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F R E E E ve r y T h u r s d a y Fo r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / Ju l y 1 1 - 1 7 , 2 0 1 9


news:

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news:

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With hundreds of families and thousands of kids homeless in Boulder County, can more be done to help them rebuild their lives? by Matt Cortina

Helping students see themselves and others through multicultural history curriculum by Angela K. Evans

boulderganic:

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buzz:

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Colorado tops the list for e-cigarette use among youth and the environment isn’t happy by Lauren Hamko

Windows, Walls and Invisible Lines: Portraits of Life in Sanctuary by Joel Dyer

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arts & culture:

Local author R.L. Maizes mines the human condition in her charming debut of short stories by Caitlin Rockett

Lafayette’s beer garden farmers’ market is an undiscovered gem by John Lehndorff

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departments Dyertimes: Welcome, AAN The Anderson Files: Trump’s trial run for a fascist state Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Overtones: The Spinal Tap of bluegrass reunites (minus George Clooney) Arts & Culture: Jean-Marie Zeitouni, David Danzmayr return to CMF Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar’ by Ingrid Asmus Film: ‘Wild Rose’ and Jessie Buckley sing the dreamers song Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Non-alcoholic beers hit the U.S. market Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Quickies Weed Between the Lines: This is your brain on drugs Cannabis Corner: Illinois was number 11, so who’s next?

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or a wonderfully unique and enjoyable outing, please drop by The Boulder The Drum Shop is proud to carry the best selection of ethnic percussion in the Rockies. If you’re looking for a great selection of djembes, doumbeks, cajons & frame drums or if you’re not quite sure what you might want, owner Billy Hoke will be pleased to help you find the right drum for you. The Drum Shop also houses the areas largest selection of DW, Yamaha, Pearl, Ludwig, Gretsch, Tama, Sonor & Pacific drum sets and hardware. As well, there is a great selection of cymbals from every major brand and some nice smaller companies. The Drum Shop is proud to offer lessons by two of Boulder’s finest working drummers; Joe Morton and Christian Teele. The Boulder Drum Shop is working hard to be there for you. 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122 M-F 10-6, Sat. 10-5, Sun.11-4

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Accounting, Julia Spencer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Murray Editorial intern, Lauren Hamko Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Coordinator, Lara Henry Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Cover photo by Joel Dyer July 11, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 48 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Welcome, AAN By Joel Dyer

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et ready, Boulder, because the hard-partying members of the AAN are are about to descend on your town. And trust me, the folks from the American Academy of Neurology know how to tie one on. No wait. Scratch that. I meant to say the folks from the Association of Alternative Newsmedia are coming to town. Apparently, our friends at the Neurology Academy know more about SEO than we media types and they’ve secured the top spot on the all-important “AAN” Google search, which in the big picture means... absolutely nothing, of course. But just the thought of discussing an inspired subject like SEO tells me it must be convention time. Like the swallows of Capistrano (if Capistrano was in a different location every year), the people who own, publish, edit, write, market and otherwise draw a paycheck from the 120 or so alt weeklies around our country and Canada return each year to a single town in their ongoing effort to sort out the state of our industry. I

Convention week is a time to share what’s working or isn’t from a business standpoint; examine ways to better serve our readers and advertising partners; see old friends and make new ones; drink a shot every time Trump says something stupid or untrue (the game is usually over in about 45 minutes with all participants having passed out); and, of course, talk all things journalism. And yes, terms like “digital transformation” and “SEO” will be uttered, but not as frequently as, “We’ll have another round,” or, “I don’t feel anything yet... I better eat another whole cookie.” What else would you expect from a few hundred representatives of the alt-press. All kidding aside, Boulder Weekly is proud to be playing host to this year’s AAN convention which will be taking place at the Hotel Boulderado from July 11-13. It’s the first time our industry has ever held its national convention in Colorado and it could not have come at a more critical time for journalism and journalists everywhere. Shrinking newsrooms have made it hard to confront the current assault on journalism that originated from the White House with its silly-at-first chant of “fake news.” Unfortunately, see DYERTIMES Page 7

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Trump’s trial run for a fascist state By Dave Anderson

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few weeks ago, Trump tweeted that he will quickly deport millions of undocumented immigrants from this country. “They will be removed as fast as they come in,” he barked. Will that happen? Immigrants and asylum seekers will definitely continue to be terrorized and demonized. The arrests, deportations and workplace raids won’t stop. Trump is now promising to arrest thousands — not millions — of migrant families in surprise roundups across big U.S. cities. That’s more doable for his re-election campaign. At any rate, he loves “triggering the libs” and provoking the anger of bigcity Democratic elected officials and activist “snowflakes” who love the alien, brown hordes and despise the regular, white, real Americans. How far can he go? Trump knows that immigrant labor is a source of enormous profit for American employers. According to the U.S. Labor Department, a majority of the nation’s agricultural workforce is undocumented. Many other industries are dependent upon immigrant labor such as restaurants, retail establishments, meatpacking, healthcare, hotels, building services and some I

construction trades. What Trump really wants to do is create a cowering “permanent underclass,” argues Maximilian Alvarez and William Lopez in a brilliant essay in In These Times: “It is a documented fact that, rather than leave their jobs when the threat of raids and deportations looms large, undocumented workers will subject themselves — out of fear and necessity — to greater exploitation, wage theft and precariousness. Employers, in turn, will seize on the ‘opportunity’ to squeeze as much surplus value out of workers under the coercive threat of destroying their lives and families with one phone call. From bosses and managers to law enforcement to citizens with a grudge, anyone with even a modicum of power will continue to internalize and regularize the fact that they can leverage state-sanctioned terror to exploit, assault and shake down our most vulnerable neighbors, classmates and coworkers.” Mary Bauer of the Southern Poverty Law Center said Trump is pursuing, “a deliberate strategy of unmitigated, unrelenting cruelty toward people of color who dare to see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 7

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 6

seek asylum in our country.” A team of lawyers visited a Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, and found hundreds of children in wretched conditions. Isaac Chotiner of The New Yorker wrote: “The conditions the lawyers found were shocking: flu and lice outbreaks were going untreated, and children were filthy, sleeping on cold floors, and taking care of one another because of the lack of attention from guards. Some of them had been in the facility for weeks.” The Homeland Security Department’s Office of the Inspector General (the internal watchdog) warned about “dangerous overcrowding” in Rio Grande Valley Border Patrol facilities. These conditions represent “an immediate risk to the health and safety” of border agents and those detained. The report said migrants experienced prolonged detention without proper food, hygiene or laundry facilities — some for more than a month. Hundreds of children were held for longer than 72 hours. In some cases, kids were held for more than two weeks. Some adults were kept in standing-room-only cells, without access to showers, for more than a week. ProPublica investigative reporter A.C. Thompson has revealed the existence of secret Facebook pages on which current and former Border Patrol agents joked about the deaths of migrants, discussed throwing burritos at Latino members of Congress visiting a detention facility and posted a photoshopped picture of Trump forcing Rep. Alexandria OcasioCortez to perform oral sex on him. As we delve into the Trumpian heart

of darkness, should we wonder if we are in a “pre-fascist” time? Irish Times columnist Fintan O’Toole says that we are. Last year, he argued that Trump is conducting “trial runs for fascism” and “test, marketing for barbarism.” O’Toole said “putting babies in cages” was such a test.” He wrote: “Fascism doesn’t arise suddenly in an existing democracy. It is not easy to get people to give up their ideas of freedom and civility. You have to do trial runs that, if they are done well, serve two purposes.They get people used to something they may initially recoil from; and they allow you to refine and calibrate. This is what is happening now and we would be fools not to see it.” He says you prepare people for fascism by rigging elections such as happened in the victory of Trump and the Brexit referendum in 2016. There is the development of a propaganda machine, which provides “alternative facts.” But O’Toole says the next step is much more difficult: “You have to undermine moral boundaries, inure people to the acceptance of acts of extreme cruelty. Like hounds, people have to be blooded. They have to be given the taste for savagery. Fascism does this by building up the sense of threat from a despised out-group. This allows the members of that group to be dehumanised. Once that has been achieved, you can gradually up the ante, working through the stages from breaking windows to extermination.” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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DYERTIMES from Page 5

what seemed only silly has turned into something sinister since amplified and complicated by the likes of Facebook, Google and Twitter. Now people on all sides of the political spectrum are expressing their disbelief at much of what is being reported. It’s a dangerous evolution that comes at a key moment in history when climate change and the way we treat immigrants are threatening to forever change our nation and the world going forward. Got dark in a hurry, right? The point is, we have a lot of serious things to talk about at this year’s AAN conference. So, if you happen to see a BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

bunch of strangers sitting around in a local bar this week talking journalism, feel free to buy them a round. But you don’t have to. After all, you folks are already the reason that all of us in the AAN show up for work every day and try our best. So all we really ask of you is that you keep reading... oh yeah, and clicking “like” and “share” and “retweet” and stuff like that. With your help, and a little luck, I honestly believe we will one day rise above the American Academy of Neurology on search engines everywhere, even on Bing. I

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When you listen to him talk about his positions and his abilities to build consensus, remember: John Frackenlooper is a liberal Republican, posing as a Democrat. If he enters the Colorado Senate race, Cory Gardner will get a second term, because the Democratic vote will be severely split. It will be a replay of the Senate race in New York in the early ’70s, when James Buckley won a three-way race. Pete Simon/Arvada

Was America really ever great?

Once again, Mr. Danish undermines a great thesis with right-wing, knee-jerk antipathy towards the left. (Re: “Was America ever great? You bet it was! And it still is,” Danish Plan, July 4, 2019). He asks when America “was ever great” and gives examples of when it was. Let’s take a look. He cites the founding language, “We hold these Truths to be self-evident...” Yes, that was pretty good, but it only applied to a wealthy, white aristocracy. He cites the 360,000 union troops who died “to preserve the Union and slavery.” Most of those northerners didn’t care about freeing the slaves, so this is a specious assertion. Even Abraham Lincoln, who did free the slaves (legally) wasn’t truly interested in freeing slaves. All he really wanted to do was preserve the entire Union and win a war, which was one of the bloodiest and brutal the world had ever witnessed. He lauds the Morrill Land Grant College Act and the Homestead Act. Pretty great if you didn’t happen to be a Native American who experienced genocide because of them. He cites the discovery of ether as an anesthetic as “arguably the single most important and far-reaching American contribution to medicine to this day.” Really? I guess you could argue for it. And, yes, the GI Bill and the Marshall Plan were pretty good, too. But they contributed to a militarized world with America at the forefront of an oligarchic international military industrial complex. We may not all be enthused about this. Danish cites our automotive culture and the construction of the I

interstate highways as a time when America was great. Yes, I like my car, too, but I’m not so crazy about urban congestion and the petroleum economy to which we are now addicted. William Levitt’s invention of the suburb? Has Paul never heard of outof-control urban sprawl? I must agree that Martin Luther King, Jr. said some great stuff. But why does Mr. Danish accuse the Democratic Party of embracing “inherently racist and sexist identity politics” and betraying “Dr. King’s dream?” I may not agree with the farleft program that today’s Democrats are attempting to sell, but let’s not get carried away with right-wing rhetoric. Are not his beloved Republicans embracing the very same things from the other side of the fence? Mr. Danish contemptuously condemns the losers in the 2016 election, who have declared themselves “the resistance” instead of the “loyal opposition.” Has he never heard of Mitch McConnell, who famously claimed in 2008 that the Republican Party’s number-one priority would be to make Barack Obama a one-term president? His characterization of today’s Democrats ignores the fact that it was his beloved Republicans who played this game first. So enough with the American exceptionalism and proud bleating nationalism. There is one thing that all of today’s Democrats surely understand: we can only make America great again when we rid ourselves of the lying ignorant hypocritical fascist oligarch gas-bag currently residing in the White House. Evan Cantor/Boulder

Overcome partisanship to stop the climate crisis

I strongly agree with Joel Dyer’s “Hate makes us stupid” article (Re: Dyertimes, June 27, 2019). America’s growing, blatant partisanship is ruining our democracy and preventing our federal government from solving the many real, urgent problems confronting us. Fortunately there is a good bipartisan solution to one of our most urgent problems, the climate crisis. The Energy Innovation Act was introduced into the House and Senate in late 2018 with bipartisan support. And the same bill was reinBOULDER WEEKLY


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troduced into the House in 2019 as H.R. 763 with bipartisan support. The Energy Innovation Act’s carbon fee and dividend will drive down carbon emissions by 40 percent in the next 12 years and will create 2.1 million new jobs (energyinnovationact. org). It has wide support including the non-partisan Citizens’ Climate Lobby and the conservative Climate Leadership Council (which includes senior Republicans George Schultz and James Baker). Let’s not let the deep partisan divide stop us from solving the climate crisis. Thank Rep. Joe Neguse for co-sponsoring H.R.763 and tell Sens. Cory Gardner and Michael Bennet to introduce the same bill into the Senate. For the sake of future generations, including our children and grandchildren, let’s bridge the partisan divide and solve the climate crisis. Jim Dimmick/Boulder

many, if not most, Americans are so outrageously gullible. They’ll believe almost anything they’re told. (Examples abound.) Fixing this aspect would require convincing Americans to think and question, so forget that. Dick Dunn/Hygiene

In “A modest proposal for combating the plague of robocalls” (Re: The Danish Plan, June 20, 2019), Danish skips the big question: Why do Americans get so many robocalls? There are two big pieces to the answer. One is that the caller-ID technology is badly broken: Since it’s trivial to forge the ID, it usually doesn’t identify the caller. So it has failed. But more than that, there are so many robocalls because they work often enough to make them viable scams. Why do they work? Because BOULDER WEEKLY

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(Re: “Hate makes us stupid,” Dyertimes, June 27, 2019). Let’s see: On one side we have the entire Republican Party and the Christian Taliban. On the other, Nancy Pelosi and her vast legions of fans. False equivalency (a favorite tool of the right), anyone? Joel, you can do better. But at least you made me appreciate Jim Hightower. As for the Christian right, hate the sin but love the sinner? Or as the man they purport to follow would say, “Father forgive them, they know not what they do.” Jim Wilkinson/Boulder

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Sixty toilets rolled away from library

During the Boulder Memorial Day Festival, Boulder’s library had about 50 portable toilets rolled in. Three days later, I watched that 50 or so portable toilets rolled out. If you were a tourist with no access to a public toilet before the library opened, would you feel welcome in Boulder? No outdoor facility in this lovely area is inhumane. I offer three solutions, both costly and not. Our compassionate, touristencouraging City Council could choose among these solutions to beautify and clean up and show mercy to visitors. 1) Sanisette. The most high-end but cleanest would be the Parisian self-contained, self-cleaning, unisex, public outdoor toilet: the Sanisette. You pay, you enter, you go, you leave. When you leave, the Sanisette locks and a flood of soapy water immerses the whole interior! It completely washes itself inside before the next person pays, enters. Paying to enter eliminates homeless use, however. A very classy Boulder solution for human need would be the Parisian Sanisette. 2) Cheap concrete building. Another solution is a concrete parkstyle little building with a modestly paid attendant who keeps it clean and avoids vandalism. Hire people who really need income. 3) Rolling moon room. The cheapest solution is the lower-end solution of portable toilets on wheels. Easy to roll away and empty, easy to satisfy the human needs, easy to keep Boulder Creek clean for our children playing in summers. A larger unit is available with an attached faucet to wash hands. Please consider these or other compassionate solutions to human needs at the wonderful Boulder Library ASAP, and roll some toilets back to the library. Louise Love/Boulder

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VALERIA EVERETT VIA FLICKR

HUNDREDS OF FAMILIES ARE homeless in Boulder County, and one in three children live in or near poverty. There are solutions, but they require funding and political will.

HOME FIRES BURNING

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knew I was going to have to start at the bottom,” she says. “I guess I wasn’t really sure what that meant at the time.” It’s the last day of the Fourth of July weekend. Allison (not her real name) sits at a picnic table in an empty Louisville park. Long auburn hair, azure eyes, gossamer skin. She’s 44. A milkshake melts and foams beside her. Five kids. Four grandkids, two of which she raised. Married at 18. Divorced at 41. Homeless at 42. She talks about freedom, about what past dependence has cost her and her children. “That’s why I get so mad, because there was so much infidelity that I wasn’t paying attention to the kids,” she says. “My oldest daughter snuck out one night at 10 years old. One of her neighbor friends, I didn’t know, but she had an uncle that was there or a brother or something. Anyway, they told her to sneak out, and she did, and they took her to an apartment and there was four to six guys there, and they raped her and her friend. She didn’t even tell me. I didn’t find out for two years and by then shit had hit the fan. “At some point I’m going to get therapy 10

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With hundreds of families and thousands of kids homeless in Boulder County, can more be done to help them rebuild their lives?

BY MATT CORTINA

because I want to see what happened, why I didn’t notice it.” Hundreds of families are homeless in Boulder County. One in three children live in or near poverty. The rising cost of housing is the primary culprit; job loss, low wages and domestic abuse contribute as well. The impacts of homelessness on families are surprising and far-reaching. There are solutions, but they require funding and political will. Family homelessness is a problem out of plain sight — only 5 percent of families experiencing homelessness in Boulder County live on the street. This is the story of what it’s like to couch-surf; what it’s like to return to an abuser because you have no other option for shelter; what it’s like to start over, with mouths to feed and nothing in the pantry.

‘I dunno where to go’

Allison and her partner had been married 23 years when she decided to leave. “I was beginning to feel really hopeless. I was almost on the verge of just walking out on my own JULY 11, 2019

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and just leaving everything,” she says. Her husband took everything and moved in with his mother. Though Allison received alimony, it wasn’t enough to afford a place for her three children still under 18 and the two grandchildren for whom she was responsible. She hadn’t worked in years, a product of being under the thumb of her partner and which made the prospect of finding a job daunting. Not that one job guarantees financial security for a family of six in Boulder County. A family of four, according to County data, needs $94,500 to meet basic needs here, one of the highest rates in the state. About a quarter of families in Boulder County live below this threshold — that’s 7,200 kids. “These are the working poor,” says Julie Van Domelen, executive director of Emergency Family Assistance Association (EFAA), one of the largest support groups for homeless families in the county. “You would think that with full employment locally we would see less [homelessness]. In fact, the housing cost and childcare costs are hammering families.” Homeless family members who are employed BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


often work the types of jobs (laborers, restaurant workers, seasonal positions) that don’t come with living wages or benefits (health care, paid sick leave and child care) that support families. “These sectors, hospitality and tourism and food and beverage, those are the growth sectors if you look at the economic development strategies and plans, and yet those industries have lower than self-sufficiency wages on average,” Van Domelen says. And the wage required to ensure self-sufficiency is getting higher. Wanda Pelegrina of the City of Boulder reports “an increase of families of lower-middle income needing support” over the last five to eight years. It should be simple to determine if a family is homeless — do they have a home or not? But over half of homeless families couch-surf or stay with relatives, one-third are in temporary shelters and 8 percent stay in hotels. At what point is a family in between homes, or just figuring their situation out, and when are they homeless? Does it matter? “I am very careful when I’m with the kids not to say they’re homeless,” says EFAA Children’s Program Coordinator Lindsey Warren. “They don’t view themselves as homeless. They say, ‘I have a bed and therefore I’m not the person that’s on the street. They see they have a home, even if it’s for a little bit of time.”

‘We were going to move forward’

Maria Santo and her two children became homeless in January 2017 when the father of her children moved in with another woman and she could no longer afford to rent her home in Lafayette. She couch-surfed for three weeks while she came to grips with her reality. “I wasn’t ready to go out on my own,” she says. That’s when she accessed EFAA’s services. The family was put in emergency housing and later moved into transitional housing, where they’ve been since and can stay for up to two years. EFAA operates 57 units — Allison and her family stayed in EFAA housing while rebuilding their lives, too. EFAA — along with OUR Center in Longmont and Sister Carmen in Lafayette — are often the first and only option for families in distress. These nonprofits work with Boulder County and city governments to offer a network of services to homeless families, providing everything from shelter and food to counseling, academic support and more. The programs these nonprofits offer often provide the first opportunity for children to feel supported and do things their peers do. Something as simple as going for a hike may be impossible for families dealing with joblessness. “If the parents aren’t holding down a job, going on a hike is a luxBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ury,” Warren says. “The goal is to let the children be children,” she continues. “A lot of times they are exposed to trauma. They take on these adult problems. Sometimes there are 11-year-olds responsible for their siblings and they just want to go out and play.” There is a stigma about homelessness that both children and adults encounter; that there’s something wrong with them or that they cause their own financial insecurity. This perception can be damaging and belies reality, Van Domelen says. “We have a lot of moral judgment made on folks in our communities that have economic challenges,” Van Domelen says. “That somehow they’re not making the right choices. The U.S. has the lowest income mobility and highest child poverty rate of any developed country. It’s structural. It’s beyond someone’s household budgeting skills ... The folks we work with are working incredibly hard and are very savvy about how to make ends meet.” Maria embodies that sentiment. She was “emotionally destroyed” after her separation and entry into EFAA’s sheltering services, but she explained to her children that “this was how it had to be,” and that they would resolve to pull themselves out of despair, with help from their new support network. “As a human, it’s our part to move forward. The help is out there,” Maria says. “If you want to move forward, there’s a lot of support in Boulder County, but you have to look for it.” Still, the odds of achieving financial stability are stacked against some people, and those odds get worse when rising home prices, domestic abuse and income inequality are considered.

‘You become the last person to take care of’

When she was a kid, Allison’s stepdad made a bet with her uncle and the neighbor that she’d be pregnant by 16. It was 18, actually, the age she married her husband. She was in ninth grade, he in 11th, when they started dating. He had dependency issues, she says, and his actions foretold behavior to come. She’d break up with him and he’d come to her house, crying. “He’s really manipulative,” she says, shaking her head. “Even to this day, he’ll, like, cry in front of the kids and shit and I’m just like, ‘You fucking P.O.S., you don’t let your kids see you do that.’” Allison’s mom would sympathize with him. Both her parents were alcoholics, she says. They couldn’t warn her about the red flags of emotional abuse. “They weren’t able to be my parents,” she says. She’s angry about it. She writes to vent, and with detached amusement, says she takes Zumba classes to get the energy out. Only now, removed from the marriage and with her kids in a stable sitI

JULY 11, 2019

uation, can she begin to address her own issues. Maria has never met Allison, but she explains how that reluctance to care for one’s self while homeless impacted her life. “When you become dependent on somebody and that person is no longer there, you become the last person to take care of,” Maria says. “It took me a while to take care of myself.” More than a quarter of homeless families in Boulder County experience domestic abuse. Boulder’s Safehouse Progressive Alliance for Nonviolence (SPAN) is a shelter and support agency that works with 2,000 domestic abuse victims and their children every year. Anna Tapp, SPAN executive director, says the organization has to turn away another 1,400 due to lack of resources. As was the case with Allison, abusers often create dependence on themselves, Tapp says, making the decision to leave a tough one for those on the receiving end of domestic violence. “If someone is an abusive relationship but is economically dependent on their partner, it can be very scary when choosing between living with an abuser and living in your car,” Tapp says. “If you don’t have access to affordable housing or livable wage employment, that forces survivors into a cycle of homelessness. It requires them to return to an abuser.” This is exacerbated by rising home prices in Boulder County. Van Domelen says the average family of three in Boulder that accesses EFAA support spends 72 percent of their income on housing. “In years past, you lost your job or divorced or [experienced] domestic violence, you were at risk of homelessness. Now it’s your landlord that puts you at risk,” she says. “People are coming in and saying rent is being raised 30-40 percent. ... It can only get worse, if you think about it. Wages are pretty stagnant and the cost of living and housing is going up, and affordable units are disappearing.” Fifty-eight percent of homeless families in Boulder County cite the inability to pay their rent or mortgage as the primary cause of their situation. The seasonal nature of many low-income jobs puts many at risk as well. Less than 10 percent of homeless families are in that situation because of mental health or drug abuse issues. Whatever the cause, homelessness, or the fear of becoming homeless, has a lasting effect on adults and children — the hidden impacts of failing to address home affordability, income inequality and the lack of nonprofit support.

‘One frickin’ thing after another’

All three of Allison’s daughters claim they have been abused (not by their mother) and all of them see HOMELESSNESS Page 12

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are currently in therapy for the alleged abuse. “It’s just been like one frickin’ thing after another,” Allison says. She suggests the abuse her eldest daughter endured may have led her to heroin, an addiction that resulted in Allison eventually taking her daughter’s two children into her own care. If her options were better, if housing was cheaper, Allison says she would’ve left her marriage sooner — maybe, she says, she could have spared her family a lot of pain had she done so. In families where domestic violence occurs, ensuring children have access to a normal, stable education is paramount for their long-term success, but it can be tricky. “If the abuser knows where the kids go to school, know the kids’ schedules, know what sports they’re in, going back to [their] school poses dangers,” Tapp says. “It’s one of the greatest fears the moms we work with experience — the feeling when kids are at school and the abuser knows their schedule.” Even without abuse, the effect homelessness has on children can be massive. Low-income students fail to graduate high school at five times the rate of middle-income students, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. The effects of family poverty “comes out in many ways,” Van Domelen says, from kids not being prepared for kindergarten to older students unable to access an iPad or WiFi connection, necessities in today’s education system. And failing to get those resources, and failing in school, puts kids at risk of perpetuating the homelessness cycle when they get older, she says.

‘A community of haves and have-nots’

Van Domelen says it would require 5 percent of the City of Boulder’s $353.7 million annual budget to solve family homelessness. But, more importantly, it would also require community commitment and political will. “The number of kids going through this is far beyond the 12

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resources that are put to it,” she says. The City gave $273,000 this year to EFAA, SPAN and others through its Human Services Fund to support family homelessness, about one-third of what it gave to support adult homelessness sheltering and resources services. The City does, however, invest heavily in the affordable housing program, which helps shelter some previously homeless families. “Boulder considers itself a progressive community caring about individuals and the environment, but there’s a lack of awareness about things like child poverty,” Van Domelen says. “I don’t think if you ask the average person, ‘Is this an issue?’ they might not put it high on the list or on the list at all. It’s kind of invisible. ... It’s a community of haves and have-nots, and the havenots have a tough time making it here.” Tapp says residents, in Boulder at least, need to be willing to embrace “models of affordable housing we haven’t really been able to explore largely because of the neighborhood pushback and zoning restrictions” — particularly affordable multi-unit buildings in neighborhoods that don’t want that sort of construction. Finding a solution is nothing short of finding out what Boulder County truly values, Tapp says. “Are we OK with the fact if you have a crisis with your family and lose your housing that that often means you have to leave the community?” You can help outside of demanding systemic change, EFAA’s Warren says — the group gets most of its funding and supplies from private donors, citizens of Boulder County, and more is always needed. Maria and Allison appreciate all the funds, volunteer hours and donations they received from Boulder County citizens via EFAA. It’s helped them restart their lives. “I sure feel secure now,” Allison says. “This is my ship now. I decide where we’re going and how we’re going to get there.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


RON COGSWELL VIA FLICKR

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s a student in the late 1980s, Carlota LoyaHernandez hated history. She found it irrelevant and boring. Born in Mexico, her parents moved to Colorado to work in the agricultural fields and mines of the San Luis Valley, and Loya-Hernandez says even brief lessons about Montezuma, the Aztec emperor who was eventually defeated by Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés in the 16th century, meant nothing to her at the time. “I loved learning everything, but history was just all a bunch of facts about dead people that had nothing to do with me,” she says. “Kids get totally disengaged from school if it’s not relevant to them.” Now, as a talented and gifted specialist at Boulder’s Columbine Elementary, which is approximately 57 percent Latino, Loya-Hernandez is part of a growing effort in Boulder County and around the state seeking to increase multicultural education, ensuring that students of all backgrounds see themselves reflected in the classroom, and in society as a whole. “The purpose of teaching history in schools is to prepare kids for their role as engaged and effective citizens in our democracy,” says Kent Willmann with the Boulder County Latino History Project. After teaching social studies for decades in St. Vrain Valley School District (SVVSD), Willmann now trains social studies teachers through CU Boulder’s School of Education. “So if you’re not making connections across time and place then you’re not doing your job right as a teacher.” The Boulder County Latino History Project uses primary sources, personal interviews and historical writings to equip local educators with resources to teach about the contributions and history of Latinos throughout the county. Since its inception in

The great equalizer

Helping students see themselves and others through multicultural history curriculum

by Angela K. Evans

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2013, between 100 and 120 kindergarten through 12th grade teachers from both Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) and SVVSD have gone through the training, Willmann says. Although embraced by both districts, neither the training nor the content are required. There are lessons about the Mexican-American War, highlighting that Colorado used to be a part of Mexico before westward expansion. There are lessons about the rise and fall of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s and Le Seis de Boulder, six prominent Chicano activists who were killed in Boulder the 1970s. There are first-hand accounts of families migrating to Boulder County to work the sugar beet fields, as well as a handful of primary sources documenting mass deportations in the 1930s in a wave of anti-immigrant sentiment during the Great Depression, which begs comparison to current events and present day government policies. “Since the Trump administration, JULY 11, 2019

it’s been a whole new climate working with my students,” says Christina Smedle, an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher at Sunset Middle School in Longmont. “The Boulder County Latino History Project is a wonderful vehicle to teach culture in the classroom and to get teachers to use the knowledge that our kids, their stories matter, and they came here like everybody else. That we all immigrated here.” At the state level, Colorado lawmakers, during the 2019 legislative session, passed the Inclusion of American Minorities in Teaching Civil Government bill, which updates a previous mandate to include AsianAmericans, African-Americans, Latinos and LGBT individuals within those communities, as well as religious minorities, in civic and history curriculums across the state. Although it passed, there has been some pushback according to Willmann, who testified at the State House in favor of the new law. “People argue for an unsegregated I

history. They want to teach American history, unhyphenated,” Willman says. “What I suggest is there are all kinds of histories out there — military history, women’s history, religious history, and each one of those kinds of things engage us in a variety of different ways.” He uses the example of the “Star Spangled Banner” exhibit at the Smithsonian American History Museum, where visitors are greeted by a large display of mirrors hung to resemble a waving flag. “What you see ... is a reflection of yourself and then everybody else as well,” he says. “And that’s a metaphor for what we try to do in history classes — let people see themselves and everybody else in American history.” The Colorado mandate is largely symbolic, unaccompanied by any real funding for additional resources. Coupled with the way school districts can operate autonomously under local control statutes, that makes enforcing the new law almost impossible, Willmann says. Still, there’s a growing interest in multicultural education he adds, and the Latino History Project just received a large grant to expand its work into Trinidad, Pueblo and the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado. “The legislature can pass laws, but how it’s implemented in the schools [is what matters],” adds Barbara Steiner, a retired BVSD teacher at Bear Creek Elementary, which has a predominantly white student population. Steiner taught fifth grade from 2000-2012 where she covered immigration as a separate unit in social studies, following the unit on the Civil War. She taught about Asian immigration during the Gold Rush and the subsequent discrimination that relegated Chinese to societal support roles like building the railroads, laundry and food service, rather than owning any stake in the mining industry. She BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


touched on Japanese immigrants and their treatment by the U.S. government during World War II. She had her students read Esperanza Rising (by Pam Muñoz Ryan) and talked about Mexican and Central American migrants who came to work the agricultural fields in the U.S. And the curriculum covered European migration, from the English colonists through industrialization that drew people from Ireland, Italy and Germany, culminating in an annual Ellis Island simulation. According to Steiner, the entire school was converted for a day, a space representing the boat, another area representing customs, and yet another place representing the U.S. after the students passed through immigration. Students would come in costume, carrying one piece of luggage — either a suitcase or a bundle — full of meaningful items that represented their childhood and their families. They were spoken to in different languages where they had no idea what they were being told to do. They had their names changed, their belongings confiscated, and went through public health screenings. “They were put into this feeling of not understanding the process and that was the purpose of it,” Steiner says. She specifically remembers one year when a well-liked, smart, leadertype young boy started crying after a family heirloom was confiscated. “He sobbed in the middle of the gym. And it was like he got it and all these other kids looking at him got it,” Steiner says. “There was an empathetic personal understanding of what it might have been like to be an immigrant. So then as they read these accounts in the newspaper, it was more than just numbers and names, it was an experience.” This specific immigration unit, with the Ellis Island simulation, was taken out of the BVSD curriculum in 2011, says Samantha Messier, assistant superintendent of instructional services and equity. But in its place migrant history is incorporated into the social studies curriculum at a variety of grade levels. Like BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Willmann, Messier says this curriculum is beneficial not just for minority populations, but also to teach the dominant culture about the wide variety of people and cultures that have influenced U.S. history. “I think we have a pretty strong belief that all students benefit from exposure to the story that reflects the diversity of other cultures and identities. It’s not just students in marginalized groups who benefit from that exposure,” Messier says. “We also all benefit from understanding that there are other experiences out there that differ from our own. And that helps us gain a very healthy perspective on the world.” Still, she admits, not every classroom is addressing these topics, and not every student sees themselves reflected in the curriculum. And that’s a major shortcoming, according to Loya-Hernandez. “There are enclaves where there’s a lot of diversity in the bilingual schools [where] there is a lot of support because we have a critical mass of educators that are culturally competent or proficient. But the great majority, I would say unfortunately they live in vanilla land. When you live in vanilla land, you don’t realize there are 31 flavors.” According to the Community Foundation’s TRENDS report, Boulder County still has one of the highest achievement gaps between Latino and Anglo populations in both BVSD and SVVSD. While state mandates, school districts and efforts like the Boulder County Latino History Project are seeking to alleviate these shortcomings through multicultural education, it appears there’s still a long way to go. “We have to understand that we have different perceptions about reality, about what it is to be American, about what it is to live in this country. And we have to be able to coexist,” Loya-Hernandez says. “As public servants, we need to be able to serve all our children as best we can and we have to really grow as people to continue to foster education as the great equalizer. ” I

JULY 15, 2019

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Get Salted

Colorado tops the list for e-cigarette use among youth and the environment isn’t happy by Lauren Hamko

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ut of 37 states, Colorado students rank at the top of the list for e-cigarette use. That’s according to a 2018 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) study, which also found that more than 3.6 million middle and high school students in the U.S. had used e-cigarettes within the past 30 days of being surveyed. On its own, the increasing number of youth who are vaping is a concerning problem. But with this spike in vaping across the U.S. comes an unforeseen negative impact on the environment as vape products are not being disposed of or recycled correctly. To vaporize liquid nicotine, vapes and e-cigarettes have two main components that are detrimental to the environment: the cartridges containing nicotine and the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Lithium-ion batteries in landfills contribute to the growing amount of electronic waste (e-waste), discarded electronic products such as televisions, cameras and cell phones. Like other e-waste products, materials from lithium-ion batteries can leach into the environment, allowing toxins such as lead and mercury to enter the waste stream. “When the device is no longer working or the user is ready to dispose, the first step is to review local rules for electronic waste disposal,” says Sean Burchill, western account manager at the battery recycling company Call2Recycle. “Due to their containing lithium-ion batteries, vaporizer pens should never be thrown in the garbage.” Likewise, the nicotine from vape cartridges in landfills can enter the waste stream leading to unprecedented exposure to the addictive substance. As is commonly known, nicotine can impose negative effects on the cardioBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

vascular and respiratory systems, as well as lead to a decreased immune response and potentially cancer. Exposure to the toxins in vape products can negatively affect resources such as water and crops, wildlife and people. To limit these impacts, the Boulder County Hazardous Material Management Facility (HMMF) accepts vape products for disposal. When vape products arrive at HMMF, the nicotine components are separated from the battery and

cess, which has drawn the most scrutiny in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the material is mined by hand. The long-term consequences of high exposure to cobalt are still unknown but may led to respiratory problems and birth defects, health officials say. E-cigarette and vape production companies offer very little instruction on how to dispose of their products when they reach the end of their life. Employees at HMMF and Call2Recycle have tried to educate LINDSAY FOX VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS the public on disposing these products in a safe and sustainable way by posting flyers at vape shops. Shelly Fuller, a program manager at HMMF, is also looking to young people to combat the negative environmental effects of improperly disposed vape products. Although most school policy prohibits students from using e-cigarettes on school grounds, HMMF is providing schools with an accessible shipped out for incineration as a haz- way to dispose of their vape products. “We’re working with the school ardous material. Once disassembled, the lithium-ion batteries are collected districts to set up a collection bin in each of the middle and high schools from HMMF by Call2Recycle. for the next school year,” Fuller says. Batteries from vape products can “We’re targeting that age group so be used in the manufacturing of new that there is a disposal option for products such as silverware, pots, schools when they need to confiscate pans, golf clubs and other stainlessand dispose of these materials.” steel appliances. Many of the batterThe bins will also educate stuies from vape products are recycled dents on how to dispose of their vape into new batteries. products moving forward, making “This process reduces the need to sure to encourage them to deliver mine for virgin materials, conserves their unwanted products to HMMF natural resources and diverts potenor similar facilities. tially hazardous materials from land“Making battery recycling awarefills,” Burchill says. ness and education part of the discusWhile lithium-ion batteries are sion can help alleviate risks tied to known to be more environmentally improper disposal by encouraging friendly than older types of batteries, harvesting of materials to create them consumers to become responsible recyclers,” Burchill says. “If something has proven controversial. One of the can be recycled, it should be recymain elements, cobalt, releases a cled.” toxic dust during the mining proI

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Windows, Walls and Invisible Lines:

Portraits of Life in Sanctuary photos and stories by Joel Dyer

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his is the fifth excerpt Boulder Weekly has published from the Windows, Walls, and Invisible Lines: Portraits of Life in Sanctuary project. It’s been a few months since the last essays ran, so let me offer a brief reminder regarding the project. The goal is to photograph and interview everyone in the United States who has taken public sanctuary in a church to avoid deportation which would result in family separation and likely harm to people being returned to their country of origin. I am also interviewing a few people in non-public sanctuary along the way — “non-public” referring to those who have sought protection inside of churches but have chosen to keep their identities and whereabouts private. There are two people in non-public sanctuary represented in this week’s excerpt. When completed, the project will culminate in a book and a traveling photo exhibit that also has the ability to suddenly appear in unexpected places. The photos and interviews will also be used in collaborative projects with Motus Theater. When I started this effort in March 2018, there were an estimated 25 to 30 people in 22 states who had taken public sanctuary in churches to avoid deportation and family separation. At that time, the best estimate for people who had taken non-public sanctuary in the United States was just over 100, but that figure was clearly just a best guess. As of July 2019, there are now 44 people in public sanctuary and the number in non-public sanctuary is even less clear. As the Trump administration’s assault on immigrants intensifies by the day, the number is likely growing. In recent days, it appears the invisible line that protects people who have taken sanctuary in churches may be about to get tested. On July 1, the Trump administration began sending letters to people in public sanctuary informing them that they will be receiving massive fines for having not left the country when ordered to do so by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). One of the people receiving such a letter last week was Edith Espinal, whose essay you will find on page 26. I spent time with Edith last December in Columbus Ohio. She is an outspoken, 43-year-old mother of three who has been living in sanctuary for the past 21 months. 18

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She used to live with her husband and children in a small apartment in Columbus, the city she has called home for more than 20 years. Their family never had much, but what they did have was a happy home where they ate meals together and as Edith put it, “enjoyed the little things.” Edith is being fined $497,777. She understands that the purpose of this fine has nothing to do with the government trying to get money from her or her family. It is an impossible amount because its purpose is simply to be cruel — to send a message to other leaders in the sanctuary movement, like Edith, that they could be next. At least one person in Colorado has received a notice of fine and it has been reported that others have as well. Ingrid Encalada Latore, who has been in sanctuary in a Boulder church for the past 19 months, received notice that she will be fined nearly $5,000. She says she was shocked and thought the amount was excessive as she has no way to make money while in sanctuary. But then she started hearing of others whose amounts are closer to a half million dolJULY 11, 2019

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lars and realized it could have been worse. As of this writing, it is being reported that 12 people in sanctuary have received a notice of fine so far and that number is expected to rise. What is unclear is why the fines are being levied now and what might happen next. In speaking with people in sanctuary this week as well as with those whose organizations support the sanctuary effort, it’s clear there is fear that the fines are somehow a precursor to coming efforts to remove people from the churches. But at least for now, such fear is based only on speculation. It does seem the timing of the fines is suspect, with Trump having announced his intent to launch mass deportations of undocumented immigrants the same week that the letters went out to those in sanctuary. As I wrote in the original introduction to this project, these “invisible lines” are important to all of us, not just our immigrant neighbors who have sought safety behind them. We should all be aware that the long-held considerations that have protected immigrants in sanctuary thus far, as well as the sanctity of our religious institutions themselves, are under grave threat. Their violation is only a tweet away. These invisible lines of protection may be powerful, but they are also vulnerable. They are no more than a manifestation of our past cultural sensitivities, protections willed into existence by our better angels in days gone by, presumably to protect us from ourselves should darkness one day descend upon our nation. I believe that darkness has come. And we would do well to realize that it is not just our persecuted migrant friends who are in refuge within these lines and behind these walls, it is all of us who now hope and wait for our country’s sanity and compassion to again show itself. If these invisible barriers built of history, empathy and respect for religious freedom should fall, all of us and the country we call home will be forever changed. In many ways, these lines that form our islands of sanctuary are our nation’s last line of defense against the hatred and totalitarianism that has swept over us. For all of our sakes, we must fortify them by any and every means possible. That is the hope and intent behind this project. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Ded Rranxburgaj Detroit, Michigan

TIME IN SANCTUARY: 18 MONTHS

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hese are difficult times for 49-year-old Ded Rranxburgaj, TOP: Ded on the roof an Albanian immigrant who has lived in the U.S. for the of the Central United past 18 years. While taking a smoke break on the rooftop Methodist Church in of the Central United Methodist Church in downtown Detroit, downtown Detroit, where he took sanctuary in January 2018, Ded tells me that his where he has been in life is getting harder with each passing day. It’s winter and Ded sanctuary since says that’s the worst time. The rooftop garden he tends in the January 2018. summer, which provides fresh vegetables to Detroit’s homeless BOTTOM: Ded and population, is now dead. The pots — still sporting the brown, Flora watching TV in dead stalks of what once was — seem a perfect fit on this gray the small living space Detroit day. the church has proDed says in winter, he and Flora, his wife of nearly 30 vided. Ded is Flora’s years, are mostly trapped in their room staring at each other for only caregiver and hours on end with increasingly less to say. “If you don’t go out, the government still if you don’t work or do anything, what do you have to talk ordered him to leave about?” the country. He admits that on some days, “Albania doesn’t seem so bad. At least I could walk around. But I can’t leave my wife. She was down to 72 pounds and in a wheelchair. I have to help her do everything. And they tell me to just leave, leave her here to die with strangers, and I won’t do that.” Ded came to the U.S. in 2001 on a legal visa, which he overstayed. The man from Albania is a fixture at the Coney Island restaurant where he says he has worked for years without taking any time off. “I’ve made a million hotdogs for people,” he says through what almost resembles a smile. Like most of those being targeted by the Trump administration, Ded has never had any trouble with the law. He is just a man who considers this country his home after nearly two decades, a man who works hard, pays taxes, feeds the homeless and who refuses to abandon his sick wife for whom he is the sole caregiver. How is Ded a threat to this country? That is a question no one can answer. see INVISIBLE LINES Page 20

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Francisca Lino Chicago, Illinois

TIME IN SANCTUARY: 23 MONTHS

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o say that the Adalberto United Methodist Church in Chicago’s Humboldt Park district is small would be an understatement. The church’s storefront window could barely hold the eclectic manger scene that had taken over the space when I stopped in to see Francisca Lino, a 51-year-old mother of six. Originally from Mexico, but having lived and worked in the U.S. for the past 18 years, Francisca has now been in sanctuary at the church for nearly two years. Adalberto was quite a contrast to many of the sanctuary operations I have visited in the past year. In some places, a single large church with dozens of volunteers support the person in sanctuary. In other places several churches with hundreds of volunteers have come together to meet the needs of an individual or family in sanctuary. Adalberto is a tiny church that couldn’t hold more than 30 people on a busy Sunday. Its activist pastor has to work a day job just to pay the church’s rent and keep the doors open. Yet despite such challenges, Francisca is the third person protected by sanctuary in this

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church that clearly has more faith and willpower than resources. No army of volunteers here. Francisca shares Pastor Jacobita Cortez’ small apartment upstairs from the sanctuary along with the pastor’s daughter and two grandchildren. On the day she was to be deported, Francisca had already purchased her plane ticket and packed her clothes, but on the way to the airport she decided to take sanctuary in the church she had been attending faithfully for 15 years. “I just could not leave my family,” she says. Since entering sanctuary nearly two years ago, life for her family has been hard. Her husband works long nightshifts and now struggles to support the family financially without the money Francisca once made. Her oldest daughter, now 18, is struggling with depression. Even though the family regularly visits on weekends, Francisca admits that she doesn’t feel like she is really there for her husband and children. “No one can prepare for this. No one can prepare to be separated from the people you love and who need you,” she says. Later in the afternoon, Francisca shows me a picture of her family that hangs on the wall in the

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sanctuary. Her husband and five of her children are present. There is a birthday cake in the center with two candles, a one and a six. Her 16-year-old twin daughters are seated at the cake ready to blow out the candles. As Francisco explains the photo to me, her eyes fill with tears. She explains that the photo was taken last year at the church after she had taken sanctuary. She said it was hard to celebrate such an important day in that way. She then confides that “tomorrow is their 17th birthday,” and that the family will once again be celebrating the event at the church where Francisca has, for all intents and purposes, imprisoned herself in order to keep her family together in at least some fashion. “I never thought I would still be here a year later,” she says. “I hope this is the last time we have to do it here.”

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TOP: Francisca peers out from the tiny church she has now called home for nearly two years. BOTTOM LEFT: Francisca in the upstairs apartment she shares with Pastor Jacobita Cortez. An empty stocking and nothing under the tree are just hints of the loneliness she feels being separated from her family.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


TOP: Vicky Chavez chose sanctuary over being returned with her young daughters to one of the world’s most dangerous cities in Honduras, where she believes she and her family would have been killed. She says the only time she allows herself to be sad is when both her daughters are asleep. BOTTOM LEFT: Vicky has found many creative ways to play with her young daughters to keep their minds off their situation. Here, she “crawl-races” her oldest daughter beneath the pews in the sanctuary. She says it’s a nearly daily occurrence. BOTTOM RIGHT: Vicky has been in sanctuary in Salt Lake City for the past year and a half.

Vicky Chavez (with her two young daughters) Salt Lake City, Utah

TIME IN SANCTUARY: 18 MONTHS

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ou can’t cut it any closer than Vicky Chavez did in January 2018. After being ordered to leave the country by ICE officials, Chavez bought plane tickets for herself and her then 4-month-old and six-yearold daughters. She packed their few belongings, went to the airport and even checked in for the family’s deportation flight. But then she became overwhelmed by what would be waiting for her and her small children when the plane landed. In 2014, Vicky and her then-3-year-old daughter fled their home town of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, a city widely regarded as one of the most dangerous and violent in the world. Vicky left her home country because she says she was experiencing sexual vio-

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

lence and domestic abuse. She said things were rapidly deteriorating and that both she and her daughter were told they were going to be killed. Vicky chose to flee to the U.S. because she hoped to apply for asylum — which she says she did immediately upon her arrival — and because her parents already lived here legally. Despite doing all the things her attorney instructed, Vicky and her daughter’s asylum request was eventually turned down by the courts. She says she still doesn’t understand why but suspects that her legal advice may have been flawed. After her appeals also failed, Vicky, who had another daughter in 2017 (a U.S. citizen) was ordered to leave the country and return to Honduras even though she has no immediate family, no job prospects and no way to feed her children there. And as Vicky put it so bluntly, “I knew I would be killed if I went back and that meant my children could be killed as well.” So, standing in the Salt Lake City airport waiting to board her plane to what she believed would be the death of her family, Vicky suddenly changed her mind. She asked one of the activists who had come to see her off if she would take her to a church where she and the

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girls could take sanctuary. That was 18 months ago and Vicky, now 31, along with her nearly 8-year-old daughter and her nearly 2-year-old daughter, who has no real memories of life outside of sanctuary, are still spending every day of their lives inside the walls of Salt Lake City’s First Unitarian Church. They live in a converted classroom. Vicky does her best to make the girl’s lives as normal as possible under conditions that are anything but. She tries to always keep a good attitude and a smile on her face when around the kids. She told me the only time she lets herself be sad is when they are both asleep. Vicky has no idea how long she’ll be both imprisoned and protected within the church walls she now calls home. And while she hopes to have her case for asylum reopened at some point, she says no matter what happens, she knows she made the best decision for her children. “At least we are all together and safe, and that is more important than anything else.” see INVISIBLE LINES Page 22

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Saheeda Nadeem Kalamazoo, Michigan

TIME IN SANCTUARY: 16 MONTHS

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aheeda Nadeem came to the United States 14 years ago on a non-immigrant visa. Her goal was to create a better life for her two elementary-aged children, her daughter, Lareb, and her son, Samad. Saheeda was born in rural Pakistan 63 years ago. Her parents helped her to gain her education and then, while she was still a teenager and sensing that her opportunities would be greatly limited if she stayed in Pakistan, her family immigrated to Kuwait, where Saheeda became a domestic servant. After years in Kuwait, Saheeda still wanted more opportunity for her children than what she had been given. That’s why she decided to come to the U.S. around 2005. Saheeda and her kids found a home in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where the woman from Pakistan would become a beloved part of the community. She is known as “Auntie Saheeda” for her decade of work with disabled adults in a group home setting and as a parental figure for orphaned refugee children relocated to the Kalamazoo area. After her visa ran out, Saheeda was granted annual deferments from deportation. But after Trump took office, ICE ordered her deported back to Pakistan, a country she has not set foot in for more than 40 years and where she has no known family or friends. The area where Saheeda is from in Pakistan is very strict in its Muslim teachings. While Saheeda is herself a devout

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Muslim, she fears that without having a male family member, her life will be in danger. For these and other reasons, Saheeda’s family and friends believe she may be killed if deported to Pakistan. For her part, Saheeda says she simply can’t leave her children. Sadly, her daughter, Lareb, was killed in a car wreck in 2016 just as she was graduating from college. Saheeda took comfort in visiting her beloved daughter’s grave every single day before being forced to take sanctuary in Kalamazoo’s First Congregational Church. She told me not being able to visit her daughter’s grave is the hardest part about being in sanctuary. When asked if she struggles with boredom after working so many hours prior to being in sanctuary, she smiles and says, “No, I eat three times a day and I pray five times a day. I am still very busy.” Saheeda’s son Samad is still in college and protected for now by his DACA status. He is a passionate and outspoken advocate for his mother and increasingly for all those threatened because of their undocumented status. He says if his mother is deported he will go to Pakistan with her because her life could well depend on it. But as a young man who has grown up in the United States, it is certainly not the preferred outcome for himself or his mother. As for this historic old church in Kalamazoo that has so kindly provided sanctuary for Saheeda, it is just the latest in a long history of such social justice actions. The church was actually the last stop on the Underground Railroad so many years ago. Oh, how little has changed.

TOP LEFT: SAHEEDA has a route she walks through the church each day for exercise. She says she likes to stop and spend time in this small sanctuary off the beaten path of the main church buildings. Top right: Saheeda “Auntie” Nadeem has been a beloved figure in the Kalamazoo, Michigan, community for more than a decade for her community service to those in need. The Trump administration is now trying to deport her back to Pakistan, a country she hasn’t set foot in in more than 40 years and where she knows no one. Bottom: Saheeda says she is never bored because she occupies her time by praying five times a day, eating three meals a day and walking around the church for exercise.

see INVISIBLE LINES Page 24

JULY 11, 2019

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Jorge Taborda

Las Cruces, New Mexico TIME IN SANCTUARY: 26 MONTHS

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TOP: Jorge Taborda realizes that he is more fortunate than many of his peers in sanctuary because the retreat where he now stays covers 36 acres and he can take walks outside in the pecan orchards.

orge Taborda covers his mouth with his hand and his eyes fill with tears as he recounts the day that saw his family torn apart. It’s as if he is trying to stop the words from escaping, as if not telling the story can undo what has been done. But after a bit, the words come. It was in May 2017, Jorge was at the hospital with his 14-year-old son, Stephen. It was a planned appointment. Stephen has been receiving treatment for a neck ailment his entire life. Then Jorge’s cell phone rang. It was his wife. ICE agents had stopped her on her way to work and she was being taken to nearby El Paso, Texas, to be processed for deportation. Agents had also picked up the couple’s oldest son, Jeff. She told Jorge not to go home. As Jorge and Stephen rushed from the hospital – not sure what was happening with the rest of their family – undercover ICE agents wearing street clothes were waiting in the hospital parking lot. They stopped Jorge and Stephen, who is a U.S. citizen having been born in this country after his parents came here fleeing persecution in Colombia 22 years ago. Jorge pleaded with the agents to allow him to drop off his son at school before following the agents to the border patrol facility in El Paso. They acquiesced. On the way to the school the two went over the plan they had practiced so many times. Stephen would stay with another family who had been granted power of attorney for just such a situation. They prayed together and Stephen went into the school. Jorge started driving through Las Cruces with the agents behind him. He was supposed to take the highway to El Paso. At some point he realized he would be driving somewhat near the small Catholic church his family had been attending. And although he says he hadn’t previously planned it, when he came to the road that led to the church he suddenly turned. The agents were not pleased. At one point, according to Jorge, they rammed the rear of his car in an effort to force him to pull over. He showed me the dents in his car as his proof. At that point, Jorge says God took over and drove him into the church parking lot of Our Lady of Health, Roman Catholic Church. The agents parked across the street and as has been their instructions for many years now, did not enter onto church property in their pursuit. Later that night, Jorge was slipped out of the Catholic church and moved to the nearby Holy Cross Retreat Center, a 36-acre spiritual facility nestled among abundant pecan orchards and run by the Franciscan Friars. Jorge and Stephen have now been living in sanctuary at the center for over two years. Jorge’s wife was deported back to Colombia, where she is struggling to get by. The couple speak by phone most days. Jorge often sets his alarm for precise times in the middle of the night so he can call his wife to pray with her at optimal times according to their beliefs. I don’t claim to understand much about Catholic rituals, but it is clear that Jorge’s faith is the glue that is holding his family together across two continents. Jorge is self-imprisoned in a place with many freedoms, his wife is free in a place that feels like a prison. Jorge recognizes that his sanctuary location offers many advantages over those of his peers. He can go for long walks outdoors, which he often does, strolling through the rows of pecan trees. He also helps out around the center doing small maintenance jobs, mostly so he feels he’s still contributing... to something. Jorge says he prays everyday that his wife will somehow be able to rejoin him in New Mexico once he is able to leave sanctuary. It may indeed take a miracle to make that happen, but I wouldn’t bet against this family.

BOTTOM: Jorge clutches his rosary beads between prayers in the small courtyard across from his room that was built in 1912.

see INVISIBLE LINES Page 26

RIGHT: Jorge Taborda gets choked up as he recounts the day his wife and oldest son were arrested and he fled into sanctuary.

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Edith Espinal Columbus, Ohio

TIME IN SANCTUARY: 21 MONTHS

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or most people, getting a letter from the federal government saying you owe a fine of $497,777 for failing to leave the country would be considered a really bad day, but for Edith Espinal, it is just another hard day in sanctuary. Edith was ordered to leave the U.S. in 2017, but she simply could not bear the idea of leaving her husband, Manual, and their three kids, Stephanie, Isidro and Brandow. Originally from Mexico, Edith has called Columbus, Ohio, home for more than 20 years, and as much as she has grown weary of living in her self-imposed confinement in the Columbus Mennonite Church, she will gladly endure more time in sanctuary if it means keeping her family together.

Edith is no wallflower. The 43-year-old woman is an outspoken leader in her community. She has been very critical of the Trump administration and its handling of the immigration issue. Many believe that it is her activism that has put her on the receiving end of the government’s massive fine, a fine so ridiculous in its size that it would be impossible for Edith and her family to ever pay. But Edith doesn’t think that getting money was ever the point behind the fine. She has made it clear to all who will listen that she believes the fines — which are also being sent to other people living in sanctuary — are simply designed to inflict pain, cruelty for cruelty’s sake. But Trump’s fine won’t stop Edith. Last time I spoke with her she told me what a truly bad day in sanctuary looks like. She described the helplessness she felt when she was told that her son Brandow had been injured in a car wreck. She had no idea how serious his injuries were. She was only told that he had been taken to the hospital with a head injury. She wept knowing that she could not leave sanctuary to go to her son in his time of need. When Brandow was eventually released from the hospital, he moved into the church with his mom so she could take care of him as he recovered. “That,” says Edith, speaking of the accident, “is a bad day.” She insists the fine will not silence her, and I, for one, believe her. Edith Espinal is enduring sanctuary because she is an amazing mother who cares more for her family than herself. And she will continue to be a leader because she cares more for her community than herself as well. see INVISIBLE LINES Page 28

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ABOVE: The tears flow as Edith recounts the night her son was injured in a carwreck and she couldn’t leave sanctuary to be with him at the hospital. LEFT: The bedroom Edith shares with her husband and daughter who stay with her in sanctuary when not working or at school.

JULY 11, 2019

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Diego (not his real name) Eastern U.S.

TIME IN SANCTUAY: WITHHELD UPON REQUEST

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here are many reasons why some immigrants ordered to leave the U.S. have taken sanctuary, but not publicly. In many cases it is because they will, with almost absolute certainty, be killed if returned to their countries of origin. That is most definitely the case with Diego, whose real identity, country of origin and current location in sanctuary I have agreed not to reveal. As a teenager, Diego and a close friend were walking together in their hometown when members of the MS-13 gang shot and killed Diego’s friend. Eventually, the police persuaded Diego to identify the murderers. After that, the gang beat Diego badly, injuring him and putting him in the hospital. Diego knew that when he was released the gang would likely finish the job. It was then, lying in a hospital bed half dead, that the young man decided he would leave his country immediately and head north to the U.S. Diego made it. He started a new life for himself, got married and had a son. His marriage has since ended, but Diego is singlehandedly raising his 4-year-old son who now lives with him in sanctuary. If returned to his country of origin, Diego says he would not be alive for long and he doesn’t know what would happen to his son. “I can’t take him with me into that. And I can’t just leave him behind not knowing what will happen to him,” he says. Diego has explained all this to ICE, but he was still ordered to leave. As in so many of these cases, deportation is little more than a death sentence.

Alejandra (not her real name) Midwest

TIME IN SANCTUARY: 14 MONTHS AT THE TIME I SAW HER LAST

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lejandra is shy and quiet, at least around me. She has been in sanctuary for some time now both because of her status and because she is afraid of people she believes will hurt her. Alejandra has had a hard life so far. She remembers always being abused. It started in her own family in her home country and followed her through relationships here in the U.S. Though we spoke for some time, there is little more that I can say here as she is a very private person. She says she is now getting help and that talking about her past abuse is becoming easier. She told me I could photograph her so long as she couldn’t be recognized. I took a number of shots. She liked this one best and, fortunately, so did I. I think it captures all the things I wish I could write about her but have agreed not to. For now, a single photo will have to tell her story and the story of so many like her.

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The Amazing Acro Cats with The Rock Cats July 5-14 Bug Theater D e n ve r, C o l o r a d o July 16-19 Gordon Gamm Theater Boulder, Colorado T i c ke t s a n d Vo l u n t e e r i n fo a t : w w w . r o c kc a t s r e s c u e . c o m

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THE JOY OF ‘CONSTANT SORROW’

The Spinal Tap of bluegrass reunites (minus George Clooney)

by John Lehndorff

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“The Soggy Bottom Boys have been steeped in old-timey material. We’re silly with it.” —Ulysses Everett McGill, O Brother, Where Art Thou?

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he gig was pitched to Dan Tyminski in 1999 like this: We want you to record an obscure, sad folk song for an odd film based on Homer’s The Odyssey set in the Deep South. It’s just a voiceover. You’re putting words in the mouth of an actor who will be wearing a bad beard and dancing like a chicken. You can’t blame Tyminski for not expecting a career-defining highlight when producer T-Bone asked him to wrap his resonant voice around “Man of Constant Sorrow” for the Coen brothers’ film O Brother, Where Art Thou?. Before the film was released, the most enthusiastic reaction to the news came from Tyminski’s thenwife. “I told her I was doing a movie voice-over and she was supportive. Then I told her that it would be George Clooney on the big screen but my voice coming out of his mouth. ‘Oh Dan, that’s my fantasy!’ she said. I couldn’t make up something like that,” Tyminski says. Tyminski did get to meet Clooney, who played lead character Ulysses Everett McGill. “We were on the set in Mississippi to play the backup band onstage when the Soggy Bottom Boys come out. Originally, he was supposed to sing it but George told me: ‘I’ll act. You sing.’” In the film, “Man of Constant Sorrow” is a huge hit for the Soggy Bottom Boys. The song became a phenomenon, played on radio stations almost regardless of musical format. In real life, the song rose to No. 35 on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart and sold over a million copies in the U.S. It earned Song of the Year, kudos in the bluegrass music world and won a Grammy for Best Country Collaboration in 2002. Country music embraced these pre-bluegrass tunes far removed from the modern Nashville sound. The song and the soundtrack reintroduced America to bluegrass and old-timey music and to stellar musicians like Norman Blake, Emmylou Harris and Gillian Welch. “We never expected that to happen. It was amazing to watch our audience change almost overnight,” Tyminski says. “There were people coming to shows that were fans of rock, jazz and everything else.” “Man of Constant Sorrow” has managed to connect with several generations of young listeners. “It really strikes a chord with them. The melody repeats over and over — it’s like 60 times. They groove to it. It’s almost hypnotic and someone always does the dance,” he says. “The dance” would be the silly, chicken wing-flapping choreography the Soggy Bottom Boys (and Gov. Pappy, played by Charles Durning) do onstage in the film. Over the past two decades, the song has become a constant on Tyminski’s setlist, regardless of whether he is playing with Alison Krauss and Union Station, as a solo act or with his band. “There are some people at every show who come

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

just to hear the song. ON THE BILL: Sometimes I have to go ahead Soggy Bottom and do it early because so many Boys — 47th Annual RockyGrass people are shouting for it,” Festival. Friday, July Tyminski says. 26, Planet Bluegrass, If you listen to the words, 500 W. Main St., Lyons, “Man of Constant Sorrow” is not bluegrass.com exactly a happy anthem. “It’s really a pretty depressing song. It’s not singing about occasional distress. It is constant sorrow,” Tyminski says with a chuckle. The soundtrack’s other equally upbeat “hits” include Ralph Stanley’s dirge-like “Oh Death” plus “I’m in the Jailhouse Now,” “Angel Band” and “I Am Weary.” A little balance is provided by “Keep on the Sunny Side.” Twenty years later, the song, the soundtrack and the film are still a touchstone. There was only one little problem. “Man of Constant Sorrow” was a huge hit for a band that didn’t exist. The Soggy Bottom Boys have been the Spinal Tap of acoustic music. “It didn’t dawn on us for a long time to perform as the Soggy Bottom Boys,” Tyminski says. The original group of musicians who recorded the song are among the genre’s most celebrated pickers but they’ve only performed together a handful of times. That’s what makes the Soggy Bottom Boys “reunion” July 26 at RockyGrass so highly anticipated by fans and the musicians. “When they asked us to do a set as the Soggy Bottom Boys we had to do it because it’s just too much fun,” he says. The Boys are Tyminski, banjoist Ron Block and bassist Barry Bales — the core of Alison Krauss’ Union Station band — plus stellar mandolinist Mike Compton, guitarist Pat Enright and fiddler Stuart Duncan, who are the heart of the celebrated Nashville Bluegrass Band. “We do as many songs as we can do from the soundtrack, and we do songs that are of the spirit of those songs. We are just steeped in old-timeyness,” he says, paraphrasing George Clooney’s character. Who would have thought that a few minutes of film back at the turn of the millennium would keep resonating? “It’s been covered by everyone. I’ve done it with rock bands, country bands, blues bands and a Celtic band with pipes and whistles,” Tyminski says. It’s appropriate given the fact that “Man of Constant Sorrow” in one of its hundreds of versions goes back at least 200 years. You can find versions and variations of the song recorded by the Stanley Brothers, Bob Dylan, Ginger Baker, Blitzen Trapper, Gangstagrass and Miley Cyrus, along with multiple variations of “Girl of Constant Sorrow” and “Woman of Constant Sorrow.” Despite 20 years of “Sorrow,” Tyminski says it never gets old. “It’s exciting when you see people’s reaction when we start playing it. There’s nothing like it,” he says. Portions of the sold-out Rockygrass Festival July 26-28 in Lyons will air live on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org). I

JULY 11, 2019

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DAVID CURLEIGH

Returning to CMF

ON THE BILL: Colorado Music Festival. July 11–23, all performances at 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666, tickets.chautauqua.com

Jean-Marie Zeitouni and David Danzmayr will lead orchestra concerts for the next two weeks

by Peter Alexander

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he Colorado Music Festival hosts the return of two guest conductors for the central portion of the six-week festival, July 11–23. For orchestral concerts July 11, 12 and 14, Jean-Marie Zeitouni, principal guest conductor of the festival, returns to lead the Festival Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra. David Danzmayr, who appeared as guest conductor in 2015 and 2018, will lead the CMF orchestra July 18,19 and 21. “I’m excited about coming back,” says Zeitouni, who was the festival music director 2015–17. “I share so much beautiful music-making with the CMF orchestra, that it’s really heartwarming for me. And I have my favorite spot for good coffee, a good meal, a good hike, a good sunset, so this is fun.” Zeitouni opens his CMF visit with a pair of concerts titled “Romantic Duos,” Thursday and Friday (July 11–12). Three of the pieces have romantic couples in their titles: Pelleas et Mélisande by Gabriel Fauré, Romeo and Juliet by Tchaikovsky, and Bacchus et Ariane by Albert Roussel. Also on the program is Brahms’s Double Concerto for violin and cello, played by the real-life romantic duo of Mira Wang and Jan Vogler, who are married. Zeitouni, who is Canadian of French heritage, always enjoys bringing French music to Boulder. “I have a long and loving relationship with the (Fauré) piece,” he says. “I think that Fauré is one of the greatest composers, not only of French music but period. I label him unofficially ‘the French Brahms’ — to me they are very good together.” Although he is not well-known in the U.S., Roussel is well-known in France, where the 150th anniversary of his birth is being celebrated throughout 2019. “His music is brilliant,” Zeitouni says, but “because he was a humble

composer, he did not promote his music very well.” Zeitouni’s second CMF concert is part of the summer series tracing Beethoven’s reach into the future. Titled “Beethoven’s Path to Neoclassicism,” it will feature Beethoven’s First Symphony and Stravinsky’s Symphony in Three Movements played with alternating movements. Completing the program is Prokofiev’s Third Piano Concerto played by pianist Lilya Zilberstein. The general theme, tracing Beethoven’s anticipation of future trends in music, was the idea of CMF artistic director Peter Oundjian, and Zeitouni contributed the neoclassical program. “Beethoven in a way was the first neoclassic composer,” Zeitouni says. “He took the music of Haydn and stepped it up to something rooted in classicism but completely revolutionary. “Then we put the Prokofiev Third Piano Concerto, played by a true Russian-tradition pianist, which is neoclassical and in C, just like Beethoven’s symphony. The audience loves a good Prokofiev concerto, especially the third one which is so colorful, a shot of pure energy.” Danzmayr, an Austrian conductor who studied at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, will conduct two concert programs, one which does not reflect his Austrian heritage, and one — an all Mozart program — that definitely does.

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The first, a pair with the same program July 18–19, features Tchaikovsky’s Sixth Symphony (“Pathétique”), the celebrated Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero playing the Grieg Piano Concerto, and Sidereus by Argentine composer Osvaldo Golijov. Not that Danzmayr is anything but enthusiastic about the programs. “Tchaikovsky’s Sixth is a piece that I’m very happy to do,” he says. “It’s an absolute masterwork.” And he does find an affinity between the culture of Russia and Austria. “Because of the imperialist times, Imperialist Vienna and Imperialist Russia, there is an influence in Tchaikovsky’s music. And Tchaikovsky loved Mozart, so there is influence there.” He also sees a connection between Tchaikovsky and Grieg, because both are from northern countries — Russia and Denmark — that are close geographically and share a similar climate. But the Argentine Gollijov represents an entirely different culture. “Since the rest of the program is quite traditional, I wanted to have something more modern,” Danzmayr says. “Golijov is the best composer of the last 20 years, and I program him very often. I think it’s music that the audience deserves to hear.” The second program, July 21, is part of the CMF “Magnificent Mozart” mini-festival, with symphonies no. 32 and 38 (“Prague”), the Overture to Don Giovanni, and the brilliant young violinist Stefan Jackiw playing the Violin Concerto No. 5 (“Turkish”). “The funny thing is, it was not my idea,” Danzmayr says. “I really love Mozart, don’t get me wrong, but the idea of the Mozart program came from the festival.” Since they had decided on a Mozart mini-festival for the 2019 season, Danzmayr says, he was the obvious choice to conduct one of those programs. In addition to the orchestral programs there will be two chamber concerts during these two weeks: “Quintessential Harp,” with music by Arnold Bax, Ravel and Brahms, July 16; and “Russian Masters” with piano trios by Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich.

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Dog poo, St. Peter and the beautiful weight of Judaism

Local author R.L. Maizes mines the human condition in her charming debut of short stories

by Caitlin Rockett

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n a 2013 interview on Sirius XM, Anderson Cooper — the television personality and descendant of a line of shipping magnates, millionaire equestrians and renowned fashionistas — admitted, quite humbly, to feeling like “an outsider”... at least as an adolescent. “If you feel like an outsider, S OOK you tend to observe things NB O D a lot more,” he said. LA CE “Early on I felt very much like an observer, because I knew I was gay, I knew I was somehow different.” Truth is, we all feel like outsiders; some of us briefly, some of us for the long haul, most of us on and off throughout our lives as we navigate the rugged terrain of existence. Even Cooper, with his money and privilege and strong jawline, felt a sense of otherness. (The insider’s outsider, perhaps?) We’re all scared we don’t quite fit — it’s just part of the human condition. This is the throughline of Boulderbased author R.L. Maizes’ first book, a

collection of 11 short stories about outsiders of all stripes, appropriately titled We Love Anderson Cooper. Maizes mines loss in its many forms — death, divorce, rejection, humiliation, fear, resentment, apathy — to create characters we can’t help but relate to, no matter how different their background. When the story calls for it, Maizes employs magical realism, often softening the harsh realities of life along the way, as is the case with “Tattoo,” where a homely fine art painter finds work, fame and otherwordly power in tattooing realistic nipples on breast cancer survivors. She also pulls liberally from her own life: an animal-loving former wills and trusts lawyer, twice-married, non-practicing Jew from a very devout Jewish family in New York. While there’s no need to know Maizes prior to reading the collection, understanding her background makes these charming stories all the more enchanting.

ON THE BILL: R.L. Maizes — We Love Anderson Cooper. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 23, Boulder Bookstore, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

In spots, some readers may see where Maizes has played with the themes of other beloved stories to create wholly new works, like in the title story, which takes a note from Philip Roth’s The Conversion of the Jews. In Maizes’ narrative, a young boy courts the popularity that currently evades him by plotting to out himself as gay at his bar mitzvah. As is the case with Roth’s story, Maizes uses humor to explore what it means when a young person questions the faith that was handed down to them by their parents. Maizes surveys the weight and beauty of Judaism over and over in clever ways. In “The Infidelity of Judah Maccabee,” an actuary frets about his cat cheating on him with his Protestant girlfriend. It’s a story about the fear of rejection, not just from a pet or lover, but also from society as a whole. Barry, the lovably insecure and irritable main character, laments that Christmas “hijacks” the country each December, relegating his own religion to side dishes and “mere afterthoughts in shops, on single shelves or in dim corners.” Maizes had similar feelings as a child in New York. “I loved Christmas music and that wasn’t OK,” she says. “My mother was alive during the Holocaust, here in the United States, and so she couldn’t have positive associations [with Christianity]. We would drive down Main Street in Queens and I would say, ‘Look how beautiful the Christmas trees and decorations are,’ and she would be horrified

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because to her, the association was of terrible persecution.” She pauses. “I come from a somewhat dysfunctional family,” she admits. “I don’t think you could be a writer without coming from somewhat of a dysfunctional family.” Duly noted. Aside from universal emotions that bind humanity together, Maizes also recognizes and plumbs another human devotion: our love of animals. Cats become proxies for our anxieties about alienation, birds symbolize the love we want from our mothers, dogs remind us of how we’ve gone astray. “I used to volunteer at the Humane Society and I think the most important thing I did there was clean cages. I would clean up the poo,” Maizes says. “Now, I don’t believe in heaven, but if I did believe in heaven, if I were ever going to get into heaven, it would be because I cleaned up poo. I would get up there and St. Peter — I don’t really know much about saints; is he the right one? — he’ll be looking at his list, looking at me, and he’ll say, ‘I’m not sure about you.’ And I’ll say, ‘You see on all those Saturdays where I cleaned up all that poo?’ And he’ll say, ‘All right, whatever, you’re in, I guess.’” St. Peter may also note that Maizes wrote a compassionate collection of short stories that allowed people to see the humanity in their foibles and shortcomings, that made people feel a little closer to each other, and more forgiving of themselves. If that’s not a good deed worthy of entry through the Pearly Gates, maybe heaven’s not so great after all.

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RONNIE BOOZE

events RHYTHM ON THE RIVER: A FESTIVAL OF MUSIC AND FUN.

5 p.m. July 12 and 13, Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-651-8404.

Rhythm on the River began in 1995 as a small celebration for the opening of Roger’s Grove along the St. Vrain Greenway. Roger Jones was an avid outdoors person whose dream was to give the community a park to visit in the middle of the Longmont. In 1995, his family donated funds to the city for the purchase of the property adjacent to the Boulder County Fairgrounds. Roger and his wife had a passion for music and art, hence the name Rhythm on the River. This year’s musical entertainment includes local favorites Clandestine Amigo, Taylor Shae, Tenth Mountain Division, One Flew West and many more. Enjoy face painting, duck races, a Kinetics parade, kayaking, paddle boarding, crafts... just go. There’s something for everyone.

CALIXTO OVIEDO QUINTET.

7 p.m. Saturday, July 13, Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Lakewood resident Calixto Oviedo is a living encyclopedia of Cuban drumming and percussion, from the deep roots of African-influenced folklore to the hottest dance music and the cutting edge of jazz. One of the creators of the dynamic timba rhythm, as the drummer for the iconic Havana group NG la Banda, Oviedo’s innovative and brilliant percussive techniques have made him the in-demand drummer for The Afro Cuban All Stars. Over a nearly 40 year career, Calixto has played with numerous internationally known artists including Paquito D’Rivera, Arturo Sandoval and many others.

AN EVENING WITH ROBERT CRAY.

KICK OFF TO THE CASEY JONES MUSIC FEST — WITH THE JOHN BUNZLI BAND, ANTONIO LOPEZ, DAVID COILE AND MORE.

6:30 p.m. Saturday, July 14, Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

6 p.m. Saturday, July 13, Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Growing up in the Northwest, Robert Cray listened to the gospel of the Five Blind Boys of Mississippi, Bobby Bland’s soul, Jimi Hendrix’s rock guitar and the Beatles pop sounds. Four decades later, Cray hasn’t stopped bridging the lines between blues, soul and R&B, with five Grammy wins and over 20 albums. Tickets are $33-$48.

The second annual Casey Jones Music Fest — coming up this September — has a new home at Parrish Ranch near Berthoud (just 10 minutes outside of Longmont) on a spacious private ranch with a campground and large festival field. To celebrate, Still Cellars is hosting a kickoff party featuring some of the talent that will be playing the festival. Enjoy the acoustic soul and modern folk of Antonio Lopez, the sharp and diverse finger-stylings of guitarist David Coile, the humorous and poignant songwriting of Shanna in a Dress and more. No cover, but donations accepted.

see EVENTS Page 36 BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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words

EVENTS from Page 35

THURSDAY, JULY 11 Music AJ Fullerton Duo. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. The Amazing Acro-cats.7 p.m. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver, 303-477-9984. Through July 14, bugtheatre.info. Ariana Grande: Sweetener World Tour. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Big Something. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Common: Let Love Tour — with Nicole Bus. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Georgia Boys BBQ Summer Music Series. 7 p.m. Georgia Boys BBQ, 250 Third Ave., Longmont, 720-999-4099. Hillbilly Hellcats. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Hogslop String Band. 8:30 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Megan Burtt. 6:30 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Moors & McCumber. 6 p.m. Mapleton Hill Concert Series, 429 Maxwell Ave., Boulder. Mozart Under Moonlight. 7:30 p.m. Arvada Outdoor Amphitheatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Renaissance Project Summer Sing. 7 p.m. Pine Street Church, 1237 Pine St., Boulder, 303-442-6530. Romantic Duos. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. The Songwriter Hour featuring Danielle Ate the Sandwich and Michael Kirkpatrick. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown + The Temperance Movement. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Events Bear Cubs Camp. 10:30 a.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. The Colfax Comedy Fest. 8 p.m. Irish Snug, 1201 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-839-1394. Through July 13, colfaxcomedyfest.com. Comfort Soup: Holidays. 5:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Garden Work Hour. 5 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Orny Adams. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. More performances through July 13, comedyworks.com. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. 2132 14th St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, JULY 12 Music The Art Market @ Art Night Out. 5 p.m. Festival Plaza, 311 S. Public Road, Lafayette.

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Art Opening for Khiri Lee with Live Music. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

AYAZ DARYL NIELSEN lives in Longmont with his wife, poet and psychoanalyst Judith Partin-Nielsen. A veteran and former hospice nurse, Nielsen has nurtured his print publication, bear creek haiku, for more than 30 years and 155 issues (bearcreekhaiku.blogspot. com). Nielsen will speak at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 16.

B-Side Music Fridays with Big Juan + Danae Simone. 5 p.m. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Bury Mia (Album Release Show). 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Chris Dismuke. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Cristina Vane. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. EcomBootCamps: Food Brands On Amazon. 8 a.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Happiest Hour. 6 p.m. Indian Peaks Golf Course, 2300 Indian Peaks Trail, Lafayette. Heller/Teppa/Mervine/Kovalcheck Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. Khalid Free Spirit World Tour. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Like A Tiger & The Yellnats. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Lindsey Saunders. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Louis Colaiannia. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Mahadev OK. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Matthew Fuller (solo guitar). 7 p.m. Muse, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Mighty Brother. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Mojomama. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Music and Movement. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Oh Like WOW. 8:30 p.m. The Roost, 526 Main St., Longmont, 303-622-5021. Peter Stoltzman Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. Romantic Duos. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Strings & Wood Presents: Sam Rae, Aviva le Fey & Daniel Steinbock. 7 p.m. Leon Gallery, 1112 E. 17th Ave., Denver, 303-832-1599. Summer Courtyard Concert Series. 7 p.m. 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville. This Must Be The Band (A Talking Heads Tribute Band) — with No Touch. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Timmah Ostdiek. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. The Tom Weiser Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole,

JULY 11, 2019

THURSDAY, JULY 11 Mareya Ibrahim — Eat Like You Give a Fork. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, JULY 12 Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SUNDAY, JULY 14 Jean Reidy — Truman. 2 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

MONDAY, JULY 15 Mitali Perkins — Forward Me Back to You. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. Travers Brothership — 2 Sets: “Travers Brothership Eats A Peach” and an Original Set. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Views at the MUSE. 5 p.m. Museum of Boulder at the Tebo Center, 2205 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-449-3464. Wood Shop Introduction (Wood Shop 101). 6 p.m. TinkerMill, 1840 Delaware Place, Longmont. Events Flosstradamus & 4B. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Fun on the Farm: Pioneer Life. 9:30 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Ute Highway, Longmont, 303-776-8688.

So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, JULY 16 Ayaz Daryl Nielsen. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Patricia Eagle — Being Mean. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 Alan Sumler — Cannabis in the Ancient Greek and Roman World. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

The Aristocrats. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Bound for Peaches (Tribute to the Allman Brothers Band + Tedeschi Trucks Band). 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Calixto Oviedo Quintet (Afro Cuban Jazz). 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. Chilldren of Indigo. 7 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Daniel Sloss: X. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Dave Tamkin. 7 p.m. Gold Hill Inn, Boulder, 303-443-6461. Drums Along the Rockies. 6:30 p.m. Broncos Stadium at Mile High, 1701 Bryant St., Denver, 720-258-3000. Esmé Patterson. 7 p.m. Dazzle at Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5100.

Louisville Downtown Street Faire. 5:30 p.m. Steinbaugh Pavilion, Louisville.

Ethan Mindlin Jones. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Opening Reception: ReLove: Colorado Mosaic Artists Group Exhibit. 5:30 p.m. Bricolage Gallery, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder.

Flynn & The Electric Company. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720-600-4875.

Summer Breeze Yacht Party Burlesque Show. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 443-603-6233.

Food Truck & Live Music — with Shauna Lee. 5 p.m. Spirit Hound Distillers, 4196 Ute Highway, Lyons, 303-823-5696.

SATURDAY, JULY 13

Green Buddha. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

Music The 89s. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

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Hackensaw Boys. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 see EVENTS Page 38

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arts A·Maze·D. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 1.

FIREHOUSE ART CENTER

BREAKING GROUND, curated by Brandy Coons, features the work of three artists, each addressing habitat and what lies beneath the surface, inside and outside our built environments. Now showing at Firehouse Art Center in Longmont through July 28.

Amuse Yeux: A Small Delight For The Eyes. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through Sept. 15. Breaking Ground — Alice Stone Collins, Saxon Martinez, and Pam Rogers. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through July 28. Cara a Cara (Face to Face). The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through July 14. Clark Richert: Pattern and Dimensions. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 15. Climate Ribbon. Boulder Public Library, Arapahoe Ramp, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Aug. 28. Elements — The Boulder Potters’ Guild: 50 Years and Counting. Boulder Public Library, Canyon Gallery, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through. Aug. 4. Evan Cantor, New Work (oil paintings). Seeds Cafe (Boulder Public Library), 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder. Through July 31. Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Fiber Art by Dianna VanderDoes. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Sept. 6. Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing exhibit. Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit.

The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9. Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18. The Light Show. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through May 2020. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. The museum has numerous permanent and temporary exhibits. MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. The launch event will begin at 4 p.m. on July 12 at 14th Street between Champa and Stout streets, Denver (located at the plaza in front of the Colorado Convention Center). Through Jan. 31, denvertheatredistrict. com/event/monumental/ Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 23. Alex McLeod: NPC Hell. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through July 28.

Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8. ReLove: Colorado Mosaic Artists Group Exhibit. Bricolage Gallery, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. Opens July 12. Through Aug. 17. Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture. Longmont Museum, 350 Kimbark St., Longmont. Through Jan. 5, 2020. Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 25. Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through January 2020. Watercolor by Anne Gifford. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through Sept. 6.

Pack-It-Up. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 23.

EVENTS from Page 36

Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Inspector — with Vic N’ The Narwhals. 6 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488.

Open Mic — hosted by Silent Bear. 7 p.m. Tandoori South Side Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder. Acoustic format (no drum sets),15 minute sets.

Kick Off to the Casey Jones Music Fest — with The John Bunzli Band, Antonio Lopez, David Coile and more. 6 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Over Time. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Little Song Circle for Infants and Toddlers: Second and Fourth. 9:30 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-443-3934. Live Music with Star 69. 7 p.m. Lansdowne Arms, 9352 Dorchester St., Longmont. The Mailboxes. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Mailboxes, Shanna In A Dress, Ethan

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Michael Bublé. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

July Clouds of Sound Meditation Concert. 7:30 p.m. Atma Buti International Sound & Vibrational School, 6395 Gunpark Drive, Suite U, Boulder.

Kirk Margoles. 7:30 p.m. Trident Booksellers and Cafe, 940 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-249-8458.

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Jones. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

JULY 11, 2019

The Pamlico Sound. 8 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Sal & Swing Shift. 7 p.m. Collision Brewing Company, 1436 Skyway Drive, Longmont, 720-996-1850. Seeing Stars Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Shanna in a Dress. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Spencer Zweifel Trio. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 970-818-6006.

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Streetlight Manifesto. 6:30 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Strings & Stories — with Daniel Rodriguez & Darren Garvey of Elephant Revival. 7:30 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 4th Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Summer Music Series at Upslope. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. Events Ann Lincoln: Comedy, Magic, Juggling, and more. 11 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Apollopalooza. 10 a.m. Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum, 7711 E. Academy Blvd., Denver, 303-360-5360. Through July 20, wingsmuseum.org/events/apollo. BoulderReads Summer Potluck. 3:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. see EVENTS Page 40

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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EVENTS from Page 38

theater

History and Habitat of Caribou Ranch. 9 a.m. Caribou Ranch Open Space, Nederland. Rayback’s Third Birthday Celebration. Noon. The Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder, 303-214-2127.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN five nuns try to manage a fundraiser? ‘Nunsense,’ that’s what. It’d be easier if the rest of the sisterhood hadn’t died from botulism after eating vichyssoise prepared by Sister Julia. Nonetheless, the remaining nuns — ballet-loving Sister Leo, street-wise Sister Robert Anne, befuddled Sister Mary Amnesia, the Mother Superior Sister Regina, and mistress of the novices, Sister Mary Hubert — stage a talent show in order to raise the money to bury their dearly departed. ‘Nunsense’ plays at Jesters Dinner Theatre in Longmont July12-Sept. 29.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Seawell Ballroom Presents: Phantom Circus. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Seawell Ballroom at the DCPA, 1350 Arapahoe St., Denver. Summer of Discovery: Family Yoga. 11:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Summer of Discovery: The Inner World of our Body and Mind: Coming into Balance. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

42nd Street The Musical. The Spark Theatre, 4847 Pearl St., Suite B4, Boulder. Through July 13.

Summer of Discovery: Meet & Bleat: Baby Goats at the Library. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21.

Summer of Discovery: Rocky Mountain Paranormal: UFOs: Fact or Fiction?. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

SUNDAY, JULY 14 Music Beethoven’s Path to Neoclassicism. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. City Park Jazz 2019. 6 p.m. City Park, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, 720-402-5033. Felonius Smith. 7 p.m. Georgia Boys BBQ, 250 3rd Ave., Longmont, 720-999-4099.

As You Like It. University Theater, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through Aug. 10.

Building the Wall. Curious Theatre Company. 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through July 27. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Buell Theater, Denver Center for Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver. Through July 28. Cinderella and Her Barely Godmother. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Saturdays and Sundays only through Aug. 5

St., Denver. Through Aug. 3. Nunsense. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday matinees, through Sept. 29. Romeo and Juliet. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, University of Colorado. Opens July 7. Through Aug. 10. Shrek, JR — presented by Tapestry Theatre. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Opens July 12. Through July 16. Well — presented by Firehouse Theater Company. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through July 20. Tarzan The Musical. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Aug. 25.

Crowns. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Aug. 4.

Twelfth Night. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, Boulder. Through Aug. 11.

Emma. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Opens July 12. Through Aug. 18.

The Wedding Singer — presented by Evergreen Players. Center Stage, 27608 Fireweed Drive, Evergreen. Opens July 12. Through Aug. 4.

Mixed Taste. Seawell Ballroom, Denver Center for Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver. Through Aug. 21. Nirvamlet — presented by Band of Toughs. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1400 Curtis

You Can’t Take It With You (student production). Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Saturdays and Sundays through Aug. 4.

Joseph Huber. 8 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Kelly Augustine. 4 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Suite 130 (east side alleyway), Longmont, 303-258-6910. Orgone — with Cosmic Joe. 5 p.m. Levitt Pavilion, 1380 W. Florida Ave., Denver, 303-578-0488. Patio Blues & BBQ featuring Eef Music. 2 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

The Levins. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Michael McDonald. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Pint Sized Polkas. 10:30 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4821.

Strangebyrds. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Events

Events Boulder Comedy Show. 7 and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Boulder Market. 11 a.m. Central Park, 1236 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 720-272-7467. Esther Povitsky. 7 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637.

MONDAY, JULY 15

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Chilldren of Indigo. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Reverend Freakchild and Friends. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Unity Arts Show. Noon. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

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3045 19th St., Boulder, 303-478-3044.

Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Adobe After Effects Motion Graphics Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Babies and Board Books. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. A Butterfly’s Life Slide Program. 6 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Music

Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Boulder Concert Band. 7 p.m. Salberg Park,

Modern Physics Book Discussions. 6 p.m.

JULY 11, 2019

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Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. The Musical Theater Project. 8:30 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717. Summer of Discovery: Bicycle Rodeo with Boulder Police Officers. 12:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. VIVA Theater at the Library. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

TUESDAY, JULY 16 Music Community Night. 5:30 p.m. Sandstone Ranch, 3001 Sandstone Drive, Longmont, 303-651-8404. Grupo Chegando Lá and Francisco Marques. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. see EVENTS Page 42

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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FILMS THURSDAY JUlY 11

Common

w/ niCole BUS

FRiDAY JUlY 12

THiS mUST Be THe BAnD (TAlking HeADS TRiBUTe) w/ no ToUCH

THURSDAY JUlY 11

gHoST Town DRiFTeRS

w/ THAT DAmn SASqUATCH (PATio SeT), kRiS lAgeR BAnD (lATe SeT) & DeeR CReek SHARP SHooTeRS (PATio SeT)

FRiDAY JUlY 12

TRAveRS BRoTHeRSHiP

FRiDAY JUlY 19

2 SeTS: TRAveRS BRoTHeRSHiP eATS A PeACH & oRiginAl SeT w/ keSSel RUn & Big Time RASCAlS (PATio SeT)

weDneSDAY JUlY 24

oFFiCiAl ReggAe on THe gRASS PRe PARTY

oRCHARD loUnge

w/ giAnT wAlking RoBoTS, ReD SAge, BlooDPReSHAH, DJ imeH & DA TeACHA

YellA BeezY Re: SeARCH

w/ PRUiTT, SAm wARRen (lATe SeT) & JoRDAn PolovinA

FRiDAY JUlY 26

Amon ToBin PReSenTS

Two FingeRS DJ SeT SATURDAY JUlY 27

BUTCHeR BRown w/ DiRTY RevivAl

SUnDAY JUlY 28

DoBRe BRoTHeRS live (eARlY SHow)

SATURDAY JUlY 13

eARTHkRY SUnDAY JUlY 14

SoUnDS like SUmmeR

FeAT BAnkSHoT, STAY gYPSY, PeACH BlooD, kHAmYel, FReqUenCY ReSPonSe, miRoS, BoDAngo & All SeCReTS known

weDneSDAY JUlY 17 Re: SeARCH

SUPeRTASk (lAB gRoUP) + PoTionS (lAB gRoUP) w/ DillARD & JoRDAn PolovinA

THURSDAY JUlY 18

wooD & wiRe

FRiDAY, SATURDAY & SUnDAY AUgUST 2-4 @ SUnRiSe RAnCH in lovelAnD

w/ JAY RoemeR BAnD (PATio SeT) & HAzel HUe (PATio SeT)

FRiDAY AUgUST 9

evol inTenT, HeAvYgRinDeR & mC Dino

ARiSe mUSiC FeSTivAl UnlimiTeD gRAviTY

w/ FUnkSTATik, mzg & mom n DAD

FRiDAY AUgUST 16

40oz To FReeDom

FRiDAY JUlY 19

w/ miSS JAeDHA, DRTY HBTz, mAgneTik, mS ToXiiC, DJ evenFlo, miSS FeliX & XeelA

SATURDAY JUlY 20

loS CologneS

(SUBlime TRiBUTe) w/ lil’ ween (ween TRiBUTe) PeRFoRming “THe mollUSk” & XoA

w/ FlASH moUnTAin FlooD & SHAwn nelSon BAnD

THURSDAY AUgUST 22

THe HomegRown CAPiTol ToURS lAUnCH PARTY

STUnnA 4 vegAS

FeAT BlACC zACC, DeRRiCk RoYCe, mi$FiTS & TAHATHAkiDD

FRiDAY AUgUST 23

iSAiAH SHARkeY

(D’Angelo/JoHn mAYeR/CoRY HenRY) w/ JUiCe FeAT PATRiCk HARveY (CYCleS), eRiC lUBA (AnAlog Son), SeAn DAnDURAnD (DAnDU) & Collin o’BRien (low SPARk/CYCleS)

SUnDAY JUlY 21

FeAT kAlYST, PeoPle CoRRUPTing PeoPle, TRiP, FvnCiiSAvAge, DillonJ, YoDA PoPz, AnomAloUS, SCHnell JoRDAn, FATHom All THe AnimAlS, TooSwiFT & Joe lAw TUeSDAY JUlY 23

e.n YoUng

SATURDAY AUgUST 24

w/ lUnA SHADe, BeTARAY & DAve HAlCHAk (PATio)

w/ CoFReSi, megAn HAmilTon & CATPARTY

SoPHiSTAFUnk

BASS PHYSiCS THURSDAY AUgUST 29

Bone DiggeRS SATURDAY AUgUST 31

HeRBie HAnCoCk TRiBUTe THURSDAY & FRiDAY SePTemBeR 12-13

SUiCiDegiRlS BlACkHeART BURleSqUe SATURDAY SePTemBeR 14

THe movemenT w/ ARiSe RooTS

Friday September 20 • dual venue!

BAlloon PoP

wAX TAiloR (DJ SeT), BloCkHeAD, liTTle PeoPle, YPPAH, nATASHA kmeTo, ARmS AnD SleePeRS, & CnJR

SATURDAY SePTemBeR 21

weDneSDAY JUlY 24

w/ envY Alo, SARAH moUnT & THe RUSHmoReS

THURSDAY JUlY 25

HYmn FoR HeR

w/ THe DeeR, CHe APAlACHe (ARgenTinA – PATio SeT) & HigH CoUnTRY HUSTle (PATio SeT)

FRiDAY JUlY 26

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‘THE ADVENTURES OF PRINCE ACHMED’ Thursday, July 11 ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Saturday, July 13 Alice Guy-Blanche.’ 4:30 p.m. ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Alice Guy-Blanche.’ 2:30 and 7:30 Boulder. p.m. Boedecker. Boulder Environmental/Nature/ Boulder Environmental/Nature/ Outdoors Film Festival. 4 p.m. Dairy Outdoors Film Festival. 4 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Arts Center. ‘The Cure Anniversary 1978-2018 ‘Ramen Shop.’ 5 p.m. Boedecker. Live in Hyde Park.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Ramen Shop.’ 2:30 p.m. Boedecker. Sunday, July 14 Sips N’ Cinema: Movie & Tasting ‘L’Italiana in Algeri: Gran Teatre feat. ‘Dr. Strangelove’ and Fernet. del Liceu.’ 1 p.m. Boedecker. 7 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th ‘Rams.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. Ave., Denver. Thursday Cinema ‘Shadows of Monday, July 15 Forgotten Ancestors.’ 7 p.m. Boulder Public Library ‘Framing John DeLorean.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. Main Branch, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. ‘L’Italiana in Algeri:.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. Thursday Cinema ‘Solaris.’ 5 p.m. Boulder Public ‘Psychedelica.’ 5:30 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse Sloans Library Main Branch. Lake, 4255 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. Thursday Cinema Local Filmmakers’ Showcase ‘Mondo Hollywood.’ 6 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, Tuesday, July 16 4600 Broadway, Boulder. ‘Framing John DeLorean.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. Kids Films: ‘Brave.’ 10 a.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Friday, July 12 Quail Road, Longmont. ‘Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice GuyBlanche.’ 4 p.m. Boedecker. Wednesday, July 17 Boulder Environmental/Nature/Outdoors Film ‘The Adventures of Prince Achmed’ (1926) — Festival. 4 p.m. Dairy Arts Center. with The Silent Cinema Trio. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua ‘Endzeit.’ 8:45 p.m. Boedecker. Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Friday Family Film: ‘Coco.’ 2 p.m. Longmont Public ‘Between Me and My Mind.’ 4 p.m., 6 , 8 and 10 Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. p.m. Boedecker. Movies @ Meadows: ‘Mars Needs Moms.’ 4 ‘L’Italiana in Algeri’ 1 p.m. Boedecker. p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder. ‘Ramen Shop.’ 2 and 6:30 p.m. Boedecker. Short Film Screenings. 7 p.m. Medium Studio 1, 1401 Walnut St., Suite 070, Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 40

Open Mic. 3 p.m. Vic’s Espresso, 1055 Courtesy Road, Louisville, 303-440-8209. Open Mic — with Andy Eppler. 6 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Quintessential Harp. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Events All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Lap Babies. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Musical Theater Project. 8:30 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17

Welton St., Denver, 732-462-4262. Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Jesse hunter (of Von Disco) and Friends. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Kelly Hunt. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Events BeeChicas: Disappearing Salad Bowl. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Summer of Discovery: The Inner World of our Body and Mind: Coming into Balance. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Summer of Discovery: Supercomputers, Climate, and You! 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Music Betraying the Martyrs. Roxy Theatre, 2549

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


- EDUCATIONAL ADVERTISEMENT -

Why Haven’t Senior Homeowners Been Told These Facts?

Keep reading if you own a home in the U.S. and were born before 1957. It’s a well-known fact that for many senior citizens in the U.S. their home is their single biggest asset, often accounting for more than 50% of their total net worth. Yet, according to new statistics from the mortgage industry, senior homeowners in the U.S. are now sitting on more than 6.9 trillion dollars* of unused home equity. With people now living longer than ever before and home prices back up again, ignoring this “hidden wealth” may prove to be short sighted. All things considered, it’s not surprising that more than a million homeowners have already used a government-insured Home Equity Conversion Mortgage or “HECM” loan to turn their home equity into extra cash for retirement. However, today, there are still millions of eligible

Although today’s HECM loans have been improved to provide even greater financial protection for homeowners, there are still many misconceptions. For example, a lot of

for everyone, they can be a real lifesaver for senior homeowners. The cash from a HECM loan can be used for any purpose. Many people use the money to save on interest charges by paying off credit cards or other high-interest loans. Other common uses include making home improvements, paying off medical bills or helping other family members. Some people simply need the extra cash for everyday expenses while others are now using it as a “safety net”for financial emergencies. If you’re a homeowner

Request a FREE Info Kit & DVD Today! Call 1-855-319-0231 now. homeowners who could benefit from this FHAinsured loan but may simply not be aware of this “retirement secret.” Some homeowners think HECM loans sound “too good to be true.” After all, you get the cash you need out of your home but you have no more monthly mortgage payments. It’s a fact: no monthly mortgage payments are required with a government-insured HECM loan; however the homeowners are still responsible for paying for the maintenance of their home, property taxes, homeowner’s insurance and, if required, their HOA fees. Another fact many are not aware of is that HECM reverse mortgages first took hold when President Reagan signed the FHA Reverse Mortgage Bill into law 31 years ago in order to help senior citizens remain in their homes. Today, HECM loans are simply an effective way for homeowners 62 and older to get the extra cash they need to enjoy retirement.

people mistakenly believe the home must be paid off in full in order to Our new Reverse Mortgage infomation guides & DVD are now available qualify for a HECM loan, which is not the case. In fact, featuring award-winnng actor and paid AAG spokesman, Tom Selleck one key advantage of a HECM is that the proceeds will first be used to pay off any age 62 or older, you owe it to yourself to learn more so existing liens on the property, which frees up cash flow, that you can make an informed decision. a huge blessing for seniors living on a fixed income. You may be pleasantly surprised by what you Unfortunately, many senior homeowners who might be discover when you call AAG for more information better off with HECM loan don’t even bother to get today. more information because of rumors they’ve heard. That’s a shame because HECM loans are helping Homeowners who are interested in learning many senior homeowners live a better life. more can request a FREE 2019 Reverse In fact, a recent survey by American Advisors Group (AAG), the nation’s number one HECM Mortgage Information Kit and DVD by lender, found that over 97% of their clients are satisfied calling toll-free at 1-855-319-0231 with their loans. While these special loans are not

*Source:https://www.mpamag.com/market-update/senior-home-equity-has-grown-to-6-9-trillion-112295.aspx A reverse mortgage increases the principal mortgage loan amount and decreases home equity (it is a negative amortization loan). AAG works with other lenders and fnancial institutions that offer reverse mortgages. To process your request for a reverse mortgage, AAG may forward your contact information to such lenders for your consideration of reverse mortgage programs that they offer Reverse mortgage loan terms include occupying the home as your primary residence, maintaining the home, paying property taxes and homeowners insurance. Although these costs may be substantial, AAG does not establish an escrow account for these payments. However, a set-aside account can be set up for taxes and insurance, and in some cases may be required. Not all interest on a reverse mortgage is taxdeductible and to the extent that it is, such deduction is not available until the loan is partially or fully repaid AAG charges an origination fee, mortgage insurance premium (where required by HUD), closing costs and servicing fees, rolled into the balance of the loan. AAG charges interest on the balance, which grows over time. When the last borrower or eligible non-borrowing spouse dies, sells the home, permanently moves out, or fails to comply with the loan terms, the loan becomes due and payable (and the property may become subject to foreclosure). When this happens, some or all of the equity in the property no longer belongs to the borrowers, who may need to sell the home or otherwise repay the loan balance.V2019.04.17 NMLS# 9392 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). American Advisors Group (AAG) is headquartered at 3800 W. Chapman Ave., 3rd & 7th Floors, Orange CA, 92868 (Regulated by the Division of Real Estate; to check the license status of your mortgage loan originator, visit http://www.dora.state.co.us/real-estate/index.htm) These materials are not from HUD or FHA and were not approved by HUD or a government agency.


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You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar by Ingrid Asmus

Grandma said, “you catch more flies With honey than with vinegar” I wondered... She herself was vinegar She never made sweet things Or said sweet words Was she afraid of catching flies? She said, “you already know what you did right, So I’m here to tell you What you did wrong.” Sour, sour as vinegar She lingers in my memory As I were a fly she didn’t Want to catch. What vinegar lingered in her memory? What soured her life? Was there no sweet and nourishing hand? Unknown... Send blessings to that sour spirit. Wish that it may find at last Its own sweet and honeyed path.

Ingrid Asmus is a longtime Boulder resident, a lifelong student, outdoors woman and writer. 44

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


NEON

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ose-Lynn Harlan (Jessie Buckley) is leading an ON THE BILL: inauthentic life. In her mind, she is the Queen of Wild Rose. Century Theater, Memphis, a country singer born in Scotland but 1700 29th St., destined for the U.S. And though Rose-Lynn has Boulder been singing in the Grand Ole Opry since she was 14 — a Western-themed bar in Glasgow, not the iconic Nashville theater — reality is not something she is ready to promote: two kids before she was 18, a disapproving and concerned mother (Julie Waters) and a rap sheet that’ll either keep her tethered to the underclass or fuel the music that’ll break it. Rose-Lynn is hoping for the latter, and she’ll make it happen by hook or by crook. She’s even prepped herself by tattooing her forearm with the mantra: Three chords and the truth. Like most of us, Rose-Lynn is stuck in the middle. And Wild Rose, a musical drama from writer Nicole Taylor and director Tom Harper, is about deciding which way to go. Rose-Lynn has the voice, there’s no doubt about it, and she’s lived the life to inform it. When she meets with prominent BBC presenter Bob Harris, he tells her exactly what she wants to hear: “All that matters is that you’ve got a voice and you’ve got something to say.” Well, almost. The voice is important, and so is the intent behind it, but they are far from everything. The music may be eternal. So, too, are the scars. That may sound cliché, but Wild Rose is far from it. Thanks, primarily, to Buckley’s performance as both a singer and as an actor in command of small moments. Whether she is attempting to diffuse her mother’s laser glare, or trying to stifle a burp after drinking her Coca-Cola too fast, Buckley gives Rose-Lynn a livedin complexity: You know her almost immediately, and yet you still want to learn more. To see whether she will pull this dream off or fall back on selfish habits. Luckily for Rose-Lynn, there are those along the way who extend a helping hand: Susannah (Sophie Okonedo), a wealthy woman who hires Rose-Lynn as a cleaning lady and does just about everything she can to help her musical career. The only problem is Susannah doesn’t know Rose-Lynn — she’s been taken in by the passion, the demeanor and the narrative Rose-Lynn’s created. That’s the danger of storytelling; it’s too easy to shave off the grittier bits that make going from A to B a lot less admirable. Thankfully, Wild Rose doesn’t sidestep those moments the way Rose-Lynn does. That said, Wild Rose is still a heartwarming tale that ends with a climactic performance of “Glasgow (There’s No Place By Home)” penned by American actress and singer Mary Steenburgen. It’s the kind of song you’d turn up and singalong with if it came on the radio. It’s a solid hit, one that rings true no matter many times you hear it.

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Chicken Taquitos Ahogados

PHOTOS BY STAFF

Mojo Taqueria 2785 Iris Ave., Boulder, and 216 E. Main St., Lyons, mojotaqueria.com

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yons’ Mojo Taqueria has opened a second shop in North Boulder, bringing its trademark tequila and mezcal cocktails and menu inspired by Baja, Yucatán and Oaxaca. We tried the chicken taquitos ahogados on our inaugural trip to the Boulder outpost — four crispy rolled chicken tacos dipped in a bowl of tomatillo salsa topped with lettuce, crema and cotija cheese. The salsa was the star, with a smoky mezcal streak running through it and bright acidity. The cream and cotija added much appreciated fat, and the taquito itself was perfectly textured. $12.

Vegetarian Plate

Falafel King 1314 Pearl St., Boulder, falafelkingfoods. com

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oming up on its 40th anniversary, Falafel King on the Pearl Street Mall is somewhat of a Boulder institution. While its dips and sauces are for sale in most area grocery stores, a visit to the original restaurant is worth the trip. With a line out the door, but quick and friendly service, it’s perfect for a quick bite. Recently, we went with a vegetarian plate, which included six pieces of falafel with tahini sauce, along with an ample portion of hummus, fresh pita sprinkled with za’atar (a blend of Mediterranean spices) and two dolmas — grape leaves filled with rice and herbs. $10.50.

Blueberry Turnover

La Momo Maes Bakery 900 S. Hover St., Longmont, longmontbakery.com

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t’s hard to pick just one thing from the displays at La Momo Maes Bakery in Longmont. Cupcakes, croissants (and savory croissant sandwiches) and cookies beckon, but we were called to the tray of turnovers on a recent visit. A triangular balloon of delicate, flaky pastry was filled with jam, blueberry in our case, in perfect proportion. The pastry was buttery and a little salty, the jam sweet and well distributed. $3.29.

Carnitas Gordita

Guacamoles 827 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 303-772-0074

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or low-key Tex Mex fare, its hard to beat Guacamoles. The casual spot has a large menu of tacos, burritos, tortas, gorditas and more, with plenty of meat, veggie and salsa options. The gordita was pure joy, with meat stuffed between charred, chewy masa pastry. We chose to fill our gordita with tender carnitas, and Guacamoles added in cheese and a little salsa to pull it all together. $4.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday BOULDER WEEKLY

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


ALL PHOTOS BY SUSAN FRANCE

Small Rules

Lafayette’s beer garden farmers’ market is an undiscovered gem

By JOHN LEHNDORFF PICKLED GARLIC AND ALFALFA SPROUTS are but a few of the local culinary treats available at the cozy Lafayette Farmers Market.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

S

ometimes I’m just not in the mood to deal with the Boulder Farmers Market. Don’t get me wrong. I’ve been a supporter since it first opened, and it is one of the nation’s best producer-run markets. It deserves to be a popular destination. On nice summer Saturdays and Wednesday evenings, the Boulder Farmers Market is happily crowded with lines for food and lots of kids, bikes and strollers. Parking is available but still a challenge. Look, it’s like going to any “event” — it requires a time commitment. That’s fine on a day off, but for a lot of folks it makes it hard to grab fresh ingredients and head home. That’s why it’s often easier to swing by one of Boulder County’s summer farm stands instead for local produce. There is an event of a different kind in Lafayette, 4-8 p.m. Thursdays, that seems to meld the best of the market and the stand into a smaller package. The Lafayette Farmers Market is set on a street you probably haven’t ever driven down. Simpson Street east of South Public Road is a historic neighborhood with old storefront, but only a handful of businesses including Odd13 Brewing. Simpson Street feels like a small-town Main Street. The Lafayette Farmers Market, which is operated by the Boulder Farmers Market, has much less to offer... and that’s a great thing. At only two blocks long, it takes just a few minutes to stroll through and it’s much less crowded. I

It’s the kind of market where you can park easily and pick up something quickly or hang out and shop with a pupusa in one hand and craft ale in the other. That’s because the entire Lafayette Farmers Market area is a fenced beer garden, and there are shaded seating areas with live music tucked between buildings. What I discovered was that fewer vendors means more breathing space and less hubbub, so I actually spent more time visiting each vendor, and there are some good ones. Many of the same merchants sell at other markets. Familiar names include Moxie Bread Co., Morton’s Organic Orchards, Ollin Farms, Boulder Beef and Ginger Cat Farm. Niwot’s Farm 49 offers greens and vegetables along with fungi growing logs that produce blue oyster, pearl oyster and shiitake mushrooms. Oxford Farm and Sol Y Sombra will join the Lafayette lineup as the harvest booms. Pickled, fermented and bottled treats are available from Cajun Mountain Girl and FermenTasty. Anji Probiotic Kitchen, Charlotte’s Lil Kitchen, Cheese Love Grill, Farm & Smoke and Pupusas Familia were on hand to provide dinner when I visited. In its low-key, intimate way, the Lafayette Farmers Market does exactly what farmers’ markets and stands see NIBBLES Page 50

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NIBBLES from Page 49

have always done: Make fresh local vegetables available to more kinds of people more easily while offering farms and food businesses a space to test their concepts. SUMMER FOOD READING Kick back in the hammock with Bacon, Beans, and Beer (Gibbs Smith) by Eliza Cross, the veteran Colorado cookbook author who famously penned the obsessive 101 Things to Do With Bacon. This new volume doesn’t waste any time with culinary history and philosophy, just well-tested recipes for soups to desserts that star bacon, beans and/or beer. The recipe list reads like a comfort food mantra: Beer Candied Bacon, Beer Cheese Soup, Beer Bacon Mac & Cheese, Alecaramelized Onion and Bacon Dip, Bacon & Shrimp Po’ Boys, Kentucky Hot Browns, Baked Beans with Bacon and Beer, and Chocolate Peanut Butter Garbanzo Bean Cookies. Bacon, Beans, and Beer, which won the “Eating the West” award from the Mountains & Plains Independent Booksellers Association, goes on my shelf next to 1997’s Buckskin, Bullets and Beans (Northland). That collection from the Western Writers of America includes a good recipe for Elmore Leonard’s Barbecue Red Snapper.

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LOCAL FOOD NEWS The folks at Arcana have opened Jungle, a tiki bar with Caribbean fare, in the former PMG space at 2018 10th St. ... On July 18, Chef Bradford Heap’s Wild Standard, 1043 Pearl St., becomes Pepper The Noshery, located next to sister eatery, Salt The Bistro. ... Boulder’s first cidery, BOCO Cider, is open in North 28th Street’s tasting room row at 1501 I

Lee Hill Drive serving unpasteurized ciders. … Colorado’s first craft brewery, Boulder Beer Co., celebrates its 40th anniversary on July 20. A vertical tasting of the high-octane Killer Penguin Barleywine (2005–2019) is featured at 3 p.m., followed shortly by nap time until karaoke begins at 6. … Pastures of Plenty hosts a July 18 dinner on the farm as a salute to Slow Food Nations (in Denver July 19-21) featuring Western Slope heirloom vegetables and sustainably raised meat. pasturesofplentyfarm. com … Glacier Ice Cream now offers non-dairy, vegan, paleo butter pecan CBD-infused ice cream, $14 a quart. TASTE OF THE WEEK Edwards, a small town at the base of chic Beaver Creek west of Vail, is the unlikely culinary hot spot in the mountains these days. Among the taste attractions is an exceptionally good fried chicken appetizer served at The Rose, a funky bar/bistro tucked away in the Riverwalk. The kitchen first slowly cooks top-notch boneless breast sous vide with fresh herbs. Then, it gets a thin, crispy jacket that’s fried crunchy. Drenched in sage-honey syrup and sided with pickled veggies, it made me grin. The accompanying mojito is optional. WORDS TO CHEW ON “Sit around the table with family, friends and strangers sharing food and wine. The table is the great equalizer. Conversations generated around the table have stopped wars, created friendships, exposed talent and extended love.” — Chef Jacques Pépin John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursday on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM). Podcasts: news.kgnu.org/ category/radio-nibbles BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Nothing in it

Non-alcoholic beers hit the U.S. market, Boulder County

by Matt Cortina

B

oulder County has been the launching pad for dozens of natural foods brands. And with more craft breweries per capita than almost everywhere (we’re coming for you Asheville, North Carolina, Bend, Oregon, and Portland, Maine) it’s been kind to craft brewers. So take those two dynamics and you might soon find yourself perusing the liquor store aisles for Boulder County-brewed craft non-alcoholic beer. Data indicates we’re behind the times when it comes to producing NA beer. Buoyed by a growth in sales overseas, Heineken dropped an NA beer, Heineken 0.0 (you’ve surely seed the ads), in January, with more international brands following suit, including Peroni. If you’ve been pregnant in the last 40 years, or loved someone who has, you’ve likely at least been tempted by St. Pauli’s NA, Kaliber, CLUB SODA GUIDE/FLICKR Klausthaler or the very pleasing Bitburger. As Heineken sets out to prove if there’s a market for NA beer in the U.S. — and there likely is one — craft breweries across the country are preparing to launch their flavorforward, low-calorie, healthful (relatively) takes on the beer variation. Brooklyn Brewery developed and launched Special Effects late last year in Europe, with an eye toward bringing it stateside if all goes well. Of the foray, the brewery says: “We’re beer people. We genuinely believe that humanity’s favorite beverage belongs almost everywhere and at almost any occasion. But the more we thought about those ‘almosts,’ the more moments seemed to beg for a great beer but not necessarily the attendant buzz. Being beer people, we decided that it was time to explore one of brewing’s trickiest corners: alcohol-free beers.” Lagunitas’ Hoppy Refresher has zero carbs, zero calories and zero alcohol. Brewer Jeremy Marshall asks drinkers to “think of it like a club soda... with soul.” Missouri’s Wellbeing Brewing has a lineup that includes an NA coffee cream stout, a dark amber and a golden wheat. Connecticut’s Athletic Brewing Co. is an all-NA brewery with takes on a rye ale, India pale ale, stout and Mexican lager, and it claims to “believe you shouldn’t have to sacrifice your ability to be healthy, active and at your best to enjoy great beer.” That sounds like Boulder County, doesn’t it? Denver’s Grüvi touts naturally derived terpenes in its IPA and weisse — the IPA is packed with Citra, Mosaic and Galaxy hops for all that classic IPA flavor, and the Berliner Weisse is the self-proclaimed first NA sour beer, and is brewed with lemon peel to provide a pop of citrus. How far can NA beer go? You tell us when you’re sipping a Boulder Countybrewed NA beer, let’s say, by year’s end. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF BOULDER BEER

The first to 40

The early days of Boulder Beer

by Michael J. Casey

W

hat are these hippies doing up here in Boulder?” Randolph Ware, co-founder of Boulder Brewing Company, remembers Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) inspector Lou Krivitzsky saying when he visited Colorado’s first craft brewery in the late 1970s. “He was not happy,” Ware elaborates. “He had a gray suit and a thin, black acetate tie, and he was a big guy. “At that time, the brewmaster was a guy by the name of Otto Zavatone,” Ware continues. “And Otto was a real character: storyteller, fisherman from Cape Cod, musician — he was the piano player in a band named The Fornicators (Ware played saxophone in the band.)” Zavatone, who died in 2015 at the age of 75, is one of those colorful characters that permeate the craftbrewing world. He played the B3 Hammond Organ on Del Shannon’s “Runaway,” keyboard on Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” and a slew of others. He was also Boulder Brewing’s first hire at Alvin Nelson’s goat shed in Hygiene and a raconteur of the highest accord. “So, Otto and Lou go into the goat shed, to show BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

him what’s going on, and they were in there about an hour,” Ware says. “When they came out, Lou was grinning from ear-to-ear. And the next time he showed up, [Lou] was on his Harley, in his leathers. “That was another one of those windows of things not being set-up for success,” Ware chuckles. Not set-up for success, but it was too important to fail. It didn’t, and on Saturday, July 20, Boulder Beer will celebrate its 40th anniversary at the Pub on Wilderness, Boulder Beer’s home for over 35 years. Getting to 40 was no easy task, but it certainly was colorful. • • • • The story of Boulder Beer begins in California, at a high school in South Pasadena to be precise, where a skinny young Ware — or Stick, as his older brother teased him — learned to make homebrew from a friend’s older brother, a Louisianan on the lam and hiding out in Cali. “He took [us] down to East L.A. and bought a bunch of brewing equipment,” Ware says. “A crock, hydrometer and Blue Ribbon malt (an extract syrup that provides beer’s fermentable sugars) and the rest, and showed us how to make homebrew. ... We were using bread yeast and canned malt, and it was pretty hard to drink the stuff, but it was all we could get.” It was enough, and Ware kept brewing. Fast forward a few years and Ware, a post-doc student at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA), crosses paths with JILA chair David Hummer. Hummer had studied at University I

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College, England, where he developed a taste for flavorful English ales, a far cry from the mass-market lagers available in the post-Prohibition U.S. Hummer also homebrewed, but with malted grains, a technique that far surpassed Ware’s extract methods. “So we started conspiring,” Ware says. Looking back, Boulder Beer’s director of sales, Dan Weitz, puts it simply: “They were making beer because they wanted to drink better beer.” And they weren’t alone. Friends, family members and fellow faculty all wanted better beer — enough that Ware had an epiphany: “I just, off the top of my head, spouted, ‘Shoot, we ought to start a brewery.’” Let’s back up. There is nothing unusual about saying, “We ought to start a brewery,” in 2019, 2009 or even 1999, for that matter. But in the late ’70s, the notion of opening a brewery would be equivalent to trying to start your own car company. Or manufacture freeze-dried coffee. Beer in the 1970s was controlled by the big three — Anheuser-Busch, Miller and Coors — a few regional macros, like Pabst Brewing Co. and Olympia Brewing Co., and two small breweries out in California: Anchor Brewing in San Francisco and New Albion Brewing in Sonoma; 42 in all and they were beginning to consolidate. Starting a brewery was simply not something one did. “You know, my mom had always cautioned me against spouting off things, saying things you weren’t see BOULDER BEER Page 54

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going to do,” Ware recounts. “So, I kind of called myself on it.” Further recalling that Hummer, who passed away in 2016 at the age of 82, would regularly claim, “I had talked him into doing the most irresponsible thing he’d ever done in his life, which was starting the brewery.” Irresponsible or not, on Sept. 25, 1979, Ware, Hummer and Nelson — an engineer Ware met at CU — were issued the 43rd brewing license. The Boulder Brewing Co. was open for business. On July 4, 1980, they delivered their first case of Boulder Beer to the Gold Hill Inn. For the first few years, Boulder Brewing operated out of a goat shed on Nelson’s farm — not exactly an ideal place to brew beer. The obstacles were numerous; from re-purposing dairy and restaurant equipment into a brewhouse to dealing with county health inspectors, building inspectors and the ATF — none of which had any experience working with small brewers. “If we go into Boulder County and say, ‘We want to build a brewery,’ they’re going to say: ‘No. You can’t do that. Nobody’s ever done that,’” Ware recalls. But leaning on gut instinct, ingenuity and an unwillingness to give up, Boulder Beer stayed the course. In 1984, they relocated from Hygiene to their current facility on Wilderness Place — they were the first business to set up shop in the now developed Transit Village — and survived myriad ups and downs while the craft beer revolution exploded, imploded and recovered. “It’s not as easy to be around for 40 years as some people might think,” Jeff Brown, president of Boulder Beer from 2002–2019 says. “[You] always have to be re-thinking what it is that you’re doing.” Brown, who joined the company in 1990 when Gina Day purchased the struggling brewery, adds that “the ’90s I

THE BOULDER were really BEER facility on about small Wilderness Place in brewers insert1984. ing themselves into something that had been, predominantly, players of large commercial operations.” Also joining the team in 1990 was brewmaster David Zuckerman of BridgePort Brewing Company. He cleaned up the beers and introduced Buffalo Gold, an easy-drinking golden ale that’s been a staple ever since. Meanwhile, the craft beer industry was going bananas — from less than 300 U.S. breweries at the beginning of the ’90s to over 1,500 breweries by the end. This sudden expansion caused a healthy amount of industry fallout, but Boulder Beer remained intact and weathered craft beer’s first major shakeup. How? As Brown is quick to point out, craft beer has always been “more than just beer.” “When we started at the goat shed, we had no idea of starting a business,” Ware remembers. “It was, ‘Hey, we want to brew beer.’ And then in order to brew beer, we found out: We got to get a license, we gotta do this, we gotta do that. All the rest of it.” That, “all the rest of it,” is an entire economic system that didn’t exist 40 years ago, but is now an integral component of industries, communities and entrepreneurs. “Everything from manufacturing of wearables to books being written,” Brown adds, “to hop farmers out in Paonia, supplying local products to local breweries. ... Brewers are influencing more than just people’s palates.” And it all started with two homebrewers, an engineer and a goat shed 40 years ago. BOULDER WEEKLY


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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: You’re in the Land of Green Magic. That’s potentially very good news, but you must also be cautious. Why? Because in the Land of Green Magic, the seeds of extraneous follies and the seeds of important necessities both grow extra fast. Unless you are a careful weeder, useless stuff will spring up and occupy too much space. So be firm in rooting out the blooms that won’t do you any good. Be aggressive in nurturing only the very best and brightest.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Eight years ago, researchers in Kerala, India, went to the Padmanabhaswamy Temple and climbed down into centuries-old vaults deep beneath the main floor. They found a disorganized mess of treasure in the form of gold and precious gems. There were hundreds of chairs made from gold, baskets full of gold coins from the ancient Roman Empire, and a four-foot-high solid statue of a god, among multitudinous other valuables. I like bringing these images to your attention, Taurus, because I have a theory that if you keep them in your awareness, you’ll be more alert than usual to undiscovered riches in your own life and in your own psyche. I suspect you are closer than ever before to unearthing those riches.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Children need to learn certain aptitudes at certain times. If they don’t, they may not be able to master those aptitudes later in life. For example, if infants don’t get the experience of being protected and cared for by adults, it will be hard for them to develop that capacity as toddlers. This is a good metaphor for a developmental phase that you Geminis are going through. In my astrological opinion, 2019 and 2020 are critical years for you to become more skilled at the arts of togetherness and collaboration; to upgrade your abilities so as to get the most out of your intimate relationships. How are you doing with this work so far?

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Vantablack is a material made of carbon nanotubes. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, it is the darkest stuff on the planet. No black is blacker than Vantablack. It reflects a mere 0.036 percent of the light that shines upon it. Because of its unusual quality, it’s ideal for use in the manufacture of certain sensors, cameras, and scientific instruments. Unfortunately, an artist named Anish Kapoor owns exclusive rights to use it in the art world. No other artists are allowed to incorporate Vantablack into their creations. I trust you will not follow Kapoor’s selfish example in the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, it’s crucial that you share your prime gifts, your special skills and your unique blessings with the whole world. Do not hoard!

LEO

the climactic phase of your personal ripening process. Your motto should be to take care of your valuables by any means necessary.

LIBRA

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: I can’t decide whether to compare your imminent future to a platypus, kaleidoscope, patchwork quilt or Swiss army knife. From what I can tell, your adventures could bring you random jumbles or melodic mélanges — or a blend of both. So I’m expecting provocative teases, pure flukes and multiple options. There’ll be crazy wisdom, alluring messes and unclassifiable opportunities. To ensure that your life is more of an intriguing riddle than a confusing maze, I suggest that you stay closely attuned to what you’re really feeling and thinking, and communicate that information with tactful precision. NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Every year, thousands of people all over the world go to hospital emergency rooms seeking relief from kidney stones. Many of the treatments are invasive and painful. But in recent years, a benign alternative has emerged. A peerreviewed article in a scientific journal presented evidence that many patients spontaneously pass their kidney stones simply by riding on roller coasters. I doubt that you’ll have a literal problem like kidney stones in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. But I do suspect that any psychological difficulties you encounter can be solved by embarking on thrilling adventures akin to riding on roller coasters.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: In his book The Histories, ancient Greek historian Herodotus told the story of a six-year war between the armies of the Medes and the Lydians in an area that today corresponds to Turkey. The conflict ended suddenly on a day when a solar eclipse occurred. Everyone on the battlefield got spooked as the light unexpectedly dimmed, and commanders sought an immediate cease to the hostilities. In the spirit of cosmic portents precipitating practical truces, I suggest you respond to the upcoming lunar eclipse on July 16-17 with overtures of peace and healing and amnesty. It’ll be a good time to reach out to any worthwhile person or group from whom you have been alienated.

AQUARIUS

VIRGO

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: As a self-taught rebel poet with few formal credentials, I may not have much credibility when I urge you to get yourself better licensed and certified and sanctioned. But according to my analysis of the astrological omens, the coming months will be a favorable time for you to make plans to get the education or training you’re lacking; to find out what it would mean to become more professional, and then become more professional; to begin pursuing the credentials that will earn you more power to fulfill your dreams.

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SAGITTARIUS

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Hi, my name is Rob Brezsny, and I confess that I am addicted to breathing air, eating food, drinking water, indulging in sleep and getting high on organic, free-trade, slavery-free dark chocolate. I also confess that I am powerless over these addictions. Now I invite you to be inspired by my silly example and undertake a playful but serious effort to face up to your own fixations. The astrological omens suggest it’s a perfect moment to do so. What are you addicted to? What habits are you entranced by? What conditioned responses are you enslaved to? What traps have you agreed to be snared by? The time is right to identify these compulsions, then make an audacious break for freedom. AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: When cherries are nearing the end of their ripening process, they are especially vulnerable. If rain falls on them during those last few weeks, they can rot or split, rendering them unmarketable. So cherry-growers hire helicopter pilots to hover over their trees right after it rains, using the downdraft from the blades to dry the valuable little fruits. It may seem like overkill, but it’s the method that works best. I advise you to be on the lookout for similar protective measures during

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JAN. 20-FEB. 18: My astrological colleague Guru Gwen believes that right now Aquarians should get scolded and penalized unless they agree to add more rigor and discipline to their rhythms. On the other hand, my astrological colleague Maestro Madelyn feels that Aquarians need to have their backs massaged, their hands held, and their problems listened to with grace and empathy. I suppose that both Gwen and Madelyn want to accomplish the same thing, which is to get you back on track. But personally, I’m more in favor of Madelyn’s approach than Gwen’s.

PISCES

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Dear Dan: My fiancé and I have been in a relationship for 11 years. His best friend is one of his exes, and that has always bothered me. What do I do? —Needing Guidance After Getting Engaged

BY DAN SAVAGE

den kink that I’ve had since childhood: I get off on destructive, city-smashing Dear NGAGE: You could make up your mind to get over it, NGAGE. Or you giants — think of Godzilla as a muscular man smashing things with his dick. could threaten to break off the engageSince this is impossible to realize, I rely ment unless your fiancé cuts his best on drawings and other images. After friend out of his life. That would be an Tumblr removed the adult content, I asshole move — that would be an emofound my way to newer websites. Some tionally manipulative asshole power featured manga-style drawings of giant move. But, hey, you prepubescent boys. I’ve wouldn’t be the first perROMAN ROBINSON never experienced any son to wait for the moment attraction to children, but of maximum leverage these cartoons are a turnbefore telling your partner on. Does lusting after carthat, despite what you led toon images of boys make them to believe (or me a pedophile? allowed them to assume), —Freaky Erotic Art they are going to have to Requires Serious Selfchoose between their best Scrutiny friend(s) and the person they’re about to marry or just married. Fair warning: If you issue that ultimatum and your fiancé (or husband) writes in and asks me what to do, I’m going to tell him to leave you. Dear Dan: I’m a 58-year-old happily married gay man, and I have a well-hid-

Dear FEARSSS: If you aren’t sexually attracted to children, FEARSSS, you aren’t a pedophile. Pedophilia is not something a nonpedophile drifts into after viewing a little squicky manga. Pedophilia, according to the best and most current

research, is a hardwired sexual orientation — one that can never be acted on for moral and ethical reasons. That said, I would urge you to avoid viewing or downloading this stuff. It’s illegal in the United States (and lots of other places) to possess drawings or computer-generated images of children that depict “a minor engaging in sexually-explicit conduct,” per federal law. I don’t know whether your local prosecutor would consider viewing drawings of giant prepubescent boys smashing buildings with their dicks as a criminal offense, but I’m sure you don’t want to find out. Avoid those websites. Dear Dan: Where can a gal go to find reluctant/nonconsensual porn that isn’t overly rapey? I really love power play (think “naughty secretary gets punished”) — but when I look for reluctant/ nonconsensual porn, I often come across male-perspective rape fantasies. I’d love to wank to a video or story about a woman reluctantly enjoying herself while her aggressor fucks her up the ass, but every search is fraught with the

perils of finding something truly rapey. And that just makes me feel sad and icky. I’m willing to spend money if I trust the source. I just don’t know where to look! Is the issue with my keywords? Help! —Really Enjoys Specific Pornographic E-Content, Thanks Dear RESPET: “This is one of the things people don’t understand about ethical and feminist porn — it’s not just soft lighting and sweet lovemaking,” said Tristan Taormino, the feminist author, sex educator, podcaster, and porn director (tristantaormino.com). “Ethical and feminist porn can also have an edge and feature power play, so long as there’s consent. My series ‘Rough Sex,’ which has three volumes, is all about real women’s kink fantasies, and there will be something in there for RESPECT (you can find it on gamelink.com). In addition, I recommend bellesa.co, where she can use the search term ‘rough,’ and xconfessions.com, where she should search for ‘BDSM.’” On the Lovecast, work questions on the podcast?! Yup. Listen at savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

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This is your brain on drugs by Seymour

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

ome recent research out of Ontario, Canada, may have sussed out why marijuana produces such a pleasant experience for some while creating negative sensations for others. A team from Western University, led by neuroscientist Steven Laviolette and post-doctoral fellow Christopher Norris from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, mapped how different regions of the brain produce vastly different responses to marijuana. Their research was published in Scientific Reports (an online open access journal from the publishers of the renowned journal Nature) on July 5. For some folks, pot produces feelings of euphoria — a highly rewarding feeling that may lead to dependence — but for others, marijuana use leads to paranoia, cognitive problems or even an increased risk for developing schizophrenia. Research on rat brains showed that THC — the primary active compound in marijuana — can produce highly rewarding effects in a region of the brain called the nucleus accumbens. The nucleus accumbens is one part of the reward circuit in the human brain, helping to process rewarding stimuli that keeps us alive (like food and water) and less healthy stimuli like addictive drugs. Likewise, the nucleus accumbens plays a role in aversion. The blog Neuroscientifically Challenged breaks it down well: “When we do anything that is considered rewarding (e.g. eat food, have sex, take drugs), dopamine neurons (along with other types of neurons) in an area of

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the brain called the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are activated. These neurons project to the nucleus accumbens, and when they are activated it results in an increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. The nucleus accumbens is an important component of a major dopaminergic pathway in the brain called the mesolimbic pathway, which is stimulated during rewarding experiences.” But Laviolette’s team saw that in some people’s brains, THC had an effect on a different part of the nucleus accumbens (the posterior part of it), producing highly adverse effects, “including schizophrenia-related cognitive and emotional symptoms and nerve cell activity similar to individuals with the psychiatric disorder,”

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according to the The London Free Press. So someone’s response to pot, according to this research, depends on what specific area of their nucleus accumbens is more sensitive to THC. “Until now, it was unknown which specific regions of the brain were responsible for these highly divergent effects of marijuana,” Laviolette told the website Medical Xpress. Researchers also found that THC in this region of the brain amplified the addictive properties of drugs like morphine and increased reward-related activity patterns in the neurons — which could explain why some folks develop a psychological dependence on pot, despite any research indicating marijuana can produce physical dependence. “Our data indicates that because the reward and aversion are produced by anatomically distinct areas, the different effects between individuals is likely due to genetic variation leading to differential sensitivity of each area,” post-doctoral fellow Norris told The London Free Press. A lot of the research conducted in Laviolette’s laboratory has centered on identifying the way cannabisderived chemicals could treat specific mental health disorders including schizophrenia, addiction, depression and anxiety. Ontario-based CanaQuest Medical Corp recently filed two provisional patents that stem from research done in Laviolette’s lab. These patents cover a formulation using THC and a botanical extract to treat various psychiatric disorders, while eliminating negative side effects associated with THC (read: it won’t get you high).

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Illinois was number 11 So who’s next?

By Paul Danish

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llinois became the 11th state to legalize recreational marijuana, setting off an immediate round of speculation over which state might be the 12th, and when it might happen. There are a lot of candidates. Pot legalization can occur in two ways, by action of a state legislature or by action of the people at the ballot box. Start with the ballot box. Currently legalization initiative drives are cranking up in at least four states: Arizona, Arkansas, Montana and Florida. A fifth state, New Jersey, might also vote on legalization; after the effort to legalize marijuana in the state legislature fizzled, pro-legalization lawmakers announced they would try to get the legislature to put a legalization measure on the state ballot in 2020 and let the people decide. None of these are slam dunks. Arizona voters narrowly defeated legalization in 2016. Supporters appear better organized this time. Ditto for opponents. In Montana there will be two competing petition drives, echoing an Arizona misstep in 2016. When there are two similar proposals, voters who haven’t been closely following the issue tend to be more skeptical and vote “no” instead of taking the time to evalu-

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ate them. A Florida initiative will have to take the form of a state constitutional amendment, which requires at least 60 percent majority to pass. (And maybe a 67 percent majority. The Florida legislature passed a bill during the last session raising the bar, which will almost certainly be challenged in court.) As for Arkansas — it’s a red state with a populist streak; passage isn’t impossible but it’ll be an uphill fight. There’s one thing that these four states have in common: They all voted for Trump in 2016. The demographic most likely to support marijuana initiatives, 18- to 30-year-olds, is also the demographic least likely to vote period. It’s also the demographic most likely to vote against Trump as things now stand. Experience in states that have legalized by vote of the people shows that a legalization initiative on the ballot boosts turnout among young voters. It wouldn’t be surprising to see Democrats directing support and money toward these initiatives in the 2020 cycle ­— and putting some on the ballot in other states as well. Legalization via a state legislature was a big disappointment this year, with failed attempts in New Jersey, New York, New Mexico, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, among others.

JULY 11, 2019

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But the issue will be considered again in New Mexico, where a legalization bill passed the state house, but died in a state senate committee last spring. Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has announced she intends to have legalization on her call for the 2020 “short session” (30 days) of the legislature. The governor’s call largely determines what bills will be considered during a short session. Gov. Lujan also formed a “Cannabis Legalization Working Group,” composed of lawmakers, industry stakeholders and law enforcement officials to study how best to address public safety and other concerns raised by opponents in a legalization measure. In other words, New Mexico legalization supporters will come to next year’s fight with active participation by the governor and with a bill that addresses the issues that were successfully used by opponents in the past. Sounds like a good strategy, and if it works it will probably be adopted in other states. • • • • The longest journey begins with a single step: The House Judiciary Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security Subcommittee was scheduled to hold a hearing on July 10 on proposals to allow states to set their own marijuana policies without fear of federal intervention. According to the Marijuana Moment website, the hearing is titled “Marijuana Laws in America: Racial Justice and the Need for Reform.” The committee isn’t expected to vote on a bill, but just the fact that a hearing is being held is progress. And in the future the committee could consider actual bills, including the House version of Colorado Senator Cory Gardner’s bill to protect state legalization laws from federal interference.

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