Alabama. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Events Adobe Premiere Pro Video Editing Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Bourbon & Blues with the Delta Sonics. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Daniel Caesar — Case Study 01 Tour. 8 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Rabblefish. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

303-441-3100.

Take Down The Door. 6:30 p.m. Four Mile Historic Park, 715 S. Forest St., Denver, 720-865-0800.

Midday Music Meditation. 12 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

This Year [a new musical], by Elle Tyler. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-2064.

Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Events

Pollinator Appreciation: Explore with Your Pollinator Journals and the BeeChicas. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Cosmology and Modern Physics. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder,

Psychedelica — GoodCinema. 5:30 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse Sloans Lake, 4255 W. Colfax Ave., Denver, 985-285-9998.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 13 Music An Acoustic Evening — with John Hiatt. 6:30 p.m. Denver Botanic Gardens - York Street, 1007 York St., Denver, 720-865-3500. Brandon ‘Taz’ Niederauer. 7:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

HIGH ALTITUDE CRAFT PIES BUILT IN BOULDER

Ciarra Fragale & Ami Madeleiene. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Bringing the traditional savory pie culture of New Zealand to America. We don’t use words like organic or natural, we just call it food.

Golden West to host musical performance by Community Recorder Consort. 4:30 p.m. Golden West Senior Living, 1055 Adams Circle, Boulder. Jocelyn Medina. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Kevin Boehnke. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Open Mic — with Andy Eppler at Grossen Bart. 6 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Pilfers. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Rochelle Riser. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Events Adobe Premiere Pro Video Editing Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568.

Our classic SPICED PEACH PIE available during PEACH FEST! AND our chef-made all butter pastry will be available to make YOUR OWN PEACH PIES!

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14 Music Beach Goons. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Blackfoot Gypsies. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Open Sunday through Thursday 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM Friday and Saturday 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM 105 North Public Road, Lafayette, Colorado (720) 845-2155 I

AUGUST 8, 2019

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VICTOR DUBREUIL VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS Friday august 9

unlimited gravity

w/ Funkstatik, mZg, mom n dad & since Juleye

Friday august 16

40oZ to Freedom

(sublime tribute) w/ lil’ ween (ween tribute) PerForming “the mollusk” & Xoa

saturday august 17

Zebbler encanti eXPerience

w/ sumthin sumthin (lost dogZ), untitld (lost dogZ), Zerogravity & Future Joy

thursday august 22

stunna 4 vegas

Feat blacc Zacc, derrick royce, mi$Fits & tahathakidd

Friday august 23

isaiah sharkey

(d’angelo/John mayer/cory henry) w/ Juice Feat Patrick harvey (cycles), eric luba (analog son), sean dandurand (dandu), collin o’brien (low sPark/cycles) & ghost taPes

saturday august 24

bass Physics

w/ coFresi, megan hamilton & catParty

thursday august 29

bone diggers

Paul simon’s greatest hits eXPlored Feat lebo (alo), JenniFer hartswick & James casey (trey anastasio band), reed mathis (golden gate wingmen), JeFF Franca (thievery corPoration), danny eisenberg & scott rager w/ heartbyrne (talking heads tribute)

Friday august 30

the Phunk sessions Phish late night

Feat george Porter Jr (the meters), robert walter (mike gordon), craig brodhead, michelangelo carubba & shira ellis (turkuaZ), lyle divinsky, drew sayers & Parris Fleming (the motet)

thursday august 8

the billy Failing band

w/ 300 days, dirty grass Players (Patio set) & Pierce edens (Patio set)

Friday august 9

the commonheart

Feat James casey (trey anastasio band) w/ two Faces west & genuine reverie

saturday august 10

delvon lamarr organ trio & neal Francis w/ the soltones on the Patio: hachey’s haus (homemade songs & beats From scott hachey oF magic beans)

wednesday august 14 re: search

artiFakts

w/ thug scouts (Feat members oF temPlo & beak nasty), midicinal & Jordan Polovina

thursday august 15

Pick & howl

w/ Julian davis & the situation (oF JeFF austin band – Patio set), buFFalo commons (late set), tara rose & the real deal (Patio set)

Friday august 16

collidoscoPe & melody lines

w/ telemetry, Floatgoat & mr. bugatti

saturday august 17

a deitch Family aFFair

Feat adam deitch & Friends (adam deitch – lettuce, borahm lee – break science, adam “shmeeams) smirnoFF – lettuce & hunter roberts – dom lalli’s bluebird quintet) & bobby deitch band

tuesday august 20

the tomorrow PeoPle

Feat Parris Fleming (the motet), garrett sayers (the motet), isaac teel (tauk) & chris beck (Jaden carlson band) w/ Fat tuesday house band Feat casey russell (magic beans), will trask (analog son), sean dandurand (dandu) & aleX caZet

Saturday auguSt 31 • poSt phiSh Show

wednesday august 21

Feat dominic lalli (big gigantic), Joey Porter (the motet), garrett sayers (the motet), dave watts (the motet) & dan schwindt (kyle hollingsworth band)

w/ eXo (late set), great dane & Jordan Polovina

herbie hancock tribute

Friday sePtember 6

inFekt, mvrda & samPliFire thursday & Friday sePtember 12-13

suicidegirls

blackheart burlesque

saturday sePtember 14

the movement

w/ ProJect 432, arise roots, a-mac & the height

Friday September 20 • dual venue! balloon PoP

waX tailor (dJ set), blockhead

little PeoPle, yPPah, natasha kmeto, arms and sleePers, & cnJr

re: search

hucci

thursday august 22

that damn sasquatch

Pickin’ on talking heads Feat dave watts (the motet), tyler grant w/ katharsis Feat dave watts, chuck Jones (doPaPod) & marcus reZak, highland ramblers (Patio set), Jacob moss & matt Flaherty oF Park & Parcel (Patio set)

Friday august 23

mass relay

w/ notorious conduct (late set), kruZa kid, doZier, Patrick skyler & FoXy doPe

saturday august 24

the new orleans susPects & cris Jacobs band

saturday sePtember 21

w/ Jubilingo on the Patio: hachey’s haus (homemade songs & beats From scott hachey oF magic beans)

w/ the bordas brothers & Pruitt

wednesday august 28

mark Farina & christian martin wednesday sePtember 25 re: search

the geek X vrv

w/ Poldoore, Jordan Polovina & Juschill

Friday sePtember 27

eminence ensemble w/ dog city disco

re: search

dJ logic

w/ animated earth, Jordan Polovina & brisco Jones

wednesday sePtember 4 re: search

subdocta

sunday sePtember 29

w/ Jordan Polovina

saturday october 5

shira elias’ goods & services

aPPalachia on the rocks w/ the wooks, laid back country Picker & chelsea nolan

dr. Fresch

w/ angelZ, PunJahbae & miXed messages

sunday october 6

Pnb rock

w/ nocaP, rylo rodrigueZ

Friday & saturday october 11-12

the new mastersounds w/ ghost-note

wednesday october 16

Friday sePtember 6

guilty Pleasures

Feat megan letts (mama magnolia), ashley niven Fairman (tiger Party) w/ isaac teel (tauk), Jay cobb anderson & eric luba (many colors)

saturday sePtember 7

the collective

thursday sePtember 12

saturday october 19 cycles Presents

the game show

an interactive concert & game show eXPerience

Friday october 25

sonic blossom

Feat bluetech, sPoonbill, dynohunter, the librarian, laPa, hanover, k+lab, Phlo & Patrick skyler

saturday november 9

Time is money isn’t everything in it’s place and a place for everything counts count your blessings and don’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched especially if you put all your eggs in one basket case of mistaken identity is not your own you are your own fears the enemy within the hour of your death comes calling of the wild in the streets are paved with gold which it isn’t even though it glitters like a diamond in the rough riders on the storm of the century 21 is the legal drinking age of innocence lost and found a penny picked it up and all day long I had good luck of the draw upon experience is the best teacher may I be excused

Feat isaac teel (tauk), d-vibes, Joel gonZaleZ (big daddy kane), sasha brown & dan aFricano (John brown’s body)

erica Falls & boyFriend

(Faction ski Film denver Premiere)

by Lee Davidson

thursday sePtember 5

big k.r.i.t.

thursday october 17

Clichés

Jon wayne & the Pain wake uP & live – bob marley tribute

Boulder Weekly accepts poetry and flash fiction submissions at 450 words/35 lines or fewer and accompanied by a one sentence bio of the author. Send to poetry@boulderweekly.com.

Friday sePtember 13

ill.gates

w/ ahee, gangus & lowPro.

thursday sePtember 19

turkeyFoot

Feat mike robinson (railroad earth) w/ bowregard (Patio set), Jackie & the racket (late set), laney lou & the bird dogs (Patio set)

anders osborne teXt cervantes to 91944 For ticket giveaways, drink sPecials, discounted ticket Promotions & more

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2637 welton St • 303-297-1772 • Cervantesmasterpiece.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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ON THE BILL: tories of how movies get made are as varied as the ‘The Peanut Butter movies themselves. For Tyler Nilson and Michael Falcon.’ Century Schwartz, two first-time writer/directors, the story of Theatre, 1700 29th St., Boulder. Opens their debut feature goes back 13–14 years to an Aug. 9. apartment building along the Santa Monica beach where the two were neighbors. “I had just ridden my bike across the country, and I was like: ‘I want to make movies,” Schwartz says. Commercials really. Nilson had a similar goal, but his interest was surf films and acting. Neither dreamed of feature films, but both liked working with each other. Fast-forward five years and the two met Zack Gottsagen, a “person with Down syndrome,” to use Gottsagen’s parlance, at a camp for people with and without disabilities. “He had been acting his whole life and wanted to be a movie star,” Schwartz says. “It was his idea to make this film.” That film, The Peanut Butter Falcon, stars Gottsagen as Zak, an escapee from his North Carolina nursing home. Wanting to be a professional wrestler, Zak gives his caretaker (Dakota Johnson) the slip, searches for The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church) for lessons and crosses paths with Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), a down-on-his-luck fisherman. Winner of the audience award at 2019’s South by Southwest Film Festival, The Peanut Butter Falcon, is a feel-good story wrapped around a Mark Twain yarn. Nilson uses the word “sweet” to describe both Gottsagen in real life and his character. Schwartz focuses on the film’s tone, which is honest and authentic. But eight years ago, Nilson and Schwartz didn’t have anything more than Gottsagen and an idea. Thanks to a trip to the library, the two became self-taught writers. But without industry connections, they were still dead in the water. “We’re nobodies, man,” Nilson says with sincerity. “I was living in a tent. I was homeless at the time. We had a script that we knew, in our hearts, was really good. But other than that, we had nothing. Truly nothing.” Then, in late 2015, actor Josh Brolin posted on Instagram that his New Year’s resolution was to help people. So, Nilson and Schwartz sent him their script, and Brolin got the ball rolling. Before they knew it, Nilson and Schwartz had producers and actors ready to join their maiden voyage and work alongside Gottsagen. “He’s incredibly present,” Schwartz explains, pointing out that most of Zak’s dialogue comes courtesy of Gottsagen. “We knew he was talented,” Nilson says, “and we had to cleave out a way to show the world his talent.” “He has his own sort of charisma,” Schwartz adds. “The actors really responded well, and instantly became friends off-camera.” Watching Gottsagen on camera, it would be hard not to.

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Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz on making ‘The Peanut Butter Falcon’

8:00pm NO COVER

by Michael J. Casey

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF

PHOTOS BY STAFF

Homemade Biscotti

Maple Glazed Lamar’s Bar

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La Vita Bella Café 471 Main St. Longmont, longmontcoffee.com a Vita Bella Cafe is a cozy coffee shop/café/ bar nestled in the Experience Building in downtown Longmont, designed to draw people in and allow them to stay awhile. The menu here is expansive with breakfast treats, sandwiches, salads and tapas, along with Ampersand coffee and a full bar. On a recent afternoon, we couldn’t pass up the decadent homemade biscotti displayed on the counter to go along with our iced coffee. The twice-baked almond Italian cookie was both crisp and chewy, and the adornments of dark chocolate and almond slivers were satisfying. $3.

The Skip Scramble

Walnut Cafe 3073 Walnut St., Boulder; South-Side Walnut Cafe, 673 S. Broadway, Boulder; Super Mini Walnut Cafe, 2770 Arapahoe Road, Suite 116, Lafayette; walnutcafe.com

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n a recent visit to Boulder’s South Side Walnut Café we couldn’t help but order The Skip Scramble out of curiosity over the name. Who’s this mysterious (assumed) vegetarian named Skip that has secured his fame on the menu of one of Boulder’s favorite breakfast spots for over 30 years? Our server couldn’t say, but that didn’t stop us from ordering the dish. Two scrambled eggs are mixed with Cheddar cheese, an ample portion of mushrooms and some delicious veggie sausage that adds the right amount of salty texture to the dish. It’s served with two sides, and you can never go wrong with classic breakfast potatoes. Thanks Skip, whoever you are. $10.45.

Lamar’s Donuts 133 McCaslin Blvd., Louisville, lamars.com amar’s has been a prairie state staple since 1933, and we’re glad to have an outpost in Boulder County. The donuts are baked fresh daily and come in a variety of flavors and textures, and the coffee is always piping hot. In short, it’s everything a donut shop should be. We opted for the massive maple glazed Lamar’s bar on a recent trip, a long, airy, chewy pastry topped with maple frosting and chocolate. It’s an indulgent way to start your morning, but every bite is worth it. It’s not too sweet, the bite is substantial and the maple flavoring is well apportioned. $2.

Black Pepper Chicken

Bao Asian Fusion & Sushi Bar 594 McCaslin Blvd., Louisville, baoasianfusion.com

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t’s hard to have a more satisfying lunch than the one you get dining at Louisville’s Bao Asian Fusion & Sushi Bar. Start with complimentary soup — the hot and sour is fantastic — pick from a long menu of sushi and nigiri, and order an affordable lunch special. We chose the black pepper chicken, a heaping plate of wok-sizzled tender chicken, spears of red onion and ligtly charred red and green bell pepper. It’s topped with thick-cut scallion and punchy black pepper, and it’s served with a fried egg roll that comes with a sweet pepper dipping sauce and nostril-flaring horseradish. You’ll get out of there with your belly full and your wallet no worse for the wear. $7.95.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday BOULDER WEEKLY

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

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Happy Hour 3:00pm-6:00pm

EVERYDAY $6 BBQ SLIDERS $6 FRIED PICKLES $8 CHOPPED BRISKET NACHOS $9 SMOKED WINGS $1 OFF ALL DRAFTS $3 TECATE, UTICA CLUB, 16OZ PBR $1 OFF FROZEN & ROCKS MARGARITAS $6 DEEP EDDY MULES $5 WELL DRINKS / $5 HOUSE WINES

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Enjoy a prix fixe menu of Cheddar Cheese Fondue, a combination entrée, and a pure Milk, White, or Dark Chocolate Fondue.

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VOTED BOULDER’S BEST THAI

YEARS IN A ROW! 38

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LUNCH: Mon-Fri 11am-4pm DINNER: Mon-Fri 4-10pm Sat 12-10pm • Sun 5-10pm

1600 Broadway, Boulder 303-447-0273 • khow-thai.com

AUGUST 8, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


SUSAN FRANCE

Co oking under

the hoo d

by J ohn Lehndorff

USE YOUR CAR ENGINE AND DISHWASHER TO COOK DINNER TONIGHT

H

ow hot is it today? For sure, it’s just too toasty to turn on the stove, never mind the oven in your house. While it may not be toasty enough to fry eggs on the sidewalk or bake cookies in your car, consider using already hot heat sources in your life. If you’re going to drive to Aspen or wash a load of dishes anyway, you might as well cook vegetables Provençal or sous-vide a slab of salmon while you’re doing it. I’ve heated things but never quite cooked them in my 2005 Nissan Quest minivan. I think having a V-8 helps, and I’m not talking about the vegetable juice. You need a hot engine or a long drive if you want caramelization. To figure out where to place your food, drive your car around a bit and lift the lid. Move your hand around the engine to feel where it is hottest, typically near the exhaust manifold. Hence, the name of the bible on using second-hand BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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CHEF JAMES VAN engine heat: Manifold Destiny: DYK cooks on the The One! The Only! Guide to manifold of a Cooking on Your Car Engine! by Chevrolet El Camino SS, borrowed from Chris Maynard and Bill Scheller. owner Darren Muth, The volume — which lists manager/mechanic cooking times in miles driven — at Tebo’s Garage. features such classics as Veal Rollatini Calabrese, Hyundai Halibut, Median Noche Sandwich and Scion S’mores. Naturally, caution is called for as in the kitchen. You have to be certain you anchor the foil package where it won’t fall into anything vital. You have to stop and turn the food when you get gas and then voila! Hottish food when you arrive. One friend admitted she had successfully attempted car engine cooking. “One was a Toyota 4-Runner, probably a V-8. The other was an Alfa Romeo. The Alfa was easier to cook in,” she noted. see NIBBLES Page 40

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coffee – breakfast – lunch – tapas – dinner

5530 spine rd, boulder 303.719.1431 aperitivoboulder.com Executive Chef: Miguel Vazquez

TURN UP THE FLAVOR!

Colorado Green Chili Sauce & Salsa TM

LOCALLY SOURCED & HAND CRAFTED!

Vegan & Gluten Free

www.cosdiner.com I

WASH GLASSES, POACH SALMON I had no trouble finding friends and acquaintances who have used their dishwasher to help make dinner. Dishwashers are definitely hot enough to cook food and boil eggs. It’s like sous-vide — slow-cooking in simmering water — on a grand scale. The key is to seal all the food tightly. You definitely don’t want your package of miso-ginger chicken thighs to open during the rinse cycle. Needless to say, skip the soap, bleach and rinse agents. Former Denver chef and veteran fisherman Michael Long offered a favorite dishwasher-safe recipe: “I take a whole, small salmon, douse it in wine and single-malt Scotch, and rub it with salt, cracked pepper and cut lemons. I encase it in dill fronds and double wrap it in plastic wrap and foil and run it through the dish machine three times. It works great. I serve it whole, warm.” A sealed mason jar is also ideal for the dishwasher. Put a half pound of trimmed asparagus in a half-quart mason jar with about a cup of water or broth, splash of white wine, butter, salt and pepper. Set on the top rack for a normal cycle. An old friend tells me; “Dishwasher on pots and pans setting. Poached salmon, new potatoes and green beans... Yum!” I understand this technique works well for butter-poached lobster tails, normal cycle. One chef noted that he had cooked on a Coast Guard cutter early in his career: “I remember disconnecting the chemicals from the steam dish machine and cooking crab legs for the crew.” Chef James Van Dyk says that the dishwasher is fine for cleaning a bunch of particularly dirty potatoes. COOKING ON A SUNNY DAY AT THE HOT SPRING I’ve never boiled eggs in a hot spring although I understand that it is a traditional technique on geothermal islands like Rotorua and the Azores. Other alternate cooking techniques require a time invest-

Available At

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ment. A recipe for pot roast in the Solar Cooking cookbook by Harriet Kofalf notes: “Start by 10 a.m., finish cooking by 3 to 4 p.m. (assuming a sunny day). Food will keep warm in oven until dinnertime.” Given the popularity of sous-vide, slow cookers and cold smoking, cooks seem to understand the value of patience. You will need at least 250 miles and an internal combustion engine to make the following recipe. Electrics and hybrids are the future but they aren’t going to fricassee your cage-free coq au vin. We may be the last generation of manifold cookers unless future tourists rent an antique 2019 F-150 pickup for a nostalgic road trip. This classic recipe is from Manifold Destiny: Cruise-Control Pork Tenderloin 1 large pork tenderloin, butterflied 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons dry white wine 1/2 cup red onion, minced 2 teaspoons crushed fresh rosemary Salt and pepper Blend other ingredients, spread inside tenderloin and fold over. Triple-wrap in foil and place on a medium-hot part of the engine. Turn once at 125 miles. Should be done at about 250 miles. LOCAL FOOD NEWS Veteran chef Mathew Koury has opened Chicken On The Hill, serving rotisserie chicken crisped up over hardwood charcoal. ... Heifer and the Hen, chef Ian Clark’s artisan ice cream scoop shop, is closing this week, but his nextdoor BRU handbuilt ales & eats remains open. ... Blue Corn Tacos has opened at 1515 Main St. in Longmont. Menu includes chicken mole tacos. WORDS TO CHEW ON “Silverware should be the heavy metal at a dinner party, not the music.” — Craig Claiborne John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU. Podcasts at: news.kgnu.org/ category/radio-nibbles BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


DA!

New Summer Menu!

WEEKLY EVENTS Tuesday 5pm–9pm Prime Rib Night Wednesday 3pm–close $5 Burgers Night You can have a small draft beer addition for $5 more. We Also have a $9 Veggie Burger deal featuring the Beyond Meat Burger Thursday Ladies Night $5 specialty cocktails (change every week), $3 house red/white/rose wines, $1-off draughts beers. Live music Featuring Andy Eppler and accompanied by other musicians

Patio Now OPEN!

1111 Francis Street, Suite A, Longmont, CO 80501 • 303-647-3755 www.longmontpublichouse.com

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We Deliver in Boulder

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Front Range Food for Front Range Families Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Brinner!

BOTTOMLESS WINE WEDNESDAYS 4-8pm MORNINGGLORYCAFE | 1377 FOREST PARK CIRCLE, LAFAYETTE | 303.604.6351

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Sunday: 11:00am - 9:30pm Monday: Closed Tue - Sat: 11:00 am - 9:30pm 4800 Baseline Rd. A-110 Boulder, CO • 303.494.4210 www.noodlehousekitchen.com 42

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BOULDER WEEKLY


SAVANNAH SCHLAUFMAN

COLORADO PROUD

COLORADO PROUD

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ow’s a good time to talk about the state of agriculture in the state of Colorado. Colorado Proud — a program of the Colorado Department of Agriculture that raises awareness of locally grown and raised food — is celebrating its 20th year with events at farmers markets across the state. Plus, August 4-10 is Colorado Farmers Market Week. And Colorado Proud takes its festivities to the Boulder Farmers

Let’s start with the good news. About 83 percent of Coloradans are buying some locally grown or raised products when they go shopping. Just 10 years ago, only 77 percent of Coloradans said they bought locally, and Wendy White of Colorado Proud, who’s been with the program almost since its inception, says the number was “significantly less than that 20 years ago.” White says there are multiple factors that have contributed to the growing public awareness and reception of local foods. “It’s a combination of things. It’s sort of interesting as we have a population that’s more generations removed from having a connection with a farmer [or] rancher. There’s this disconnect, yet there’s this desire and yearning for a connection with the producers who grow and raise this food. There’s this natural direction of seeking out information. Consumers are certainly asking more questions — where was my food produced and how was my food produced?” White says the state helps to build that connection by supporting local farmers markets and educating the public about Colorado-grown food. For instance, White says one of the program’s most popular resources is a produce calendar so the average consumer knows when and where they can get locally grown fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy.

The state of agriculture

Consumers are buying more local food, but the trade war, weather and mental health issues in rural Colroado are impinging on the industry’s growth

by Matt Cortina Market on August 28. But it’s also a time when trade wars are directly impacting Colorado farmers and ranchers, and, by extension, the communities in which they operate. Older generations of farmers and ranchers are retiring or selling farms, extreme weather events have impacted some farms and ranches in the last few years, and lack of access to mental health care in rural Colorado — as in other parts of the country — is impacting the vitality of the state’s agricultural communities. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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AUGUST 8, 2019

Colorado Proud also asks consumers in the state every five years about their perceptions of and experiences with local agriculture. The findings are interesting at least, but also help the program direct educational outreach efforts. For instance, Colorado Proud recently asked consumers what they think the state’s top agricultural goods are; they answered, in order, corn, peaches, melons, vegetables and cattle. In reality, the state’s top products are, in order, cattle, dairy, corn, hay and wheat. The disparity in those answers represents a divide between the producers themselves and what people find, and buy, in their local grocery stores and farmers markets. White says there is a further disparity in how people perceive agricultural producers and their realities. “I like to talk to people who have gardens. I’ve talked to several people at the markets, [who say], ‘My garden just got hit by hail and I had to replant,’ and I ask them now think about your garden and think about a farmer who’s out there growing food who gets hit by hail and how do you think that impacts them? There continues to be those basic challenges of weather and [also] finances, and unfortunately the mental health crisis in rural Colorado is definitely there.” White says the state has resources in rural Colorado to connect those suffering from mental health issues to help. In sparsely populated areas, too, access to locally grown produce can be a challenge, and so White says the state tries to educate people in those communities about where and when see AG STATE Page 44

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AG STATE from Page 43

they can get local produce. One of the most pressing concerns for Colorado producers is the impact of tariffs and Trump’s trade war with the rest of the world. Tom Lipetzky, director of marketing programs and strategic initiatives at the Colorado Department of Agriculture, says although exports of the state’s agricultural products totaled $2 billion in 2018, it’s 17 percent lower from January to June this year from last, and that the trade war is to blame. “Much of the decline can be attributed to markets that we’re hearing about in

the news almost daily relating to trade. The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement has yet to be ratified by the U.S. and Canada, and until it is, there is still uncertainty in the markets. Buyers in Canada and Mexico are cautious about committing to purchases of new products and making longer-term commitments,” Lipetzky says. Lipetzky adds that China has been the fifth leading importer of Colorado goods in recent years, bringing in mostly beef and then hides and skins for manufacturing. But on Aug. 5, China

announced it would stop importing U.S. agricultural products in response to new tariffs on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods set by the Trump administration and set to take effect on Sept. 1. “The announcement [on Aug. 5] that China’s state-run enterprises will stop purchases of U.S. food and agricultural products is going to hurt farmers and ranchers at a time when they are already experiencing lower net incomes and depressed market prices. The impact reaches well beyond just our farmers and ranchers but also to main street

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businesses all across rural Colorado,” Lipetzky says, adding that the Chinese markets lost to South American and European producers who pick up the slack “may take years to win back when the dust settles on this trade dispute.” Now certainly there are arguments to be made about keeping agricultural products in the U.S., and further arguments to be made about the environmental and social sustainability of large commodity farms in Colorado. But at the very least, the unraveling of the system, if the trade war escalates, will have serious impacts on one of the state’s largest revenuegenerating industries and the communities in which they operate. Everyday folks will be hurt most by the escalating tariffs. White says conventional Colorado farmers and ranchers have been making the effort to stress the environment less and operate on tighter budgets, all while new generations of farmers seek to implement organic and sustainable practices on existing farms or the new farms they’re launching. Over the last 20 years, technology has helped set that foundation to meet these new challenges. “Agriculture has always been an early adopter of technology,” White says. Producers are, “utilizing technology to be as efficient as possible. Farmers and ranchers are producing more food with fewer inputs, less water and smaller acres.” White says producers are also diversifying their crops, implementing agritourism into their business models, and selling directly to consumers as much as possible. When we talk about the future of farming, though, we’re talking about people. Yes, the future is in sustainable and organic food — it has to be because more consumers are demanding it and because the world will continue to get hotter if we don’t upturn conventional agriculture processes. In this regard, the state is doing a lot to help get new farmers up to speed, helping them with planning and getting their wares to market, and helping consumers continue to see the merit in local food, by slapping the Colorado Proud label on produce in grocery stores so people can choose to eat local, and by, for instance, hosting cooking challenges with Colorado produce, as the Colorado Proud program did this week at the Broomfield Farmers Market. It sounds basic, but by showing people how to use local produce and allowing them to taste food that hasn’t sat on a truck or in a grocery store for months, the department is hoping locality speaks for itself. BOULDER WEEKLY


Tour de brew: Adamant Brewing & Blending Wild and free on Lee Hill Drive

ON TAP: Adamant

Brewing & Blending, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Boulder, 80302. adamantbrewing.com.

by Michael J. Casey

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can’t stay stagnant,” Adam Kandle of Adamant Brewing & Blending says with a grin. And he isn’t. Already the co-owner of Boulder’s homebrew and winemaking store, Boulder Fermentation Supply, and the small taproom next door, VisionQuest Brewery, Kandle has a new project in town, this one about five miles northwest, where the buses turn around. He calls it Adamant Brewing & Blending, an ode to mixed fermentation and oak-focused beers. Born out of necessity, Adamant is a chance for Kandle to “clean up” (remove any unwanted wild yeast) VisionQuest, while trying something completely different. Lucky for him, Zach Nichols relocated Cellar West Artisan Ales to Lafayette and Kandle scooped up the small garage/brewery nestled between North Boulder’s auto repair shops. If you ever visited Cellar West, then you already know how Adamant is laid out: Smallish taproom with a bar MICHAEL J. CASEY and a half-dozen stools near the entrance, a couple of tables for parties of two or more and a garage filled with oak barrels fermenting the goods. Currently, Adamant has four ales on tap and two more available in the can. Due to Kandle’s size of production, you better visit sooner rather than later should any of the below pique your interest. Start with Raw Wild Strawberry, a sour ale made with rhubarb and strawberry. Sporting a slight pink hue, loose carbonation and a soft nose, Raw Wild Strawberry comes alive in the mouth with flavors of sweet strawberry, tart rhubarb and tangy sourness. It’s not like anything you might anticipate — the mingling of flavors is vibrant and invigorating — and it’s refreshing to boot. Pair it with a bowl of hummus, fresh radishes and sliced cucumbers; you’ll be in heaven, Even if Adamant isn’t pouring Raw Wild Strawberry, go. All available brews are worth the trip and then some. The Berliner Weisse is tart and snappy, like pink grapefruit without the pulp. Raw Needs Islands is a piña-colada inspired sour with coconut and pineapple and fermented with lactobacillus and saccharomyces; the best execution of a flavor profile many breweries aim for. Available in to-go cans are Oyster, a mixed-culture sour wheat ale fermented in oak puncheons with oyster mushrooms — the nose has a fleshy earthiness, but the mouth is mostly tart acid with a hint of funk — and Grisette, a Belgian-style mixed-culture wheat ale. Grisette is Kandle’s canvas: Like the other beers but don’t want the flavors of strawberry, rhubarb, piña colada or mushrooms? Grisette is the brew for you. But if you’re looking for something truly different, JARROD Mixed Fermentation Pale Ale is fermented with a Belgian yeast strain and Adamant’s house Brettanomyces. Using Eukanot and Azacca hops like aged Parmesan, JARROD is dry, like brut Champagne, funky like a Belgian saison and contains the prickle of a beautifully bitter pale. It’s fantastic. Adamant Brewing & Blending opened in March 2019, and Kandle projects selling about 100 barrels of beer in his first year. Not bad for a side hustle designed to keep the Boulder brewing scene funky. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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HELP WANTED GARDENERS NEEDED! Experience preferred, but not required. Must be reliable and punctual. Must have valid driver’s license/reliable transportation. Work performed throughout Boulder County. Fair compensation for the right candidate. Send resume to bloomboosters@gmail.com

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: When it came time to write your horo-

scope, I was feeling unusually lazy. I could barely summon enough energy to draw up the planetary charts. I said a weak prayer to the astrological muses, pleading, “Please don’t make me work too hard to discover the message that Aries people need to hear; just make the message appear in my mind.” As if in response, a voice in my head said, “Try bibliomancy.” So I strolled to my bookcase, shut my eyes, pulled out the first book I felt, and went to a random page. Here’s what I saw when I opened my eyes: “The Taoist concept of wu-wei is the notion that our creative active forces are dependent on and nourished by inactivity; and that doing absolutely nothing may be a good way to get something done.”

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: There’s an old Rosicrucian vow you might have fun trying out: “I pledge to interpret every experience that comes my way as a communication of God with my soul.” If you carry out this intention with relaxed playfulness, every bird song you hear is an emblem of Divine thought; every eavesdropped conversation provides hints of the Creator’s current mood; the shape that spilled milk takes on your tabletop is an intimation of eternity breaking into our time-gripped realm. In my years of offering you advice, I have never before suggested you try this exercise because I didn’t think you were receptive. But I do now. (If you’re an atheist, you can replace “God,” “Divine” and “Creator” with “Life.”)

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Below are unheralded gifts possessed by

many Geminis but not commonly identified by traditional astrologers: 1. a skill for deprogramming yourself: for unlearning defunct teachings that might otherwise interfere with your ability to develop your highest potentials; 2. a sixth sense about recognizing artificial motivations, then shedding them; 3. a tendency to attract epiphanies that show you why and how to break taboos that may once have been necessary but aren’t any longer; 4. an ability to avoid becoming overwhelmed and controlled by situations you manage or supervise.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: In 1993, I began writing a book titled

The Televisionary Oracle. By 1995, I had generated over 2,000 pages of material that I didn’t like. Although I was driven by a yearning to express insights that had been welling up in me for a long time, nothing about the work felt right. I was stuck. But finally I discovered an approach that broke me free: I started to articulate difficult truths about aspects of my life about which I was embarrassed, puzzled and ashamed. Then everything fell into place. The process that had been agonizing and fruitless became fluidic and joyful. I recommend that you try this strategy to dissolve any mental blocks you may be suffering from: dive into and explore what makes you feel ashamed, puzzling or embarrassed. I bet it will lead to triumph and fulfillment, as happened for me.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: I am overjoyed that you’re not compet-

ing for easy rewards or comparing yourself to the mediocre crowd. Some people in your sphere may not be overjoyed, though. To those whose sense of self isn’t strong, you may be like an itchy allergen; they may accuse you of showing off or acting puffed up. But freaks like me appreciate creative egotists like you when you treat your personality as a work of art. In my view, you’re a stirring example of how to be true to one’s smartest passions. Keep up the good work! Continue to have too much fun! I’m guessing that for now you can get away with doing just about anything you want as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Let’s enjoy a moment of poignant silence in honor of your expired illusions. They were soulful mirages: full of misplaced idealism and sweet ignorance and innocent misunderstandings. Generous in ways you may not yet realize, they exuded an agitated beauty that aroused both courage and resourcefulness.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Now, as those illusions dissolve, they will begin to serve you anew, turning into fertile compost for your next big production.

LIBRA

Mon-Sat 11am-8pm Closed Sunday 1750 30th Street, Suite 7 720.379.6046

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Old rules and traditions about how best to

conduct intimate relationships are breaking down. New rules are still incubating. Right now, the details about how people express their needs to give and receive love seem to be riddles for which there are no correct answers. So what do you do? How do you proceed with the necessary blend of confidence and receptivity? Can you figure out flexible strategies for being true both to your need for independence and your need for interdependence? I bring these ruminations to your attention, Libra, just in time for the “Transforming Togetherness” phase of your cycle.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: It’s time for your once-a-year shoutout to your most audacious possibilities. Ready? Go ahead and say, “Hallelujah! Hosanna! Happiness! Hooray for my brilliant future!” Next, go ahead and say, “I have more than enough power to create my world in the image of my wisest dreams.” Now do a dance of triumph and whisper to yourself, “I’m going to make very sure I always know exactly what my wisest dreams are.”

SAGITTARIUS

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NOV. 22-DEC. 21: During the next three weeks, I advise you to load up on copious amounts of caffeine from Monday at 8 a.m. until Friday at 6 p.m. Then drastically cut back on the coffee and consume large amounts of alcohol and/or marijuana from 6:01 p.m. on Friday through 6 p.m. on Sunday. This is the ideal recipe for success. JUST KIDDING! I lied. Here’s the truth, Sagittarius: Astrological indicators suggest you would benefit from making the coming weeks be the most undrugged, alcohol-free time ever. Your potential for achieving natural highs will be extraordinary, as will your potential to generate crucial breakthroughs while enjoying those natural highs. Take advantage! DEC. 22-JAN. 19: I don’t presume you should or will gleefully embrace the assignment I’ll propose. The task may indeed be too daunting for you to manage right now. If that’s the case, don’t worry. You’ll get another chance in a few months. But if you are indeed ready for a breathtaking challenge, here it is: Be a benevolent force of wild nature; be a tender dispenser of creative destruction; be a bold servant of your soulful dreams — as you demolish outmoded beliefs and structures that have been keeping a crucial part of your vitality shackled and latent.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: I have cast a feisty love spell that will

be triggered in anyone who reads the first line of this horoscope. And since you have done that, you are now becoming even smarter than you already were about getting the most out of your intimate alliances. You’re primed to experiment with the delights of feeling with your head and thinking with your heart. Soon you’ll be visited by revelations about any unconscious glitches that might be subtly undermining your togetherness, and you’ll get good ideas about how to correct those glitches. Astrological rhythms will be flowing in your relationships’ favor for the next seven weeks!

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FEB. 19-MARCH 20: I estimate that about 25 percent of your fear results from your hesitation to love as deeply and openly and bravely as you could. Another 13 percent originates in an inclination to mistake some of your teachers for adversaries, and 21 percent from your reluctance to negotiate with the misunderstood monsters in your closet. But I suspect that fully 37 percent of your fear comes from the free-floating angst that you telepathically absorb from the other 7.69 billion humans on our planet. So what about the remaining 4 percent? Is that based on real risks and worth paying attention to? Yes! And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make progress in diminishing its hold on you.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: I am a 27-year-old man in an open marriage with a wonderful partner. They’re my best friend, I smile whenever they walk into the room, and we have a ton ROMAN ROBINSON in common. We don’t, however, have that much sex. I’m currently seeing someone else and our sex is great. We’ve explored some light BDSM and pegging, and I’m finding myself really enjoying being a sub. I’m kind of terrified that, as a man, I might accidentally violate someone’s boundaries. I’m also autistic, which makes navigating cues from partners rather difficult. Completely submitting to someone else weirdly makes me feel

totally safe and free for kind of the first time. The problem is, my spouse is also pretty subby. When they do try to initiate sex, it’s often so subtle that I totally miss the signals. In the past month, I’ve had sex with my spouse maybe once, compared to four or five times with my other partner. My question is this: Have you seen examples of people in open marriages who essentially fulfill their sexual needs with secondary partners, while still maintaining a happy companionable partnership with their primary? —Sexually Understanding Butt-Boy Dear SUBB: I’ve personally known people in loving, happy, sexless marriages who aren’t leading sexless lives; their marriages are companionate — some can even be described as passionate — but both halves seek sexual fulfillment with secondary, tertiary, quaternary, etc., partners. But companionate open marriages only work when it’s what both partners

want… And your partner’s feelings are conspicuously absent from your letter. How do they feel about being in a sexless or nearly sexless marriage? Your spouse would seem to be interested in having sex with you — they occasionally try to initiate — but perhaps your spouse is just going through the motions because they think it’s what you want. So… you’re gonna need to have a conversation with your spouse about your sex lives. If you’ve found being told what to do in unsubtle ways by your Dominant second partner to be sexually liberating, SUBB, you could ask your spouse to be a little less subtle when they want to initiate — or, better yet, ask them not to be subtle at all. Nowhere is it written that subs like you and your spouse have to be subtle or sly or stand there waiting for others to initiate. “I am feeling horny and I’d really like to have sex tonight” is something submissives can and do say.

Hey, Everybody: The deadline is right around the corner to submit short films — five minutes or less — to HUMP!, my dirty little film festival! Your HUMP! film can be hardcore, softcore, live-action, animated, kinky, vanilla, gay, straight, lesbian, trans, enby: everyone and everything is welcome in HUMP! And HUMP! films are only screened in theaters — we don’t release anything online — so you can be a porn star in a movie theater for a weekend without having to be a porn star for eternity on the internet! The deadline to submit your film is September 13! Go to humpfilmfest. com to find out more about entering HUMP! On the Lovecast—Some medical causes for excessive horniness: savagelovecast.com. Send emails to mail@savagelove. net, follow Dan on Twitter @ FakeDanSavage, and visit ITMFA.org.

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You’ve got to concentrate By Seymour

A

CAMEEK33 VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

t the risk of sounding old, back in our day you just rolled a joint or packed a bowl when you wanted to enjoy a little marijuana. Sure, sometimes that bowl was an apple. And yeah, OK, maybe once in a while someone would fashion a gravity bong out of a three-liter Coke bottle and a 10-gallon bucket. And then there was that one industrious friend who landed a copy of the High Times Cookbook and made weed brownies. But basically, for the most part, using marijuana meant smoking ground-up herb. But in today’s world of legalization, there are more ways to get high than you can shake a(n incense) stick at. Concentrates are all the rage. Why? Because the effects are immediate, and the potency is high. A marijuana concentrate is a product that is nothing but trichomes — the sticky, amber and translucent hairs (trichome comes from the Greek word for hair) that contain all of the cannabinoids and terpenes that give marijuana its effects and flavor. No stems and leaves, just sticky icky. Sometimes people use the words concentrate and extract interchangeably, but there are differences between the final products — all extracts are concentrates, but not all concentrates are extracts. The difference is how the trichomes are collected. Extracts use solvents like alcohol or carbon dioxide to wash the trichomes

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

off the plant. Concentrates are made by mechanically or otherwise physically pulling the trichomes from the plant. (Word to the wise: let professionals in labs make concentrates. Using solvents or flammable gases or having poor ventilation while making a concentrate can lead to serious danger, so again, save this for the pros.) When you start getting into concentrates, you’ll see several words pop up over and over again: shatter, budder, badder, crumble, sugar, sauce and crystalline. These words basically

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AUGUST 8, 2019

describe the texture of the concentrate. Shatter, as the name may suggest, is brittle and glass-like. Budder and badder (these are used interchangeably) are soft and oily, like an oily cake batter. Crumble is a drier version of budder. Sugar is a wetter concentrate, kind of like the body scrubs you may use in the shower. Sauce is thick and viscous, while crystalline is pretty self-explanatory, either powdered or small rocks. The oilier concentrates, like budder, can be spread on joints for added potency, while some drier concentrates, like crumble or sugar, can be sprinkled on top of bowls (or mixed in with joints). There are plenty of vape pens sold in dispensaries that offer a chance for users to experience concentrates in a streamlined form that’s discrete, but one of the most popular ways to use concentrates is dabbing. Dabbing uses high heat to vaporize a concentrate for consumption. Folks typically have “dab rigs” consisting of a blow torch to heat the concentrate, a nail (glass, ceramic or titanium) on which to heat the concentrate and a glass bowl to inhale the vapor from the concentrate. It looks a little extreme, but if done correctly it provides fast effects that can be therapeutic for folks with chronic pain. When trying concentrates for the first time, ask your bud tender lots of questions. Start small and see what type of concentrate suits your needs and tastes best.

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Pot enters presidential politics with a bang by Paul Danish

I

f marijuana wasn’t an issue in the 2020 presidential campaign before the second Democratic candidates’ debate, it sure is now. Two brutally blunt exchanges — one between Cory Booker and Joe Biden, the other between Kamala Harris and Tulsi Gabbard — guarantee that marijuana legalization is going to be front and center from now on. The Booker-Biden exchange began when debate moderator Jake Tapper asked Biden to comDONKEYHOTEY/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

ment on Booker’s criticisms of Biden’s recently released criminal justice reform plan. (All of the quotes that follow are taken from the NBC News transcript of the debate.) Senator (and former Newark, New Jersey mayor) Booker had called Biden’s plan “an inadequate solution to what is a raging crisis in our country.” Biden responded that, “Right now, we’re in a situation where, when someone is convicted of a drug crime, they end up going to jail and to prison. They should be going to rehabilitation. They shouldn’t be going to prison. When in prison, they should be learning to read and write and not just sit in there and learn how to be better criminals...” Booker responded that “...since the 1970s,

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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every major crime bill — every crime bill, major and minor, has had his name on it. And, sir, those are your words, not — not mine... you claimed responsibility for those laws. And you can’t just now come out with a plan to put out that fire. We have got to have far more bold action on criminal justice reform, like having true...” Tapper: “Thank you, Senator. Booker: “...marijuana justice, which means that we legalize it on a federal level...” Tapper: “Thank you, Senator Booker.” Booker: “...and reinvest the profits in communities that have been...” Tapper: “Thank you, Senator Booker.” Booker: “...disproportionately target by marijuana enforcement.” Biden wasn’t about to take it lying down. He had come loaded for bear and unloaded on Booker: “In 2007 you became mayor [of Newark] and you had a police department that was — you went out and you hired Rudy Giuliani’s guy; you — and engaged in stop-and-frisk. You had 75 percent of those stops reviewed as illegal. You found yourself in a situation where three times as many African-American kids were caught in that chain and caught up...” Booker was having none of it. He said all of the problems Biden spoke of, Biden created, adding: “Mr. Vice President, there’s a saying in my community, you’re dipping into the Kool-Aid and you don’t even know the flavor... “Sir, you are trying to shift the view from what you created,” Booker said. “There are people right now in prison for life for drug offenses because you stood up and used that ‘tough on crime’ phony rhetoric that got a lot of people elected but destroyed communities like mine...” The exchange between Gabbard and Harris

AUGUST 8, 2019

was even nastier. It started when Tapper asked Gabbard to elaborate on why she had earlier said it was a false accusation for Harris to have said Biden is a racist. Instead of answering, Gabbard lit into Harris: “Now Senator Harris says she’s proud of her record as a prosecutor and that she’ll be a prosecutor president. “But I’m deeply concerned about this record. There are too many examples to cite but she put over 1,500 people in jail for marijuana violations and then laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana. “She blocked evidence — she blocked evidence that would have freed an innocent man from death row until the courts forced her to do so. She kept people in prison beyond their sentence to use them as cheap labor for the state of California...” Harris replied that as California Attorney General she had worked at reforming the state’s criminal justice system, “which became a national model for the work that needs to be done.” “And I am proud of that work,” she added. “It is... because I know that the criminal system is so broken... Tapper: “Thank you, Senator. Harris: “That I am an advocate for what we need to do to not only decriminalize, but legalize marijuana in the United States.” Gabbard retorted: “The bottom line is, Senator Harris, that when you were in a position to make a difference and an impact in these people’s lives, you did not...” Going forward, candidates for any office, Democrat or Republican, who participated in the drug war (and who, like Biden, were cheerleaders for it), are going to have to answer to the voters for what they did. And it’s about damn time.

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www.boulderwc.com 5420 Arapahoe, Unit F, Boulder www.terrapincarestation.com See our ad below

See Ad on PG 47 FOR SPECIALS ON

OUNCES and CONCENTRATES & EDIBLES 11AM - 8PM MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, CLOSED SUNDAY 1750 30th Street, Suite 7, Boulder

720.379.6046

*See ad on PG 47 for restrictions.

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 51. THE TERRAPIN APP,

ORDER AHEAD, Cleanest Artisan SKIP THE WAIT! Cannabis & Extracts

Naturally-grown award winning flower since 2009

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

Boulder’s oldest active dispensary, grower owned since day one. Stop in today and see the difference love can make. 5420 Arapahoe • Unit F • 303.442.2565 • www.boulderwc.com Now open til 8p Thurs, 9p Fri & Sat, 6p Sun, 7p Mon-Wed

Taste for yourself Ask about our 30 day free trial 303-604-3000 www.eldoradosprings.com

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122

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Boulder Weekly 8.8.19  

Boulder Weekly 8.8.19