Page 1

B o u l d e r C o u n t y ’ s Tr u e I n d e p e n d e n t Vo i c e / F R E E / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / J u l y 1 3 - 1 9 , 2 0 1 7


_

Boulder 2830 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO 80303 (303) 440-0288


contents NEWS:

Inside the turmoil at BVSD by Angela K. Evans

10

Boulder Weekly’s Online Marketplace

....................................................................... BOULDERGANIC:

Colorado nonprofit seeks to educate public about wolves by Mana Parker

17

Dining Entertainment Wellness Retail

....................................................................... ADVENTURE:

More than 20 people with type 1 diabetes ride across the country by Caitlin Rockett

19

Must pre-purchase from BestOfBoulderDeals.com

Six Persimmons Apothecary

....................................................................... BUZZ:

‘Modern America’ asks artists to respond to the political landscape by Amanda Moutinho

23

....................................................................... OVERTONES:

Trap artist UZ shows his face by Alvaro Sanchez

26

....................................................................... NIBBLES:

The Top 10 scary food news items keeping me up at night by John Lehndorff

45

....................................................................... COMMUNITY TABLE:

Cured’s Will Frischkorn on the synergy of pro cycling and good food by Matt Cortina

49

.......................................................................

departments 5 THE HIGHROAD: Amazon buys out Whole Foods: What’s it to us? 6 THE ANDERSON FILES: A reason for hope 8 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 27 ARTS & CULTURE: Artist-in-residence Benedetto Lupo will play both Ravel piano concertos in one evening; Steve Hackman creates the music festival of his dreams 31 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 41 FILM: Two men seek to find out: ‘How to Build a Time Machine’ 43 T  HE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in Boulder County this week 51 DRINK: Tour de Brew: Very Nice Brewing Co. 54 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 S  AVAGE LOVE: Short and sweet 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Father-daughter politics 59 CANNABIS CORNER: New Jersey marijuana politics and ‘Murphy’s Law’ 61 IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent view of the world Boulder Weekly

$10 off an Organic Facial or Massage with ad! (exp. 8/31/17)

u Organic Dr. Hauschka, Anti-aging Sanitas or Astara Facials u Boulder’s Best Massages: Deep Tissue, Swedish, Lymphatic, Oncology u Phyto, Dr. Hauschka, Sanitas, Astara skin & hair care u Natural remedies for allergies, colds, flu, sinusitis, sleep & anxiety Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine & Homeopathy

728 Pearl St. Boulder - 303 583-0179 - sixpersimmons.com Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine: 303 413-9596 • Gift Certificates Available!

SANDAL SALE A Selection of our most comfortable Sandal Styles are included!

UP TO

40% OFF! comfortableshoes.com ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL at 1425 Pearl St. 303-449-5260 & IN THE VILLAGE next to McGuckin 303-449-7440

1750 15th St. Corner of 15th and Canyon Boulder, CO. 303.449.3374 LIQUORMART.COM

Serving Boulder’s beer, wine, and liquor needs for 49 yearss Mon. - Sat. 8am-11:45pm

Sun. 9am-10pm July 13 , 2017 3


BOULDER’S OWN. BOULDER’S BEST. SAME FAMILY DOING BUSINESS IN BOULDER FOR OVER 60 YEARS.

0%

2017 SUBARU L E G A C Y 2.5i

Financing for up to 63 months!! Available on select models

$99 a month

36 mo lease 36 mo lease. 10k miles per year. $0 sec dep. $3295 due at signing + taxes. No security deposit req.

Model HAB-02 #77116

2017 SUBARU I M P R E Z A

$99

a month 36 mo lease

2.0i

Model HJB-01 STK #97179

ALL NEW!

Model HFB-02 STK #86097

2017 SUBARU FORESTER

2.5i

$129 a month 42 mo lease

Rates As Low As

Rates As Low As

@ 48 mos avil. On select models

@ 48 mos avil. On select models

1.9%

0%

36 mo lease. 10k miles per year. $0 sec. dep. $3295 due at signing + taxes. No security deposit req.

2017 SUBARU O U T B A C K

$139

2.5i

Model HDB-01 STK #77115

42 mo lease. 10k miles per year. $0 sec. dep. $3295 due at signing + taxes. No security deposit req.

2017 SUBARU CROSSTREK Model HRB-11 STK #V5111

$169 a month 42 mo lease

a month 36 mo lease

Rates As Low As

Rates As Low As

1.9%

0%

@ 48 mos avil. On select models

2.0i Premium

36 mo lease. 10k miles per year. $0 sec. dep. $3295 due at signing + taxes. No security deposit req.

42 mo lease. 10k miles per year. $0 sec. dep. $3295 due at signing + taxes. No security deposit req.

@ 48 mos avil. On select models


staff

commentary

Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Amanda Moutinho, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley, Amanda Moutinho Interns, Mana Parker, Alvaro Sanchez SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Marketing Consultant, George Hardwick Inside/Outside Account Executive, Andrea Ralston Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Advertising Coordinator, Olivia Rolf Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

July 13, 2017 Volume XXIV, Number 49 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2017 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

Boulder Weekly

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

the

Highroad Amazon buys out Whole Foods: What’s it to us? by Jim Hightower

W

all Street analysts tell us that Amazon’s $14 billion buy-out of Whole Foods Market is not only a winwin for both of them — but also for consumers: Amazon intends to lower the organic grocer’s prices. Really? Yes, say the analysts, because Amazon will use its amazing computer-driven tactics to cut Whole Foods’ cost of selling groceries. But

Amazon’s robotic “efficiency” is achieved by cutting people. It ruthlessly squeezes suppliers, for example, demanding that they give bankruptlevel wholesale prices to the retail colossus. That means that small organic farmers and food artisans are destined to be squeezed out of Whole Foods, displaced by deep-pocket, global food makers who’re willing to cut corners on quality and the environment in order to get on Amazon’s new grocery shelves. Next comes Whole Foods’ helpful and friendly work force. Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s CEO, doesn’t view workers as assets, but as costs, so to jack-up the grocery chain’s profit, he’ll cut those “costs” — aka, people. He’s already testing a store concept that has no cashiers to interfere with your shopping “experience,” using computer

sensors to take your money electronically, instead of paying bothersome humans to do the job of checking you out and — God forbid — conversing with you. Oh, another plus of connecting us to the corporate computers is that they will track and record our every move and every purchase, building a detailed personal profile on each of us in order to... well, to do what? And why? According to the calendar, we’re living in 2017, but the Brave New Future of Amazon’s electronic, robotic Whole Foods Market tells us we’re living in the corporatized version of 1984, where the human need for jobs and personal relationships are subverted to the corporate love of automation and avaricious profits. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. July 13 , 2017 5


Have You Ever Had a Concussion? • Struggle to remember things? • Difficulty managing daily tasks? • Overwhelmed with big projects? • Trouble finding your words? • Tough to focus? All of these symptoms can be caused by a concussive injury, even one that occurred years ago. Sarah Brittain, Clinician

303.447.0022 x2 1790 30th Street Suite 120, Boulder

We can identify and treat areas of loss to help improve your daily performance. www.boulderbrain.com

the anderson files A reason for hope by Dave Anderson

W

hile the media’s attenHe promoted a civilian law enforcetion has been focused ment review board and a reform of on the Trump circus, public school education pedagogy “to an impressive number benefit our children’s specific learning of progressives have needs.” been winning local races around the Lumumba promised to make country. A few reporters have noticed Jackson “the most progressive city in this, such as John Nichols of The the country.” Jackson is a city that is 80 Nation, Alex Roarty of McClatchy percent black with 31 percent of its newspapers and population living in Alan Greenblatt poverty. It is the of Governing (the capital of a state nation’s leading where Republicans magazine for state have near total and local leaders). power. The most Lumumba’s MAKE JACKSON, “THE intriguing victor father, Chokwe MOST PROGRESSIVE was Chokwe Lumumba, became Antar Lumumba, Jackson’s mayor in CITY IN THE COUNTRY.” a 34-year-old 2013 but died at JACKSON IS A CITY THAT the age of 66 just black human rights lawyer, who eight months after IS 80 PERCENT BLACK became the mayor taking office. The WITH 31 PERCENT OF ITS senior Lumumba of Jackson, Mississippi, with was also a human POPULATION LIVING IN 93 percent of the rights activist and POVERTY. vote in a June lawyer who had election, which previously worked had one of the with the Republic highest turnouts in of New Afrika, a years. In May, he won the black nationalist organization that Democratic primary by 55 percent aimed to create an independent black against the centrist incumbent mayor republic in the Deep South. He was born Edwin Finley Taliaferro in and several veteran politicians. He advocated economic self-determination Detroit. But he would later discard his “slave name” and take the name via cooperative businesses and participatory, neighborhood by neighborhood see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 7 democracy with “people’s assemblies.”

LUMUMBA PROMISED TO

6 July 13 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


the anderson files THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 6

Chokwe Lumumba, honoring a Central African tribe that resisted the slave trade and the Congolese prime minister Patrice Lumumba. There were fears that he would be too far left to build coalitions, but he demonstrated that he could be both pragmatic and radical. He soon won praise from his election opponents and the business community. He passed a budget that raised spending by 43 percent to deal with the city’s serious infrastructure needs (the city has horrible roads, an overflowing sewage system and a water supply that frequently requires boil notices). Now his son is mayor. He has the same name as his father except for his middle name of Antar (the name of a historic poet and warrior who died while saving a woman from drowning). Shortly after being elected, he was a featured speaker in Chicago at the People’s Summit, a gathering of Bernie Sanders-aligned groups pushing for a “political revolution.” The younger Lumumba assembled a diverse local coalition of supporters which included veterans of civil rights struggles, the city workers’ union and supporters of Bernie Sanders’ presidential bid. He also received help from national groups such as the black nationalist Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, Democracy for America (which came out of Howard Dean’s 2004 presidential campaign) and the Working Families Party (a laborbacked group which aims to create a viable third party while also crossendorsing progressive Democrats). Shortly after the elder Lumumba died, Cooperation Jackson was formed. According to its website, its mission is “to advance the development of economic democracy in Jackson, Mississippi, by building a solidarity economy anchored by a network of cooperatives and other types of workerowned and democratically self-managed enterprises.” At the moment, Cooperation Jackson operates Freedom Farms, an urban-farming collaborative, and the Chokwe Lumumba Center for Economic Democracy and Development, a community center and small-businesses incubator. The organization is fighting gentrification by buying up vacant lots to create a “community land trust,” which is a nonprofit that manages land to ensure that it remains affordable as prices of commercially owned land fluctuate. It now owns 25 plots and plans to purchase 50 more in order to create a village of susBoulder Weekly

tainable housing for low-income residents. The group is also fund-raising to build a small-scale manufacturing facility. They are inspired by Mondragon, a corporation and federation of worker cooperatives based in the Basque region of Spain. It was founded in 1956 by a Catholic priest when Spain was ruled by fascist dictator Francisco

FREE

Franco. It runs 261 businesses in finance, industry, retail and knowledge. Kali Akuno, a co-founder of Cooperation Jackson, hopes his city can create a new economy of co-ops, which would be independent of the dominant economy. Co-op farms would sell to co-op restaurants, and co-op small businesses would take out loans from co-op banks.

In order for that to happen, Akuno argues, co-ops have to be politicized with “ordinary” people wanting to build a new society. Is this part of the answer to Trump and Republican political dominance? We have to not only resist the far right but also build an alternative. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

Educational Seminars

STOP THE PAIN! Get Relief without Surgery!

Do you SUFFER from... • Knee Pain • Lower Back Pain • Shoulder Pain

• Neuropathy • Joint Pain • Plantar Fasciitis

Find Out if Regenerative Medicine is Right for You! SAFE • ETHICAL • EFFECTIVE

• Osteoarthritis • Neck Pain • Tennis Elbow

Regenerative medicine is now available locally and can effectively reduce and even eliminate your pain without surgery or addictive medications. Regenerative medicine uses amniotic tissue cells to regenerate and repair tissues in your body that are damaged due to injury, age, disease, and defects. Stem cells have the power to go to these damaged areas, generate new cells and rebuild the area.

Lakewood

July 18th at 12:00, 3:00 & 6:30pm

Littleton

July 18th at 1:00 & 6:30pm & 6:30pm

Over 16 Seminars to Choose From See Chicago Football Editor and Former Announcer of the Chicago Bears Testimonial in the Stem Cell Institute Documentary on website below!

www.StemCellTherapyForPain.com Reservations Required

CALL TODAY

888-424-5311 July 13 , 2017 7


FUELED BY Authentic BIG DADDY NYC BAGELS BAGELS! in Colorado GOLDEN on Route 93 303.279.1481 BOULDER at Meadows Shopping Center 303.554.0193

LAFAYETTE 489 US Highway 287 303.665.5918 LONGMONT Prospect Village 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237

letters Offended by cover

VOTED BEST BAGEL!

Southwest Acupuncture College Are you Interested in a rewarding career in Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine? Come see what SWAC has to offer. Contact Rhonda at 303-581-9955 ext. 1110 or Rhonda@acupuncturecollege.edu to schedule your tour and get your questions answered! Southwest Acupuncture College • 6630 Gunpark Drive, Boulder, CO Oriental Medicine has been used effectively by billions of people for thousands of years.

before a bistro massage

VOTED BEST OF BOULDER 2013

and after

Your July 4 cover illustration was highly offensive to any military person, past, present, healthy, maimed or dead. These people risked life and limb so you could publish such a trashy front page. You might wish to research all of Obama’s “un-presidential” utterances through the media he chose — late night TV shows, correspondents’ dinners, public speeches, etc. You’ll find that these were essentially no different than the tweets of Trump, which the mainstream media and the Libs find so “offensive” and “un-presidential.” Oh, hypocrisy — you are soulless and brainless. If you feel Trump is “course” in his discourse, look at yourself in the mirror because he is simply reflecting the coarseness that our society as a whole has evolved to. That’s why his communications cut through and are embraced by so many Americans. We have met the enemy, and they are us. R. Eggers/Niwot

Work on ACA, don’t kill it

massage by boulder’s best

@ 3 convenient locations Downtown 1100 Spruce • 303.440.1992 Whole Foods 2905 Pearl • 303.545.6611 Living Arts Center 3825 Iris • 303.413.1992 b o d y w o r k b i s t r o . c o m

IS YOUR OFFICE CHAIR GIVING YOU PAIN? An office chair with a COCCYX CUTOUT in the back will eliminate pressure on the tailbone and discs by suspending the tailbone over empty space.

FREE BOULDER DELIVERY WITH AD Hours: Mon-Sat 10-6pm - Closed Sunday

1664 30th Street, Boulder • (303) 442-3998 (Next to King Soopers)

www.backstoreboulder.com 8 July 13 , 2017

Everyone eventually will need healthcare. It’s a policy that will affect the entire nation, and I hope others feel that the process behind the American Health Care Act (AHCA) and Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA — the Senate version) has been unacceptable. Hopefully people are reaching out to their senators and representatives, and letting them know that crafting bills in secrecy and then trying to push them through without debate, opportunities for amendments, etc. is not good practice. We should vote out those that think that it is. As for the actual healthcare bills, I understand that some feel that Obamacare/ACA is not perfect. I’d agree, but would prefer to see the issues worked on, rather than starting all over, and saying it’s “exploding” (which it’s not). Regardless, I know it can be improved, and I wish that was the main focus, rather than the current bills (AHCA and BCRA), which are not really health care bills, but rather a massive transfer of wealth from working people to Wall Street and corporations. It will cause an estimated 22 million Americans to lose coverage (that’s almost 7 percent of the population, which is a huge deal.) The Senate bill effectively destroys Medicaid — stripping health care, especially from children, seniors and low-income Americans. Again, I hope many people

are inspired to reach out to their senators and representatives to let them know the current bills, as well as the process being used, are unacceptable. We need to be better at holding our legislators accountable. Adam Pastula/Boulder

Independence Day reflections

This Independence Day I’m reflecting on our founders’ attempts to reintroduce a radical notion. Simplified, the founders created a grand experiment to see if “We the People” could govern ourselves through representatives to make our voices heard to create laws, and thus, communities we wanted. That system of democracy has struggled all along to fulfill its promise, but now is in dire shape mostly due to fatal mistakes that allow corporations to pay the people’s chosen representatives for influence. Representatives and the Executive are now beholden to corporations, not voters. Today I’m compelled to focus on one failure of representative democracy that poses an imminent danger to the people of Boulder County — the kind of danger that many privileged people don’t often have to personally face. As you may know, hydraulic fracturing is set to begin in the coming months in Boulder County. The catastrophic results wrought by fracking will hurt you and your family if you don’t stand up and prevent it from ever happening in Boulder County. The time is upon us. No more moratoria, no bans allowed (say the County Commissioners). We are poised to allow permanent damage to our beautiful Boulder open spaces. Fracking could ruin the special, gorgeous place where we live and our vibrant community for the rest of our lives. Because of the failure of representative democracy, only “We the People” through direct action can protect our land, air and water. You may say, “That’s so dramatic. This tree hugger must be exaggerating.” Nope. Did you know that Boulder County already has an “F” rating for air quality? Did you know that it is impossible to prevent accidents related to oil and gas extraction no matter how strict the regulations? Things blow up, things leak, toxins get in your air and water. “Safe regulation of oil and gas development” is an oxymoron. Sharon Cascone/Boulder Boulder Weekly


Presented by:

JULY 15 10am-7pm JULY 16 10am-5pm Pearl Street Mall 100+ Artisans The iconic Pearl Street Mall (celebrating its 40th anniversary) will transform into a sprawling outdoor gallery where some of the most inspired ďŹ ne artists from near and far will be setting up shop. Come enjoy the festivities,

PearlStreetArtsFest.com No Pets Please

Produced by:

Sponsored by:

Painting: Snapdragon Delivery by Alexandra Hall

a host of children’s activities, and more.


NEWS INSIDE THE

TURMOIL AT BVSD

W

hen the Boulder Valley School District Board of Education (BOE) placed former Colorado Superintendent of the Year Dr. Bruce Messinger on paid administrative leave — pending an investigation of a personnel matter — at the end of March, it sent shockwaves through the entire community. Subsequently, when the Board voted to unilaterally terminate Messinger’s contract on May 9 without revealing the results of the investigation or the reasons for its decision, critics of the Board’s actions lambasted the process for lack of transparency and publicly defended the former superintendent for his contributions to the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) during his six years at the helm. The following is the first installment of what Boulder Weekly has learned regarding the turmoil within BVSD. According to multiple sources who asked to remain anonymous either because they are not authorized to speak on the issue or for fear of retaliation — and confirmed by an open records request recently submitted to BVSD — the BOE investigation was due to complaints lodged by Leslie Arnold, a highlevel BVSD administrator. And while Messinger was not fired for cause, the BOE investigation did, according to sources, raise concerns about alleged questionable behavior by the superintendent towards subordinates both recently and in the past. Messinger hired Arnold in 2015 as the assistant superintendent of strategic initiatives to head up the district’s strategic planning process. She had previously worked as an assistant superintendent at the Clark County School District in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sources familiar with the investigation say Arnold alleges she was on the receiving end of what she believed was inappropriate behavior by Messinger, which led her to bring her concerns to the 10 July 13, 2017

Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Shelly Landgraf. Landgraf was hired in 2006 as director of human resources and promoted to assistant superintendent by Messinger in 2014. According to sources, when Arnold brought her concerns regarding Messinger to Landgraf, she did not feel that the head of HR took the appropriate actions. Furthermore, according to sources, Arnold believed that she was being retaliated against and stripped of responsibilities because of her complaints. In an interview with BW, Messinger would not address the nature of the complaint. However when asked about the nature of his relationship with Arnold he says that the two had a “constructive working relationship.” “Clearly there are always issues you work through,” he says. “There was some concern about some organizational restructuring I was doing and that didn’t set well with everyone. It never does. So we were working through that when this complaint was initiated in early March.” Emails obtained through an open records request show that Messinger, with the input of Landgraf and Chief Operating Officer Leslie Stafford, was in the middle of reorganizing the superintendent’s cabinet this past winter. Stafford started at BVSD in 1997 as an accountant, eventually making her way to Chief Financial Officer in 2008 and Chief Operating Officer in 2014 under Messinger’s direction. Messinger affirms that the three of them were working on the reorganization — a necessary process, he says, given several members of his administrative cabinet were set to retire. The emails reveal several different suggestions regarding how Arnold’s job would change under the reorganization and multiple sources familiar with the

investigation have told Boulder Weekly that Arnold alleges these emails demonstrate her responsibilities were being taken away as a means of retaliation. The email discussions include talk of moving Arnold away from the strategic plan and “more towards program evaluation/development,” as well as what responsibilities “can be moved 100 percent, what needs some insight from her and what still needs her direct attention and/or would be considered part of her adjusted responsibilities.” Additionally, according to organizational charts attached to the emails and confirmed by Messinger, Arnold would no longer report to the superintendent — instead reporting to Stafford — and that she would be stripped of at least some of her direct reports. Although her job title was intended to stay the same, sources confirm Arnold believed the changes were a demotion in terms of her responsibilities and retaliation for her previous complaints about Messinger’s behavior toward her. “She would still remain a member of the cabinet,” Messinger says. “There was

becoming less need for that position to actually provide oversight to the strategic plan but there was other important work in the organization that I felt would support the strategic plan but was a change of some responsibilities.” In early February, he says, he met with Arnold and Landgraf to inform Arnold of the “conceptual” reorganization and how her responsibilities may change. “That meeting didn’t go particularly well; she wasn’t receptive to those changes,” Messinger says. After that meeting, he included Landgraf in all future meetings with Arnold, including regularly scheduled “check-in meetings” according to the emails. One email chain in particular reveals that Landgraf was added to those meetings with Arnold and Messinger to serve as “a referee.” In the end, Arnold bypassed the HR department and brought her complaint directly to the BOE. Not only do sources say that Arnold did not believe Landgraf was taking the appropriate actions as to her concerns, Messinger was the district’s compliance officer, Boulder Weekly


CONSIDERING CATARACT SURGERY? including responsibility for human resources complaints, and therefore Arnold had nowhere else to go but the BOE. According to Darci Mohr, the assistant superintendent of human resources during Messinger’s first three years with the district (2011-2014), the role of compliance officer is typically held within a district’s legal counsel or human resources department. Mohr was also a part of BVSD from 2001-2006, when she served in the district’s legal counsel office and held the role of district compliance officer, until she left BVSD. However, Mohr says, when she came back to BVSD in 2011, the compliance officer role had already been transferred to Messinger and when she offered to take on the role, “the decision was made that he (Messinger) was going to serve in that capacity.” Messinger says the decision was made with legal counsel and made sense given he’s the “most senior administrator.” “Honestly, in that whole time, I never really had an active role as a compliance officer because I delegated it back down to the appropriate level,” he says. “We just did that because everybody ultimately reports to me as the superintendent.” “Having been in both legal counsel and human resources for 15 years in public education in different school districts, I did find that having the superintendent as compliance officer a little out of the ordinary,” Mohr says. “In my professional opinion, oftentimes superintendents won’t want to be the compliance officer because as superintendents you can tend to be the lightning rod for various complaints and concerns and situations that come up. Oftentimes superintendents want to avoid that role.” Multiple sources confirm Arnold’s complaint was received by the BOE on a Sunday in mid-March. “I was provided a copy of the complaint when it came in. I met with Sam Fuqua (president of the BOE) and Jennie Bevel (vice president) that Monday afternoon,” Messinger says. “There wasn’t anything in the allegations, of course in my opinion, that would justify termination. I did and would argue that not everything in those allegations were true. Even with the weight of what’s in the allegation from the complaint, even if those are all true, in our opinion it didn’t justify termination.” He was advised at that time by district counsel Richard Bump of Caplan and Earnst to not meet with the complainant (Arnold) alone. And an email from Messinger dated March 19 instructs his assistant to cancel all future regularly scheduled check-in meetings with Arnold and Landgraf. Subsequently, the BOE hired private law firm Berg, Hill, Greenleaf and Bruscetti upon recommendation from Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett. The firm is a Boulder-based practice that specializes in a variety of areas including employment law, and by the end of March, attorney Kathleen Alt began appearing in communication emails regarding an open records request made by Arnold. BOE member Kathy Gebhardt was named the alternate compliance officer given that Messinger was the subject of the complaint. At the end of March, the BOE explained to BVSD staff via email the decision to place Messinger on paid leave was in response to a pending investigation regarding a personnel matter. The procedure for the investigation, according to Board President Fuqua, fell under the district’s nondiscrimination and equal opportunity policy (AC-R) that “address concerns and complaints about unlawful discrimination and/or harassment.” Fuqua, however, would not comment on whether or not those types of complaints were the basis for the investigation, only that the AC-R served as the model on which to conduct the investigation. According to sources, Kathyrn Miller, a private investigator from Littleton who specializes in workplace disputes, was then brought in to run the investigation, and Messinger says he was interviewed twice as part of the investigation. During the month Messinger was on paid leave, the BOE refused to disclose or even comment on the nature of the investigation, prompting a great deal of scrutiny from the larger BVSD community with the most vocal critics demanding more transparency in the process. After meeting 14 times in executive session, the BOE finally held the vote on Messinger’s future at a regularly scheduled public meeting on May 9. In a 7-0 vote, the board unilaterally terminated Messinger’s contract without cause while agreeing to pay out the remainder of his contracted compensation ($120,000). At the meeting, Fuqua acknowledged that while the process may have been frustrating for many people, he reiterated the confidential nature of the investigation and refused to talk about the nature of the complaint that led to the controversial process. “When you join the board, you agree to respect the confidentiality of executive See BVSD Page 12

Boulder Weekly

BOUlDER VISION CENTER The key to a satisfying outcome is expert consultation and planning. Having practiced at some of the nation’s most distinguished cataract surgery centers, our doctors have vast experience in cataract care. After a careful history and clinical examination - including digital imaging and eye measurements - they will discuss which of the latest technologies best meets your specific needs to restore vision. We work closely with the most experienced cataract surgeons in the region to make your experience and outcome the best it can possibly be. Call for a consultation today. Dr. Terri Oneby

303-443-4545

Dr. Brooks Alldredge

or visit bouldervisioncenter.com

28th near apapahoe

- buffalo village

MeDiCare, MeDiCaiD anD va aCCepteD

99

$

New Patient Special Exam, Digital X-rays & Cleaning In the absence of periodontal disease, call for details.

Our New Dental Plan Beats Insurance Not only are the entire staff friendly, helpful and courteous, they go above and beyond to accommodate your needs.

Now Offering One-Visit Crowns!

Harald Joesaar, DDS

6700 Lookout Road, Suite #1, Boulder 303-530-7525 • www.gunbarrelfamilydentistry.com July 13, 2017 11


BVSD from Page 11

Ready to experience something new? • • • • • • Local • • • • • • • • • • • • Non-Tipping • • • • • • • • • • • • Eco-Loving • • • • • • • • • • • • Complimentary Relaxation Rituals • • • • • • • • • • • • Online and/or Phone Scheduling • • • • • •

765 E South Boulder Rd Louisville (720) 890-5837 • www.salonnove.com

BOULDER'S HIP CONSIGNMENTS!

12 July 13, 2017

session and confidentiality as it relates to district policies and procedures,” Fuqua told BW. “We’re also subject to following state statutes.” Approximately three weeks after Messinger’s termination, Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Landgraf resigned. Landgraf has not publicly commented on the reason for her resignation and she did not return calls prior to press time. Since the Board’s decision on May 9, Messinger has repeatedly criticized the transparency of the BOE process and its refusal to meet with him after he was shown a copy of the compliance officer’s report, which summarized the actual investigative report. “We are very concerned about the objectivity of this investigation. Just from that glimpse of this report that we saw, if it is representative in any way of what’s in the full report, then we have serious concerns about the accuracy of the investigation,” Messinger says. “I was misrepresented, and we pointed that out to the Board.” He says Board members Fuqua and Gebhardt did meet with him after this, although he didn’t meet with the full board. And although his attorney requested it, the Board never released the full investigative report. Messinger also says he tried to negotiate alternate solutions to terminating his contract, including reducing his contract by one year to give him time to work through the administrative reorganization, with the help of a mediator if need be, and also give the Board time to find a replacement. But, he says, the Board refused. “We had suggested, not knowing what the findings were in the interviews, there would be a less extreme measure to address any concern that they might have over my supervision of my senior staff,” he says. Overall, Messinger says there was not enough transparency in the process and he’s “not done with the Board yet.” “I think the District, and the Board as their governing body, has an obligation to provide me with more information and we will pursue that,” he says. After Messinger’s complaints about the process came out in media reports, BOE President Fuqua submitted a letter to the editor to the Daily Camera stating: “There is a perception that Dr. Messinger was not allowed an opportunity to be engaged in the process. This is not the case. Dr. Messinger and his attorney were given the opportunity to participate in the process from the beginning and they did.” Regardless of Messinger’s attempts to salvage his job, in the end the BOE voted unanimously to terminate his contract on May 9, a consensus almost unheard of in this board’s history. The rarity of which Messinger apparently agrees: “This was a fairly extreme action but the level of dysfunction and conflict within this Board has been going on for some time, they have been unable to set their own agendas without hiring a facilitator to do that,” he says. “So this is obviously symptomatic of bigger issues.” Fuqua states in his letter to the editor: “The board is composed of elected officials with diverse points of view. They rarely decide on difficult issues unanimously. The vote to terminate Dr. Messinger’s employment was 7-0. If any members felt they were ‘pressured’ to vote a certain way, they could have made their feelings known. None were and none did.” So why was the Board motivated to unanimously terminate Messinger? And if it was a result of the investigation into Arnold’s accusations, which sources say went beyond mere management differences in the work place, why not fire for cause and save taxpayers the remaining contract payout? There may be an explanation. According to multiple sources, the BOE investigation not only examined questions concerning Arnold’s recent complaints, but also raised questions as to whether similar behavior may have occurred in the past. If such behaviors were known earlier and went uninvestigated and unaddressed, it could cause further problems for BVSD on a variety of fronts. According to multiple BW sources, a former high-ranking administrator, who has since left the District, raised serious concerns about Messinger’s behavior toward her during the time the two worked together, but she never filed a formal written complaint. At that time, sources say some BOE members requested an investigation into Messinger’s alleged behavior towards the woman despite the fact she had already left the District without filing a written complaint. No such investigation apparently occurred, however, even though sources say BVSD legal counsel Richard Bump had been made aware of the details of the woman’s complaints. The decision not to investigate in 2015 seems questionable at best given the guidelines for such decisions as laid out in BVSD’s own policies regarding such matters. The District’s policy AC-R states, “whether or not the individual files a Boulder Weekly


NEWS written complaint or otherwise requests action, the district is required by law to take steps to correct unlawful discrimination or harassment and to prevent recurring unlawful discrimination, harassment or retaliation.” Messinger told BW he was unaware of any complaints made prior to Arnold’s. “This is my 39th year in my profession, 20 years as a superintendent, I have never had any investigations, any allegations. I have only had glowing evaluations,” Messinger says. And this claim seems true based upon the history of positive evaluations he has received in the past, including in June 2016 before his latest contract was renewed. However, according to multiple sources, Arnold told the independent evaluator in charge of the 2016 investigation, Abbey Curnow-Chavez of The Trispective Group, about the issues she was having with Messinger. Also during that same evaluation process, sources say, information regarding the concerns of the previously mentioned former employee were also brought to the evaluator’s attention. When Curnow-Chavez was asked about such complaints, she said, “I absolutely cannot comment on anything.” It remains unclear why there is no mention of any such complaints in the final evaluation that was made public and ultimately led to Messinger’s 2016 contract renewal. As is often the case, one controversy leads to another. Since Messinger was terminated, the salaries of top-level BVSD administrators have come under BOE scrutiny. During budget negotiations in June, several Board members expressed concern over the salary schedules of Messinger’s cabinet, asking the overall board to do more research before approving a 4.8 percent raise for all cabinet members this year that accounts for both cost of living and experience. Additionally, there have been some questions as to why cabinet members were placed at 90 or 95 percent of the approved salary ranges, with several members receiving significant raises under Messinger. Landgraf, for instance, received a 35 percent raise in 2014, and Stafford a 26 percent increase that same year, the year they were both promoted. Other cabinet members also received significant raises that year, ranging from 11-17 percent increases. Regardless, the 2017 cost of living and experience increase were approved as part of the budget at the June 27 BOE meeting, with some cabinet member salaries reaching nearly $200,000, while Stafford will now make more than $204,000. While there may be perfectly legitimate reasons for these compensation increases, such as a change in title and responsibilities, the size of some raises and the level of pay in general for those at the top has caused some within BVSD to voice their frustration. Perhaps the best example can be found in a handwritten anonymous letter to the BOE dated in early May and obtained via an open records request. The letter reads, “We are hopeful that today this Board will hold accountable all those who are responsible for the harassment and hurt imposed on others, those who were in positions of power and trust and chose either to turn a blind eye or to cover up and hide allegations, and those who took benefit of any kind for their silence or inaction.” The letter closes with the statement: “I choose to remain anonymous for fear of retaliation, please understand.” Members of the BOE have been relentlessly criticized for dismissing Messinger and refusing to explain why he was terminated or what was the reason behind the investigation that led to his paid administrative leave. At the same time, many people from the teachers’ union to parents and others in the community still support Messinger and all he accomplished for the District. But just like people, all stories have two sides and most times we are better off having the opportunity to hear both. Messinger has stated that he would like to see the full investigation made public. That would seem to be the best way for the community to understand the nature of the allegations against the superintendent. Such transparency would also give the public a mechanism for evaluating the way the Board and BVSD legal counsel may have handled any past behaviors that should have warranted an earlier investigation. At this point, all the public knows is that the former BVSD superintendent’s behavior toward fellow BVSD administrator Leslie Arnold was investigated, and that at the end of that process, Dr. Bruce Messinger’s contract was terminated without cause. That doesn’t seem enough information to be fair to anyone; not Arnold, not Messinger, not the members of the BVSD Board of Education, not the District’s legal advisors nor anyone else who may have believed they were treated inappropriately. It would seem this story is far from over. To be continued. Boulder Weekly

29

$ Best Chiropractor

Eleven Years in a Row!

* Adjustment

no appointments • convenient hours licensed chiropractors *Offer valid for first visit only. Initial visit includes consultation, exam and adjustment.

BOULDER 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Suite C2

Monday-Friday: 10am-7pm • Saturday & Sunday: 10am-5pm

303.440.8019 • thejoint.com

50% OFF

INITIAL SESSION NEW CLIENTS ONLY

GETROLFING.COM | 720.878.2888

Folsom Street Laundry THE CLEANEST PLACE IN TOWN

• Self-Service • Wash/Dry/Fold Service • Dry Cleaning • Coin and/or Credit Card Machines • Comfortable Seating and Free Wi-Fi • Accepts iPay

1785 Folsom St. Boulder, 303.442.5339

The Cleaning Fairies We give you your weekends back!

Specializing In: Residential, Construction, Move Out & Move In, and Commercial Cleans.

WE A R E

I R I N G! H PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW. 720v565v3411 • boulderfairies@gmail.com www.cleaningfairies.com July 13, 2017 13


Support these local businesses Alan Green, DDS

H

See why we’re consistently the TOP MOVER in Boulder County at

TAYLORMOVE.COM

Licensed, Bonded & Insured • Locally Owned & Operated by the Taylor Family

Call Today! 303-443-5885

Sustainable

Nursery

Come to us for non-toxic products to manage pests and for strong, healthy plants Celebrating 25 Sustainable Years 4795 N. 26th Street • Boulder • www.HarlequinsGardens.com • 303-939-9403

Go to our web for more events:

www.yolosalsa.com Or Call 720-675-9656

elping people, studying the perfection in nature, problem solving and the expression of my creativity are all part of what I value in being a dentist. I graduated from New York University College of Dentistry in 1981. As an undergraduate, my interests ranged from engineering and philosophy, to botany and biology. As a graduate student, I researched neurophysiology. I find it intriguing that all of these fields show up in the dental office nearly every day. In 1983, I became a mercury-free dentist and

Grossen Bart Brewery

W

elcome to Grossen Bart Brewery! Grossen Bart Brewery is located directly behind the Safeway on Ken Pratt at 1025 Delaware Ave. in Longmont, Colorado. We are a 10bbl Brew House and serve only our beer brewed on site. We offer weekly live music, food trucks, and FREE popcorn! We are pet and family friendly. We have a nice outdoor beer garden with a mountain view! We look forward to pouring you and your friends, The Purest Form of Outlandish

H

Receive a Luxurious 2 hr ‘Double Session’ Rolfing, Neurofeedback and Cranial Therapy previously $240 for only $170! Now thru August 31.

Joy Om

303 449-8664

mindbodyneurofeedback.com

Character! Join us July 29th, Annual Beard Contest with music by Defunkt Railroad. Check out our events at Grossenbart.com, or call 720-438-2060 for more info.

Boulder Pet Doors ow many times a week do you work as a doorperson for your pets? Just settled on the couch to watch a good movie with your favorite person and a bowl of popcorn… and the dog wants to go out and chase the squirrels. My dog Rudy used to wake me up before the sun every morning to let him outside, but not since I installed my Hale Pet Door. I am so impressed with the quality of the doors I have become a dealer for Hale Pet Door across Northern Colorado, and would like to offer you more freedom and your pet more autonomy. These doors are manufactured in Canon City

Neuro Spa Special

began studying the many aspects of holistic medicine. Nutrition, homeopathy, bodywork, spiritual healing, holistic dentistry and holistic, herbal and oriental medicine are all ares I have studied. Advance dental studies include periodonticds, implants, cosmetics, complex diagnosis, pain relief, and TMJ and bite corrections. Our office is located at 625 S Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 Please call 303-543-8555 to schedule an appointment.

Colorado; they have extruded aluminum frames with reinforced corners and superior weatherstripping, along with the most flexible flaps for your pet’s comfort. Bill Hale was the first person to start installing pet doors in glass in the mid 80’s. At Boulder Pet Doors I offer many different models and installations that can be seen on my website boulderpetdoors.com in the photo gallery, and there is a link to Hale Pet Door to see the many products we have to offer. www.boulderpetdoors.com. Bernie Desfosses, Owner, or info@boulderpetdoors. com, Longmont. 720-507-5476

ArtWalk

LONGMONT

free arts festival in beautiful

DOWNTOWN LONGMONT

SEPTEMBER 16

4-8PM * Live Music * Artists *Activities * fun for all ages artwalklongmont.org brought to you in part by

No Assembly Required. Delivery Available. What Could Be Easier!

We have a great selection of furniture at prices you will appreciate.

3550 Arapahoe Avenue • Boulder 303.440.9011 • usedfurnitureboulder.com


Support these local businesses No Place Like Home

N

o Place Like Home has been doing business in Boulder since 1986 selling new and consigned furniture at great prices. We are committed to recycling good used items and providing you with a great selection of furniture at prices you will appreciate! We offer pickup service with professional movers who can remove or place each piece of furniture exactly where you want it. Delivery fees begin at $55.00 within the city of Boulder and vary outside the city limits, ask your sales associate for details. Visit our website’s consignment page if you are interested in consigning your furniture with us. Come on in and check us out! No Place Like Home is located at 3550 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. www.usedfurnitureboulder.com. Open Mon-Sat 10am-7pm and Sunday 11am-5pm. 303-440-9011

T

Carousel of Happiness is located 17 miles west of Boulder on HWY 119

www.carouselofhappiness.org 20 Lakeview Drive Nederland 303-258-3457

together and raised money to build it a home. The Carousel opened Memorial Day, 2010, with the first ride a silent memorial to veterans. A little over a year later, the Carousel awarded its 100,000th rider a special card, giving her free rides for life. The winner was a 5-year-old girl who was living in Boulder while her father was deployed in Iraq. The Carousel has become a destination for families, senior groups, organizations serving people with disabilities, parties and weddings. A local dating Website called it a perfect place for a first date. As a non-profit organization, the Carousel relies on volunteers and donations to keep rides $1 so that everyone can experience that feeling of joy. The Carousel aspires to share proceeds with organizations that serve people with special needs. To donate please visit the Carousel’s Website. www.carouselofhappiness.org. 303 258-3457

H

NATURAL DENTISTRY is the art of combining holistic, natural, and complementary medicine with the latest bioesthetic dental techniques to provide positive experiences and attain long-term health.

625 S. BROADWAY • BOULDER, CO 80305 • 303.543.8555 naturaldentistboulder.com

Our New Location! 303.402.0122

3070 28TH ST., STE D. BOULDER CO 80301 thedrumshopboulder.com

OPEN 7

days a week

Boulder Pet Doors Your Pets Opening To Health & Happiness

To learn more visit:

boulderpetdoors.com or call: 720-507-5476

Harlequin’s Gardens arlequin’s Gardens is celebrating 25 Years as a local, sustainable plant nursery. We grow our plants without toxic pesticides, fungicides and chemical fertilizers. All our plants are free of neonicotinoid pesticides. We specialize in natives, organic vegetable and herb starts, xeriscape, hardy roses, Colorado-adapted and unusual perennials, fruit trees and berry bushes, groundcovers, hardy cacti and seeds. Come to us for soil-building products, composts, mulches, fertilizers; books by local authors; non-toxic

#1 attraction in Nederland . . . next to the view!

Hours: Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm / Fri & Sat 10am - 7pm

Carousel of Happiness he story of the Carousel of Happiness is the story of a young Marine, a derelict carousel, and the small mountain town of Nederland, CO. It starts in 1910 when a Looff carousel was installed at Saltair Park, outside Salt Lake City, Utah. During its 49 years at Saltair, the carousel survived fires and wind storms. It was moved to the Utah State School where it was enjoyed by people with disabilities until 1986, when it was sold and stripped of its wooden horses. Meanwhile, a young Marine in Vietnam, Scott Harrison, (pictured at the right) received a tiny music box that he held to his ear to balance the horror of war. He began to dream of building a carousel in a mountain meadow. Decades later, when Scott heard of the empty, abandoned Utah carousel, he rescued it. He would spend 26 years carving animals to bring it back to life. As he finished the last of 35 animals, the community of Nederland pulled

Rides $1. Happiness FREE!

pest-management supplies; and good advice to support your gardening success. See our schedule of empowering classes. •Growers of Life Brand Plants ™ • The Life Brand: Oil is the problem, Life is the Solution • Support Life with organic matter and love, • Plants need Soil Life • Healthy Soil=Healthy Plants • Vitality & Nutrition=Value www.HarlequinsGardens.com. Boulder 303-939-9403

SMART WOOD

7 er 77 uld 2-7 t, Bo 4 4 S 330 9 7th 1 19

FLOORING SOLUTIONS

SHOP • SAVE • SUSTAIN Now Offering Estate Buyouts! ...or Consign your Quality Furniture!

1225 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont • 303-485-2617 • wwwLifestyleConsignments.com

Rockin’ Robin’s

• Vintage Clothing • Costumes • Furniture • Consignment

NOW OPEN!

233 Main St. Longmont, CO • 303-652-4144 www.rockinrobins.net


$1000

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION CASH

GOOD THRU

JULY 17th

ALL LEASE SPECIALS 12000 MILES PER YEAR. $1999 DOWN, PLUS 1ST PAYMENT, AND TAXES DUE AT SIGNING

2017 NISSAN TITAN 4X4 CREW CAB SV

2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE!

2 OR MORE AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE!

Model Number: 38217 Stock Number: HN524821 VIN Number: 1N6AA1EJ0HN524821

MSRP... $42,330

NISSAN FRONTIER

LEASE FOR $299

OR UP TO

7,750 OFF

$

Model Number: 38217 Stock Number: HN524821 VIN Number: 1N6AA1EJ0HN524821

MSRP... $31,680

LEASE FOR $219

1005 KEN PRATT BLVD., LONGMONT, CO 80501 720-501-2975 • WWW.VALLEYNISSAN.COM 16 July 13 , 2017

2017 4X4 CREW CAB SV

Model Number: 32217 Stock Number: HN713179 VIN Number: 1N6DD0EV4HN713179

OR UP TO

6,000 OFF

$

2 YEARS COMPLIMENTARY MAINTENANCE Boulder Weekly


boulderganic Wolves return to Estes Park (for the weekend) Colorado nonprofit seeks to educate public about the rare species by Mana Parker

A

ON THE BILL: Wolves return to Estes Park with Wolfwood Refuge. 10 a.m.7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, July 15-16, Hermit Park Open Space, Hermit Park Road, Estes Park. Public lectures at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Saturday, 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday.

Joan Fassett

fter a massive wolf eradication effort in the United States, the last remaining wolf in Colorado was killed in 1930. But for decades since, conservation groups have been advocating for the reintroduction of wolves in the Colorado backcountry, arguing that they help to repair the ecosystem by culling the overgrown elk population. But not everyone supports the effort. Ranchers and farmers have fought against the return of wolves fearing they could kill livestock. Others in rural and wilderness areas fear being attacked by the predators. In light of the controversy surrounding the return of wolves to the wilds of Colorado, Wolfwood Refuge, a nonprofit that shelters rescued wolves and wolf-dogs, seeks to educate the public about this endangered species during its annual visit July 15-16. “[The wolves] are not vicious man killers. On the other hand, they are what they are, which is apex predators,” says Paula Watson, the founder of Wolfwood. Watson wants to emphasize however, that she is only a proponent of reintroducing wolves in Colorado if it’s done properly, with collaboration from people who know the best way to do it without harming the animals.

Despite her outspoken advocacy for returning wolves to Colorado, Watson is more firmly rooted in her own work of rescuing wolves and wolf dogs already partially domesticated and unable to be returned to the wild. After adopting her first wolf dog in 1995, Watson has continued adopting animal after animal. That effort has now evolved into Wolfwood Refuge, an organization in Ignacio, Colorado, run with the help of 35 volunteers for the 55 to 60 wolves now living there. Her mission with the refuge center is twofold: educate the public about the species, and save the animals from bad situations with unqualified pet owners Wolves are often or in shelter facilities maligned by unequipped to take care of ranchers and farmers who the specific needs of wolves oppose their and wolf dogs. reintroduction to Colorado. All of the animals Wolfwood receives come to the refuge in need of medical care and socialization before they are put into the pens with the other animals, says Darla Lange, who volunteers at Wolfwood taking care of merchandise, events and public relations. The animals are usually rescued by the police, animal shelters or animal control, and are sent to Wolfwood as an alternative to being euthanized.

Do Your Part

Be theForChange Your Home, Your Planet, Your Wallet

Do Your Part For Your Home, Your Planet, Your Wallet

“They come from all walks of life, from different people and different circumstances. We just do our best to see that they are taken care of,” says volunteer Joan Fassett who has been working at Wolfwood since 2002. Wolfwood has received wolves and wolf dogs from all over the country, from Alaska to Iowa. “The Alaska 9” was the single biggest rescue in Wolfwood history when the group came to the refuge as weeksold puppies in 2011. Another six wolves came from Oakland, California, where the police found them chained in a meth lab. After being taken to a shelter, they were transported to Wolfwood and underwent extensive rehabilitation. All of the animals Wolfwood receives have varying personalities — some are more social, can be trained and enjoy being around people, while others will never come near humans and may never be able to be trained. It’s up to the volunteers who take care of the wolves to know their behavior, and therefore how to act around them. Of all the animals at the refuge, Watson says she plans to bring eight ambassador wolves with her to Estes Park this coming weekend, wolves that are comfortable being around people. The event, which Watson predicts will draw 600-700 people, is a wearing, but rewarding experience for the participating animals, as well as an educational experience for everyone who goes. Watson emphasizes that many preconceived notions about wolves are inaccurate and need to be altered, whether or not the animals are reintroduced in Colorado. While wolves are not just like dogs — rather an exotic species requiring special care — neither are they the vicious animals they are often depicted as — a false image causes fear within rural communities where the animals may roam again one day. By hosting events like the one in Estes Park this weekend, Wolfwood is introducing wolves to the public, hoping to provide living proof against such misperceptions.

ime Limited T S

TE REBA p To

Now Offering:

U Time

Limited $S1,300 Electric BATE REAdvising Vehicle Up To

Boulder County Can Help For Your Home, Your Planet, Your Wallet 300 * FreeCounty 3rd Party Home Energy Advisors Are EVs $1,right Boulder Can Help Boulder* County Can Efficiency Help for you? Home Energy Rebates * Free 3rd Party Home Energy Advisors * Free 3rd Party Home Energy for Advisors * Greater Assistance Income Qualified Homes

* Home Energy Rebates * Home Energy Efficiency Rebates * Free or 50% Off Home Upgrades - Sliding Scale * Greater Assistance for Income Qualified Homes SIGN UP SIGN TODAY 303.544.1000 EnergySmartYES.com UP TODAY 303.544.1000 EnergySmartYES.com EnergySmart services are availableEnergySmart to homes and businesses in alltoBoulder County communities. EnergySmart is fundedEnergySmart by Boulder is County, City ofCounty, Boulder Action Climate Plan (CAP) thetax City ofthe Longmont. EnergySmart residential services areare administered services are available homes and businesses in all Boulder County communities. funded the by Boulder theClimate City of Boulder Actiontax Planand (CAP) and City of Longmont. EnergySmart residential services administeredby by CLEAResult. CLEAResult.

Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 17


2017

2017 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.0i 5MT

MSRP: $19,377 Model Code: HJA-01 Stock Number: H1621529 VIN Number: H1621529

MSRP: $26,870 Model Code: HDB-01 Stock Number: H3408305 VIN Number: H3408305

As Low As

109/MO

$

SUBARU OUTBACK 2.5i CVT

LEASE with $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING

2017 Subaru Impreza 2.0i 5MT for 36 months at $109 per month, plus tax, $2,999 Due at signing, plus tax, 10,000 miles per year. Offers with approved credit. No security deposit required. Stock#H1621529, model code HJA-01, MSRP: $19,377. See Dealer for Details. Must take delivery from dealer stock by 7/31/2017.

Rates as low as 1.9% for up to 48 Months W.A.C.

As Low As

149/MO

$

LEASE with $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING

2017 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT for 36 months at $149 per month, plus tax, $2,999 Due at signing, plus tax, 10,000 miles per year. Offers with approved credit. No security deposit required. Stock#H3408305, model code HDB-01, MSRP $26,870. See Dealer for Details. Must take delivery from dealer stock by 7/31/2017.

Rates as low as 0% for up to 48 Months W.A.C.

®

1800 INDUSTRIAL CIRCLE, LONGMONT, CO 80501 • 720-745-4850 • WWW.VALLEYSUBARU.COM 18 July 13, 2017

Boulder Weekly


adventure

Instagram/Wall_E_Vision

T

he signs were there: constant thirst, loss of weight despite a healthy appetite, fatigue. A trip to the hospital confirmed it: 12-year-old Walt Drennan had type 1 diabetes. Type 1 is a relatively rare condition, affecting only 5 percent of the total population of diabetics — type 2, sometimes referred to as adult onset diabetes, affects the other 95 percent. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, a hormone that allows the body to use sugar from food as energy. Those with type 1 produce no insulin whatsoever, so sugar builds up in the blood and never makes it to the cells. Regular insulin injections are necessary to keep blood sugar levels within a very specific range. Too much insulin can kill you, but too little can have long-term damaging affects on the kidneys and liver.

Beyond bikes

More than 20 people with type 1 diabetes ride across the country by Caitlin Rockett

Top: A few Beyond Bikes riders gather for a photo; Middle: Walt Drennan celebrates in Washington D.C.; Bottom: Drennan recreates the famous scene in Rocky... but with a bike.

Boulder Weekly

In the middle of a move from Texas to Mexico City, Drennan remembers his diagnosis getting somewhat lost — diluted — in the general chaos of the time. With his parents there to support him and help him manage the condition, Drennan didn’t feel scared or shocked, just different. He says he never truly accepted the diagnosis; he just “dealt with it.” He never talked to people his age about having diabetes, and adults often didn’t know how to treat Drennan, fussing over what he could and couldn’t eat. “There aren’t a lot of people with any understanding, or not enough understanding, about type 1, so they assume things,” he says. “It can be tough when you are alone in a community that doesn’t get what you are going through and likely never will. I was the only type 1 I knew for a long time. There are psychological and emotional effects that can happen outside of the medical complications.” Drennan was never an athletic kid, more invested in books and video games. But that all changed in college when he found out about a program called Bike and Build. The ride takes young adults from Charleston, South Carolina, to Santa see BEYOND BIKES Page 20

July 13 , 2017 19


Instagram/Wall_E_Vision

CLEAR YOUR CLUTTER, CHANGE LIVES MAKE A DONATION – FREE PICKUP CALL 303-404-2008

From arm chairs to washing machines, every donation or purchase at the Flatirons Habitat for Humanity ReStore helps build homes for families in Boulder and Broomfield counties.

Sometimes a fried hot dog is the perfect answer to low blood sugar on a cross-country bike ride.

LEARN MORE: www.flatironshabitat.org/restore or follow us on Facebook NEED SOMETHING? SHOP from 9am to 5:30pm Wednesday through Saturday and 10am to 5pm Sunday 1 Park Street, Broomfield, CO 80020

BEYOND BIKES from Page 19

Visiting Boulder? We have Boulder’s Best

Bike Rental Selection

We have the bike you need for enjoying the Summer! CITY CRUISER, FULL SUSPENSION, ROAD, KID’S BIKES AND TRAILERS

1668 30TH STREET, BOULDER • 303-443-1132 • BoulderBikeSmith.com Open 9am-6pm every day 20 July 13, 2017

Cruz, California, after raising thousands of dollars in funding for affordable housing programs and taking courses in affordable housing issues. Drennan had never ridden cross-country before, and he was the only member of the team with type 1 diabetes. “Knowing what to expect was hard for me that first time,” he says. “[Before the ride] I found someone who had type 1 and had done it before. He told me how he’d prepared for it. It showed me that someone could get through it unscathed.” It was on that first cross-country ride that Drennan finally found the acceptance he’d denied himself for so many years. “It was the first time I had to accept and deal with my type 1 as a member of a team, as something that could affect other people, something that could affect their time on the trip,” Drennan says. “It was the first time I felt the drawbacks; it was a lot of exercise, there were a lot of lows, a lot of inexplicable highs, blood sugar wise. I learned a lot about my type 1; it’s a part of me but it can’t define me. It taught me how to minimize risks, how to live with it and how to have a good time on the bike.” Drennan had such a good time, he signed up for another cross-country bike ride through the 4K for Cancer program. Again, he was the only member of the team with type 1. He made the decision to keep it to himself, but he felt isolated. After his second ride, an idea began to percolate: what would it feel like not to be alone on this kind of ride? What if he could raise money and awareness about type 1? What if Drennan stopped being quiet about his condition and started educating people about it? The answer was Beyond Bikes, a program Drennan developed with the help and backing of outreach and educational outfit Beyond type 1. The inaugural ride this summer includes more then 20 people with type 1 diabetes, cycling from New York City to San Francisco, a total of 4,248 miles. Teams of four to five cyclists ride each day, covering an average of 75 miles a day. Another two team members travel in an equipment trailer, and others work setting up lunch and rest breaks. Each rider was required to raise $4,500 in order to participate. The team raised more than $100,000 and has traveled more than halfway through their countrywide trip, stopping in cities along the way to talk about type 1. They’ll be stopping in Boulder on Monday, July 17. “My hope for this ride was to show ... what type 1 really is and what it’s like to live with it but also what can be done, and the importance of support,” Drennan says. “I feel like this ride has been a lot easier because I have 20 people who know exactly what it’s like. ... If I’m missing medication I can ask somebody to borrow something. It’s a really weird weight to be lifted off because I’ve had it for so long.” Drennan hopes the ride becomes an annual event, something that people “can look forward to, that they can kind of put on their bucket list.” “I don’t really worry about the future of diabetes research,” Drennan admits. “There’s a running joke in the type 1 world that the cure is five or 10 years away. I’ve been hearing that for 17 years now. I don’t pay attention to the research aspect of it. What I do pay attention to is people with type 1 doing extraordinary things.” Boulder Weekly


Safely Manage Your Allergy Symptoms With New Daily Pill This new patented formula pill is effective and safe to take every day By: D. Steller News Health Reporter NHR – A new pill is hitting the shelves this allergy season that has allergy sufferers excited. Innovus Pharmaceuticals, the company behind the breakthrough, announced that after a landmark published clinical trial, they are bringing their new allergy management product to the U.S. The buzz around the new allergy pill, which goes under the brand name AllerVarx® is incredible. In published clinical tests, it proved to dramatically relieve nearly every seasonal allergy symptom tested! But what makes this a game changer for allergy suffers is that because it’s completely natural, it’s safe to take every single day (even for those on prescription medications). “After years of research we were able to bring to the U.S. an all-natural allergy management formula that partipants in the clinical study reduced the use of the most popular OTC allergy medications by 70% but without the side effects that make taking allergy pills so problematic,” says Dr. Bassam Damaj, from Innovus. “It’s a non–drowsy, all-natural allergy management pill clinically published to be effective, but safe to take every day. It really doesn’t get better than that.”

SAY GOODBYE TO SEASONAL ALLERGIES Seasonal allergies affect an estimated 40-60 million Americans each year. Unfortunately, for many long-time sufferers, the leading over the counter brands are simply not an option. The chemical decongestants in popular allergy pills work by causing the small blood vessels in your nose, throat and sinuses to narrow. The result is a dramatic decrease in swelling, which is causing your congestion and the rest of your symptoms. But decongestants can have a horrifying effect on blood pressure (it will send it skyrocketing!) and are not recommended to be taken daily or with most medications, leaving most with seasonal allergies suffering in silence...until now.

SAFE TO TAKE EVERY-DAY Seasonal Allergy is caused by allergic sensitivity to airborne mold or pollen spores from grass, weeds, and trees. When your body is exposed to allergens, it triggers the release of special immune chemicals called histamines to get them out. These histamines create an enormous amount of inflammation in the mucous membrane, which leads to all of the itching, sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes that you experience with seasonal allergies. AllerVarx® naturally supports a healthy immune system for the management of seasonal symptoms of allergies without the use of decongestants. AllerVarx® helps your body’s allergic response, resulting in relief from symptoms as clinically tested and published! And because it’s natural and doesn’t use chemical decongestants, it’s safe to take every day.

AllerVarx® works in three easy steps: Step 1: Perilla

immediately blocks the release of histamines. Step 2: Quercetin makes sure that your histamines stay blocked! And delivers fast action! Step 3: Vitamin D3 acts as a natural antiinflammatory and supports normal function of immune system, improving that “blockedup” feeling. AllerVarx® showed significant reduction in every allergy symptom tested.

INSTANT RELIEF THAT LASTS AllerVarx® patented controlled release formula contains a special blend of three all natural ingredients, which are clinically proven and published to deliver remarkable management from allergy symptoms.

Perilla Seed Extract is the leading ingredient in AllerVarx® that makes it so stunningly effective. Perilla naturally blocks histamines from creating the inflammation that causes congestion. Multiple published studies show Perilla can prevent up to 99% of histamine release. Quercetin is another natural histamine blocker that prevents and relieves the persistent sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and a runny nose that accompanies most allergies. And vitamin D3 is a natural antiinflammatory and supports normal function of your immune system. But what makes AllerVarx® so amazing is its patented fast-slow technology. Bilayer tablets with patented rapid and slow release technology allow for a controlled release of ingredients. Fast release of Perilla allows for instant action. While slow release of quercetin + vitamin D3 provides relief that can last all day! AllerVarx® is clinically proven and published to significantly reduce every single allergy symptom tested in the clinical trial and provide much needed relief during allergy season. CLINICALLY TESTED In a published clinical study, male and female subjects with a history of seasonal allergies took 2 tablets of AllerVarx® per day, one in the morning and evening at mealtimes, for 30 days showed a significant reduction in symptoms across the board: sneezing, stuffy nose, nasal congestion, itchy eyes, watery eyes, and sore eyes. After 30 days on AllerVarx® participants showed an average of 70% reduction in overall symptoms. And a 73% reduction in the use of allergy medication by the end of the study.

70% REDUCTION IN ALLERGY SYMPTOMS AllerVarx® is a clinically tested and published, all natural dietary supplement containing Quercetin, Vitamin D3 and Perilla that supports your immune system, enhances the body’s natural defenses, and decreases histaminic response. The results from the published clinical trial show AllerVarx® provides real relief from seasonal allergies and support. Best of all, it’s all-natural, nondrowsy formula is safe for every-day use and gentle on stomach.

AllerVarx®: Created to be taken daily due to its safety and ability to manage symptoms associated with allergies without side effects

AllerVarx® showed an average of 70% reduction in overall symptoms.

RELIEF IS AVAILABLE NOW AllerVarx® patented controlled release formula provides instant results that lasts all day. No side effects or medicine interactions have been reported. The sooner you start using AllerVarx®, the sooner you can say goodbye to seasonal allergies and safely stop the misery of bouts with pollen, hay fever, and grasses. AllerVarx® is NOT sold in stores. No prescription or doctor visit is required. Your product will be delivered directly to your door. AllerVarx™ starts working immediately and is guaranteed to significantly reduce all your seasonal allergy symptoms.

HOW TO GET ALLERVARX® IN COLORADO This is the first official public release of AllerVarx® in Colorado. In order to get the word out about AllerVarx®, the manufacturer, Innovus Pharmaceuticals is offering a special introductory discount to all Colorado residents. A special phone hotline has been set up to take advantage of deep discounts during this ordering opportunity. Special discounts will be available starting today at 7:00am. The discounts will automatically be applied to all Colorado callers. The Special TOLL-FREE Hotline number is 1-800-931-1569 and will be open 24-hours a day. Only a limited supply of AllerVarx® is currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more become available. But this could take weeks. The maker advises your best chance is to call 1-800-931-1569 early.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.


MUSIC

@

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

FREE

JULY 14

( 9PM - MIDNIGHT )

Courtyard Concert Series SUMMER 2017 22 July 13 , 2017

FEATURING:

/porwinehouse/

LIVE MUSIC BY:

LONGEST DAY OF THE YEAR @PorWineHouse

PorWineBar Boulder Weekly


buzz Susan France

The art of

politics ‘Modern America’ asks artists to respond to the political landscape

by Amanda Moutinho Susan France

O

ver the past several months, the current state of politics has left many dejected. It’s a feeling that weighed heavily on Firehouse Art Center curator Jessica Kooiman Parker. “I was feeling powerless and frustrated, literally just thinking, ‘What can I do to help people feel better about the political climate?’” Parker says. “I think all of us are thinking that: What can I do? I can go to a march, or I can write my congressman. For artists, what’s great is they can reflect back and create a piece that viewers can go see and connect with.” But when she looked at the walls of her home and the art she collected, she felt everything was too beautiful. She wanted art that had a message — ugly art for an ugly world. So she reached out to local artists and asked them to use their work to react to the current political state, and the result is Modern America, now showing at the Firehouse through July 30. “I want this to slap people in the face, I want it to scream at people, or it can even quietly reflect,” Parker says. “I want the artist and the viewer to feel really passionate about it.” Parker started with asking the artists questions: Do you believe in something enough that you are willing to fight for it? What do you stand for? What are you ashamed of? What are you proud of? The artists came back with varying answers. Some tackled issues of environment, feminism and greed, while others explored hoarding, selfie culture, the frustration of failed promises and even TSA pat downs. Along with analyzing various facets of American life, the show also questions the role of the artist in responding to politics. Parker says artists have the opportunity to reflect society back to the

Susan France

see MODERN AMERICA Page 24

Clockwise from Top: “Big Sticks,” “Hot Air,” and “Kings” by Clay Hawkley.

Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 23


MODERN AMERICA from Page 23

With special guests

Dearling Mr. Majestyk's 8-Track Revival Spinphony 24 July 13 , 2017

audience and create work that forges connections. And many of the artists agree. “I believe artists have a responsibility to represent the concerns of the people, whatever that may mean,” says Libby Barbee, one of the artists in the show. “Art is one of the few languages through which we can talk — really talk — about these big issues.” Barbee is not new to blending politics into her art. The underlying theme she works with is examining humanity’s relationship with the natural world. In Modern America, Barbee’s piece “Sanguinaria” showcases wells, fire explosions and flowers blended together in saturated colors to create a sort of hyper reality. She links fracking and natural gas extraction with bloodwood, a North America plant used by Native Americans that was later peddled by snake oil salesmen as a miracle drug. “I was interested in using this plant that was being sold as medicine but was actually really Susan France poisonous, and the analogy of that to natural gas as being this fuel that’s going to be this interim savior from coal and dirtier fuels, but that is in fact equally terrible,” she says. With the invitation from Parker to be overtly political, Barbee wanted to show the misuse and abuse of our landscapes. In “Sanguinaria,” she stresses that we’re facing a critical moment with the Libby Barbee, environment. “Sanguinaria” “In the next 15 years we need to get ourselves off fossil fuels if we’re going to be able to continue as a species,” she says. “We’re in decade zero; I think we’re very much in denial about that. And the Trump administration is unfortunate timing in that we need to be making some huge moves right now. The damage that is done in the next few years may be irrevocable.” While Barbee’s piece is the only one in Modern America that deals hands-on with global warming, others reference the environment as one of the many casualties of the current state of the country. “There’s a violence in the air in modern America, via language or what you see in the news, whether it’s live video or taking health care away from tens of millions of Americans,” says artist Clay Hawkley. “There’s direct and indirect violence. Climate change, the environment, the destruction of those things, is a slower violence on the world and ourselves.” Hawkley frequently tackles politics in his work. In Modern America, he showcases multiple pieces, from a display of deflated balloons in “Hot Air” to a drawing of a dollar bill imprinted with the words “Believe me,” a popular phrase for our commander-in-chief. But perhaps Hawkley’s most haunting work is “Big Sticks,” a set of seven wooden bats, painted red, white and blue and covered with nails jutting out from all sides. Leaning against the gallery wall, “Big Sticks” addresses the elephant in the room. “I’m not a violent person, but it feels like there are new potentials for violence. We have a greater capacity for it now more than ever,” he says. “Things can escalate really quickly, and they have. Having those bats in the gallery, they could be picked up at any time and be used against somebody in that space. I certainly don’t expect that or want to encourage that in any way, but that threat is on a lot of people’s minds, certainly on mine.” Hawkley believes it’s art’s job to initiate dialogue and get people to think in nontraditional ways to stimulate growth and new perspectives. “[Art] gives you the right to think freely and act freely and be offensive. That’s the beauty of it,” he says. “It’s an artist’s responsibility to call it as I see it. That doesn’t mean you’re necessarily going to agree with me or your neighbor, but I Boulder Weekly


Susan France

buzz

think it’s as important now as it’s ever been to get outside of your own head, to let something plant a seed and maybe get you thinking in a different way. Art is a Cindy Sepucha, “Nevertheless great place to do that.” She Persisted” For her painting “Nevertheless She Persisted,” Cindy Sepucha chose one of the most iconic symbols of America: the Statue of Liberty. To avoid its almost-clichéd imagery, she opted to paint it from a different perspective: from inside the flame. At first glance, the painting looks dismal, almost as if Lady Liberty is melting or fading away. But the work offers hope for America’s future, Sepucha says. “The artist who created the statue wanted to make a lighthouse, and the purpose of a lighthouse is to guide people through a storm to safe land so they don’t hit anything,” Sepucha says. “And it’s not an acting lighthouse because it’s not in an area that needs one, but I liked that symbolism of the light being the guide and kind of a safety net. “I wanted to show [the painting] from the perspective of that light, which is kind of like a symbol of all things good in the United States,” she continues. “You can see the faint glow coming from the bottom of the piece; it’s what I saw as the hope. I believe things are going to be OK, regardless of how we feel right now, because I believe in the people who live here and in humanity in general.” Normally, Sepucha says, her work is more whimsical than political. But even before being asked to participate in Modern America, she felt ON THE BILL: Modern the call to respond to the state of the world. America. Firehouse Art “As an artist and anybody who uses expression Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. in their work, I think right now if you’re feeling Through July 30. angst about what’s going on, it’s important to share that in whatever way you use as your mode of expression,” she says. These days, with such thick party lines drawn, it’s hard to step across the aisle and have an open-minded discussion. But Sepucha hopes Modern America can be a step in the right direction. “I don’t necessarily think if you make art that’s anti-gun, you’re going to make an NRA member believe in stricter gun control,” she says. “But I do think that having this consistent conversation around things that are important to people is a way to continue the conversation on what is important to us as a society.” As curator, Parker wants the show to serve as not only a conversation starter, but also as a reminder of the strength of community. “The thing that comforts me is knowing that we’re all in this together,” Parker says. “And so seeing all the artists with all their different perspectives feels to me like a good way to bring us back together.” With Parker’s idea of “ugly art for an ugly world,” she wants the show to galvanize the viewer to fight for the future. “There’s a lot of frustration, animosity and anger, but at the end of the day there’s some hope that it will get better, especially if we do it together and we’re conscious about it,” she says. “We so easily get lost in our day-to-day life and we let it go. Let’s not forget that it’s happening, and let’s do something about it.” Boulder Weekly

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER with EMILY BARKER

JULY 24 • 7:30 PM TICKETS: chautauqua.com 900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

coloradochautauqua

colochautauqua

July 13 , 2017 25


COSTUMES FOR

CONCERTS and

FESTIVALS BOULDER’S FUNKIEST COSTUME SHOP! 673 30th St., Boulder Corner of 30th & Baseline in Williams Village Shopping Center (between Moe’s BBQ & Gameforce)

303-440-8515 theatricalcostumesetc.com

NEW HOURS: 10AM - 7PM DAILY

THURSDAY JULY 13 10:00 AM

BELLA GAIA: BEAUTIFUL EARTH 2:00 PM

DYNAMIC EARTH 7:00 PM

BELLA GAIA: BEAUTIFUL EARTH 8:30 PM

LASER: SUBLIME FRIDAY JULY 14 8:00 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 9:30 PM

LASER: QUEEN 11:00 PM

LIQUID SKY FLOYD: THE WALL SATURDAY JULY 15 1:00 PM

PLANETS AND LASER: GALACTIC ODYSSEY 2:30 PM

SUPERVOLCANOES 9:00 PM

LASER: PRINCE 10:30 PM

LIQUID SKY: GORILLAZ SUNDAY JULY 16 1:00PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 2:30 PM

STARS AND LASER: GALACTIC ODYSSEY 4:00 PM

WE ARE STARS

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 26 July 13 , 2017

overtones

Courtesy of Thomas Surey/Second Nature PR

I

ON THE BILL: UZ. 9 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Tickets $20.

Beneath the mask

Trap artist UZ shows his face by Alvaro Sanchez

n a post-Daft Punk world, putting on a mask to hide your identity has almost become a prerequisite for emerging DJs. SBTRKT, Deadmau5, Marshmello and Cazzete are just a few names from a list that goes deep into the abyss of electronic subgenres. For some DJs the mask is a gimmick, an excuse to add more lights and mystery to an overpopulated music community. For others, a mask is a filter, separating what’s important — the music — from everything else. Just as Daft Punk introduced the world to their brand of funky-inspired dance music as two robots from parts unknown, UZ, aka Guillaume Barbier, donned a mask and ushered trap music into the electronic dance era. Although the real pioneers of the synthesized, 808 bass-drenched trap genre stem from Southern hip-hop legends such as Lil’ Jon and T.I., Barbier made trap his own, fusing it with gritty, industrial synths, thick drum patterns and hip-hop sound samples that have now become a staple of the genre. After learning how to play guitar and drums proved insufficient to satisfy his musical appetite, Barbier delved into digital production. “[I] got into turntablism/DJing around 1996 or ’97, and music production around 2000,” the French DJ says via an email interview, retaining that secretive persona he’s known for. “I started by making beats and scratching break-beats, and then I progressed from hip-hop beats to electro/house/ pop to dubstep, to finally concentrate [on] making trap beats until today.” Barbier took on the moniker DJ Troubl and made a name for himself on some of the most prestigious dance

floors on the planet. But he longed for a way to distance himself from his music and let listeners make opinions without having to worry about the person that makes it. That’s when Barbier donned the mask and became UZ. “I decided to start the project UZ anonymously on the internet at the beginning of 2012,” he says. Beneath the golden mask, made by FX artist Ralis Khan (who also designed the masks for Slipknot), Barbier took mystery very seriously. “I created my own alphabet to respond to comments and tweet people,” he explains. After five years as the mysterious UZ, Barbier revealed his identity for the first time during a show at Los Angeles’ Belasco Theater earlier this year. “When I heard the track ‘Mask Off ’ by Future, I immediately thought, ‘Why not close the set with it and actually take the mask off?” Barbier explains. “We talked to the crew and everyone loved the idea.” The decision to reveal his identity comes from difficulties of managing celebrity status and the daily ins andouts of making and releasing music. “At the start, the secrecy was fun for the first few years but it became really difficult after that,” he says. “Also, it kept me isolated from people and was not fun anymore. We’re way more relaxed now, especially since people now know who I am.” Barbier is currently touring after releasing the latest UZ album, Layers, an ambitious yet well-contained project full of features and co-collaborators. “I wanted to do a record that you could listen back in a few years and still think it’s a classic,” Barbier says. “I

wanted to try different things, keeping it dark but yet still powerful, and having rappers, vocalists, etc., and still sound like UZ.” One of the stand-out tracks on the LP is “Bang,” a heavy set track with a long list of collaborators, including fellow trap artist Stööki Sound, Grime artist Onoe Capone and French rap duo Foreign Beggars. “We had the track done with Stööki Sound and we felt like it would sound even better with vocals,” Barbier says. “I immediately thought of my friends from Foreign Beggars. I’ve known them for like 15 years or so, so I sent them the track. Pavan [Mukhi] was immediately down to record and he suggested grime artist Onoe Caponoe for a second verse. They sent the track back and we loved it.” Barbier’s passion for trap extends past his own music. Quality Goods Records is his personal music label, housing artists like Sumthin Sumthin, Oski and Big Makk. “[Quality Goods] is what motivates me right now, and I love looking for new talents and helping them release their music,” Barbier explains. “We’re also starting to release singles in a couple of months and really focusing on creating our own sound and growing a family of artists/producers.” Trap music is often criticized for being a one-trick pony fad that will eventually fade away, but Barbier begs to differ. “Trap music has been here for years and will be there for a long time. From the real trap music (Southern hip-hop) that’s been here for years to mainstream DJs playing trap on festival main stages, it’s definitely here to stay.” Boulder Weekly


CMF’s mid-summer mini-fest puts the focus on French music Artist-in-residence Benedetto Lupo will play both Ravel piano concertos in one evening

ON THE BILL: Colorado Music Festival: French MiniFestival. July 20-23. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303442-3282. For a list of performances and times, visit coloradomusicfestival.org/festival/ category/french-mini-festival/

by Peter Alexander

T

a rt s & cultur e

he mid-summer mini-festival, happily restored to the Colorado Music Festival season, this year will fill Chautauqua Auditorium with the sounds of French music — Ravel, Debussy and others less familiar. This is a welcome opportunity for Boulder audiences. The orchestral repertoire is so dominated by German and Russian composers that we can easily forget that France too had a vital musical culture. The choice is also unsurprising: French music is the natural home of Jean-Marie Zeitouni, the CMF’s music director. “This is a repertoire with which I have intimate affinities,” he says. “I grew up with the Montreal Symphony playing Ravel and Debussy, so I have a special love for it.” But that is not his only reason for selecting French music for the mini-festival. “It also is repertoire in which the orchestra is allowed to shine, because these are orchestral works that are very colorful,” he says. “What makes CMF unique is the fact that it has its own orchestra, people who are leaders in their respective organizations, who come together to play each summer in Boulder.” There is so much French music to chose from that Zeitouni had a hard time culling the repertoire to make just two orchestral concerts. “This is a minifestival that I might have drafted 50 different versions of,” he says. “There are so many things to cover, so many different ways to do it.” In addition to Zeitouni’s affinity for the repertoire, the other factor in the programming was the availability of pianist Benedetto Lupo. Although he is Italian, Lupo says he “always had an interest” in French music. He studied with Aldo Ciccolini, another Italian Boulder Weekly

COSTUMES FOR

CONCERTS and

FESTIVALS

Musacchio & Ianniello

BOULDER’S FUNKIEST COSTUME SHOP! 673 30th St., Boulder Corner of 30th & Baseline in Williams Village Shopping Center (between Moe’s BBQ & Gameforce)

303-440-8515 theatricalcostumesetc.com

NEW HOURS: 10AM - 7PM DAILY

who was renowned for his performances of French music. “I feel very privileged that I had the chance to work with this great pianist,” Lupo says. Lupo will be the CMF artist-inresidence during the mini-festival week and will be part of all four concerts — a Festival Orchestra concert July 20, an abbreviated repeat for “Fresh Fridays” July 21, a solo and chamber concert July 21 and a CMF Chamber Orchestra concert July 25. On the first night of the mini-festival, Lupo will follow Olga Kern’s footsteps in playing two concertos on the same program, Ravel’s Concerto in G major and his Concerto for the Left Hand. “I like the idea that during a festival you will do stuff that you will not hear on a regular symphonic season,” Zeitouni says. “I think it is OK to do stuff that is a bit crazy, like playing both Ravel concertos on the same night.” “It is a crazy thing to do,” Lupo admits, “but I’m crazy enough to like it. It’s demanding, but those two concertos are so different, they are really like day and night. The Left Hand (Concerto) is so dramatic and almost impossible, and the Concerto in G is so happy and full of life. It is wonderful for the public to listen to those two pieces which are so different.” Also on the Thursday Festival Orchestra program are Debussy’s gauzy Prélude à L’Apres-midi d’un Faune and Iberia, and Ravel’s showy La Valse — “a very nice concert-ender because it’s punchy,” Zeitouni says. The shorter “Fresh Friday” performance will include Iberia, the Concerto for the Left Hand and La Valse.

For the Saturday concert, Lupo will play a program of Debussy pieces for solo piano, and then join with CMF players for Fauré’s Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor. The latter, Lupo says, “is a composer who deserves to be known much more. His influence was enormous on French music, but his music is very difficult to play well. “It sounds very elegant and simple, but it’s never as simple as it looks.” The final concert of the mini-festival is built entirely around Fauré’s music. Titled “Fauré’s French Soirée,” the program features the composer’s Masques et bergamasques, a suite of dances originally compiled to accompany light entertainment. Here the various movements will be heard between other pieces on the program. “It’s a salon soirée of early 20thcentury Paris,” Zeitouni explains. “I try to give the CMF players the chance to be exposed, because they are the inspiration behind all of this. For this concert I wanted to choose one woodwind player and one brass player and one string player.” In addition to Lupo, the soloists with the orchestra will be flutist Vivian Cumplido Wilson, horn player Catherine Turner and CMF concertmaster Calin Lupano. Lupo will play Fauré’s Ballade, a piece that is really unfamiliar, even among musicians. Nonetheless, Lupo wants you to pay attention. The Ballade, he says, “is music that doesn’t reveal its all on the first chance you have to listen to it, but it’s like you get addicted once you start to listen. “You don’t get tired of it.”

& Sushi Authentic Thai and Full Sushi Bar!

A Unique Dining Experience Jai Thai & Sushi combines the bright, vibrant flavors found in traditional Thai cuisine, with rich, savory Japanese spices and ingredients.

2055 Ken Pratt Blvd Longmont, CO 80501 Tues - Sun: 11am - 9pm Monday: Closed

303-776-8089 CALL FOR DELIVERY! visit our website: www. jaithaimenu.com

July 13 , 2017 27


JUNE 11-AUG. 13

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW HAMLET JULIUS CAESAR ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD BY TOM STOPPARD

HENRY VI, PART 3

303-492-8008 · COLORADOSHAKES.ORG

Farmers Selling What They Grow ... And Only What They Grow Boulder Hours Sat. 8am - 2pm Longmont Hours Sat. 8am - 1pm Boulder Wednesday Hours 4pm - 8pm Lafayette Hours Thurs. 4pm - 8pm

www.bcgm.org

Like us on Facebook 28 July 13 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


A show within a show

Steve Hackman creates the music festival of his dreams by Caitlin Rockett

S arts & c u lt u r e

ome people might call Steve Hackman a John Mayer, Adele and Chance the Rapper,” “Because instead of just looking for whether it’s rulebreaker, a rogue in the world of classical Hackman says. “This would be the music festival of melody, structure, form or rhythm that the songs have music. But the composer known best for his my dreams. Not only are all the performers and comin common, we have a narrator that’s able to explain “mash-up” arrangements — think Brahms posers performing along with one another, they are the concept of Shostakovich’s Fifth Symphony (written meets Radiohead, Bjork versus Bartok, collaborating, hanging out back stage, partying after during the height of the Stalinist purges of 1937) but Beethoven and Coldplay — is really doing just the the show together. When I started writing it with this also that Chance the Rapper is from the war-torn opposite, tapping into a deep-rooted creative energy idea in mind, through people in this fantasy world streets of Chicago, an underserved population forgotten that composers through the centuries have used to Tom Russo by the government and city,” Hackman explains. produce some of the most iconic music in the Classicalapalooza is a show within a show, creworld. ated simply by Hackman asking, “What would “In the classical world, we’re behind regarding Wagner do after hearing this Adele song?” our techniques,” Hackman says. “We “Wagner having written some of the most epic tend to be a little closed-minded vocal music the world has ever seen, and Adele regarding borrowing techniques from having one of greatest voices in the pop realm, it’s other genres of music, even though fun to imagine these two sharing their music,” other composers have been doing this Hackman says. “Imagining how Wagner would for centuries.” react to hearing Adele, what Take Johannes Brahms, for examhe would insert in, how they ple. The German composer took would pick ideas for how they ON THE BILL: Hungarian folk music and arranged it would work together, what Classicalapalooza — the Colorado Music Festival for symphonic orchestra, made variaAdele would do in response.” Orchestra with composer tions on some of Joseph Hayden’s There will also be some mixSteve Hackman, singers works and wove drinking songs into his ups between contemporary artMalia Civetz, Logan James and Andrew Lipke, and orchestral overtures. ists: Twenty One Pilots and narrator Andrew Carter. Then there’s Kanye West, who’s Bruno Mars, and Kayne West 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 25, famously taken works by Ray Charles and Daft Punk. These mixes just Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, and Daft Punk and created chart topemerged naturally, Hackman Boulder, 303-441-3440. ping hip-hop songs. says, and provide comfortable Tickets: $12–$45, coloradoArgue all you like, but Hackman transitions in the show. musicfestival.org will tell you it’s all a part of the creative As with his previous CMF game. shows, Hackman will only This month Hackman will premiere have one two-and-a-half-hour rehearsal with the his fourth mash-up concert at the entire CMF orchestra before playing Colorado Music Festival’s Happy Hour Classicalapalooza live. series (formerly called the Mash-Up As Hackman’s career is really beginning to take series) at Chautauqua Auditorium. together, this situation started to write itself.” off — he’ll be debuting with the Boston Pops this To date, Hackman’s written six full-scale orchesThe result is Classicalapalooza, featuring 20 difyear — he finds himself back with the orchestra that tral mash-up shows that pair one pop artist with one ferent artists from the contemporary and classical “took a chance on him” years ago when he was just classical composer. So his goal for this year’s Colorado genres, where Lady Gaga’s work meets Brahms, and getting started as a composer. Music Festival (CMF) show was to go bigger. More “With any relationship with an orchestra, it builds Chance the Rapper’s lyrics find cadence over variety. More artists. More music. over time — especially with somebody that has a Shostakovich. “The way that I sort of devised to accomplish this technique like I’ve got, it does take time. It can be Hackman has added a narrator to the mix as well was to create an imaginary music festival where we very startling at first,” Hackman says. “It’s going to be — his friend Andrew Carter — to lead audience were not limited by time, in essence, so that Mozart, members through layers of meaning and intersections, a pleasure to get back with this orchestra after a couBeethoven and Müller could be in the same place as ple of years.” to provide context to the mash-up.

OFFICIALLY SPONSORED BY

Boulder Weekly

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

OFFICIAL RADIO PARTNER

July 13 , 2017 29


WWW.FOXTHEATRE.COM

1135 13TH STREET BOULDER 720.645.2467 JUST ANNOUNCED OCT 9 ............................................................................... LESS THAN JAKE OCT 17 ....................................................................................... YELAWOLF OCT 20 ......................................................................... BOOMBOX CARTEL

WWW.BOULDERTHEATER.COM 2032 14TH STREET BOULDER 303.786.7030 JUST ANNOUNCED AUG 31 ......................................................................................... SLANDER OCT 7 & 8 ..................................................... ADVENTURE FILM FESTIVAL OCT 13 & 14 ........................................................................ MIKE GORDON NOV 19 ...................................................................... THE WAILIN’ JENNYS

THURS. JULY 13 KGNU, ROOSTER & BOULDER WELLNESS PRESENT

FLASH MOUNTAIN FLOOD

KIND HEARTED STRANGERS, HONEYDEW CONNECTION FRI. JULY 14 KGNU, BOULDER WEEKLY & KARING KIND PRESENT

FRI. JULY 14 24 GRAMMY NOMINATIONS COMBINED

PETER KATER & R. CARLOS NAKAI SAT. JULY 15

THE PAMLICO SOUND THE JIVE TRIBE

RAILROAD EARTH

SAT. JULY 15

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

THE GUESTLIST, JUSTUS LEAGUE

FOWLER’S HOME TEAM, 97.3 KBCO’S GROOVE SHOW & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

INSTERSTELLAR BOYS FT. TODD NANCE, DANIEL HUTCHENS, JERRY JOSEPH, AND MORE!

AN EVENING WITH

FRI. JULY 21

SARAH JAROSZ JAMES MCMURTRY TUES. JULY 25 SIRIUSXM’S COFFEE HOUSE LIVE TOUR

THURS. JULY 20

JOSHUA RADIN RACHAEL YAMAGATA

ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

BRANDON JENNER

CLOZEE

FRI. JULY 28

LUCID VISION, GODLAZER TUES. JULY 25

AN EVENING WITH

NICOLAS JAAR THURS. JULY 27 CHANNEL 93.3 E-LEVEN, ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

BOOGIE T

CALVIN HOBBES, GANGUS FRI. JUL 28

GOOD OLD WAR TWIN BANDIT

SAT. JUL 29 EUPOHONIC CONCEPTIONS & ROOSTER PRESENT

SPECTACLE

KLL SMTH, NOBIDE, THE ORCASTRATOR WED. AUG 9

21+

FMQB TRIPLE A CONFERENCE & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT

FUTURE ISLANDS THE LONE BELLOW MONDO COZMO WED. AUG 9

FMQB TRIPLE A CONFERENCE & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT

BAHAMAS CURRENT SWELL

FREE OUTDOOR STAGE ON THE HILL THURS. AUG 10 FMQB TRIPLE A CONFERENCE & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT

BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

HERBIE HANCOCK TRIBUTE

DOMINIC LALLI (BIG GIGANTIC) + MEMBERS OF THE MOTET AND KYLE HOLLINGSWORTH BAND CASEY RUSSEL & THE SOUL SHACK SAT. JULY 29

AMADOU & MARIAM SELASEE & THE FAFA FAMILY

FRI. AUG 4 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES THE MASTERSONS

FRI. AUG 11

TWIDDLE MOE. (ACOUSTIC) TICKETS AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AS BUNDLE WITH RED ROCKS TICKETS

SAT. AUG 12

MOE. TWIDDLE (ACOUSTIC) TICKETS AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AS BUNDLE WITH RED ROCKS TICKETS

MON. AUG 14 106.7 KBPI PRESENTS

POISON THE PARISH TOUR

SEETHER

LETTERS FROM THE FIRE, BIG STORY

SUN. AUG 27

JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE THE BAND OF HEATHENS

SIERRA HULL

FRI. AUG 11

GOGO PENGUIN

FREE OUTDOOR STAGE ON THE HILL

FMQB TRIPLE A CONFERENCE & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT

COLONY HOUSE MARLON WILLIAMS

THE RAILSPLITTERS

WED. SEPT 6

FRI. SEPT 8

BONOBO

FREE OUTDOOR STAGE ON THE HILL

SAT. SEPT 9

SAT. AUG 12

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND’S TORCH & TWANG & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

CAAMP

THE WONDERFOOL THURS. AUG 17 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

MACEO PARKER NAUGHTY PROFESSOR THURS. AUG 24 ROOSTER PRESENTS

POLICULTURE

GROOVE A LICIOUS, HUGH MANATEE, RED NINJA FRI. AUG 25 ROOSTER PRESENTS

JONNY LANG WED. SEPT 13

DELBERT MCCLINTON TERESA JAMES & THE RHYTHM TRAMPS

SUN. SEPT 24

GHOSTLAND OBSERVATORY EVANOFF

THURS. SEPT 28 - SAT. SEPT 30 AN EVENING WITH

DARK STAR ORCHESTRA 9/28 IS ALL AGES - 9/29 & 9/30 ARE 21+

THURS. OCT 12

GOVINDA

BILLY BRAGG

WED. AUG 30

PENNY & SPARROW

TOYBOX, ASALOTT CHANNEL 93.3’S THROWBACK LUNCH & TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

VNV NATION ¡VARDENSPHERE FRI. SEPT 1

CHANNEL 93.3’S THROWBACK LUNCH & ROOSTER PRESENTS

ELECTRIC GUEST

THURS. OCT 19

LOWLAND HUM

OCT 20 ........................................................... SHAWN COLVIN AND HER BAND OCT 27 & 28 ................................................................................... PAPADOSIO NOV 1 ......................................................................................... THE BAD PLUS NOV 2 ....................................................................................... JOHNNY CLEGG DEC 29-31 ............................................................ THE POLISH AMBASSADOR

THURS. SEPT 7 ROOSTER PRESENTS

ONE MORE TIME (A TRIBUTE TO DAFT PUNK) SEPT 8 & 9 ................................ JIMMY HERRING & THE INVISIBLE WHIP SEPT 10 ............................................................................................. JAY SOM SEPT 15 ................................................................................CHERRY GLAZERR SEPT 16 .................................................................................................. ÁSGEIR

30 July 13 , 2017

Now open Tuesday - Saturday, 5pm - 11pm & on event nights SPECIALIZING IN LOCALLY SOURCED SMALL PLATES, FINE WINES BY THE GLASS, MICROBREWS & CRAFT COCKTAILS 303.998.9350

Boulder Weekly


Michael Lavine

General admission tickets $44.50, reserved tickets $49.95-$64.50.

AMOS LEE Tube to Work Day 8 a.m. Friday, July 14, Eben G. Fine Park, 101 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-325-1255. Wake up, take a shower and grab your tube! Show up to work in style on July 14, Boulder’s 10th annual Tube to Work Day. Spend your morning commute along the cool waters of Boulder Creek dodging traffic and splashing around with fellow tubers. Helmets and closed-toe shoes are mandatory. Attire: business casual/ wetsuit. —Alvaro Sanchez

Boulder Weekly

Courtesy of Jeff Kagan/Tube to Work Day

Scott McCormick

with Colorado Symphony Orchestra. 7 p.m. Sunday, July 16, Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494. see EVENTS Page 32

An Evening With Railroad Earth

Happy Hour at Chautauqua: Time for Three

8 p.m. Saturday, July 15, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 18, Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Shervin Lainez Road, Boulder, 303-4413440.

After stopping by Red Rocks on July 14, Railroad Earth will hit Boulder Theater the next night. Tickets to the Boulder Theater show will get you into the Red Rocks show as well. Featuring the improvisational, multi-genre style made famous by bands like The Grateful Dead, Phish and the String Cheese Incident, Railroad Earth is a jam band that places emphasis on aspects of bluegrass, folk and rock. It all comes together on July 15. Tickets: $39.94 -$185. —Alvaro Sanchez 7S Management

Commonly described as “America’s favorite classical garage band,” Time For Three is an orchestral trio consisting of double bassist Ranaan Meyer and violinists Charlie Yang and Nicolas Kendall. Time For Three formed at Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of Music and have played around the world, including at Carnegie Hall, BBC Proms, NFL games, the Indy 500 and Dancing With The Stars. Happy Hour starts at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $12 - $45. —Alvaro Sanchez

July 13 , 2017 31


events

EVENTS from Page 31

arts

Susan France

Paper on Paper: The Art of Chine-Collé. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through Aug. 20.

Beyond Thought — Steve Mason. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 30. Dasha Shishkin: Tram Pam Pam. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location

Divas — Leona Lazar. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 30.

LEESAANN 8PM ELLEN PIERCE OF THE WARM HONEYS 9PM

“SO YOU’RE A POET” PRESENTS

OPEN POETRY READING FOLLOWED BY BAFS STUDENT FEATURE TUESDAY JULY 18 8PM

THE SHY BIRDS

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 8PM

JAZZETRY NIGHT! FEAT. VON DISCO

THURSDAY JULY 20 8PM

BRAZIL NIGHT

FRIDAY JULY 21 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE

Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 32 July 13 , 2017

Stan Meyer: Poetic Presence. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through Aug. 6.

Jenny Morgan: SKINDEEP. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 27.

Shade. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through July 16.

Tonos Latinos/Latino Hues. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Through July 30.

Then, Now, Next. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Aug. 31.

Mauro Giaconi: Cae a plomo/falls to lead. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10.

SATURDAY JULY 15 8PM

MONDAY JULY 17 8PM

Seriously Audacious Situational Surrealism — Hone Williams. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 30.

Illustration, Design, Art & Photography by Michael Hamers. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-4971174. Through July 29.

FRIDAY JULY 14

HUMBIRD 8PM DAVEY DAYDREAM 9:30PM

Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 20.

Home: American Photography at the CU Art Museum. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through July 15.

TIM OSTDIEK 8PM THE COTERIES 9PM

SUNDAY JULY 16

Rituals — Mark Alan Francis. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 30.

Enhanced Photography by Marc Bernardi. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through July 29.

THURSDAY JULY 13

“DUELING DUOS” STRANGEBYRDS WITH MARK VIATOR & SUSAN MAXEY

Paper.Works. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-8987200. Through Aug. 20.

Derrick Velasquez: Obstructed View. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 27.

Modern America is an unabashed political and social commentary from the hearts and minds of local artists. See more about the exhibition on page 23.

Mi Tierra. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Oct. 22. Modern America. Firehouse Art Center, 667, Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Through July 30.

Music Beethoven’s Ninth. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-3282. Blue Limousine. 6:30 p.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Boulder Swing Collective. 8:30 p.m. Waterloo, 809 S. Main St., Louisville, 303-993-2094. The Coteries. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628. Flash Mountain Flood — with Kind Hearted Strangers, THC. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Thursday, July 13

The Western: An Epic in Art and Film. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Sept. 10.

Hazel Miller and Friends. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Thursday, July 13

words

Walk the Distance and Slow Down: Selections from the Collection of JoAnne Gonzalez Hickey. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10.

Lyle Divinsky’s Soul Survivors — with 300 Days. 8 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Manuel Valera Trio. 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Dazzle, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5102. Music & Magic on the West Patio. 10 a.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-776-6050. One On One with Miles Apart Band. 7 p.m. Louisville Community Park, 955 Bella Vista Drive, Louisville, 303-666-6565. Open Mic Night hosted by Brian Rezac. 6:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont,

720-297-6397. Outback Saloon Open Mic Night. 9 p.m. Outback Saloon, 3141 28th St., Boulder, 573-569-0370. Purple Squirrel. 6:30 p.m. St Julien Hotel & Spa, 900 Walnut St., Boulder, 877-303-0900. Thursday Nights with Franklin & Friends. 9 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 W. 38th Ave., Denver, 303-455-4269. Tommy Trash. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver, 303-383-1909. Ween After Party: Mike Dillon Band featuring Claude Coleman, Jr. of Ween and Very Special Guests. 11:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Events Tony Rock. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, E. 49th Ave., Suite 1400, Denver, 303-307-1777. Dance Camp 5-7 yr olds. 9 a.m. Reverence Academy, 1370 Miners Drive, Unit 111, Lafayette, 303-661-0719.

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store

Steven Taylor — The Leap: The Psychology of Spiritual Awakening. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. Tuesday, July 18 Erisy Watt and Jeremy Ferrera. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Wednesday, July 19 Jaimal Yogis — All Our Waves Are Water. All day. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

What does it mean to be enlightened or spiritually awakened? Drop by Boulder Book Store to hear Steve Taylor talk about how common it is for humans to achieve this state of being.

Dispensary Ribbon-Cutting & Open House. 4:30 p.m. Igadi, 1325 S. Public Road, Lafayette, 970-536-0420. Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452. Hari Kondabolu. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Improv Cabaret. 7:30 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver, 303-758-4722. Naughty Pierre’s Burlesque & Comedy Show. 8 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075. Nutrition Know-How with Natural Grocers. 3 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Sinbad. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly


Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 33


events

EVENTS from Page 32

Denver, 303-595-3637. Sonder Immersive Dance Theatre Experience. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 303-328-7233. Summer Cannabis Pairing Dinner by Mason Jar Event Group. 6:30 p.m. Lone Hawk Farm, 10790 N. 49th St., Longmont, 303-776-8458.

The Pamlico Sound + The Jive Tribe — with The Guestlist. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Peter Kater & R. Carlos Nakai. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Pink Hawks. 5 p.m. Museum Of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554.

Trivia & Comedy. 7 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 970-302-7130.

Purple Squirrel. 9 p.m. License No. 1, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-0486.

Friday, July 14

Quirktett. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Music

Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Integral Steps Presents Music & Movement. 1 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. La La Land in concert. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. L’Estrange Menagerie: A Sexy Circus. 11 p.m.

Wikimedia Commons/ Asaavedra32

Adam Herman & Friends. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. All Time Low. 6:30 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. AOA-Alive On Arrival. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Argentine Tango GroundSchool Classes. 7 p.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 303-938-0716.

theater Anything Goes. Jester’s Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303-682-9980. Begins July 14. Through Oct. 1

Beethoven’s Ninth. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-3282.

Baby Boomer Baby — presented by Playhouse Productions. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 23.

Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 10, Boulder, 262-719-8795. Buckner Funken’ Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Jazz@Jack’s, 500 16th St., Suite 320, Denver, 303-433-1000.

Broadway Bound. Miner’s Alley Theatre, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden, 303-935-3044. Begins July 14. Through Aug. 20.

Copper Leaf. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Crizzly. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver, 303-383-1909.

In the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, a young storeowner watches the joys and heartbreaks of his tight-knit community as they pass through his bodega. See CenterStage Theatre bring Lin-Manuel Miranda’s In the Heights to the stage at The Dairy Arts Center, through July 23.

Dixie’s Tupperware Party. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Begins July 19. Through Aug. 6.

The Eagle Rock Gospel Singers. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

Hamlet. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, University of Colorado, 303-492-8008. Through Aug. 13. How to Eat Like a Child — presented by CenterStage Theater Company. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 16.

Fridays Uncorked featuring Ellie D and Soul Mix. 6:30 p.m. Bonacquisti Wine Company, 4640 N. Pecos St., Denver, 303-477-9463.

In the Heights — presented by CentreStage Theatre Company. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Begins July 15. Through July 23.

GameJazz. 6:30 and 9 p.m. Dazzle, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5102.

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through Aug. 19.

Grady Champion: Grammy Winning Mississippi Blues. 8 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075.

Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora, 303-856-7830. Through Aug. 6. The Taming of the Shrew. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, University of Colorado, 303-492-8008. Through Aug. 13.

Greener Grounds & Broccoli Samurai — with Very Special Guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. The Hot Lunch Band. 9:30 p.m. Jazz@Jack’s, 500 16th St., Suite 320, Denver, 303-433-1000. Interstellar Boys — with Very Special Guest Eric Martinez. 9 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Jarren Benton. 7 p.m. The Roxy Theatre, 2549 Welton St., Denver, 720-242-9782. Jerry Rasch. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Keith A. Rea. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 20, Boulder, 303-449-2911. Kory Brunson Band. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Lawn Concert: Sean Rowe. 5:30 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 720-354-4880.

Strangebyrds. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075.

Swinging Songstress. 6 p.m. Dabble Paint and Sip Studio, 2330 Main St., Suite E, Longmont, 303-827-3523.

Louisville Street Faire. 5 p.m. Steinbaugh Pavilion, 824 Front St., Louisville, 720-236-5206.

Welcome Steele Family Reunion & Meetup. 5 p.m. Jazz@Jack’s, 500 16th St., Suite 320, Denver, 303-433-1000. Will James and Rhythm of the Sun. 9 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 W. 38th Ave., Denver, 303-455-4269. Zeppephilia — with Stone Beat Invasion. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Events

Sinbad. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Sonder Immersive Dance Theatre Experience. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 303-328-7233. Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335. Taste the Local with BookCliff Vineyards. 5 p.m. Bookcliff Vineyards, 1501 Lee Hill Road, Suite 17, Boulder, 303-499-7301.

LeesaAnn — Skep-tacular! 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-956-6702.

10th Annual International Tube to Work Day. 8 a.m. Eben G. Fine Park, 101 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-325-1255.

Lloyd Morris. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Adult Gymnastics. 5:30 p.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717.

Tony Rock. 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 E. 49th Ave., Suite 1400, Denver, 303-307-1777.

Lola Black. 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666.

Catfish Night. 7:30 p.m. Stearns Lake at Carolyn Holmberg Preserve, Boulder, 303-678-6204.

We Still Like You: Denver. 7 p.m. El Charrito, 2100 Larimer St., Denver, 303-523-1688.

McPherson Duo. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Family Films. 2 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-776-6050.

Saturday, July 15

Mike Masse. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver, 303-294-9281.

Free Legal Clinic. 2 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Hari Kondabolu. 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. Comedy

34 July 13 , 2017

Music & Movement. 10:30 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849.

Music 45s Against 45: An Anti-Trump Dance Party. 9 see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


24th anniversary party

AUGUST 5TH featuring music by

 HEAD FOR THE HILLS AND

THE HOP PICKERS

JULY 15th & 16th

SATURDAY 3-8PM

15 GENERAL ADMISSION 55 VIP TICKET GET YOUR TICKETS @ AVERYBREWING.COM/24 LIVE MUSIC | CRAFT BEER | RARE & VINTAGE AVERY BEER BBQ & FOOD | KID ZONE | ALL AGES WELCOME!  N C. N. B, C

PLATINUM -

$99

Every day you visit: 2 GAMES OF LASER TAG + $5 ARCADE CARD

GOLD -

$49

What you get: 10 GAMES OF LASER TAG + 10 $2.50 GAME CARDS

SILVER -

$29

What you get: 5 GAMES OF LASER TAG + 5 $2.50 GAME CARDS

STARTER - FREE

What you get: 3 GAMES OF LASER TAG + 3 $2.50 GAME CARDS *With any KBF shoe pass purchase

LASER TAG

LASER TAG

www.ChippersLanes.com

#chipperslanes LASER TAG

Broomfield Lanes

Horsetooth Lanes

North College Lanes

Classic Lanes

Estes Park Lanes

100 Nickel - 303-466-9700

217 W. Horsetooth Rd. - 970-226-6327

830 N. College Ave. - 970-226-6327

2454 8th Ave. - 970-353-4275

555 South Vrain - 303-466-9700

BROOMFIELD

Boulder Weekly

FORT COLLINS

FORT COLLINS

GREELEY

ESTES PARK

July 13 , 2017 35


events

EVENTS from Page 34

EVENT

Thrangu Rinpoche

p.m. Globe Hall, 4482 Logan St., Denver, 720-668-8833.

Songwriter’s Festival. 12 a.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Suite C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Beauty of my Land. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

The Summer Party Series. 2 p.m. Lincoln Station Bar, 776 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-885-8589.

Brad Paisley. 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver, 303-405-1100.

Treasure Fingers + Kill Frenzy. 9 p.m. Club Vinyl, 1082 Broadway, Denver, 303-860-8469.

CD Release Party: High Water Trio. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder, 303-530-7423.

UZ. 9 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666.

Defunkt Railroad. 7 p.m. Grossen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Drums Along the Rockies. 6:30 p.m. Sports Authority Field at Mile High, 1701 Mile High Stadium Circle, Denver. Gypsy Flamenco Passion. 8 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-722-0054. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. Honey of the Heart. 2 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Teaching the text

Naturally Liberating Whatever You Meet By Khenpo Gangshar

Thrangu Rinpoche has taught in more than twenty-five countries and established numerous monasteries, nunneries, schools, and Dharma Centers throughout the world. He is especially known for making complex teachings accessible to Western students. Thrangu Rinpoche is a recognized master of Mahamudra meditation.

Saturday, July 22, 2017 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Nalanda Campus 6287 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO Cost $90 Naropa Students $60

For more info, visit:

naropa.edu/events 36 July 13 , 2017

The Hot Lunch Band $10 Cover. 9:30 p.m. Jazz@Jack’s, 500 16th St., Suite 320, Denver, 303-433-1000. Interstellar Boys. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-555-5555. Isobar: Sword & Sorcery Edition. 9 p.m. KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., Longmont, 540-239-7861. Jack Hadley Band. 7 p.m. Element Bistro Rooftop, 6315 Lookout Road, Boulder, 303-530-5400. Janis Kelly’s “Summer of Love” Tribute Show 2.0! 7 p.m. Deviant Spirits, 2480 49th St., Suite E, Boulder, 916-873-4856. John Koontz Memorial Weekend. 9 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 140 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-722-7844. Lights Journey Tribute — with Special Guest. 7 p.m. The Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214.

The Winehouse Experience. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Events Adobe Photoshop For Photographers Hands-On. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. A Series of Unfortunate STEAM Events: Unfortunate Foodology. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Sinbad. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Sleightly Impossible: Comedy Magic Show. 7 p.m. Lumber Baron Mystery Mansion, 2555 W. 37th Ave., Denver, 303-477-8205. Sonder Immersive Dance Theatre Experience. 2 and 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 303-328-7233. Tony Rock. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 E. 49th Ave., Suite 1400, Denver, 303-307-1777. Sunday, July 16

Boulder Weekly staff pick Taimane — with Michael Franti and Spearhead

Music 5280 ProJamz. 8 p.m. Jazz@ Jack’s, 500 16th St Suite 320, Denver, 303-433-1000. Amos Lee — with the Colorado Symphony and Joseph. 7 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Courtesy of Mark Tarone

6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 13, Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494.

Blues and BBQ with John McKay. 2 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Taimane brings her ukulele skills to Red Rocks as part of Michael Franti’s Love Out Loud tour. Taimane’s dynamic style spans a wide range of genres, from classic rock to flamenco, all on her small but powerful ukulele. Tiamane means “diamond” in Samoan, and it is with this foundation that Taimane and her ukulele shine everywhere they go. Her origins can be traced to Hawai’i, where the traditional roots of the island music flow strongly through her veins. Taimane has built a distinct character through live shows and personal adaptations of classic and modern music. Whe represents the versatility of the musical mind and the creativity of the human spirit. Tickets start at $59. —Alvaro Sanchez

Live Patio Music: Steve Selinsky. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Longmont Jazz Festival. 11 a.m. Roosevelt Park, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont, 303-383-1909. Manufactured Superstars. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver, 303-383-1909. Meagan’s High Fitness Rockin’ Cardio Workout (FREE). 9 a.m. Athleta on Pearl St., 1133 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-443-9237. Mr. Criminal. 7 p.m. The Roxy Theatre, 2549 Welton St., Denver, 720-242-9782. Official LoHi After Party: TAUK & Friends — with Tiger Party. 10 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-776-6050. Old’s Cool Rock. 10 a.m. Boulder Farmers’ Market, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-910-2236. Pat Martino Trio. 6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Dazzle, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5102. Rafael Méndez Brass Institute Concerts. 12 a.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-7720. Red Rock Ramblers, 59 years Lyons Square Dancing. 7:30 p.m. Lyons Elementary School Gymnasium, 338 High St., Lyons, 303-823-5925. Rico Jones Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Roommates/ RMMTS Album Release Show. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

The Crud. 8 p.m. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Suite B, Denver, 720-946-1388. Dinner Under the Grape Arbor: 2017 FOD. 5:30 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599. Free Movie Night & Mini History Tour. 6 p.m. Fairmount Funeral Home & Cemetery, 430 S. Quebec St., Denver, 303-399-0692. Hari Kondabolu. 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Heritage Evening: Livestock. 4 p.m. Walker Ranch Homestead, 8999 Flagstaff Mountain Road, Boulder. The Jefferson Park Farm & Flea Market. 10 a.m. Historic business district on 25th Avenue between Federal Boulevard and Eliot Street, 2900 W. 25th Ave., Denver, 720-301-4293. Loopr Mobile Cannabis Lounge Routes. 2 p.m. 1-Up Colfax, 717 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 844-695-6677. Louisville Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m. Downtown Louisville, 916 Main St., Louisville, 303-902-2451. Meet in the Street. 11 a.m. 16th Street Mall, Denver, 303-534-6161. Orthodox Food Festival. 11 a.m. Holy Transfiguration of Christ, 349 E. 47th Ave., Denver, 303-294-0938. playback. 7:30 p.m. Trident Cafe, 940 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-916-4927. Railroad Earth. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

City Park Jazz. 6 p.m. City Park Pavilion, 1700 N. York St., Denver, 303-744-1004. Colombian Independence Festival. 10 a.m. War Memorial Park (in front of the Capitol), 100 E. 14th Ave., Denver, 720-288-0360. DJ R.A.W.. 12 p.m. Lincoln St. Station, 775 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-885-8589.

303-875-7514.

Espresso! 9:30 a.m. Spruce Confections, 767 Pearl St., Boulder,

Family Dog Duo. 5 p.m. The Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Gold Hill, Boulder, 303-443-6461. John Koontz Memorial Weekend. 1 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 140 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-722-7844. Pat Martino Trio. 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dazzle, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5102. Stewart Goodyear. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-3282. Strangebyrds. 7:30 p.m. The Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Gold Hill, Boulder, 303-443-6461. Sunday Spiritual Service. 10 a.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Vinyl Sundays with the Denver Kush Club. 12 p.m. Spangalang Brewery, 2736 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1276. What the Folk: Avourneen and Avenhart. 6 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075. Events Second Annual Carbon Sequestration Festival 2017. 12 p.m. Ollin Farms, 8627 N. 95th St., Longmont. Anime Club. 3 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-776-6050. see EVENTS Page 38

Boulder Weekly


5:30pm PRE-CONCERT MIXER | 7:30pm CONCERT

7/18: TIME FOR THREE STEVE HACKMAN, CONDUCTOR

7/25: CLASSICALAPALOOZA STEVE HACKMAN, CONDUCTOR

Come early to three pre-concert mixers which take place from 5:30-7pm at three different locations in Chautauqua Park and feature free drink samples from local restaurants, breweries, coffee shops, and more. PARTY SPONSORS - AT THE EVENT

coloradomusicfestival.org or 303.440.7666

Single Tickets (starting at $12) | Chautauqua Box Office monday-friday, 12-5pm (phone or in person)

Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 37


Warren Family Productions Presents the musical

events Boulder Weekly staf f pick Courtesy of Erisy Watt

Erisy Watt and Jeremy Ferrara 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 18, Innisfree Poetry Bookstore and Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

hosted by FairvieW high school July 31, august 1, 7, 8 • 7Pm For tickets visit Warren Family Productions on Facebook

Photo by Ann Strand

Nashville, Tennessee, native Erisy Watt crafts a sound that is reminiscent of days past, yet young and refreshing in its delivery. Along with the guitar stylings of Jeremy Ferrara, the duo delivers an intimate blend of soul and folk, often compared to the tunes of Joni Mitchell and Norah Jones. Watt is currently on tour with her band after releasing a self-titled EP. In 2014 she founded Cabin By The Sea, a traveling concert series that raises funds for local nonprofits. Watt and Ferrara will be stopping in multiple Colorado towns and cities, including Durango, Pagosa Springs, Boulder and Denver. Don’t miss this intimate show. —Alvaro Sanchez

EVENTS from Page 36

Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Suite 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Loopr Mobile Cannabis Lounge Routes. 2 p.m. 1-Up Colfax, 717 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 844-695-6677. Lucha Libre & Laughs: Free Show! 7 p.m. Ratio Beerworks, 2920 Larimer St., Denver, 303-997-8288. No More Talking Heads, MOVE! — with Meredith Grundei. 12 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver, 303-758-4722. RC Speedway. 2 p.m. George Reynolds Branch, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-4413100. Return of the Wild Feminine: Womb-Centered Training. 9 a.m. Vali Soul Sanctuary, 6717 Valmont Road, Boulder, 303-442-1301.

Concert in the Park: Boulder Concert Band. 7 p.m. North Boulder Park, 9th Street and Dellwood Avenue, Boulder. Concerts in the Park. 7 p.m. Central Park, 1739 Broadway, Boulder. The Milk Blossoms, Bianca Mikahn & Christian Wilhoft: Head Room Sessions #11. 7 p.m. ReCreative Denver, 765 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, 720-6383128.

SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@ boulderweekly. com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

Sensory Friendly Playtime. 8 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424.

Music on Pine Street. 5 p.m. Hotel Boulderado, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-440-2880. Noches de Verano: Tango at the Teahouse. 6 p.m. Courtyard north of the Dushanbe Teahouse, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-718-4798. Open Mic Night. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884.

Super Sunday Funday! 7 p.m. Bug Theater, 3654 Navajo St., Denver, 303-477-9984.

Prospect Sound Bites presents Girls On Top! 5 p.m. Prospect Park, 700 Tenacity Drive, Longmont, 303-249-4492.

Thai Rivera. 7 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637.

The Yellow Submarine. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Tony Rock. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver, 303-595-3637.

Events

Monday, July 17 Music Adult SRP: “World Folk Music: Inside Jayme Stone’s Folklife.” 6 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4820. Anxious Arms with Ease. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

38 July 13 , 2017

Bandshell Boogie. 7 p.m. Central Park Downtown Boulder, 1212 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 720-971-1972.

Arts Caravan Presents: 3 Ring Workshop: 4. 7 p.m. Rackhouse Pub, 2875 Blake St., Denver, 720-570-7824. Black & Blu: Comedy/Variety Show. 7 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 West 38th Ave., Denver, 303-455-4269. crazywise. 5:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Boulder Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Boulder Weekly


events Free Beginner Argentine Tango Class. 6 p.m. Boulder Dushanbe Tea House, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-938-0716. Little Mermaid Princess Camp. 9:45 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Mystery of the Golden Mustache. 11 a.m. Adams Mystery Playhouse, 2406 Federal Blvd., Denver, 303-455-1848. Tuesday, July 18 Music Community Night Concert. 5:30 p.m. Sandstone Ranch, 3001 Sandstone Drive, Longmont, 303-651-8404.

Harold Lloyd Comedy Night (1921-1922). 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. John Mayer. 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver, 303-405-1100. Lauren Michaels Acoustic Showcase Opening. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Mary Chapin Carpenter — with Sarah Jarosz. 6:30 p.m. Denver Botanic Gardens-York Street, 1007 York St., Denver, 720-865-3500. Mateo on the Terraces: 2017 FOD. 7 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599.

Mitski. 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666.

Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-997-4108.

Perpetual Motion. 6:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Summer Concert Series. 7 p.m. Waneka Lake Park, 1600 Caria Drive, Lafayette.

Purnell Steen & Le Jazz Machine. 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Dazzle, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5102.

Events

Purple Squirrel. 10 p.m. Appaloosa Grill, 535 16th St., Suite 11, Denver, 720-932-1700. Ragtime Randy. 4 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th St., Boulder, 303-939-0594. RE:Search featuring iLL.Gates — with Supersillyus, Unfold, Mikey Thunder, Jubee. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Comedy at Tandoori. 8 p.m. Tandoori Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 970-302-7130. Let’s Farm Kids Summer Camp. 9 a.m. Longmont YMCA, 950 Lashley St., Longmont, 303-443-9952. Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335. Swing Dancing. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Diana Krall with the Colorado Symphony. 8 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

America’s Best Microbrew Pub

Folk Dancing on the Plaza. 7 p.m. Plaza beside Dushanbe Teahouse, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-499-6363. Mighty Mystic. 8 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. The Robert Cray Band — with The Delta Sonics. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Now Open in Louisville

Time for Three. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-3282.

Craft beer. Good fun. 100 Taps.

Tuesday Tapping and Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company, 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. Events Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4845. Doppelgängers! Improv Showcase. 8 p.m. Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver, 970-481-7918. Free CodeCraft School Open House. 5:30 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Kids Film Series: Toy Story. 10 a.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. The Met Live in HD: Carmen. 7 p.m. Denver Pavilions 15, 500 16th St., Denver, 844-462-7342. Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live. 8 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

Come enjoy the best local and regional craft beers at Louisville’s newest neighborhood pub. Some you’ll know; others you’ll come to love. Enjoy craft cuisine and hand crafted beverages in a comfortable setting. Make yourself at home… only with a much, much larger beer selection. Did we mention 100 taps? And craft beer? And wine. And ciders. And flavored kombucha teas, and more. We’re all about comfort and yumminess. Is that a word? It should be.

Open Mic with the Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335.

$2.00 OFF

Wednesday, July 19 Music Acoustic Open Mic Hosted by Captain Flashback. 4 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 W. 38th Ave., Denver, 303-455-4269.

A BEER ANYTIME!

Ben Hammond. 4 p.m. Boulder Farmers’ Market, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-910-2236. Bible Study. 10:30 a.m. Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder, 720-885-1234. Conjunto Colores. 6 p.m. Village at the Peaks, 1250 S. Hover St., Longmont, 720-438-2500. Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Enion Pelta-Tiller Quartet, Thom LaFond Trio. 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver, 303-295-1868. Film/Still: A Band Called Death. 7 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 720-354-4880.

Boulder Weekly

Get Here

Lunch. Dinner. Drinks. Everything in between. Come on in for a bite and a beverage. Let’s make it a regular thing.

1071 Courtesy Rd • Louisville, CO 80027 • (303) 665-9967 • https://www. facebook.com/GrowlerUSALouisvilleCO/ Hours: Mon – Thurs: 11:00 am-10:00 pm • Fri: 11:00 am-12:00 am • Sat: 10:30 am-12:00 am • Sun: 10:30 am-9:00 pm July 13 , 2017 39


SATURDAY JULY 22 STRING CHEESE INCIDENT AFTER SHOW

EOTO W/ SKYDYED

SATURDAY JULY 29

HERBIE HANCOCK TRIBUTE FEAT DOMINIC LALLI (BIG GIGANTIC), DAVE WATTS, JOEY PORTER & GARRETT SAYERS (THE MOTET) & DAN SCHWINDT (KYLE HOLLINGSWORTH BAND)

FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY AUGUST 4-6 @ SUNRISE RANCH:

ARISE MUSIC FESTIVAL ATMOSPHERE, TIPPER, ANI DIFRANCO, RISING APPALACHIA, THE EXPENDABLES, BROTHER ALI, DESERT DWELLERS,

EVERY THURSDAY @ THE OTHER SIDE

GRASS FOR THAT ASS

FREE BEFORE 8PM & FREE BEFORE 9PM FOR ALL TEXT MESSAGE SUBSCRIBERS

TEXT CERVANTES TO 91944 TO SIGN UP 7/20: JAY ROEMER BAND FEAT DAVE CARROLL (TRAMPLED BY TURTLES) W/ RAIN CITY RAMBLERS // SLIPPERY CREEK (PATIO SET) 7/27: THE GRASS IS DEAD & THE WOOKS W/ ONE GRASS TWO GRASS // CANYON COLLECTED (PATIO SET) FRIDAY JULY 21

DENVER HOME GROWN MUSIC FESTIVAL FEAT DENVER’S BEST MUSIC, COMEDY & MORE

SATURDAY JULY 22

SOBER ROB, WHEREISALEX, ZOTTI

W/ SNUBLUCK & BIMYO CVILLOU WORLD SERIES 001

MONDAY JULY 24

MONDAY NIGHT MENAGERIE GOAT FASHION SHOW WEDNESDAY JULY 26

RE: SEARCH

DOPAPOD & MANY MORE

FEAT RONI SIZE W/ JUBEE

SATURDAY AUGUST 5 • DUAL VENUE

RASTASAURUS

BASSWORKS FEAT EPTIC W/ MIDNIGHT TYRANNOSAURUS, FAR TOO LOUD, PHASE ONE, RAY VOLPE, STABBY, CRYSTALIZE, FURY & TYRO

FRIDAY AUGUST 11

ZAPP W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

FRIDAY AUGUST 18

JOJO SLIM’S WEDNESDAY FEAT JOHN “JOJO” HERMAN (WIDESPREAD PANIC)

FRIDAY JULY 28

W/ APEX VIBE, ENVY ALO & DJ BLOODPRESSHAH

SATURDAY JULY 29

IGNATIUS REILLY

W/ JEFF CROSBY & THE REFUGEES & HYONA HILL (PATIO SET)

FRIDAY AUGUST 1

FAT TUESDAYS

W/ STRUTTIN’ – A TRIBUTE TO NOLA FUNK, SOUL & R & B FEAT THE MUSIC OF ALLEN TOUSSAINT W/ STEADY FLOW

FRIDAY AUGUST 4

40OZ TO FREEDOM SUNDAY AUGUST 6

RYAN CARAVEO

W/ TRAVIS THOMPSON, ROOKE5 & MATTY JAY

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 9

RE: SEARCH

W/ NAUGHTY PROFESSOR

FEAT ADAM DEITCH (BREAK SCIENCE) W/ TY COOMES (LETTUCE), PROB CAUSE,

& SPECIAL GUESTS

MIKEY THUNDER & JUBEE

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 2

FRIDAY AUGUST 11

BALLYHOO!

THE SOUL REBELS

W/ THE HOLDUP & KASH’D OUT W/ P432

FEAT BIG FREEDIA

TENTH MOUNTAIN DIVISION

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 14

THROUGH THE ROOTS FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 15

OTT & THE ALL SEEING I W/ SPECIAL GUESTS

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 20

SHAGGY SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 23

RIDE THE BUS TO

SATURDAY AUGUST 12

W/ PART & PARCEL AND SWIMMER

TUESDAY AUGUST 15

TALKING DREADS WEDNESDAY AUGUST 16

RE: SEARCH

FEAT PHAELEH W/ SUPERVISION, MUX MOOL, MIKEY THUNDER & JUBEE

SATURDAY AUGUST 19

TATANKA

W/ RED SAGE & I CONSCIOUS (PATIO SET)

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 23

RE: SEARCH

FEAT MUZZY BEARR W/ TNERTLE, PRELIMINARY MALFUNCTION, MIKEY THUNDER & JUBEE

FRIDAY AUGUST 25

GREENSKY BLUEGRASS

MAMA’S COOKIN’

TUESDAY OCTOBER 3

SATURDAY AUGUST 28

GOLDLINK

(ALLMAN BROTHERS / GOV’T MULE TRIBUTE)

FRIDAY OCTOBER 27

(WIDESPREAD PANIC TRIBUTE)

BLIND MELON FRIDAY & SATURDAY DECEMBER 8-9

THE DEL MCCOURY BAND

W/ SMOKED OUT

MY BLUE SKY THIN AIR

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 8

TODD SHEAFFER (RAILROAD EARTH)

DEAD FLOYD

W/ SPECIAL COLLABORATION SET

TEXT CERVANTES TO 91944 FOR TICKET GIVEAWAYS, DRINK SPECIALS, DISCOUNTED TICKET PROMOTIONS & MORE

MAX 15 MSG/MO. MSG & DATA RATES MAY APPLY TEXT STOP TO OPT OUT FOR OUR PRIVACY TERMS & SERVICE GO TO HTTP://CERVANTESMASTERPIECE.TICKETFLY.COM/FILES/2014/03/CERVANTES-PRIVACY-DOCUMENT.PDF

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

40 July 13 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


While Supplies Last

film The moment when everything changed

MEDICAL SIDE

60% OFF

Oil Stix CBD Syringes OPEN REGULAR HOURS ON JULY 4TH

20% OFF

by Michael J. Casey

Scientific people know very well that time is only a kind of space. We can move forward and backward in time just as we can move forward and backward in space. — H.G. Wells, The Time Machine

L

Build a Time Machine. July 19–22, The Boedecker Theater, The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7825, thedairy.org

40% OFF

Canyon Cultivation Drop Its and Apothecanna Calming Crème

Two men seek to find out: ‘How to Build a Time Machine’ ON THE BILL: How to

50% OFF

All Foria Products

VOTED BEST RECREATIONAL / MEDICAL DISPENSARY

Incredibles Pumpkin Pie Bars Must Present Coupon. 1 Item Per Coupon. Valid 7.13.17 - 7.19.17.

400 W. South Boulder Rd. • Lafayette Plaza • 303.665.5599 www.herbalwellnessco.com • www.facebook.com/herbalwellnesslafayette OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • 8AM-10PM For Medical and Recreational

ike most, this story begins with love at first sight. The year was 1960 and the movie was The Time Machine, George Pal’s adaptation of H.G. Wells’s seminal novella, starring Rod Taylor. Many loved the movie, but for two young boys in particular — Rob Niosi and Ron Mallett — The Time Machine would come to shadow both of their lives, albeit in drastically different ways. Little did they suspect this movie, and the obsessions it spurred, would bring them together 50 years later. For Niosi, The Time Machine motivated him to create his own time machine, one that could give the feeling of stepping into the past. His machine is an exact replica of the one Bill Ferrari built for the 1960 film. But Ferrari’s machine was merely a prop that only needed to give the impression of something spectacular. As long as it was photographed properly, the wood, paint, cardboard and tape Ferrari used looked magnificent. Niosi’s time machine, on the other hand, isn’t just built to look magnificent; it is. Though he modeled his creation after the movie, Niosi bypasses the wood, cardboard and tape in favor of durable material that would have been available to an inventor from the Victorian era. Niosi, a former stop-motion animator, chuckles upon realizing what started as a fun three-month project has grown into a nine-year obsession. The Time Machine also begat Mallett’s love of time travel, though his obsession manifested in the theoretical, rather than the physical, realm. The University of Connecticut physics professor has spent his life researching the possibilities of time travel. Mallett knows he cannot dial back the dates like one does in the movies, but there are ways of traveling through time. Just how effective they are is his quest. Directed by Jay Cheel, How to Build a Time Machine follows both men: Niosi as he builds his time machine and Mallett while he works through his theories. Cribbing from Errol Morris’s playbook, Cheel has Niosi and Mallett speak directly to the camera, explaining themselves to the audience with no intermediary interviews, no secondary commentary. Just Niosi and Mallett’s well-thought-out theories and rationales. Neither looks past the connection between cinema and time travel. As Mallett points out, a camera is forever recording the past in the present tense. Furthermore, the act of watching a movie is traveling through time without the headache of Niosi’s reconstruction or Mallett’s life-long study. Though Rod Taylor is no longer with us, we can call up his ghost anytime we watch The Time Machine, just in the same way the film’s director called up the ghosts of the Victorian era to make the movie. Maybe we can’t go forward, but we can always go back. Niosi’s machine takes him back to 1960 when he first laid eyes on the contraption. In the end, that might be enough. Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 41


SI M P L E

|

L O C A L

|

FA R M

T O

TA B L E

BEST NEW RESTAURANT THANK YOU for voting for us!

578 Briggs Street Erie, CO 80516 303.828.1392 www.24carrotbistro.com

BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 3 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

DINNER

SUN-THR 5PM-9PM

F R I & S AT 5PM-10PM

2016

“I would do anything to pass this class...”

#FoodPorn lodo 1514 blake street 720.354.5058 42 July 13 , 2017

landmark center 5380 greenwood plaza blvd. 303.267.8744

denver cherry creek 2780 e 2nd avenue 303.322.9554

boulder pearl street mall 1117 pearl street 303.473.4730

follow us on instagram @hapasushi

Boulder Weekly


Joel Dyer

Four courses to try in Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Matt Cortina

Montreal-style everything bagel with herbed chèvre Woodgrain Bagels 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Suite E-1A, Boulder, woodgrainbagels.com

Y

Gorgonzola gnocchi

Gondolier Italian Eatery 4800 Baseline Rd., A104, Boulder, gondolieritalianeatery.com

G

ondolier is a Boulder staple, renowned for its all-you-can-eat pasta nights. But the pasta isn’t only worthwhile for its quantity; dishes like gorgonzola gnocchi put a bold spin on the Italian classic. Chewy rolls of gnocchi are covered in creamy gorgonzola, creating a decadent bite. Fried kale, bacon and balsamic vinaigrette all complement the indulgent foundation — the kale is crispy and herbaceous, the bacon is smoky and rich in umami, and the balsamic adds a much-needed acid punch and fruit sweetness. It’s a scarf-able dish that is rich enough to pass as an entrée if it weren’t on the appetizer menu. Gondolier, by the way, is opening a Longmont outpost this fall, bringing its gnocchi, pastas and pizzas to points east. $7.

Peach cobbler

Matt Cortina

ou don’t know you need Montrealstyle bagels in your life until a) you hear that term for the first time and b) try them. Woodgrain serves their bagels straight from a wood-fired oven, giving them a unique, enjoyable texture. They’re chewy, dense and moist on the inside, and crispy on the outside. The everything bagel with herbed goat cheese packs walloping flavor — the bagel’s toppings are fresh and pungent, while the cheese is pastoral and dank. Together, each bite brings more flavor and texture than you’d expect. Woodgrain opened to much fanfare several months ago, and the goods stack up. $4.

Wayne’s Smoke Shack 406 Center Dr., Superior, waynessmokeshack.com

W

ayne’s is another Boulder County shopping center gem, tucked away between the Big Boxes in the Superior Marketplace. If you can’t find Wayne’s, just follow your nose. Wayne’s is serving up some of life’s simplest pleasures: smoked meats and hearty sides. Among these treats is Wayne’s peach cobbler — a dish that soars when treated as simply as possible. This cobbler is a taste of summer: crisp yet tender; fragrant, juicy, warm and filling. Wayne’s whips up a traditional Southernstyle cobbler, with fresh, lightly seasoned fruit on the bottom, fluffy and moist sweetened biscuits on top. Light pressure with a fork reveals the airy pockets that make the biscuits so fluffy, then the gooey area where biscuit meets peach. It’s the only way to round out a meal of barbecue. $3.

Joel Dyer

Pozole

Comida Cantina 721 Confidence Dr., Unit 1, Longmont, eatcomida.com

C

omida Cantina in Prospect is always a great place to grab a meal and a marg. So the next time you’re in the mood for something simple, hearty and delicious, order up a big bowl of Comida’s pozole. This bowl of green is an absolute meal all by itself. Comida’s pozole is verde rather than rojo and reminiscent of the style most often found in Mexico’s mountainous state of Guerrero. The combination of tomatillos, roasted chicken, hominy and serrano peppers is pretty much perfection, but toss in some lime juice and pickled onions (served on the side) and this Mexican staple takes flight. Cup $6, bowl $9.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday Boulder Weekly

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

2016

July 13 , 2017 43


Thank You for Voting for Us!

Best Pizza Slice Best Food Delivery

People tell us it’s Real New York Pizza!

Family Owned and Operated, Making Every Pizza with Love! 3060 Pearl Pkwy #112, Boulder • (303) 442-4949

44 July 13 , 2017

BEST NEW RESTAURANT Brunch: Sat-Sun 10am-2:30pm Lunch: Tues-Fri 11:30am-2:30pm Dinner: Tues-Sat 5pm-Close 909 Walnut St, Boulder www.arcanarestaurant.com

Boulder Weekly


nibbles BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

The Top 10 scary food news items keeping me up at night

M

y name is John and I’m a food-news junkie despite the fact that my habit often horrifies me. Here are 10 recent non-fake news items that disturb my slumbers. 1. Seven percent of all American adults — 16.4 million people or more — believe that chocolate milk comes from brown cows, according to the Innovation Center of U.S. Dairy. Don’t ask about strawberry milk. 2. Hostess Brands will debut microwaveable frozen Molten Lava Ding Dongs next month. Nobody is certain why, but “Molten Lava Ding Dongs” can be chanted rapidly as a mantra. Try it. 3. The international airport in Genoa, Italy, has announced it will waive the 100 ml. maximum amount of liquids allowed on flights as long as the liquid in question is composed only of fresh basil, olive oil, cheese and pine nuts, otherwise known as pesto. Carry-on a puttanesca and you get busted. 4. Yes-we-are-that-gullible department: If you use what the industry calls “indulgent phrasing” on vegetable labels, the number of Americans who choose to eat vegetables increases by 25 percent, according to JAMA Internal Medicine. Call them “rutabagas” and we are disinterested, but give us seconds of those yummy “Sweet Sizzlin’ Rutababies.” Veggie desire decreases a whopping 41 percent when labels with “restrictive” wording like “high fiber rutabagas” are used. Good-for-you is bad for sales. 5. Yes-we-are-that-gullible department II: Eatery menus with sensory descriptors such as “tender” and “satin,” nostalgic terms such as “homestyle” and “Grandma’s,” and cultural/geographic references such as “Cajun” and “Italian,” produce 27 percent higher sales and more satisfied diners, according to research at the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University. 6. ConAgra is trying so hard to be hip. The bowl for its new microwaveable frozen Healthy Choice Korean-Inspired Beef Power Bowl is made with compostable and recyclable plant-based fibers, which will likely end up in a landfill. However, it’s still made by ConAgra. 7. Hampton Creek Foods, the maker of Just Mayo and other plant-based products, is developing a version of lab-grown meat that will grow from animal cells in a plant-based medium, the company said. It’s for those times when you want the carnivorous feel of toothsome and slightly bloody flesh in your mouth but you don’t want to kill any animals. see NIBBLES Page 46

Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 45


NIBBLES from Page 45

E EAST? LIVE IN TH LDER? U O B N I K R WO

Recognized for our outstanding Greek cuisine, excellent service and friendly staff.

ITA! EAT AT K AL Known for our modern interpretation of classic dishes and its insistence on only using high quality fresh ingredients.

8. The flagship Taco Bell restaurant in Las Vegas is offering $600 wedding packages starting next month. That gets the lucky couple an officiant, a hot sauce packet bridal bouquet and a reception for 15 guests featuring a 12-pack of tacos and a Cinnabon cake. The honeymoon is extra. 9. Dog bones used to be something butchers gave away by the bagful, but now there is a serious bone shortage. The price for beef marrow bones is rising rapidly as restaurants and home cooks dip a toe in the bone broth, ramen and pho trends du jour. 10. OK. You deserve a ray of sunshine. Carcinogens that form when you grill meat at high temperature were lowered up to 50 percent in pork chops that were marinated in dark beer first, according to a report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. What scares you? Nibbles@boulderweekly.com.

Local Food News

WN! O T N I S O R B E S T GY

ORDER ONLINE • ASK ABOUT CATERING 2426 ARAPAHOE AVE. • BOULDER • OPEN M-SA 11AM-8PM 303.443.0596 • KALITAGRILL.COM

This is it: The largest and potentially most significant food gathering in Colorado history takes place in Denver this week, including many free public events. The inaugural Slow Food Nations presented by Slow Food — the international sustainability-oriented organization — includes a street food block party with tastes from Colorado farms and ranches, cooking demos and cooking activities for kids. slowfoodnations.org. ... Dozens of chefs and brewers team up for the outdoor BrüFrou July 16 on the Tivoli Quad on the Auraria Campus in Denver. brufrou.com. ... Veteran local restaurateur Kevin Taylor and his chef son, Ryan Taylor, have opened Hickory & Ash near the 1stBank Center in Broomfield ... Noted vegetarian book author Deborah Madison will be signing her new cookbook In My Kitchen 4-6 p.m., July 15 at the Boulder County Farmers Market with recipe taste samples from Black Cat Bistro. ... Historically oriented foodies should grab a timely new read for the summer about life in the White House from Denver’s Adrian Miller: The President’s Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, from the Washingtons to the Obamas (University of North Carolina Press). Miller won a James Beard Award for his first book: Soul Food.

By the Numbers: 13.3 Breweries

Fresh stats say that Colorado now has 348 breweries, the state with the second-most breweries in the nation, or six breweries for every 100,000 residents. That’s not good enough for Boulder, which now boasts more breweries per capita than any U.S. city — 13.3 breweries for every 100,000 people, according to Datafiniti and Boulder’s Brewers Association. Those stats don’t include Boulder County or the wineries, meaderies, cideries, distilleries and kombucharies. In fact, while you were reading this, another tasting room probably opened somewhere in Boulder County. John Lehndorff

illegalpetes.com/catering PERFECT FOR ANY DIET

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, AND BEYOND

GET FREE QUESO WITH YOUR CATERING! 46 July 13 , 2017

USE PROMO CODE

BWQUESO EXPIRES 9/5/17

Taste of the Week

When you don’t have the time to experience the wonderful sensory overload that is dim sum at Kingsland, Star Chef and Empress Seafood in Denver, you can pick up many of the best little treats at a nearby bakery at Alameda and Federal. How could you not stop at a shop called the Celestial Bakery? The window of this tiny shop touts it as a “Sole Authentic Asian Bakery.” Is that a jab at the equally tasty Vinh Xiong Bakery and its banh mi sandwiches just across the parking lot? Inside glazed ducks hang upside down in one case. The greatest hits of dim sum — from diverse dumpling styles to wrapped rice bundles, snacks and desserts — are all about a buck a piece to take home. I got soft buns filled with sweet BBQ pork and some not overly sweet custard tarts thick with coconut in a croissant-like crust. In the interest of transparency I admit that most of them never made it past the Denver city line.

Words to Chew On

“True individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.” — President Franklin D. Roosevelt John Lehndorff is the former Executive Director of the American Pie Council. He hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU, 88.5 FM. Podcasts: news.kgnu. org/category/radio-nibbles. Boulder Weekly


Summer Special POKE BOWL

NEW!

High Quality, Authentic Japanese and Nepalese Food at a Great Price!

2018 BROADWAY, BOULDER, CO 80302 720-420-9050 • FUJICAFEBAR.COM

Large Rooftop Bar with Beautiful Mountain Views! Now Serving Sunday Brunch Every Week 9am - 3pm Join Us for Happy Hour 4pm - 6pm Mon - Fri Live Music Every Saturday during the summer!

Every Tuesday is Taco Tuesday!

6315 Lookout Rd, Boulder • 303-530-5400 • Hours: Sun 9a - 9p • Mon - Thurs 11a - 9p • Fri-Sat 11a - 10p Get information about our menus, events and more on our website: elementbistroboulder.com

Fresh Authentic New York Pizza 12” 16”

Cheese Pizza...........................................................$13 Pizza Margarita ......................................................$14 Pizza Margarita w/ Arugula ................................$16 Ham & Mushroom ..................................................$14 Spinach & Mushroom ...........................................$15 Pepperoni ................................................................$14 Extra Toppings $1.50/12” • $2.50/16”

$16 $18 $20 $18 $19 $18

12” 16”

Pizza Puttanesca ...................................................$14 Pizza 4 Cheese........................................................$15 Pizza Pesto ..............................................................$15 Homemade Sausage & Green Peppers .............$15 Smoked Salmon & Carmelized Onions ..............$18 Prosciutto & Arugula ............................................$16

Ask About Pizza of the Day!

$18 $19 $19 $19 $22 $20

We Deliver in Boulder

1647 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO • 720-328-2324 www.BrooklynPizzaBoulder.com Boulder Weekly

July 13 , 2017 47


Celebrating 12 years of a new taste experience and 39 years of family tradition

the Praha

NEW HOURS: Tuesday - Saturday HAPPY HOUR DINNER SERVED

now from 4:00 - 6:00pm!

5:00pm until close

Czech Us Out!

Beers on Tap Fine Wines Delicious Food 7521 Ute Hwy, Longmont, CO • 303-702-1180 www.praharestaurant.com

WIN A MOUNTAIN BIKE! Now t Augu hrough st 7t h

FROM THE DIVIDE TO YOUR DOOR!

INTRODUCTORY OFFER Free Two 5-Gallon Bottles of Water & One Months Rental on the Dispenser of Your Choice

Offering Glass Bottle Options

TEXT SNARFS TO 737737

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN A MOUNTAIN BIKE AND FREE SNARF’S FOR A YEAR!

303.440.0432 • www.IndianPeaksSpringWater.com

LOOK FOR OUR SOLAR WATER CART AT BOULDER EVENTS

2128 Pearl St. 303.444.7766 6562 Lookout Rd. 720.622.0107

BOULDER 5340 Arapahoe Ave. 303.444.3404 637 S. Broadway St., Ste. A 303.444.7714 LONGMONT

645 Ken Pratt Blvd. 303.774.1441

2130 Mountain View Ave. 303.702.1111

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Must be U.S. legal resident residing in CO, IL, MO or TX, 18 or older. Text SNARFS, to 737737 6/26/17-8/7/17. Requires 2-way text message capable phone and digital service. For every text you send, you will receive up to 3 text replies back. Notice: Your mobile provider may charge you for each text sent/received. Warning: message and data charges may apply. For help send HELP to 737737. Send STOP to cancel. T&Cs & Privacy Policy at http://hipcricket.com/privacy-policy. Entries must be rec’d by and promotion ends 8/7/17. For Official Rules/mail-in entry, print your name and residential address on a 3x5 card & mail to: 2017 Dr Pepper/ Snarf’ Snarfs Summer Mountain Bike Sweepstakes, PO Box 6136, Dept. S, Clear Lake, MN 55319. Mark outer env. with entry or rules. Subject to full Official Rules. Void where prohibited. DR PEPPER is a registered trademark of Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Inc.

48 July 13 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


All photos by Susan France

community

TABLE W

ill Frischkorn saw much as a professional cyclist, churning at 30 mph through Europe and North America’s best culinary and historic destinations in a sea of Lycra. He wasn’t able to enjoy much of it. “You race around and you look and up and say, ‘This is insane,’” Frischkorn says. “But then your head’s down, you’re slaughtering yourself and then you finish and get on the bus and get a massage and go to bed, and it’s like, ‘Huh, I didn’t do anything. … Can we just put this all on pause and check this out for even just a day?’”

From saddle to Sauternes

Cured’s Will Frischkorn on the synergy of pro cycling and good food by Matt Cortina That desire for more inspired Frischkorn to eventually return to Boulder and open Cured, an artisan cheese, charcuterie and wine shop on East Pearl. Since, Frischkorn and his team have opened a second location and launched catering operations. But it’s been a long ride, going from mountain biking as a kid in West Virginia, to placing second in one 2008 Tour de France stage, to operating an artisanal mini-empire. Frischkorn, however, is unequivocal about what’s been the most difficult part of the journey. “Way harder to be a small business owner,” he says. “Back then, cycling was so easy. You got to ride your bike and hang out in cool places, and you get paid pretty well. You’ll never suffer in an acute moment as much in business as [you would] groveling over a mountain pass, but [here it’s] seven days in a row, like 70 hours of standing, and then hours of computer work on either side of it.” Frischkorn grew up in a family that celebrated food, but cycling, he says, “injected travel and allowed me to see where it happens.” The nature of professional cycling, which involves a short period of intense physical work every day followed by hours of down time, allowed Frischkorn to educate himself on the areas in which he was racing or training. He rummaged through books and websites, as he often wasn’t allowed (either by his trainers or from fatigue) to go out and experience the scenes. Frischkorn recalls attending a race in Milan when his wife, Coral, pointed out he’d been in the city more than most people ever will, yet had never seen the famous Duomo. see FRISCHKORN Page 50

Boulder Weekly

Top to Bottom: A charcuterie plate assembled at Cured; Frischkorn slicing cured ham; Frischkorn in Cured’s wine shop.

July 13 , 2017 49


FRISCHKORN from Page 49 Courtesy of Will Frischkorn

Cafe

Dine Al Fresco On Our Beautiful Patio

Now accepting reservations for a 5-course dinner with paired wines on August 10th, call us or visit our Facebook page for more details

Summer Hours: 7:30am until 9:00pm

1377 Forest Park Cir. Lafayette • 303-604-6351 MorningGloryCafe.org

10AM - 2PM

ktails $5 c o C y lt ia c e p S e bar ing behind th $1 off Everyth ials $5-10 c e p S u n e M Food Happy Hour LE.COM YSLOUISVIL

WWW.JIMM

9 720-476-397 UISVILLE CO

SLIN 328 S. MCCA 50 July 13 , 2017

BLVD, LO

“So she They ran dragged me into the out of the immediate hotel and got a challenge of taxi, and we sourcing went and unique prodwalked ucts that around,” he would sell says. “I had a before they coffee, and we perished. got back to the Frischkorn hotel and one says it’s been a of the directors Frischkorn competed in the 2008 Tour de France, learning prowhere his team’s top cyclist finished fourth overall. was like, ‘What cess but did you just they’ve got it do?’” (mostly) figured out by now. Cured On the professional circuit, cyclists issues almost 100 checks every week to are highly regulated not only in their vendors that, for the most part, activities (Frischkorn says he couldn’t Frischkorn or a team member have visitcarry groceries because it would bulk up ed on scouting trips. Frischkorn says he his arms), but in their diets. Nothing sees himself as a middleman between reminds you more that food is fuel than the small producer and the consumer, long-distance cycling, which makes you serving as the storyteller for the products wonder how one develops a healthy rela- and their makers. tionship with food — and a passion for Deciding what makes it in the shop it — when their diet is micromanaged is a mix of personal taste and market and the romance of cuisine is stricken. trends (as is opening shops — when But Frischkorn says he “probably Twitter moved their offices from East to enjoyed food a little more” than other West Pearl and employees complained pro cyclists, and even sneaked glasses of they were no longer able to run down wine while competing in the Tour. In for a sandwich, Frischkorn opened fact, it was that strict dietary oversight Cured West). Frischkorn says one rule of bringing in products is that if the staff that ultimately prompted Frischkorn to would be excited to take it home and eat reconsider his career. it if it doesn’t sell, then it’s worth stock“Food is one of those things that I ing. Like, bottarga or cured fish roe, for love too much to not be able to enjoy it instance. in the way that I want to,” he says. “We want bottarga, and we think it’s Frischkorn could’ve kept competing cool, but that’s something that so few professionally for another six or seven people know what to do with it that we years, he estimates, but figuring he’d end up taking a lot of it home,” he says. “never be one of the top guys,” he and Coral decided to get a jump-start on the “But what we can play with now is so different from what we could play with next phase of their lives. when we opened.” So Frischkorn transitioned into a Being small allows Cured to rotate hospitality role in Spain with the team stock — they may not have an Italian for whom he cycled, escorting high-end vermentino for those looking for one, sponsors to various locations during but they can recommend a hearty and races. Making Barcelona home, fruity Corsican one, with booming Frischkorn finally experienced the Island strains of Italian and French hands-on education in food and drink grapes, for instance. he had to eschew while racing, taking Bringing unique flavors back from advantage of cheap flights and trains to abroad is also the goal of the shop’s jet off to Austria, Morocco or points in “Cured de France” program. With the between. Tour entering its third week, Cured is The style of life in Barcelona also offering packages of rare wines, beers inspired the initial plans for what Cured and cheeses from the regions in which would become, Frischkorn says. the race is running. The program is a “You never did a big grocery shop; microcosm of Cured’s approach to food: you grabbed what you wanted for your sourcing high-quality, small-farm prodmeals,” he says. “We had three little ucts on a rotating basis. It also happens markets that were kind of like [Cured] to tell the story of Frischkorn himself, nearby. We developed relationships with that the two things to which he’s comthe shopkeepers there … and that style mitted his career (cycling and food) of shopping really took us.” work in harmony, and he’s happy he can Seeking a space that was the right share that with others. size in Boulder, Cured teamed with “The two are synergistic: the more Boxcar Roasters, who also happened to you eat and drink, the more you should be looking for a retail shop at the time, and whose product (craft coffee) aligned ride. The more you ride, the more you can eat and drink,” he says. with Cured’s proposed offerings. Boulder Weekly


drink

ON TAP: Very Nice

Brewing Co. 20 Lakewood Drive, Suite 112, Nederland, 303-258-3770, verynicebrewing.com

Tour de brew: Very Nice Brewing Co.

NEW

Whiskey Lounge Pearl Street & Back Bar Patios Sake Bar

Easy-going mountain town charm in a glass by Michael J. Casey

SPECIALS

A

visit to a brewery can range anywhere from magnificent to abysmal with most falling somewhere in between. The average skews closer to the positive but it helps when brewers sow the seeds of enthusiasm ahead of time. When Jeffrey and Susan Green decided to open their own brewery, they seeded the field and called it the Very Nice Brewing Co. There’s a little bit of humility in using the word “nice” instead of “good” and a little bit of boldness by tossing in “very,” Courtesy of Very Nice Brewing but the two play well together. The sign on the door says, “Very Nice Brewing,” and very nice brews are what you get. Very Nice is on the smaller side. Green uses a three-and-a-half barrel brewing system to craft his beers, each of which has a distinct homebrew approach. There is personality in each glass and in the names of the beers. Take Steffie’s Hefe (4.5 percent alcohol by volume) for example, a traditional hefeweizen made with pilsner and wheat malts for easy drinking, galena hops to give the beer enough bitterness to quench your thirst on a hot day and Bavarian yeast to give the beer a hint of Very Nice Brewing co-owners Jeffrey banana and clove. As Green’s Bavarian friend, Steffie, and Susan Green proclaims: “Es ist sehr nett” (“It is very nice”). The pleasantries continue with the Very Nice Pale Ale (5.7 percent), a beer that is both floral and citrusy thanks to galena and cascade hops. As one might expect, the Pale Ale is higher up on the bitter scale than the Hefe but not as much as the Royal We IPA (7.2 percent), which not only has the bitterness of cascade hops but a funky, dank flavor from summit hops that Green uses to dry-hop the brew. For those looking for more bitterness, The Logical Fallacy (7 percent) is a hoppy stout that is simply delicious. The hops — summit and northern brewer — are generous and leap right out of the glass and into the nose, but are tamped down in the mouth thanks to the dark malt. And with just enough smokiness, The Logical Fallacy carries the drinker straight down to the bottom and into another pint. It’s one of those beers that throws you off at first but quickly wraps you up and won’t let go. If hoppy stouts aren’t your thing, then Very Nice’s seasonal Summertime Ale (6.8 percent), is sure to please. Easily one of Very Nice’s best, Summertime Ale is light and floral with refreshing fuggles and cascade hops that provide the backbone to all the mountain aromas and flavors that Green tosses in: rose bud, lemon balm and pineapple weed. It’s like herbal tea and pale ale had a baby and named it “Summer.” And if Summertime Ale isn’t refreshing enough, try the Sin-Ger, half Steffie’s Hefe and half ginger ale; a “Very Nice” way to cool your heels during the dog days of summer. Boulder Weekly

All Day & Night Happy Hour Every Monday

1/2 off Bottles of Wine Every Wednesday Night

DJ’d Late Night Happy Hour Every Friday & Saturday

HOURS

Open Daily at 1 1 am Daily Happy Hour 3-6pm CONNECT

1 1 36 Pearl St. Boulder, CO JapangoRestaurant @JapangoSushi BoulderJapango.com

Now offering Beer & BBQ Catering! That's right folks, UturnBBQ now offers catering! Whether you're hosting a company gathering, graduation party, or just getting some friends together for a good time ...we've got you covered! And you better believe we’ll even bring the beer! We’ve got our Uturn LIGHT & DARK in kegs or cans ready for your shindig. Call 303.993.6033 or email Info@UturnBBQ.com

ou y k rt n Tha e suppo l th nty! l u a o for lder rC am n Te u u t Bo -The U HWY 287 in Lafayette

@UturnBBQ www.UturnBBQ.com July 13 , 2017 51


service directory MASSAGE AND SKIN CARE

LEGAL SERVICES

COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL PAINTING

MORE THAN 30 YEARS OBTAINING THE BEST RESULTS FOR HIS CLIENTS!

•CRIMINAL LAW •TRIALS •APPEALS •DISCIPLINARY •PERSONAL INJURY CASES •SMALL BUSINESS LITIGATION •REASONABLE FEES •FREE OFFICE CONSULTATIONS

Massage and Skin Care A Clean Slate (acne clearing)

SKIN TREATMENT

This organic skin treatment includes: Deep Pore Cleansing Extractions, High frequency, Lymphatic Enhancement Therapy, Omnilux Plus (Near Infra Red) Light Therapy, two organic enzymes, Colloidal Silver and Lavender Clay Mask, plant based Hyaluronic Acid with steam and vitamin C

Jonathan S. Willett Mr. Willett always puts his client’s interests first.

Fast Free Estimates!!! 25 yrs in Boulder County. Husband & wife team; we do the work ourselves & save you $$$! A+ Rating BBB. Int & Ext, Decks & Fences, Pressure Washing.

Highest Peer & Client Ratings by Martindale Hubbell

phone: 303-832-5648 • fax: 303-832-7813 jwillett@willettlaw.net • 255 Canyon Boulevard, Suite 100 Boulder

720-435-2106 or email: micjac1@msn.com www.jacobspainting.info

THE DIVINE RESONANCE

(anti-aging)

SPIRITUAL/PERSONAL GROWTH

SKIN TREATMENT This organic skin treatment includes; organic products for sensitive skin, an organic vitamin C peel, a papaya Bromelain enzyme, Sapphire Microdermabrasion, and Omnilux Revive ( Red ) Light Therapy.

$100 for 1 hour $135 for 90 mins $180 for 2 hours (for either treatment) *bothincludePhenomenal TouchMassage,BigSur JadeHotStoneGemTherapywithSunInfusedHerbal MassageOilBlend,Acoustic ResonanceTechnology (A.R.T),HerbalFacial Steam,alongwithAroma TherapeuticEssentialOils.

Free Threading when you book a session

Reach over 98,000 Boulder Weekly readers by advertising in the Service Directory! Email: orolf@boulderweekly.com or call 303-494-5511

Psychotherapy Hypnotherapy Addictions Counseling Coaching EMDR Lynda Hilburn, LPC, CAC II, CCHt 303-939-8832 http://www.lyndahilburntherapist.com

REAL ESTATE

Now, more than Now, more than ever, make sureis ayour a make your agent Now, more thansure ever, BUY 4 GET 1 FREE Now, more than ever, make sure your agent is aever,is a RE Now, more than SPECIAL DEAL! make sure your agent Boulder Area make sure your agent is a Boulder Area REALTOR® Area REALTOR® Boulder Area Boulder REALTOR AFFORDABLE TRAVEL CALL TODAY FOR A

BEST SKIN CARE Nora Keahon L.M.T/L.E 2595 Spruce Street Boulder 80302 (Spruce & 26th) 720-432-1108 (Shop) • 503-536-5131 (Cell) Text Cell Number For Quick Response! www.divineresonance.com www.bouldermassageandskincare.com

®

MUSIC Travel to Ireland

SAVE $$$

on your trip to

IRELAND

Our New Location! 303.402.0122

3070 28TH ST., STE D. BOULDER CO 80301 thedrumshopboulder.com

52 July 13, 2017

OPEN 7

days a week

www.IrelandMadeSimple.com IrelandMadeSimple@gmail.com 303-579-3011 Like us on Facebook

Boulder Weekly


boulder marketplace HELP WANTED Veranda Sun Boulder Flexible part time work. All ages sought. Great benefits, complimentary red light for health. email for consideration: info.verandasun@gmail.com

HELP WANTED

PERSONAL Very successful guy involved in music business, the arts and many other things seeks attractive female companion 20’s to 30’s or so for great times, world travel, laughter and much more. I’m relationship minded, sane, self made and also I’m kind. Peace. Bukowski482@gmail.com

WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY

HIRING: Manager, Julia’s Kitchen North Boulder. Amazing opportunity to use your skills and creativity; learn and grow with the business as you help rebuild it. Salary/benefits negotiable. Details at juliaskitchen.co.

We provide Drone/Quadcopter videos and Photography for your special day or event. Please call 303-579-3011

HOUSEMATE

Belle Star will come and take ten or more auras, read the photos and interpret the colors. Your photo will be FREE! 303-249-6958 Labellestar12@gmail.com www.BelleStar.net

Clean, neat & quiet housemate wanted in Frederick. Furnished BDRM suite 14”x14” w/walk-in closet & attached bath. Garage prkng, access to LR, kitchen, & laundry. Utilities, WiFi & cable included. Community pool & workout room. No pets, drugs or smoking. First, last & damage deposit required w/ 1 yr lease. $35 bkgrd check fee w/app. Text Diana 970-397-3200.

MASSAGE Body Massages, Your Location or Mine. Daily 9am - 9pm All Credit Cards Accepted 720.253.4710. No Text Messages!

Reach over 98,000 Boulder Weekly readers by advertising in Boulder Marketplace! Email: orolf@boulderweekly.com or call 303-494-5511

HOST AN AURA PARTY!

FURNITURE

Now Offering Estate Buyouts! Or Consign your Quality Furniture. Email pics to info@lifestyleconsignments.com or call 303-485-2617

The Goddess Of Massage SUV / 4x4

$

DIRT BIKE / MOTORCYCLE

$ $

CASH for your 4x4 or SUV, TEXT or CALL now! Local same day pickup!

303-578-8024

• Hot Oil Massage • Relaxing Massage

• Shower & Sauna • All New Staff

$49/hr with this ad 5290 Arapahoe Ave #A, Boulder Past Foothills, 2 traffic lights on right side.

720.565.6854

Open 7 days a week • Hours: 9:30am-10:00pm Visa & Mastercard accepted

Massage E&W

303.443.3336 open 7 days

1/2 Hour / $40 45 Min / $50 1 Hour / $60

CASH for your KTM, YZ, or CRF, 2006 or newer. TEXT or CALL now! Local same day pickup!

303-578-8024

BEAUTIFUL TOUCH OF BOULDER Boulder’s Longest Running and Most Comfortable and Sensual Body Rubs

720-296-2799

We are centrally and discreetly located in Boulder Monday-Sunday 10am-7pm

BeautifulTouchofBoulder.com

Advertise in Maximum Wellness... IT WORKS! Email: orolf@boulderweekly.com or call 303-494-5511 Boulder Weekly

720-422-0582

Or email me at: ladybeanwithrice@gmail.com

ASIAN STYLE

Check out our website for more information

1750 30th St. #8, Boulder

What a great day to feel relaxed with the coolest massage therapist around! Call now to set up that serious body work appointment:

$

maximum wellness All Natural Massage

Presents...

MASSAGE full body massage

$40 for 1/2hr. $60 for 1hr.

Open 7 days in Boulder

(303) 449-8005 1666 30th St. Boulder, CO. 80301

Indulge & Unwind NY Style! An OAsis

frOm

DAy

tO

DAy Life

California Blonde Now Accepting Preferred Clientele IN/OUT Photos upon request

720-364-0840 July 13, 2017 53


BOULDER OWNED. BOULDER GROWN SPECIALS

JULY MEDICAL ROOM FLOWER SALE WITH $99 OUNCES AND $15 EIGHTHS ON ALL STRAINS *Limits may apply DESIGNATE BOULDER BOTANICS AS YOUR CAREGIVER AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY OUNCE WITH YOUR FIRST MEMBER PURCHASE *Select Strains. Limits may apply.

REC $

20 flower eighth on the rec side

Medical Pre-roll Special:

5 PRE-ROLLS FOR $

10

Limit 2 packs per order while supply lasts!

MED & REC

Buy any BBG Extracts shatter, wax or 500 mg cartridge for the regular price and get 1 at 50% off on med & rec sides

MUST PRESENT COUPON

NEW EXTENDED HOURS Medical & Recreational 8am - 9pm Mon - Sat 11am - 5pm Sunday Medical & Recreational Services in One Place

1750 30th Street, Suite 7 720.379.6046

astrology Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: It’s not your birthday, but I feel

like you need to get presents. The astrological omens agree with me. In fact, they suggest you should show people this horoscope to motivate them to do the right thing and shower you with practical blessings. And why exactly do you need these rewards? Here’s one reason: Now is a pivotal moment in the development of your own ability to give the unique gifts you have to give. If you receive tangible demonstrations that your contributions are appreciated, you’ll be better able to rise to the next level of your generosity.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Other astrologers and fortune-tellers

may enjoy scaring the hell out of you, but not me. My job is to keep you apprised of the ways that life aims to help you, educate you, and lead you out of your suffering. The truth is, Taurus, that if you look hard enough, there are always seemingly legitimate reasons to be afraid of pretty much everything. But that’s a stupid way to live, especially since there are also always legitimate reasons to be excited about pretty much everything. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to work on retraining yourself to make the latter approach your default tendency. I have rarely seen a better phase than now to replace chronic anxiety with shrewd hope.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: At least for the short-range future, benign neglect can be an effective game plan for you. In other words, Gemini, allow inaction to do the job that can’t be accomplished through strenuous action. Stay put. Be patient and cagey and observant. Seek strength in silence and restraint. Let problems heal through the passage of time. Give yourself permission to watch and wait, to reserve judgment and withhold criticism. Why do I suggest this approach? Here’s a secret: Forces that are currently working in the dark and behind the scenes will generate the best possible outcome.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: “Do not be too timid and squea-

mish about your actions,” wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson. “All life is an experiment.” I’d love to see you make that your operative strategy in the coming weeks, Cancerian. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now is a favorable time to overthrow your habits, rebel against your certainties, and cruise through a series of freewheeling escapades that will change your mind in a hundred different ways. Do you love life enough to ask more questions than you’ve ever asked before?

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Thank you for contacting the Center for Epicurean Education. If you need advice on how to help your imagination lose its inhibitions, please press 1. If you’d like guidance on how to run wild in the woods or in the streets without losing your friends or your job, press 2. If you want to learn more about spiritual sex or sensual wisdom, press 3. If you’d like assistance in initiating a rowdy yet focused search for fresh inspiration, press 4. For information about dancing lessons or flying lessons or dancing-while-flying lessons, press 5. For advice on how to stop making so much sense, press 6.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: The cereus cactus grows in the

deserts of the southwestern U.S. Most of the time it’s scraggly and brittle-looking. But one night of the year, in June or July, it blooms with a fragrant, trumpet-shaped flower. By dawn the creamy white petals close and start to wither. During that brief celebration, the plant’s main pollinator, the sphinx moth, has to discover the marvelous event and come to gather the cactus flower’s pollen. I suspect this scenario has metaphorical resemblances to a task you could benefit from carrying out in the days ahead. Be alert for a sudden, spectacular, and rare eruption of beauty that you can feed from and propagate.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: If I had more room here, I would

offer an inspirational Powerpoint presentation designed

54 July 13 , 2017

just for you. In the beginning, I would seize your attention with an evocative image that my marketing department had determined would give you a visceral thrill. (Like maybe a photoshopped image of you wearing a crown and holding a scepter.) In the next part, I would describe various wonderful and beautiful things about you. Then I’d tactfully describe an aspect of your life that’s underdeveloped and could use some work. I’d say, “I’d love for you to be more strategic in promoting your good ideas. I’d love for you to have a well-crafted master plan that will attract the contacts and resources necessary to lift your dream to the next level.”

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: I advise you against snorting cocaine, MDMA, heroin, or bath salts. But if you do, don’t lay out your lines of powder on a kitchen table or a baby’s diaper-changing counter in a public restroom. Places like those are not exactly sparkly clean, and you could end up propelling contaminants close to your brain. Please observe similar care with any other activity that involves altering your consciousness or changing the way you see the world. Do it in a nurturing location that ensures healthy results. P.S. The coming weeks will be a great time to expand your mind if you do it in all-natural ways such as through conversations with interesting people, travel to places that excite your awe, and encounters with provocative teachings.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: In late 1811 and early 1812, parts of

the mighty Mississippi River flowed backwards several times. Earthquakes were the cause. Now, more than two centuries later, you Sagittarians have a chance — maybe even a mandate — to accomplish a more modest rendition of what nature did way back then. Do you dare to shift the course of a great, flowing, vital force? I think you should at least consider it. In my opinion, that great, flowing, vital force could benefit from an adjustment that you have the wisdom and luck to understand and accomplish.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: You’re entering into the Uncanny

Zone, Capricorn. During your brief journey through this alternate reality, the wind and the dew will be your teachers. Animals will provide special favors. You may experience true fantasies, like being able to sense people’s thoughts and hear the sound of leaves converting sunlight into nourishment. It’s possible you’ll feel the moon tugging at the waters of your body and glimpse visions of the best possible future. Will any of this be of practical use? Yes! More than you can imagine. And not in ways you can imagine yet.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18:

This is one of those rare grace periods when you can slip into a smooth groove without worrying that it will degenerate into a repetitive rut. You’ll feel natural and comfortable as you attend to your duties, not blank or numb. You’ll be entertained and educated by exacting details, not bored by them. I conclude, therefore, that this will be an excellent time to lay the gritty foundation for expansive and productive adventures later this year. If you’ve been hoping to get an advantage over your competitors and diminish the negative influences of people who don’t empathize with you, now is the time.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: “There is a direct correlation between playfulness and intelligence, since the most intelligent animals engage in the greatest amount of playful activities.” So reports the National Geographic. “The reason is simple: Intelligence is the capacity for learning, and to play is to learn.” I suggest you make these thoughts the centerpiece of your life in the coming weeks. You’re in a phase when you have an enhanced capacity to master new tricks. That’s fortunate, because you’re also in a phase when it’s especially crucial for you to learn new tricks. The best way to ensure it all unfolds with maximum grace is to play as much as possible.

Boulder Weekly


Dear Dan: My partner has a hard time dealing with the fact that, before him, I had several casual flings and one-night stands. It has repeatedly caused issues with us. He is disturbed by the vastness of my past and concerned that I am sometimes impulsive. Because of these things, he often feels too scared to move forward in the relationship. In all other ways we have a supportive, fun-filled, and loving relationship — but I wonder if this issue is just too fundamental. I cannot change my past (and wouldn’t even if I could) and I am trying to be less impulsive, but I’m not sure he sees the changes I’m making. —Partner’s Angst Seriously Troubling

SAVAGE

Love

by Dan Savage

Dear CLIP: The Other Man (TOM) is fucking CUCK’s husband, CLIP, so TOM is involved in CUCK’s sex life — at the margins, on the edges, but kindasorta involved. When CUCK told his husband he didn’t

appreciate TOM’s texts, his husband asked CUCK to play along because it turns TOM on. (I suspect it also turns CUCK’s husband on.) I told CUCK that he should play along only if the texts didn’t bother him. It may have

It’s just the inspiration you need.

Dear PAST: With apologies to George Santayana: Bros who cannot shut up about your past are condemned to reside in it. DTMFA. Dear Dan: My boyfriend of three months is great! He’s smart, funny, and attractive — and two weeks ago, we said those three words. My parents like him, my friends like him, and my cat is enamored with him. But that’s where the problem starts. I had some reservations that he was only coming around to cuddle with my cat — which I know sounds crazy — so I disregarded it. Then he told me that he loves sleeping in my bed because of the mattress! He says his mattress at home hurts his back and he feels achy all day unless he sleeps at my place. (I splurged on an expensive gel/ foam combination mattress.) I can’t shake the feeling that he is using me for my mattress and my cat. —Boy Erodes Dame’s Satisfaction

Boulder Weekly

ALCHEMY ™ IS THE HOLY GRAIL OF CANNABIS. THE FIRST VAPE OIL WITH THE FULL EFFECTS OF YOUR FAVORITE STRAIN. The key to Alchemy’s effectiveness and flavor is FreshTerps™, showcasing the full spectrum of compounds extracted from your favorite plant. Combining all of the essential elements of cannabis including terpenes and purified cannabinoids creates a superior experience. Scientists call this The Entourage Effect. Alchemy™ is the only oil that has it and The Station in Boulder is where you’ll find it. THESTATIONBOULDER.COM

Dear BEDS: Which seems likelier: This smart, funny and attractive guy has been fucking you for three months (and said “those three words” two weeks ago) to keep the gel/foam and literal pussy coming, BEDS, or this guy likes you, he really likes you. Since men can get cats and mattresses of their own, BEDS, my money is on the latter. But you’re right about one thing: Your question makes you sound crazy. Dear Dan: I was surprised by your advice to CUCK, the gay man whose husband was sleeping with another man who insisted on treating CUCK like a cuckold — sending him degrading text messages — even though CUCK isn’t into that. Why isn’t this a case of someone involving another person in his sex life without his consent? While CUCK has agreed to let his husband fuck another person, he didn’t agree to receive sexually explicit texts from that person. —Consensual Lovin’ Is Paramount

been out of line for TOM to send that first message without making sure it would be welcome (I’ll bet CUCK’s husband, who was there, gave TOM the OK), but it was a party foul at best. And, again, if the texts don’t bother CUCK and he’s willing to play along for his husband’s benefit, I think he should. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

Available at

THE STATION

3005 28th Street Boulder COLORADO (303) 442-0892 TM

EVOLAB.COM

July 13 , 2017 55


YOUR FULL SERVICE DISPENSARY FOR FLOWER, CONCENTRATES, EDIBLES & MORE!

BUY ANY GRAM OF SHATTER, WAX, OR SUGAR, GET THE 2ND GRAM

50% OFF LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER EXPIRES 8/3/17

15% OFF

SELECT NUGS OF FLOWER LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER EXPIRES 8/3/17

FOLLOW US FOR DETAILS AND SPECIALS @thehoneycellar

5290 ARAPAHOE AVE. SUITE J, BOULDER, CO


EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

Father-daughter politics

A

long time ago I learned on their big boy pants and get some tisnot to talk politics with sues for your issues.” Later he ranted my Dad. Instead we about the devil’s weed wasting away the embraced a long-term minds of our country’s precious youth. and unspoken agreement My dad says he lost about a third of to keep our conversations focused elsehis Facebook friends over the course of where — on card games and jokes and the following months and yet he football, betting on every game, not to remains totally unapologetic. He chose win but to fuel the fodder of our longhis words carefully, he says, he never distance phone calls. We talked about said anything he didn’t truly believe, the weather, a lot. I became accustomed to seeing Wikimedia Commons/Kira Picabo similar pleasantries from my father online, posting pictures of gardens and short movies about the lives of artists he admires like Van Gogh and Monet. He regularly offered up inspiring memes about God’s love — my Dad’s way of doing what he can to spread the gospel he hears in church every morning, deep in the countryside of rural Wisconsin. Of course, it was football that changed all that. In August he posted a meme from Cold Dead Hands, a picture of quarterback Colin Kaepernick that read: “Colin adding it’s a “good riddance.” Kaepernick refused to stand for the “When I was growing up, my parnational anthem, saying he refuses to ents would set me loose outside and tell support a country that oppresses black me to be home by dark,” he told me in people. Like and share if this privileged a recent call. “When we were out there, athlete is an ignorant disgrace to our they didn’t protect us and you better country.” believe nobody was there to make sure And, just like that, the floodgates things were fair. It was on us to stay out were open. Within days his timeline of trouble or, when we got in it, to get was full of political memes and not just ourselves out. I had to learn the hard about the sacred glory of the national lessons early, but too many people in anthem. His fervor had spread quickly this country were coddled and now they as he lit social media fire after fire with expect their mom and dad to come his now blatant far-right antics. In one back like angels and make everything post he called Trump a savior. In the OK. Only God can do that and guess next he told Hillary supporters to “put what? He’s got more important things

Boulder Weekly

to do.” Two years ago my dad moved from Janesville, Wisconsin the wholesome hometown of Paul Ryan, to nearby Watertown, a bucolic town where neighbors escape the summer heat together in shady garages, listening to baseball games on the radio while smoking cigarettes and drinking Bud Light. On the Fourth of July, my Dad went to church where he and a few hundred others sang patriotic songs to the tune of his wife’s big brass band. Underneath the outward and cheery patriotism, towns like these are still reeling with the loss of farming and automotive jobs and are struggling to find comparable substitutes. Even 10 years after the great recession, most of the people I know out there haven’t found a reliable way to pay the bills, and are still on some sort of government welfare, ironically relying on the programs they tend to fervently argue against. The hypocrisy is obvious and should be offensive, but for some reason I find it endearing — like, how can I be mad when their vulnerabilities are hanging out like that, so poorly disguised? Since the coming of Donald Trump and the age of diabolical politicking, my father and I have managed to talk with a remarkable amount of civility, not because we insist on being polite or politically correct, but because we’ve both become amenable to the idea of an irreparable divide in our worldviews. But once upon a time, my Dad was a hippie in Boulder, driving a yellow cab and performing stand-up comedy at the Nomad. Once upon a time, he

smoked a lot of weed, but these days he sticks to whiskey and beer and a couple of packs a day, he tells me, boasting that he doesn’t need pot or opiates to escape his problems like everybody else — he confronts them head-on instead. Last weekend he went to a family reunion where he ran into a dozen or so of his liberal-minded family who’d recently unfriended him on Facebook. “You know what I did?” he asks rhetorically. “I walked right up and started telling them jokes.” On the other side of the phone I rolled my eyes — in part because I know how bad his jokes can be and in part because I’ve been known to employ a similar tactic when faced with an awkward situation. He retold one of the jokes and I responded with a light chuckle before pressing him on why he didn’t get into it with the leftists in his family — why he didn’t confront the situation headon, like he’d learned to as a boy. I can still hear the silence that followed. The moment was ripe with hope — hope that maybe the two of us would finally break through the walls of our differences and talk about what we were so damn afraid of. Soon though, it yielded to something more symbolic — the impenetrable impasse that stands between the right and the left, the rural and the urban, the drinkers and the smokers. Finally it broke. “I guess because we’re family,” he said. “And when we were all standing there, face-to-face, that was all that seemed to matter.” “You know what we did next?” he asks. You guessed it — he smoked a joint out back by the lake with his 60-year-old liberal cousins.

July 13 , 2017 57


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

New Jersey marijuana politics and ‘Murphy’s Law’ (in a good way)

I

’ve argued before in this space that Murphy’s Republican opponent, Lt. Governor Republicans’ continued opposition to marijuaKim Guadagno, opposes legalization, but has called na legalization could start costing the party’s for decriminalization and expansion of the state’s candidates elections if it doesn’t change. existing medical marijuana program. That proposition is about to be put to the A poll taken immediately after the June 6 pritest in New Jersey. mary by Quinnipiac found Murphy had a better New Jersey’s gubernatorial elections occur in odd than 2-to-1 lead over Guadagno, 55 to 26 percent. numbered years, and the state’s voters will be choosThere’s more. ing a replacement for Governor Chris Christie this Wikimedia Commons/Famartin November. Christie is a drug war dead-ender who made clear (in his own inimitable way) that if the state legislature passed a marijuana legalization bill he’d veto it. New Jersey’s state constitution doesn’t provide for ballot initiatives. Legalization can only take place by action in the state assembly. However, Christie is term-limited, and marijuana legalization is about to become a major issue in the campaign to replace him. According to the New York Times, the Democratic candidate for Governor, Phil Murphy, has announced his “unambiguous support” for making recreational marijuana use legal in the state. And how. Murphy, a former American ambassador to Germany, used his primary election Last May, Democratic State Senator Nicholas victory speech to promise to legalize pot in the Scutari introduced a bill to legalize recreational Garden State if elected governor. marijuana in the state patterned roughly after “The criminalization of marijuana has only Colorado’s successful legalization initiative. Christie served to clog our courts and cloud people’s futures, promised to veto it if it got anywhere near him, of so we will legalize marijuana,” he said. “And while course, but he won’t get a chance because it won’t be there are financial benefits, this is overwhelmingly considered until he is out of office. about doing what is right and just.” “Given his (Murphy’s) support and the leaderAccording to the Marijuana Policy Project, ship of the house, I think we have obviously a legitiMurphy “consistently called for cannabis legalizamate opportunity to do this in the first 100 days of tion during the course of the primary race,” and the Murphy administration for an outright cannabis every other major Democratic candidate also ended law done legislatively,” Scutari said. up endorsing legalization. In other words, it isn’t just Murphy who’s mak-

Boulder Weekly

ing marijuana legalization in New Jersey a campaign issue. It will be Murphy and, as a practical matter, the Democratic Party’s delegation in the state assembly as well. The synergy is obvious, and chances are the strategy was thought out in advance: Legalization isn’t just a vague promise in New Jersey; a bill to make it happen is before the assembly. If you want to see marijuana legalized in New Jersey, vote for the people who are pledged to pass it, and the gubernatorial candidate pledged to sign it. This message is aimed at two groups of voters in particular: voters under the age of 30 and blacks, two voter cohorts with habitually low turnout, especially in nonpresidential election years. National polling shows both to be strongly in favor of legalizing pot. They also happen to be more likely to be busted for pot than the general population. And marijuana arrests in New Jersey just happen to be at a record high, having increased 26 percent from 2000 to 2013, according to an ACLU study. A substantial boost in turnout among these two groups could cement the race for governor and protect — and perhaps increase — the Democratic majorities in the state assembly. Murphy says he gave the legalization issue considerable thought: “I was never ‘hell no,’ but I’ve spent a lot of time on it,” he said last month. “And I have without question come to a place where I wasn’t three and a half years ago... You can’t have that many young people of color doing time on stupid drug crimes.” Democrats have lost about 1,000 seats in state legislatures in the last few election cycles. If campaigning on marijuana legalization works in New Jersey in 2017, don’t be surprised to see it used in other states in 2018.

July 13 , 2017 59


EARTH LOSING THE SUMMER WEIGHT, ACHIEVING GREAT BEACH BOD

Planet Earth debuted a slimmer new look this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Major reductions in the populations of 9,000 vertebrate species have the Earth looking fit and feeling great. No more shall zebras, giraffes and lions weigh down this literal hottie. About 200 species have gone extinct in the last century, the study shows, proving that Mother Earth really knows how to lose Richard Mc Neil/Wikimedia Commons weight and keep it off. The Earth credits its weight loss program, “Biological annihilation via the ongoing sixth mass extinction signaled by vertebrate population losses and declines,” for its shocking makeover results. The Sixth Extinction Diet has already garnered interest from major book publishers who hope to include recipes like “carbon tacos,” “drifting iceberg lettuce wraps” and “avocado toasted Earth.” There’s good news for us humans: it seems the effects of Planet Earth’s diet are only affecting the populations of stupid animals. Yeah, air quality, drought, superstorms and other freak natural events have taken human lives, but it’s not like we’re going extinct. Right?!

icumi

PICK YOUR POISON: DONALD TRUMP OR PAPA JOHN

(IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world

Former Broncos quarterback and Forehead magazine coverboy Peyton Manning appeared on the Jimmy Kimmel show this week and said he was told by many people not to golf with President Trump. What he didn’t say was whether people have told him not to appear in commercials with Papa John, Jeffrey Beall/Wikimedia Commons which objectively harms his reputation more —something that matters to P-Man, obviously, because at one point he was in every other commercial on TV. Manning said Trump didn’t cheat while they golfed, which had long been a rumor of the president, stoked only by the fact that his son reportedly said “I love it” when he was posed with the prospect of getting dirt on Hillary Clinton before last November’s election. One thing we definitely know is Peyton Manning didn’t cheat his final year in the NFL — Papa John’s pizza and a round of golf with Trump looked more appealing than the crap he put out that year.

AMERICA: WHERE ONLY THE STARVED SURVIVE

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) suggested this week that funds previously going to food stamp programs and Planned Parenthood could be used to pay for President Trump’s border wall with Mexico. The idea, of course, is that if you’re going to have unwanted pregnancies and starve to death, you’re going to do it in America, dammit. King said he expects to take $500 million from Planned Parenthood and another $4.5 billion from food stamps. All the folks who utilize food stamps and Planned Parenthood’s services and voted for Trump were quoted as collectively saying, “At least now we can go to sleep at night knowing Mexicans won’t be coming in to use food stamps and Planned Parenthood.” The idea reportedly came from a 1940s mental asylum’s plan to take all the money it used on antipsych medication and lobotomies and whatever crazy medieval crap they were doing back then and use it on extra prickly barbed wire. Of course when the inmates found out, Jack Nicholson led a small revolution and strangled a nurse, and a man named Chief threw a water fountain out the window and walked away.

Boulder’s Premier Recreational Marijuana Center

GRAB A CHEEBA CHEWS PILLOW

$25 1/8s

ANY STRAIN, ALL DAY, EVERY SUNDAY!

SPEND $50 IN CHEEBA CHEWS PRODUCTS!

$5 GRAM

ANY STRAIN WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER. EXPIRES 7.20/17. BW071317

• • • •

Cheeba Chews CBD Cheeba Chews Green Hornets Dabba Chocolate

Friday, July 14th 3pm - 6pm

$25

TOP SHELF 1/8 WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. LIMIT 1 PER CUSTOMER. EXPIRES 7.20/17. BW071317

Easy Accessibility l Plenty of Parking l Quick Service Hours: Monday - Sunday 9am - 9:45pm 303-945-4074 | bouldergreenroom.com | 2750 Glenwood Drive #8 Boulder, CO Must be 21 years of age with a valid state ID 60 July 13 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


Where the Bud Tenders Shop $88/oz

PREMIUM HI-TEST POPCORN

A ROTATION OF FOUR ARTISAN-GROWN STRAINS TESTING ABOVE 20%. $99 FROM 11AM-8PM

Stop into Drift for an inspiring collection of two dozen strains from nine of the best growers across Colorado. From the fiery to the dank, you’re sure to find something that suits you. Looking for a suggestion? You can’t go wrong with the three selections from Dank by Pank: delicious Cherry Diesel (37.4%), sublime Pineapple (29.74%) and a phenomenal cut of Gorilla Glue (30%).

FEATURED FLOWER AFGHAN KUSH –

Landrace (Greenhouse grown), 24.22% . . . . . . . $22/8th $159/oz

PURPLE DURBAN –

Durban Poison x Mendo Purps, 17.2% . . . . . . . . $22/8th, $159/oz

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY KUSH –

OG Kush x Afghani Kush, 21.3% . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22/8th, $159/oz

BLUE DREAM – Blueberry x Haze, 26.75% . . . $28/8th, $179/oz GORILLA GLUE –

Chem’s Sister x Sour Dubb x Chocolate Diesel, 30.33% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28/8th, $179/oz

PINEAPPLE –

Pineapple Oregon Cut, 29.74% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28/8th, $179/oz

CHEMMY JONES –

Chem Dawg D x Casey Jones OG, 33% . . . . . . . . $39/8th, $249/oz

CHERRY DIESEL –

Cherry Kush x Turbo Diesel, 37.4% . . . . . . . . . . . $39/8th, $249/oz

PIPE DREAM –

Blue Dream x Bio Diesel, 35% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39/8th, $249/oz

CONCENTRATES

CANNABIS MAXIMUS – Shatter and Wax, 1g . . . . . . $25 CONCENTRATE SUPPLY CO. –

Northern Cough Rosin, 1g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33

QUEST – Distillate, 93%, 1000mg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35

Worth the Drive. From Anywhere.

All prices pre-tax.

1750 30TH ST. | BOULDER, CO | 720.612.4382 MONDAY – SATURDAY 9:00AM – 9:45PM | SUNDAY 9:00AM – 4:45PM


This Week’s Specials • All Stores!

*All Deals Expire 7/31/17. Subject to Change.

All Strains. Medical Patients Only. Expires 7/31/17. Subject to Change.


GRAB SUMMER

s y t r o Sh BY THE

O N LY AT Fresh-rolled minis in a pocket-sized pack. Ready to go wherever summer takes you.

114 6 P E A R L S T. B O U L D E R , C O 80302 O P E N U N T I L 10 PM E V E R Y DAY N AT I V E R O O T S D I S P E N S A R Y. C O M


I’m Retiring Soon

Visit Me Today!

NEW HOURS MON-FRI 9AM - 10PM SAT-SUN 10AM - 10PM

last word

LOWEST MARIJUANA TAX IN THE STATE

Divine Resonance Massage & Skin Care

Elizabeth Frame is here to Help You!

I am committed to making your car buying experience easy and fun! Awarded Best of Boulder by the Daily Camera

Please see ad on page 52. Now offering acne treatments. www.divineresonance.com www.bouldermassageandskincare.com 720-432-1108

Voted by You Boulder’s #1

EARLY BIRD NEW HAPPY HOUR 7PM-10PM SPECIAL 9AM-10AM • PAY NO TAX

20% OFF

Recreational Marijuana Dispensary & Best Customer Service in Boulder County!

Call Elizabeth Today!

303-772-2900

ENTIRE ORDER

• BUY ANY EIGHTH, GET A FREE GRAM OF SAME STRAIN.

Valid 7/13/17 - 7/31/17

Limit 2 per order. Valid 7/13/17 - 7/31/17

ATM ONSITE! *some restrictions apply

www.karingkind.com • www.karingkindlabs.com 5854 Rawhide Ct., Boulder CO 80302 (1 Mile North of Boulder on HWY 36)

303-449-WEED (9333)

2801 Iris Ave., Boulder, CO

See our full-page ad across from Cannabis Corner! Voted Boulder’s Best Recreational Dispensary 2015-2017!

Colorado’s #1 Source for Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

& Oregon’s Only #4 Soil.

Guaranteed lowest price! Wholesale Pricing & Free Delivery for Qualifying Commercial Accounts!

303.66.HYDRO (664.9376) victoryhydro.com

www.terrapincarestation.com See our ad below

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 57. THE

TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

21+ Counter Open *Full Menu and Specials Now now on Weedmaps* 2897 Mapleton Ave Ste 800 303.539.6525 @14erBoulder

Save Time, Skip the Line! Order Ahead Online! Same day pickup. Now available everyday from open to 9pm. Early Bird Special* Shop Between 8-10 am Monday - Friday, 9-10 am Saturday, Receive 15% off your entire purchase!

1387 E South Boulder Rd., Louisville, CO

21+ Counter Now Open Taste the Difference, 2897 Mapleton Ave Ste 800 Love the @14erBoulder Price! 303.539.6525

Now open daily until 9:45pm

Deals

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

SHIFT ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE AN EXCLUSIVE RELATIONSHIP WITH ALL MMJ AMERICA COLORADO STORES $39.10 OTD 500MG CARTRIDGES

ENTER TO WIN FREE TICKETS TO

While supplies last.

MED ONLY

Strain of the Week* Durban Poison 20% off all quantities. $100 HALF OZ Strains* Afghani, Blackberry Kush, Flaming Cookies, Limielight, Super Lemon Haze * Not to be combined with other discounts. While supplies last. Some exclusions may apply. Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Olio, Spherex, Bolder Extracts, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar

Craft Cannabis

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com

$420 OZ OF WAX AND SUGAR WAX $450 OZ OF SHATTER + TAX

303.440.1323

Some restrictions may apply. While supplies last. Not valid with any other offers.

See Ad on PG 54

FOR JULY FLOWER SPECIALS! THIS WEEK’S COUPONS:

$20 FLOWER 1-8 (REC)* BUY 5 PRE-ROLLS FOR $10 (MED)* BUY ANY BBG EXTRACTS, SHATTER, WAX, OR 500MG CARTRIDGE, GET 1 @ 50% OFF (MED/REC)* OPEN 8AM-9PM MON-SAT, 11AM-5PM SUNDAY 1750 30th Street, Suite 7, Boulder

720.379.6046

*See ad on PG 53 for restrictions.

HPC/EPC’S WANTED $1,350 OTD CALL STORE FOR DETAILS

sign up for MMJ America’s text blasts at mmjamerica.com and be automatically entered to win a pair of tickets to see the big gigantic at red rocks

7 DAYS 9AM-9:45PM • ARAPAHOE, DENVER: 9AM-6:45PM • 303-862-4064 • MMJAMERICA.COM MMJ America offers free parking in our private lots. If our lots are ever full, we’ll pay for your parking! BOULDER REC & MED • 1909 Broadway #100 • 303-862-4064 Check out our expanded selection of edibles. 21+

Your Soul Drum Yet? 1534 55th St., Boulder Met HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES. 303-444-0861

8a- 6:45p Sun-Tues • 8a- 9:45p Weds-Sat

www.elementsboulder.com

The Drum Shop • 3070 28th St., Boulder

303-402-0122

WHERE NATURE & MEDICINE MEET

RECREATIONAL:

OUNCES

GRAMS OF SHATTER STARTING AT $25 3-PACKS OF SHATTER STARTING AT $73.5

STARTING AT MEDICAL:

$150.00

GRAMS OF SHATTER STARTING AT $18.37 4-PACK OF SHATTER STARTING AT $68.9 Select strains. While supplies last. Not to be combined with any other offers. Open Everyday Valid through July 20th. Tax not included.

Open Everyday 303.442.2565 5420 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder 5420 Arapahoe Ave.,•Boulder www.boulderwc.com 303.442.2565 www.boulderwc.com

7 13 17 boulder weekly  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you