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news:

Area faith communities host asylum seekers as border shelters reach capacity by Angela K. Evans

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adventure:

When love is the greatest adventure of all by Emma Murray

buzz:

Block 1750 re-envisions annual ‘Murmuration’ performance by Angela K. Evans

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overtones:

Ten essential albums in progressive bluegrass by John Lehndorff

arts & culture:

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nibbles:

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community table:

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Motus Theater honors Immigrant Heritage Month with performances, music and announcement of a new podcast by Lauren Hamko

Thanks, Charlie, for Boulder’s monumental place in world beer history by John Lehndorff

Neige LaRue brings Hawaiian shave ice to Louisville by Matt Cortina

departments 5 6 27 34 35 37 41 49 51 53 54

The Highroad: The new American aristocracy Danish Plan: A modest proposal for combating a plague of robocalls Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘Bukowski, again’ by Brice Maiurro Film: Learning to move on in ‘Toy Story 4’ Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Know your brew: Pilsner Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Why not me? Weed Between the Lines: A holy high Cannabis Corner: NY pot bill comes back from the dead

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Murray Editorial intern, Lauren Hamko Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Coordinator, Lara Henry Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama

June 20, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 45 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

The new American aristocracy

FOR MORE INFORMATION on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

by Jim Hightower

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ultibillionaire brothers Charles and David Koch want to supplant America’s core democratic principle of majority rule — i.e., the will of the people — with their plutocratic principle of inviolable property rights, also known as rule by the wealthy minority. Their notion is that We The People cannot be allowed to tax the riches of the owner class, nor set rules on how they treat workers, consumers and society as a whole. To set themselves up as the new American aristocracy, this clique of moneyed elites has been spending hundreds of millions of dollars — much of it secret — on front groups I

and whorish politicians. For nearly 40 years, they and their uber-rich allies have torn down legal structures and mechanisms that give ordinary people some chance to control their own destinies. The Kochs’ goals include: • Killing all restrictions on political spending by corporations and the rich • Suppressing voting rights of students, people of color, the elderly and others who tend to favor Democratic policies • Eliminating labor unions • Canceling the right of workers, consumers and others to sue corporations that harm them • Shredding the social safety net including food stamps, Social Security and Medicare JUNE 20, 2019

• Axing provisions to protect our environment • “Preempting” the right of local people to pass laws that corporations oppose • Packing courts with pro-corporate judges The Koch conspiracy’s attack on our democratic rights has already rigged our country’s economic and political rules so the richest of the rich can now grab ever more of society’s wealth and power, thus shattering America’s commitment to the Common Good and creating a savage level of inequality. To learn more, go to Center for Media and Democracy’s exposedbycmd.org/koch. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. I

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A modest proposal for combating the plague of robocalls by Paul Danish

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Spring in Style 1334 Pearl St | Boulder | 303-447-2047 www.thealpacaconnection.com

ike the United States Constitution, the Constitution of the State of Colorado contains a clause protecting the right to keep and bear arms. It’s found in Article II, Section 13 and reads as follows: “Right to bear arms. The right of no person to keep and bear arms in defense of his home, person and property, or in aid of the civil power when thereto legally summoned, shall be called in question; but nothing herein contained shall be construed to justify the practice of carrying concealed weapons.” This column is not about gun rights, however. It’s about robocalls and how to stop them. The last clause in Article II, Section 13 — but nothing herein contained shall be construed to justify the practice of carrying concealed weapons — suggests an approach. An analogous clause should be added to the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, so that it would then read as follows: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances; but nothing herein contained shall be construed to justify the practice of telephonic solicitation.” In other words, amend the Constitution to give Congress the power to ban robocalls. And while we’re at it, add a similar clause to the Eighth Amendment, so that it would read like this: “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted; but nothing herein contained shall be construed to apply to the practice of telephonic solicitation.” In other words, amend the Constitution to give courts and juries the power to sentence those who violate a ban on robocalling to be lowered inch by inch into a meat-grinder, or some more severe penalty. OK, amending the Constitution is a drastic step, especially if it touches on see DANISH PLAN Page 7

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JUNE 20, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


DANISH PLAN from Page 6

the First Amendment, which protects the heart and soul of American liberty. But telephone solicitation generally — and robocalls in particular — has turned into a drastic problem, one that supports a multibilliondollar criminal enterprise and, worse, is corrupting Americans’ ability to communicate with each other. According to a piece appearing in Fortune last week, Americans were on the receiving end of 48 billion robocalls in 2018 and are on track to receive 60 billion this year. Wired reports that Americans received 4.8 billion robocalls in May alone. According to the annual 2018 Robocall Invesigation Report put out by Transaction Network Services (TNS), a financial data communications company, one-third of all calls to wireless and wireline phone subscribers “are now considered to be high risk (scam/fraudulent) or nuisance.” The Federal Trade Commission estimates phone-based fraud costs $9.5 billion annually. Just guessing, but I bet a disproportionate amount of it is directed at my fellow geezers. My wake-up call Tuesday morning was from a scammer claiming my Social Security account had been suspended. I’ve received this particular call several times in the past; ditto for another one telling me I’m being investigated by the IRS. I get two to four robocalls a day, most of them outright frauds, the rest fundraising calls that are (more or less) legitimate, or at least non-criminal. They constitute about 75 percent of all phone calls I receive. Robocalls and telemarketing are more than an annoyance; the damage they are causing is arguably worse than the criminal enterprises they enable. The telephone system is the largest, most complex, most used and most empowering communications system in human history. And the robocall/telemarketing industry is poisoning it.

First, thanks to robocalls, people are less likely to answer their phones and let all incoming calls go to voice mail, which they may not check for hours or even days. This effectively eliminates the immediacy of a phone call, which is one of its most valuable features. It also means people may miss important calls. Second, when most of the calls you make get dumped into voice mail, chances are you call people less often and call with different expectations when you do; you call to leave a message, not to talk with someone. Third, they sow distrust. When a substantial number of the calls you get are from people trying to rip you off, you become less trusting of anyone who calls you, except maybe close friends. And you become less trusting of the phone system itself. The robocall onslaught has potentiated me to be uncivil and rude when the phone rings. It’s kind of a Pavlovian response. Anymore, when the phone rings and I don’t recognize the number, I pick it up poised to tell the caller to bugger off instead of with the expectation to have a cordial conversation or even a business-like one. And so on. But could there be widespread support for amending the Constitution to exclude robocalling/ telemarketing from its protections? Well here’s what Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai had to say about robocalls recently: “If there is one thing in our country right now that unites Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives, socialists and libertarians, vegetarians and carnivores, Ohio State and Michigan fans, it is that they are sick and tired of being bombarded by unwanted robocalls.” And since nothing has seemed to stop them, maybe it’s time to try the nuclear option. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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BRINGING THE BORDER TO THE FRONT RANGE AREA FAITH COMMUNITIES HOST ASYLUM SEEKERS AS BORDER SHELTERS REACH CAPACITY

By Angela K. Evans

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oes it snow here in December?” she asks me, sitting in the shade of a tree outside a Denver church on an 80-degree June day. “Yes,” I tell her, through an interpreter. “Sometimes it snows an inch, other times feet. It snowed recently in May.” Her eyes get big. “Does it snow everywhere in the U.S.?” she asks. “Does it snow in Arkansas?” “She” is a mother from Central America. It’s been 21 days since she left home, traveling with her 5-year-old son. She doesn’t want to be named, or to talk about which country she’s from. She doesn’t want to say anything that could compromise her asylum case. She only says that after 13 days traveling by bus, she arrived in Juarez, Mexico. The bus journey was long, and her son often complained of being hungry, but she gave him what snacks she could. When they stopped, she’d try and find water to wash their clothes. She says the journey took them longer than expected, as Mexican immigration officials patrolled the streets, forcing migrants to wait until the roads were clear to travel. As the bus pulled into Juarez, she says, the group she was traveling with was let off in a park and told to run to the U.S. border. So she ran, holding her backpack and her son, trying to keep up with the rest of the crowd. “We started to run,” she says. “I was the last one of the group, and we went downhill and fell. As I was sliding, I was scared they were going to get us. Then I couldn’t go uphill because it was a little too high for me, and a pregnant woman helped us. I was the last one to cross the line. ... “Once you cross the border, the migration police — Mexicans — can’t get you, but before you set your feet on the other side, they can.” She says that as soon as they crossed into the U.S., the entire group sat down, waiting to be found by U.S. Border Patrol so they could claim asylum. At some point, she says, officials found them, telling them to walk along some sort of barrier until they reached the immigration building. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

From there, they waited in a line that seemed to keep growing and growing before being taken into Border Patrol custody. She says there were about 100 people in all. She describes how they were then split into groups, men and women, the children staying with whatever parent they had with them. Border Patrol agents then took their names and told them to throw out all their belongings, any food, extra clothing and anything else. Finally, they were taken into what she calls a “jail.” “I spent four days and three nights in jail,” she says. She was placed in a cell with about 50 people, she says: “We looked like sardines. We could barely sit because there was no space.” She hardly slept, waiting to see if someone lying down would be released soon so she could claim their spot. The area was relatively clean, she says, mostly because the women would clean it I

JUNE 20, 2019

themselves after guards would open the door, push in cleaning supplies and then close the door again. They were fed soup and given bottles to fill up with tap water from the sink. Once a day they were given a burrito. On the fourth day, she says, she was released with paperwork she didn’t understand and taken to a nearby shelter where she was able to shower for the first time in days, although she had to put back on her same dirty clothes. From there, she and her son were put on a bus bound for Denver. A group of volunteers welcomed her to a church, gave her fresh clothes, a towel to take a shower, and warm meals. By the time we speak, she’s been at the church for two days, and is leaving that night. Volunteers helped her arrange travel to meet her family in Arkansas. For security reasons, the hosting churches wish to remain anonymous. “Above all, we have found wonderful people, like you,” she says, pointing to the interpreter, “who have helped us in the hard times when we were hungry, when we needed a shower, and when we needed clothes. A thousand thanks.” Still, she had no idea how difficult the journey would be, she says, and doesn’t wish it on anybody. “Is that immigration?” she asks, as a Denver Police SUV drives by. The interpreter explains the police regularly patrol this area of Denver, it’s nothing to worry about. She shakes her head, acknowledging she understands. But there’s still worry behind her eyes. On Tuesday, June 11, a network of faith communities and immigrant rights groups in Denver welcomed a bus from New Mexico carrying 44 asylum seekers from the border. This is the second busload of people the groups have hosted since the beginning of May. Since the end of April, U.S. Border Patrol has reported apprehending large groups of migrants, mainly from Central America, near the Antelope Valley port of entry in New Mexico. After being see BORDER Page 10

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BORDER from Page 9

held in processing facilities, the asylum seekers have been released into the small border communities of Demming (population 14,183) and Las Cruces (99,000), forcing local governments to declare a state of emergency in order to house them all. Ruben Garcia, executive director of the Annunciation House, a nonprofit which has been working with refugees and impoverished communities on the border since the late 1970s, says that when you add what’s happening in southern New Mexico to the thousands of people seeking asylum and being released in nearby El Paso, Texas, it’s easy to see how the numbers of migrants in the area needing assistance quickly became overwhelming, not just for local governments, but also for nonprofits and transportation systems. For the past five or six years, Garcia says Annunciation House has been coordinating a whole host of what he calls “hospitality sites” for refugees being released at the border, places for people to stay, receive clothes, a warm shower and hot meals while also being connected to volunteers who help with travel arrangements. For the most part, Garcia says, the volunteer efforts based in El Paso have been able to accommodate the hundreds of people being released there every day, even though at points they’ve had to rent out entire hotels to house people. But as the number of people crossing the border grew this past spring, it quickly became apparent that they were going to need more help. “When the daily numbers are in the number of 600 to 700 per day, we can manage it. We have enough churches and hospitality sites, but when the numbers surpass 700, you start getting into 800, 900 and 1,000, then we can’t,” he says. Not only is it a drain on the volunteer networks, he says, but the transportation system in El Paso can’t accommodate hundreds of additional travelers per day. (El Paso is the closest transportation hub to both Demming and Las Cruces, New Mexico, as well.) As the numbers kept increasing in early May, and especially as migrants were being released into New Mexico without established resources to help, Annunciation House began coordinating buses to take people to other transportation hubs like Albuquerque, Denver and Dallas. Garcia reached out to immigration advocates at the American Friends Service Committee and Casa de Paz to see if Denver could be a host. Within 12 hours, a group of area churches and volunteers mobilized to receive the first bus of asylum seekers on Mother’s Day. “Being able to send buses to Dallas or to Denver is immensely helpful,” Garcia says. “It was immensely helpful to be able to send up a couple of buses and have people see their humanity, to give people the opportunity to receive them, to 10

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welcome them and to help them be on their way.” For the volunteers in Denver, there has been little warning of when the buses will arrive. Still, a growing group of nonprofits and volunteers have come together and set up host sites at area churches, much like they do at Annunciation House. “Denver has the capacity to host a couple of hundred people a week and that could really help out the people at the border who have been at capacity for so long,” says Josh Stallings, one of the volunteer site coordinators in Denver who has also spent time volunteering for Annunciation House. “But also, it’s been a cool opportunity to bring the border to us in a way and for a lot more people to be exposed to what’s actually happening, rather than just see inflammatory news headlines.” Once people arrive at any given site in Denver, they are taken through an intake process that involves filling out a one-page information sheet with their personal details, as well as those of

“Our efforts are nothing

compared to their sacrifices. ... The young men are recruited into gangs. If they don’t join, there are threats, there’s arson.” —Gloria Leyba, volunteer their sponsor, so that bilingual volunteers can help coordinate and book travel. Sometimes travel arrangements can be made in 20 minutes, while others can take several hours of communicating with sponsors in different states to make it happen. Costs for travel tends to depend on the day of the week the migrants arrive and when they need to travel. In Denver, prices were as low as $38 to get to Austin and as much as $1,700 to get a family of three to Tennessee. Volunteers coordinate with the sponsors (almost always family members), who purchase bus and airline tickets. Once arrangements are made, volunteers then take people to the bus station or airport, walking them through the entire process. For flights, volunteers help pack luggage, separating liquids into small bags and walking travelers through security. At the bus station they’ll make sure people get on the right bus and understand when and how to transfer if need be. “Our efforts are nothing compared to their sacrifices,” says volunteer Gloria Leyba, who helps make travel arrangements. Born in Denver, Leyba’s mother emigrated from Mexico when she was 6 years old, and Leyba has been an immigration advocate for decades. She also spent 18 years in Guatemala working in economic development with JUNE 20, 2019

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indigenous women. In recent months, the majority of migrants crossing the U.S. southern border are from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. “When I first arrived, migration was migration for economic reasons. Villages didn’t have a lot of opportunities outside of agricultural work,” she says. “Now there are fears for safety. The young men are recruited into gangs. If they don’t join, there are threats, there’s arson, there are threats against family members. ... It’s changed, it’s changed significantly.” Whereas Leyba used to feel comfortable taking public buses in Guatemala, she now only travels by private vehicle. She’s also heard about state-sponsored violence, as friends of hers have been held at ransom while men, who she claims were soldiers, stole all their electronics, passwords and credit cards. In the fall, a United Nations special prosecutor tasked with looking into political corruption was barred from re-entering that country. “When I hear the asylum seekers talking about their struggles, I know, I’ve seen it,” Leyba says. At the churches and other hospitality sites, asylum seekers also meet with volunteer medical teams, either Denver-area EMTs or staff from local clinics, and, hopefully, a legal orientation team to help acquaint them with the immigration and asylum process. “All these individuals are given court dates in places where they’re not going to be because of their sponsors,” says Rebecca Mendoza Nunziato, who works for Mile High Ministries (MHM) and was a site coordinator at a location hosting 13 people, including families, recently. “And so to be able to do the paperwork to make sure that they’re going to be able to attend their court dates in the right location is huge.” As of June 12, MHM is now the fiscal sponsor for the coordination efforts accepting monetary and in-kind donations, as well as funds for a part-time coordinator position, “with the understanding that we don’t see an end in sight for this,” says Mendoza Nunziato, whose grandparents emigrated from Mexico to work the sugar-beet fields in Colorado. “Especially with this administration, this isn’t a short-term project. Until there are large-scale changes, this is something that we are going to be involved in on the ground and doing our best to create safe and healthy environments for people.” At the same time, border crossings are decreasing, says Annunciation House’s Garcia. He attributes this decline to Mexican immigration officials who, at the urging of the Trump administration, have stepped up patrols throughout the country in an effort to stem the flow of migrants. Additionally, the Trump administration is sending an ever-increasing number of people back to Mexico to wait for their U.S. immigration court hearings. Upwards of 600 people were being BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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released from U.S. custody on a daily basis in the last few months, but the number has dropped to 200 or 300 in the last week or so, Garcia says. “The number of people being released is declining significantly, so we don’t foresee any more buses going up to Denver or Dallas in the immediate future,” he says. But, “That organization is there. When it will be made use of again remains to be seen. It remains to be seen what will happen on the border.” In the meantime, the network of volunteers and churches are preparing to host more asylum seekers, ready to mobilize again whenever the need may arise. “People all across [the spectrum], Christian, non-Christian, from whatever faith, generally feel excluded from this conversation because it’s so polarized, but most of us are in the excluded middle. I think that’s why people are so eager to help,” says Dave Neuhausel, a pastor of Denver Community Church, which is involved in the effort. “My hope is that churches of all shapes and sizes and perspectives would have this opportunity because it really humanizes everything.” Sitting outside the church, another mother from Central America shares her story. She also does not wish to share her name or her country of origin. She only says that her country is full of violence and threats, as gangs control most of people’s everyday lives. “They can hurt you,” she says. “We can’t live there. If you own a business, the gangs will make you pay a tax, what they called a ‘war tax.’ Kids will get inducted into the gangs, and they will make them sell drugs.” Her 9-year-old son sits nearby with another young boy, their backs against a gate, playing a game on a phone. The younger one leans his head on his new friend’s shoulder. Headed to Houston later tonight, she tells me how grateful she is for the few days spent in Denver. “I left my house on a Monday,” she says. She left with a backpack filled with some clothes, medicine and important documents for her BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

and her son. It took her 15 days to get to the U.S.-Mexico border. Before Denver, her last shower was in Mexico City. When she arrived at the Border Patrol processing facility, she had to throw out all her belongings, save her documents, her earrings and one set of clothes for both her and her son. She couldn’t even keep a short sleeve shirt and a long sleeve shirt, so she kept the long sleeves, afraid of how cold the holding cell would be. “The thing that makes you sick and sad is to see your kids crying. My son was crying telling me, ‘Mommy, I want to go now,’ but I had to stay strong for him,” she says, her voice cracking, tears flowing down her face. She says the hardest part of the entire journey was the 23 hours she spent in U.S. custody. It “was the most terrifying and horrible part of the whole trip,” she says. They laid on the hard floor, covered only by aluminum emergency blankets. She says both her and her son developed a cough while in custody, even though they weren’t held more than a day. She says she’s lucky to have stayed such a short time, as she met other women who had been in the facility much longer. She was only fed one bowl of soup in the 23 hours she was there, she says, and the guards didn’t treat them well. If one guard opened the door and let in some fresh air, soon another guard would come by and close it, she says. The worst part was hearing children constantly crying. After being released, she was taken to a nearby shelter, where volunteers gave them food and water before they boarded the bus bound for Denver. She says when she got off the bus she was surprised to see a group of people welcoming them, cheering, giving them clean clothes, good food, a bed. She says she never expected it. “I never thought I was going to make it, to see my family with clean clothes and shoes. I never imagined I was going to taste such good food as I have had here,” she says. “And we needed that after coming from such a hard journey. ... I have no words to express my gratitude.” I

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EMMA AND JORDAN in Patagonia.

WHEN LOVE IS THE GREATEST ADVENTURE By Emma Murray OF ALL

URRAY

SY OF EMMA M

PHOTOS COURTE

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t’s a curious thing, the way sound bounces off rock. Cup your palms around your mouth, scream into a canyon, and on a still day you can hear your words travel as they jump between walls, softening with each impact like stones skipping water. Some rock faces act like amplifiers. Once, while climbing the Diamond on Longs Peak (the 14,000-foot mountain’s east face, which fans up from the Earth like a giant granite wave), I shouted up at Jordan, my climbing partner and then-boyfriend. He was almost a full rope’s length above me, nearly 200 feet away. Normally when climbing long pitches outside, you have to deep-belly shout to be heard over the elements, but not on the Diamond. My voice floated up with eerie ease. As I climbed up, voices from other people climbing different routes on the far right side of the wall sounded as though they were hanging right next to me. There were six of us on the wall that day, working our own paths up this massive vertical maze. I was the only woman, insofar as I could tell by the voices, which I didn’t mind until I started crying — until everyone heard me crying. I went from feeling like the day’s badass female ambassador to feeling like I’d betrayed every woman climber who’d ever lived. What lay before me — a terrifyingly exposed and run-out (thinly protected) traverse — wasn’t the sole cause of my outburst. Like how arguments between couples at the grocery store are never actually about picking out the wrong kind of cereal, I was so mad at Jordan on so many levels, I screamed. Jordan and I had met in Argentina, in a 16-person hostel in Bariloche, a small town on the northern Patagonian frontier. I was 19

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and he 22, both of us traveling long-term and solo in the region, saddled by nothing but our backpacks and the weight of dreams. It was our kind of romantic: neither minded the other only had one change of pants; that our budget registered mere dollars per day; that we’d sometimes sleep behind gas stations. We had cans of tuna, tanned faces and a fierce sense of common direction: south, traveling together, and up vertical rocks. That was in 2014, and initially, to be honest, I never thought I’d see him again. But one night in Bariloche, shortly after we’d met, a storm came in and we ran down to the lake as thick raindrops pummeled the street. The inky waves roiled. Wind howled. We kissed as lightning lit up the black sky in purple and brown flares. The next morning I tore out a page from On the Road and wrote him a letter. The last paragraph read: “We opened our arms like condors, feeling the storm pass all around us, eyes wide and mouths stretched into dopey grins, harnessing the violent energy for ourselves. In that black and thermal moment, we looked at each other and kissed. We weren’t cold. We were the storm. We were the raw energy of life. And so that moment was ours. Ours to dig, ours to feel, ours to pull into the recesses of human experience, for we were alive to feel that moment. Alive to be human. Fleetingly mortal.” Two months later, I left Jordan at a gas station (we’d been hitchhiking) and I returned to the U.S., to Rhode Island, so I could finish college. Jordan stayed in Patagonia, though it wasn’t long before we were chatting regularly over Facebook and eventually the phone. see LOVE Page 14

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PHOTO

LOVE from Page 13

The summer of 2015, I moved out to Denver, into the basement where he’d been living since his stateside return. When I left him again a couple months later, to return again to Rhode Island at the beginning of fall, he wrote me a letter: “When the time comes for you to take that next step, the American West will be here if you so choose. It is a land of perpetual exploration and new experience. It is the stuff that makes me move without hindrance. If you choose to move in the direction of the sun, I’ll be here with you. Love, Jordan.” I folded his words into my journal and carried them with me everywhere I went. Over the next 18 months, we loved each other mostly from afar, no matter how many times zones our voices had to travel. At the beginning of 2017, I finally graduated and we moved into an apartment together in Boulder. It was winter, and we bought used crosscountry skis because we couldn’t afford anything for downhill. When the snow finally melted, we packed our climbing bags and fitted Jordan’s work truck with sleeping bags and five-gallon jugs of water. It was at the end of that first summer in Boulder that we climbed the Diamond and I broke down on the wall. My frustration started at its base. The thing about Jordan is that he’s strong, but even more than that, he’s spent the last 10 years critically understanding his climbing body. He’s comfortable with climbing risks in the same way a tenured chef is comfortable subbing ingredients on a recipe’s first go: conservative but bold. Jordan had already climbed the Diamond seven times and had given me the impression that soloing the approach up to the first ledge (ascending without any protective gear) was commonplace. We started, me first, kick-stepping up a snow slope to reach the rock, then carefully moving up a rocky chimney — one foot in snow, the other on wet rock, both hands placed for balance while trying to calibrate the 40 pounds of gear I carried in my backpack. It was scary, and I was afraid. I couldn’t solo the pitch. But I wanted to. I wanted to keep up and not hold Jordan back. As my inepti14

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tude and discomfort clashed, anger sprouted. I felt forced to explicitly address my comparative weakness and unease, and of course my ego reeled. As Jordan’s girlfriend, I wanted him to see the climb from my perspective, to spare me from the feeling of not good enough. So I accused him of intentionally disregarding me even though I knew it wasn’t intentional — though we’d climbed big walls together before, he’d always climbed particularly challenging objectives like the Diamond with partners that matched his strength and style. This was a first for him. He looked just as scared as me. When we reached the middle of the wall, about three hours and 700-vertical feet later, he’d left a traversing section run-out (if I’d fallen, I would’ve swung down like a pendulum and bashed myself against the wall). I couldn’t think of a reason why he’d led me into this terrifying predicament. Then I cried. By the time I climbed up to him (without falling), I was so mad, my narrow point of view obstructed the hurt on his face. To finish the climb’s last 600 feet, you have to scramble up what’s called Kiener’s Route — a less technical but still high-stakes section, which (after what’d happened at the wall’s base) I didn’t want to assume was easy, despite Jordan’s announcement that most people didn’t bother placing any protection. So when Jordan started scrambling up, I took a deep breath as my ego reeled again, and called after him. He came down and tied back into the rope. Jordan climbed first, then belayed me up. When I reached him, I realized he’d only gone half way. I looked up at what remained until the summit, and burst into tears again. I tried to summon the confidence to say, “I can’t solo this right now,” asking him to tailor the experience for me when I just wished he could have intuited my needs. “Why did you stop here?” I asked, instead, accusatorily. “I thought...” he started, and immediately understood: I did not see what he saw. His face fell, only held up at the corners by the remains of his frustration at my anger and distrust. We both felt betrayed. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


I felt so lonely up there in that moment and as I stepped up and around him in order to solo the final goddamn blocks, I muttered something I regret to this day: “I hate you.” We each climbed to the summit alone. On top, we sat in silence. It hadn’t hit me yet, the magnitude of my words. He didn’t need amplification for the point to sink in. I cried softly. The granite absorbed my tears. The next morning, I wrote Jordan a letter, and I gave it to him in a sealed envelope with a date: Aug. 21, his birthday. He couldn’t open it until then, 11 months later. Winter came again and we watched snow pile on Longs Peak. For Thanksgiving we drove to the Utah desert and camped out in shadows of Indian Creek’s sandstone with a host of friends. The day before the holiday, Jordan and I climbed (without fanfare) the North Six Shooter, a freestanding tower. On the summit was a ring box, inside his mother’s old ring. I slipped it on my finger and jumped into his arms. Once the snow melted off Longs Peak, wild flowers popped up. At the end of summer, nine months BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

into being engaged, Jordan opened his letter: “Today we climbed the Diamond for the first time together. It was a shit show. I cried. You cried. I completely broke down and dragged you deep down with me. But you know what? If you’d asked me to marry you while we stood on the summit, I would’ve said yes, 100 percent. I love you.” The winter and early spring of 2019 got a lot of snow. We planned our wedding as the ice fields melted, and 18 months after climbing the North Six Shooter, we gathered a hundred of our friends and family along the St. Vrain Creek in Lyons. When we stood in front of the crowd, the creek gargled behind us. I looked west, upstream, and imagined tracing the St. Vrain back up into the mountains, winding through Ponderosa pines, around granite blocks, through the alpine shrub. If you follow it all the way up, you reach the base of the Diamond. I thought back to my tears on the summit, soaking into the stone — maybe they were in the creek now, rushing past us. I took a deep breath and stared into Jordan’s eyes. Loving and being loved by the same someone is perhaps the greatest adventure of all. I

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DANCER GOODGOLD improvises as Tyson Bennet jams on the keyboard.

ALL PHOTOS BY ANGELA K. EVANS

ON THE BILL:

The unexplainable phenomenon Block 1750 re-envisions annual ‘Murmuration’ performance

by Angela K. Evans

M

oving from behind his computer, Goodgold starts to dance to synthesized music. There’s a pause — and he waits for a live keyboard cue before he starts to move. As the music builds, played by Tyson Bennet, Goodgold tilts his head, snaps his arms out, pops up onto both toes of his sneakers, before rolling onto his knees. From Compton, the hip-hop dancer is in Boulder as part of the annual production of Murmuration put on by Block 1750, a dance studio and community space run by the Colorado Hip Hop Collective. Over the last decade or so, there have been varied iterations of Murmuration, a community showcase featuring a variety of collaborations between dancers and musicians. “The whole concept was artistic unity with new collaborations,” says this year’s producer and director Sarah Touslee. “So instead of putting a B-boy or a hip-hop dancer with a hip-hop beat, we were putting them with a harpist or something.” One year the producers asked dancers to BYOB (bring your own band); another year they created blind date pairings between dancers and musicians who didn’t know BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Murmuration — presented by Block 1750. 7 p.m. Saturday, June 22, Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Tickets are $20. each other previously. This year, however, Murmuration is taking yet another form, with a single-story thread uniting the performance, and a score written by local musicians Bennett and Jesse Hunter, who together make up Von Disco, a Boulder-based trip-hop jam band with jazz and hip-hop roots. The script isn’t rigid, following five main characters as they wrestle with light and dark forces through dance performances sprinkled with a few interludes of spoken word. Although Touslee wrote the script with another instructor from Block 1750, spoken word poets Changa and Franklin Cruz are writing their own performances based off the overall concept. Likewise, more than 45 dancers and musicians have been given creative freedom to integrate their work together for each scene. Jolt, a Denverbased graffiti artist, will also be live painting throughout the show. “It’s real collaborative,” Hunter says. “I’m recording music, sending it to Tyson, then he’s sending it back. Horn players are recording on top of that and sending it back.” “They’re sending it to me,” Touslee continues, “I’m sending it to the dancers, then they’re giving me feedback... This would be impossible if we didn’t have the chemistry and trust in each other.” Large groups are choreographing their performances before they get to Boulder, but the real collaboration doesn’t start until the week before the show, as dancers arrive from around North America to workshop their pieces with the musicians for the first time. “The one thing about being street dancers, social dancers, is the fact that the music is really important, but rarely do we get to dance to live music,” says waacking/house/hipsee MURMURATION Page 18

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MUMURATION from Page 17

hop dancer Nubian Néné, originally from bucket drum, along with a set of license Montreal but now based in Brooklyn. plates he zip-tied together and bent to “And it is a completely different experimake a certain snare-drum-type sound, ence to be able to do that.” all for house/hip-hop dancer Kosi Eze. Bennet and Hunter scored the entire “It’s been liberating,” Kosi Eze says show, much like creating a score for a of the process. “To have it be so human movie, while also attempting to honor a and so personal, to watch the person wide variety of style and performances take feedback and create right on the into one cohesive narrative. spot and vice versa. To hear what we’re “We represent all the styles from working with and then instantaneously breaking to crump to contemporary. And decide, OK, this is where we’re going, each of those has its own music, has its this is what we can do. And the possibiliown style,” Touslee says. “It takes a certies start opening up. They become tain level of professionalism where [the almost endless.” musicians] approached each one by just Born and raised in Kenya, Kosi Eze studying these dancers.” moved to Ontario, Canada, when she “And we’ve also had to be true to was 13. As she dialogues with our own musical intentions in how we Devincenzo, Kosi Eze talks about the want to represent ourdifferent African drum selves,” Hunter says. beats she’d like to incorpo“It’s a really intrinsic, rate in her performance. delicate process. But Devincenzo picks up the yeah, there is definitely drum sticks and starts synergy throughout the shifting around the entire show that I don’t upturned orange bucket, even think that we creating different tones as quite realize yet.” each stroke hits a different From the outside, area. At first, Kosi Eze it sounds completely isn’t so sure. Then he chaotic. There are so starts hitting a certain beat many moving parts and she snaps her fingers coming together, it’s in agreement. As he conunclear whether they tinues, she stands up and will collide on stage or starts to dance. engage in synergistic “I could have stayed in motion and sound to Canada and done like a ILLUSTRATION BY 2NES UNOe create something million things that I’ve powerful. But that’s the idea behind done before, but this is a different Murmuration and it’s all done intenopportunity in and of itself, just to be a tionally by the creators, as they seek part of the process and not just be a to engage in a collaborative process body to be sculpted and to be told what that allows for each person to shine to do,” she says. rather than stick rigorously to preconIt’s a sentiment shared by all of the ceived ideas. dancers: Murmuration is unique in the “I believe in the art-on-art concept,” performance world, allowing them — Hunter says. “There’s an element of encouraging them, even — to tap into spontaneity and just this energy another realm of creativity. exchange that happens on stage when “Everything we’re creating is all you’re working with dancers and musifrom each other’s thoughts. It’s not cians. And then it’s extremely palpable from just one person. So we’re feeding for an audience to see.” off of each other and I think that that It’s a connection that dancers rarely makes it really cool,” says Auroraget to have with musicians, and musibased breaker Bowzee. “It brings a cians seldom have with dancers. But it’s whole different mindset to what I one for which Murmuration not only thought a show could be.” allows, but demands. The story’s five main characters “There’s a call and response between explore love, friendship, the sacred femimusic and dance, which is kind of how all nine and the complexity of life in the face music is supposed to be, it is dance and of adversity, personified as a villain. dance is music,” says drummer Max “They start to basically experience a Devincenzo from Boulder. For a street certain darkness within themselves and scene in the show, he’ll be playing a travel into it. And we watch the group 18

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JUNE 20, 2019

TOP: Bowzee breaks, as Kosi Eze and Nubian Néné look on. BOTTOM: Kosi Eze dances as Max Devincenzo plays the bucket drum. Director and producer Sarah Touslee, along with Bennet and Jesse, watch.

individually process and then also group together to discover unity and move through it,” Touslee says. “There’s a real sense of community and inspiration, but also humanity and truth to the human experience.” It’s a story that mimics the community and collaboration of its creators — the crew at Block 1750, the musicians and dancers from elsewhere. Murmuration seeks to highlight the individual creativity and personality of each artist, while acknowledging the larger symbiotic nature of life on this planet, recognizing we all need each other to thrive, to become everything we can. “We couldn’t do anything that we all do without each other,” Touslee says. “It’s really discovering each other’s talents and embracing each other’s shadows so that we can just respect each other and be a community.” Over the years, Murmuration has in essence branded itself as a stable yet everevolving community connection point. Regardless of its varied concepts and forms, it “gets to the core of the human experience,” Bennet says. “When [I] see people dance, really no matter what level of dance they may be in, it makes me feel like people are worth fighting for. I mean, music and dance, what else is there to live for?” I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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You know who you are. You are America’s sect of young bluegrass devotees. I’m not saying you’re a hipster or anything, just that you are probably under 40. You are lucky to listen here and now. There were progressive pockets in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington D.C., but from the late ’60s through the ’70s, Colorado became the home of progressive bluegrass music. The Telluride Bluegrass Festival is the mother church of prog-grass, and devotees will flock there for the 46th June in a row this weekend, June 20-23. I went to the third Telluride Bluegrass Festival and wrote about more than 25 of them after that. I felt like I was present at the birth of a genre. Gifted young musicians as influenced by progressive rock

and jazz rock as they were by Bill Monroe went there to push the envelope. The festival’s notoriously open-eared audience had been introduced to bluegrass by TV shows like The Beverly Hillbillies and the soundtracks for notable films from Deliverance and Bonnie and Clyde all the way to O Brother, Where Art Thou? Ken Burns’ Country Music series debuting in September on PBS is likely to induce a taste for twang in a new generation. When I was lucky enough to interview Doc Watson, Earl Scruggs, John Hartford and Norman Blake, I always referred to their music as “bluegrass” and they each corrected me. They respected Bill Monroe but insisted that bluegrass was his variation on a theme. They played “country music” or “American music.” They pointed out that Monroe had stitched together a medley of Irishand African-American influences to “invent” bluegrass. Modern bluegrass followed Monroe’s lead from the ’70s onward as it absorbed diverse musical influences. The bluegrass deities were less than thrilled with the trans-genre virtuosi at the heart of progressive bluegrass. Monroe and the others were eventually won over because

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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the musicians and listeners still revered the roots, and bluegrass audiences are a model of inter-generational (and intergenre) togetherness. If you want to know how your favorite jam-grass tunes got that way, listen to the seminal albums that changed the way music was played, recorded and performed. I offer my list of the top 10 most influential progressive bluegrass albums. The tunes that launched the genre a half-century ago are far hipper than you’d imagine. The list starts after the founders of bluegrass — Bill, Earl, Lester, Josh and Ralph — set the template for what bluegrass had to be, and a host of bands already were messing with it. Those early innovators included The Dillards, The Country Gentlemen, Bluegrass Album Band, Country Cooking, Seatrain and J.D. Crowe & The New South. The 10 Most Essential Progressive Bluegrass Abums (in chronological order):

1. Aereo-Plain (1971), by John Hartford — This is the album that launched a thousand riffs with old timey-meetshippie originals performed by brilliant see BLUEGRASS Page 22

JUNE 20, 2019

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BLUEGRASS from Page 21 JOHN LEHNDORFF

DOC WATSON’S final performance at Rockygrass.

pickers including Norman Blake, Vassar Clements and Tut Taylor. Listen to: “Up on the Hill Where They Do the Boogie.” 2. Will the Circle Be Unbroken (1972), by Nitty Gritty Dirt Band — This threealbum epic reconnected rock and country fans with their roots and with Roy Acuff, Maybelle Carter, Earl Scruggs, Merle Travis and Pete “Oswald” Kirby. It introduced the consummate picking of Doc Watson. Listen to: “Wabash Cannonball.” 3. Old & In the Way (1975), by Old & In the Way — Still one of the best-selling bluegrass album ever because Deadheads were infected with Jerry Garcia’s love of bluegrass and the banjo. Joined by Peter Rowan, Clements on fiddle and mandolinist David Grisman, the band tackled chestnuts and acid-tinged originals with rock band swagger. Listen to: “Panama Red.” 4. Live at the Cellar Door (1975), by The Seldom Scene — Led by singer/mandolinist John Duffey and jazzy dobro genius Mike Auldridge, this hip group was the model for bands looking to really jam out on songs. Listen to: “Rider.” 5. Norman Blake/Tut Taylor/Sam Bush/ Butch Robins/Vassar Clements/David Holland/Jethro Burns (1975) — A young producer with a vision named Hank Deane pulled together a remarkable group of bluegrass, jazz and swing instrumentalists for a one-time-only album. The “lost” progressive bluegrass masterpiece is now virtually impossible to find. YouTube: “Sauerkraut ‘N Solar Energy.” 6. Too Late to Turn Back Now (1977), by New Grass Revival — Recorded live at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, this album showcases the seminal bluegrass 22

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HANS LEHNDORFF

JOHN LEHNDORFF

JERRY DOUGLAS and Béla Fleck at Telluride.

rock band including Sam Bush and John Cowan, Courtney Johnson and Curtis Burch. I could have listed a couple of later NGR albums featuring Béla Fleck. Listen to: “Lonesome and a Long Way from Home.” 7. The David Grisman Quintet (1977), by David Grisman Quintet — As Jerry Douglas told me recently: “This album changed everything.” The unprecedented hybrid of jazz, bluegrass and gypsy swing was performed precisely by an ensemble including violinist Darol Anger, mandolinist Todd Phillips and the genre’s greatest flatpicking guitarist, Tony Rice. Equally influential was the Tony Rice Unit’s 1979 album, Manzanita. Listen to: “Fish Scale.” 8. Hot Rize (1979), by Hot Rize — Boulder’s gift to modern bluegrass featured stellar instrumental skills, stage presence, compelling lyrics and great vocals by Tim O’Brien, Pete Wernick, Charles Sawtelle and Nick Forster. Live performances revealed a reverentially skewed attitude toward tradition with the addition of its Monty Python-esque alterego band, Red Knuckles and the Trailblazers. Listen to: “High on a Mountain.” 9. The Telluride Sessions (1989), by Strength in Numbers — Born from collaborations onstage at Telluride, Béla Fleck, fiddler Mark O’Connor, mandolinist Sam Bush, dobroist Jerry Douglas and virtuoso classical bassist Edgar Meyer collaborated on mind-blowing composed works for chamber string band. Listen to: “Slopes.” 10. Béla Fleck and the Flecktones (1990), by Béla Fleck and the Flecktones — The debut effort from this I

EARL SCRUGGS’ final performance at Rockygrass.

LIVE STREAM THE TELLURIDE BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL Listen to live sets from this year’s sold-out Telluride Bluegrass Festival featuring Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Béla Fleck, Peter Rowan, Chris Thile, Leftover Salmon, Green Sky Bluegrass, Yonder Mountain String Band, Railroad Earth and others streamed June 20-23 at koto.org. Festival lineup: bluegrass.com.

band inaugurated a thoroughly cool and melodic meld of rock, jazz, bluegrass and funk with Fleck, bassist Victor Wooten, Future Man on Drumitar, and Howard Levy on harmonica and keyboards. Listen to: “The Sinister Minister.” Highly Honorable Mentions Other important progressive bluegrass albums include: Blue Side of Town, by Del McCoury Band; Cowboy Calypso, by Russ Barenberg; I’ve Got That Old Feeling, by Alison Krauss; Live at the Ryman, by Emmylou Harris & the Nash Ramblers; The Great Dobro Sessions, by Jerry Douglas; Short Trip Home, by Edgar Meyer, Joshua Bell, Sam Bush, Mike Marshall; and Goat Rodeo Sessions, by Yo Yo Ma and friends. John Lehndorff has written about bluegrass music in Colorado since 1979 for diverse publications including the Rocky Mountain News and Bluegrass Unlimited. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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STILL STRUGGLING WITH CPAP? Get relief with Inspire therapy Inspire therapy is a breakthrough sleep apnea treatment that works inside your body with your natural breathing process. Simply turn Inspire therapy on before you go to bed and off when you wake up. No mask, no hose, no noise. LEARN MORE AT A FREE COMMUNITY EDUCATION EVENT PRESENTED BY DR. ANGELA PADDACK AND DR. MARK HUNTER OF BOULDER MEDICAL CENTER IN PARTNERSHIP WITH COLORADO SLEEP INSTITUTE

Tuesday, June 25th at 5:30PM Boulder Jewish Community Center 6007 Oreg Avenue, Boulder, CO 80303

View Important Safety Information & Register at InspireSleepEvents.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


A hundred pounds lighter

Motus Theater honors Immigrant Heritage Month with performances, music and announcement of a new podcast

by Lauren Hamko

E

verytime 27-year-old Reydesel Salvidrez-Rodriguez shares his story, he’s filled with a sense of relief. “No more secrets, no more lies,” says Salvidrez-Rodriguez, an undocumented immigrant who moved to the U.S. with his parents when he was 10. Telling his story for the first time, he says, “I felt a hundred pounds lighter.”

ON THE BILL: UndocuMonologues — with Robert Johnson. Saturday, June 29, eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Family friendly performance: 5 p.m. ‘Showbox Stories’ podcast announcement: 6:30 p.m. UndocuMonologues Unplugged: 8 p.m.

On June 29 at eTown Hall, SalvidrezRodriguez and nine other artists from Motus Theater will perform a series of monologues in honor of Immigrant Heritage Month. The series, called

UndocuMonologues, is an ongoing event featuring the powerful accounts of undocumented individuals and community leaders sharing their stories, including their fears, hopes and dreams. Salvidrez-Rodriguez grew up traveling between Mexico and the United States, but in 2002 his parents decided to stay in the U.S. to give him a better life with more opportunity. SalvidrezDAVE RUSSELL Rodriguez attended East High School in Denver. In 2012, he applied for college and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the Obama-era program that protects eligible immigrant youth from deportation. He was accepted by both. Salvidrez-Rodriguez went on to earn his associate’s degree at Denver Community College and then attended the University of Colorado Denver, where he stepped into his role as a leader for other undocumented students by serving in the student government and becoming the first student director of Undocumented Student

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Johnson will be accompanied by local pianist Adam Bodine. “It’s one thing to hear the actual person telling the story,” Johnson says, “but then if you are able to put a song along with it that people know or have heard, it seems to move the cord a little more because every song tells a story.” “Every ritual, every tradition, has music to help us strengthen our spirits and connect with deeply who we are,” Wilson says. “Hopefully the audience leaves inspired by the courage of the performers and more in touch with their own lives, their own bodies and what’s important to them existentially.” On June 29 Motus Theater will also share exclusive content from its new podcast, Shoebox Stories, featuring nationally known influencers — such as Jorge Ramos, Nicholas Kristof and Gloria Steinem — reading the stories of undocumented leaders. “The podcast was a way for us to scale and export the awesome things that are happening in Boulder across the country,” Wilson says. “The people who don’t live here can benefit from hearing the stories of the undocumented leaders that are in Colorado and learn from these stories and hopefully also shift policies to those that are more humane.” At a national level, Wilson says she hopes the podcast will generate an emotional response and encourage listeners to take action. “See the world through someone else’s eyes,” Wilson says. “You don’t have to agree with everything they say, but you learn a lot by just being willing to be like, ‘Wow, if I was in their shoes, what would I have done myself?’”

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Services. Salvidrez-Rodriguez recently graduated with dual bachelor’s degrees in communications and ethnic studies. Through it all, however, SalvidrezRodriguez struggled with depression and with finding educational resources — both common experiences for undocumented youth. After being hesitant to trust people with understanding his personal experiences for years, Salvidrez-Rodriguez finally found a home at Motus Theater, a place where he can confidently share his hardships and his accomplishments with others. “Motus Theater works with leaders on the front lines, in this case immigration, to create autobiographical monologues aimed at the heart of a pivotal issue that’s happening in each person’s life,” says Kirsten Wilson, artistic director at Motus Theater. “The audience has the opportunity to hear a story that you wouldn’t otherwise hear unless you knew that person very intimately.” The month of June is Immigrant Heritage Month and across the United States, immigrants come together to honor diversity and to explore their own heritage. “The beginning, the culture, the tradition, their grandparents, where they come from,” Salvidrez-Rodriguez says as he lists off what he finds important for people to discover during this time. This iteration of the UnDocuMonologues series will be accompanied by a musical performance by Robert Johnson, a jazz musician who has performed with renowned artists such as Stevie Wonder and Stan Getz.

For advertising information call 303.494.5511 www.BoulderWeekly.com

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2 0 1 9 S U M M E R C O N C E RT S E R I E S | P R O D U C E D B Y Z 2 E N T E R T A I N M E N T

WWW.FOXTHEATRE.COM

1135 13TH STREET BOULDER 720.645.2467 JUST ANNOUNCED OCT 6 ........................................................................................................... BANNERS NOV 20 ................................................................................................ ELDERBROOK

FRI. JUN 21 88.5 KGNU, ROOSTER & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

FT. NICK GERLACH PERFORM 3/29/90

THE GREAT SALMON FAMINE THUR. JUN 27

RADIO 1190, ROOSTER & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

TUES. JUL 2 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND, WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

AARON LEE TASJAN KIND HEARTED STRANGERS WED. JUL 3

BOULDER WEEKLY, GRATEFUL WEB, BOULDER BEER & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

SHRED IS DEAD + TULA KAEPORA

FRI. JUL 5 REX FOUNDATION, GRATEFUL WEB, TERRAPIN CARE STATION & BOULDER BEER PRESENT: DEAD & CO. AFTER PARTY

KITCHEN DWELLERS PICKIN’ ON THE BAND SAT. JUL 6

REX FOUNDATION, GRATEFUL WEB, BOULDER BEER & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT: DEAD & CO. AFTER PARTY

2 0 1 9 S U M M E R C O N C E RT S E R I E S | P R O D U C E D B Y Z 2 E N T E R T A I N M E N T

CYCLES + FLASH MOUNTAIN FLOOD WED. JUL 10

ANNIE BOOTH TRIO TUES. JUL 30

CROWN THE EMPIRE - RAGE FEST ATTILA, VEIL OF MAYA, GIDEON, HAWK, LIFE RIGHT NOW WED. JUL. 31 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

SUZANNE VEGA SIOBHAN WILSON SAT. AUG 3 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH

LEO KOTTKE WED. AUG 7

ARTURO SANDOVAL DELVON LAMARR ORGAN TRIO SAT. AUG 10

THE VELVETEERS

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

ROSE HILL DRIVE PLAYS LED ZEPPELIN THUR. JUL 11

THE COMMONHEART SAT. AUG 17

BONNIE AND THE CLYDES

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FRI. SEP 6 & SAT. SEP 7

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TICKETS ONLY AVAILABLE AS RED ROCKS 3-DAY BUNDLE

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DARK STAR ORCHESTRA

SAT. JUL 13

SUN. SEP 8

103.5 THE FOX, BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

KUVO 89.3 FM PRESENTS: ACROSS THE UNIVERSE 2019 - 2020

TRIBUTE TO THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND + TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND

MUSIC OF DI MEOLA, PIAZZOLLA AND THE NEW 2ND BEATLES TRIBUTE RECORDING

SAT. JUL 20 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND, WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

AL DI MEOLA & BAND FRI. SEP 20 CARAVELLE WORLD TOUR

POLO & PAN SAT. SEP 21 KVOQ 102.3 FM PRESENTS: 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR

BOB SCHNEIDER

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY

WED. JUL 24

ADRIAN BELEW

CAROLINA STORY

WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

THE DEER

HALLEWAY, PAUL KIMBIRIS THUR. JUL 25

FRI. SEP. 27 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

SAUL ZONANA

MON. SEP 30 GRAND CANYON TRUST PRESENTS

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE!

ORCHARD LOUNGE

ROOSTER PRESENTS

BETWEEN RIVER AND RIM, HIKING THE GRAND CANYON WITH KEVIN FEDARKO AND PETE MCBRIDE

FRI. JUL 26

FRI. OCT 4

KUVO 89.3 FM, BOULDER WEEKLY, TWIST & SHOUT AND TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

BUTCHER BROWN TUES. JUL 30

88.5 KGNU & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

THE DIP

MAMA MAGNOLIA WED. JUL 31 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND, WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

HAYES CARLL MON. AUG 5

KVOQ 102.3 FM PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH

MOUNTAIN MAN THUR. AUG 8 FMQB & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT

KEANE, CITIZEN COPE, JADE BIRD FRI. AUG 9

TICKETS: chautauqua.com

SAT. JUL 27

JOEY ALEXANDER

SHANE SMITH & THE SAINTS

FEAT. MEMBERS OF LOTUS, EMINENCE ENSEMBLE, AND MORE! WITH CLEAR CREEK, ZETA JUNE, BLUEPRINT METRO

CHRIS BOTTI

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

THE GIPSY KINGS

CHANNEL 93.3, WESTWORD AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

BOUND FOR PEACHES

JUN 29 | 7:30 PM

AN EVENING WITH

GHOST LIGHT

FT. NICOLAS REYES AND TONINO BALIARDO WITH SIMI STONE

SKY POND

@colochautauqua

FRI. JUL 5

FRI. JUN 28

CHOMPERS, SCHEMA THINGS

coloradochautauqua

FREE BEFORE 10:30PM, JUST $10 AFTER! 21+

REX FOUNDATION, 97.3 KBCO & BOULDER BEER PRESENT: DEAD & CO. AFTER PARTY

TUES. JUL 23

ROOSTER & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

SHAKEDOWN STREET

JUICE + LOW HANGING FRUIT STEPHEN DAY

TICKETS: chautauqua.com

THUR. JUL 4

WED. JUN 26

YAK ATTACK + GOOSE

WITH SPECIAL GUEST LOGAN LEDGER

JUST ANNOUNCED JUL 22 ............................................................... BETWEEN ME AND MY MIND SEP 26 .......................................................................................... LUCIE SILVAS NOV 2 .......................................................................................... SWITCHFOOT

REX FOUNDATION, BOULDER WEEKLY, GRATEFUL WEB, BOULDER BEER & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT: DEAD & CO. PRE PARTY

WESTWORD, CO JAM & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

JUN 24 | 7:30 PM

2032 14TH STREET BOULDER 303.786.7030

XIUHTEZCATL + THE REMINDERS WRITE MINDED

TOMMY EMMANUEL & DAVID GRISMAN

WWW.BOULDERTHEATER.COM

FMQB & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT

RIDE TUES. OCT 8 EXPERIENCE THE SENSATION TOUR

YUNG GRAVY TUES. OCT 15 FEELIN’ ALRIGHT TOUR 2019

DAVE MASON FRI. OCT 25

CAT POWER ZSELA

WED. OCT 30

DEVENDRA BANHART BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT SUN. NOV 17 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

BRUCE COCKBURN FRI. NOV 22

BIG HEAD TODD & THE MONSTERS, PETE YORN, WILLA AMAI FEAT. LINDA PERRY

THE LAST WALTZ REVISITED

SAT. AUG 10

BEIRUT

107.9 KBPI & WESTWORD PRESENT

97.3 KBCO & ANTHONY’S PIZZA PRESENT

TUES. NOV 26 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

CORROSION OF CONFORMITY CROWBAR, QUAKER CITY NIGHT HAWKS, LO-PAN

900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666 coloradochautauqua

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@colochautauqua

JUNE 20, 2019

AUG 15 .......................... SLIM WEDNESDAY FT. JOJO HERMANN (OF WSP) AUG 22 ............................. 40 OZ. TO FREEDOM (SUBLIME TRIBUTE BAND) AUG 23 ........................................................................................ CRIS JACOBS AUG 24 ......................................................................................... KESSEL RUN AUG 31 ..................................................................................... CHEWY&BACH SEP 5 ............................................................................................. BOYFRIEND

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

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BENSON KUA VIA FLICKR

events Out Boulder’s annual Pride Longmont will be jam-packed with activities, amazing community partners sharing information, and Pride merchandise galore from Out Boulder County and other vendors. Photo booths, a dunk-tank, and multiple activities will be available throughout the day. Come early, stay late.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN BEER FESTIVAL.

1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, Louisville Community Park, 955 Bella Vista Drive, Louisville. PUBLIC DOMAIN

It’s not summer until you hit your first Colorado beer festival. Formerly the Rocky Mountain Pizza & Pints Festival, the Rocky Mountain Beer Festival marks a move to a fullfledged beer festival with two summer dates — one in Louisville on June 22 and another in Boulder (in September, to kick your fall off right). Brews will be flowing from more than a dozen breweries, and $1 from every ticket will benefit Wildland Restoration Volunteers. Entrance to the festival grounds is free and open to all ages and includes access to food vendors, live music performances and lawn games. To taste the beers, you must have a ticket package and valid ID, $16.50-$35.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

LONGMONT PRIDE

2 p.m. Saturday, June 22 Fourth Street between Main and Emery streets, Longmont, 303-499-5777

see EVENTS Page 28

COLORADO LATINO FESTIVAL.

‘DER FREISCHUTZ’: AN OPERA FAIRY TALE.

11 a.m. Sunday, June 23, Central Park, 1236 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, thelatinofestival.com

2 p.m. Sunday, June 23, The Hive at East Simpson Coffee Co., 414 East Simpson St., Lafayette, 303-900-3430.

For the second year in a row, Boulder is hosting the Colorado Latino Festival, a free, familyfriendly event that brings together the diverse and myriad cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean for a day of special attractions, musical acts, cultural offerings and some of the most delicious Latin American cuisine found in Colorado. Enjoy dance performances from Nahucalli Mexican Folkloric Dance Troupe, cumbia music from Quilombo Sound System and so much more at the largest celebration of Latino culture in the state.

‘Der Freischutz’ translates to “the marksman.” This opera is based on the German folk legend of a marksman who makes a pact with the devil to procure bullets that will hit their target no matter what. Legend has it that six of the bullets will hit whatever the marksman chooses, but the seventh belongs to the devil. Carl Maria von Weber’s Romantic era opera is full of allegory, magic, good, evil, love... and death. This production, sponsored by Arts!Lafayette and Lafayette Cultural Arts Commission, will be fully staged and sung in German with English dialogue and supertitles with piano accompaniment. Free with registration: operaontap. org/der-freischutz-an-opera-fairy-tale/

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

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PUBLIC DOMAIN

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words THURSDAY, JUNE 20

With a deep history of occupational conflict and American influence, it is easy to forget Vietnam is a country and not just a war. Chuck Forsman, like many other Vietnam veterans, has found satisfaction in revisiting the ancient and beautiful land of Vietnam. ‘Lost in Vietnam’ chronicles Forsman’s trip through photographs of the people and places he visits. Join Forsman as he discusses and signs his book at Boulder Book Store on June 26 at 7:30 p.m.

Open Improv: Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

LIVE MUSIC! The CBD’s The Tune Up at Full Cycle Friday, June 21 7–10 PM Medicinal Music - good for what ails ya! The CBD’s will relieve your pain, but your body will want to dance! 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

Elle Celeste, Jenna Brayton, Noemie Levy and Molly Dillon — Yes She Can: 10 Stories of Hope & Change from Young Female Staffers of the Obama White House. 7 p.m, Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. World’s Best Books Club — The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, JUNE 21 Dani Shapiro — Inheritance. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. The Denver Moth — StorySLAM. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver. Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 Ariana Reines — A Sand Book. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover, 1628 16th St., Denver.

SUNDAY, JUNE 23 Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Writer’s Workshop. 7 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont.

MONDAY, JUNE 24 So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, JUNE 25

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 From Our Shelves Fiction Bookclub — A Gentleman in Moscow. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Chuck Forsman — Lost in Vietnam. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 27 THURSDAY JUNE 20 12:30 PM

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS 2:30 PM

WE ARE STARS 7:00 PM

DREAM TO FLY

Music Bonnie and the Clydes. 6 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-6518374.

8:00 PM

Doom Flamingo featuring Ryan Stasik (Umphrey’s McGee) — with special guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

9:30 PM

Dueling Pianos. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

8:30 PM

LIQUID SKY DAVID BOWIE FRIDAY JUNE 21

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY LASER BRUNO MARS 11:00 PM

LASER FLOYD DARK SIDE OF THE MOON SATURDAY JUNE 22

An evening with Brendan Bayliss & Jake Cinninger of Umphrey’s Mcgee benefiting Conscious Alliance. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

2:30 PM

Hal Mayfield and the Velvet Cowboys, Lucas Wolf. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

7:00 PM

Jacob Collier. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS & LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY COLORADO SKIES:THE SUMMER SOLSTICE BELLA GAIA - BEAUTIFUL EARTH 8:30 PM

LASER BEATLES 10:00 PM

LASER BOB MARLEY SUNDAY JUNE 23 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & HABITAT EARTH 2:30 PM

STARS AND LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 4:00 PM

DREAM TO FLY WEDNESDAY JUNE 26 12:30 PM

BEARS AND AURORA OF ALASKA 2:30 PM

DREAM TO FLY

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 28

THURSDAY, JUNE 20

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The Mystery Lights. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Sean Flynn. 6 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Suite 130, Longmont, 303-258-6910. The Steel Woods. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Events Artist/Curator Talk — with Clark Richert and Cortney Lane Stell. 6 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Bear Cubs Camp. 10:30 a.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Comedians Troy Baxley and Jeff Koehn. 7:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303-682-9980.

JUNE 20, 2019

Comedy in the Renaissance Room. 7 p.m. La Vita Bella Cafe, 471 Main St., Longmont.

Best of Open Stage. 7 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Garden Work Hour. 5 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Blackbear. 6:30 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360.

Happy Hour and Celebration of Allies. 6 p.m. Longs Peak Pub & Taphouse, 600 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont, 303-651-7886.

The CBDs. 7:30 p.m. The Tune Up, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-499-1829.

Old School Film School New School Film School. 9 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Open Mic with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. Boulder Pride House, 2132 14th St., Boulder. Spiritual Forum: Fierce Love and Radical Vulnerability. 7 p.m. Center for Spiritual Living, 107 E. Geneseo St., Lafayette, 720-9179303. Summer Camp: Comic Book Camp. 9 a.m. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through June 21. Third Thursday Improv Show. 7:30 p.m. Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. U.N. and International Affairs. 1 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

FRIDAY, JUNE 21

Deborah Stafford & The State of Affairs Blues. 7:30 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Denver Greek Festival. 11 a.m. Assumption of the Theotokos Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 4610 E. Alameda Ave., Denver, 303-388-9314. Through June 23. Felonius Smith Trio. 7 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids & Solids, 1555 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 303-485-9400. Fire and Ice (Pat Benatar Tribute), Liquor Biscuit. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Lawn Concert: Cha Wa. 5:30 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 720354-4880. Lucas Wolf. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Midnight Gumbo. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-931-5856. Motion Trap ‘N2U’ Single Release Party — with Retrofette, Graveyard Club. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Nick Murphy. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874.

Music Andrea Bocelli in Concert — with the Colorado Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-8654220. Ben Knighten, Jeff White and Soul Taxi. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

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Planet of the Drums. 9 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Punk is Dad: featuring Gasoline Lollipops, Dust Heart & Grayson County Burn Ban. 7 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 402-707-3932. see EVENTS Page 30

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY JUNE 20

LUCAS WOLF 8PM HAL MAYFIELD AND THE VELVET COWBOYS 9PM FRIDAY JUNE 21

BEN KNIGHTEN 8PM JEFF WHITE AND SOUL TAXI 9PM SATURDAY JUNE 22

CLANDESTINE AMIGO 8PM ASHLEI BRIANNE 9PM SUNDAY JUNE 23

MISSISSIPPI JAKE 8PM LIZ BERUBE & KATE FARMER 9PM MONDAY JUNE 24

LYLA, PAMELA MACHALA, VONNIE KYLE 8PM TUESDAY JUNE 25

DANE ARNOLD AND THE SOUP 8PM WEDNESDAY JUNE 26

ELEPHANT COLLECTIVE 8PM THURSDAY JUNE 27

GRUPO CHEGANDO LÁ AND FRANCISCO MARQUES 8PM FRIDAY JUNE 28

WOVEN HOLLOW 8PM LET THEM ROAR 9PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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arts Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change. The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9.

Few objects are instilled with as much meaning as a mask. For centuries they were used for hunting, healing, burial, celebration and religious ceremony. In partnership with Museo de las Americas, the Dairy Arts Center is presenting more than 300 different masks in the exhibit ‘Cara a Cara (Face to Face),’ showing June 21-July 14. A·MAZE·D. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Amuse Yeux: A Small Delight For The Eyes. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through Sept. 15. Cara a Cara (Face to Face). The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through July 14. Clark Richert: Pattern and Dimensions. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 15. Discarded Jewels: Found Object Art by Susie Biehl. Bricolage Gallery at Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. Through July 6. Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Evan Cantor, New Work (oil paintings). Seeds Cafe (Boulder Public Library), 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder. Through June 26. Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit.

Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18. The Light Show. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through May 2020. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. The museum has numerous permanent and temporary exhibits, including Railroads in Lyons; Lyons Newspapers; Tiny Stories: Art of the Dollhouse; Native American Artifacts; The Flood of 2013 and more. Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 23. Alex McLeod: NPC Hell. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through July 28. PACK-IT-UP. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 23. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8. Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture. Longmont Museum, 350 Kimbark St., Longmont. Through Jan. 5. Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 25. Small Works. R Gallery, 2027 Broadway, Boulder. Through July 7. Some Men Lie About Other Things. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through July 6. Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through January 2020.

EVENTS from Page 28

Silent Bear Trio. 9:30 p.m. Licence No 1, 13th St., Boulder, 303-333-3333. SlowFood Fundraiser. 5 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720438-2060.

SATURDAY, JUNE 22

Events

Music

‘Fore’ Ballet Fundraiser. 8 a.m. Twin Peaks Golf Course, 1200 Cornell Drive, Longmont.

Ashlei Brianne, Clandestine Amigo (solo). 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Free Summer Solistice Celebration. 7 p.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. One Funny Mother. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

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Teen and Tea Time. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Xiuhtezcatl + The Reminders. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Fortune Feimster. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303595-3637. Through June 22.

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Partial Proceeds Day. Noon. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Suite 130 (in Alleyway), Longmont, 303-258-6910.

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Bootstrap’s 7 Years of More Cowbell Anniversary Bash! Noon. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-6524186. Chatham County Line. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


theater FIONA SMALL

With a splash of conspiracy and a hint of murder, ‘Nirvamlet’ takes a grungy ’90s spin on Shakespeare’s, ‘Hamlet.’ Presented by Band of Toughs, ‘Nirvamlet’ is now showing at the Denver Performing Arts Complex through Aug. 3. Jack and the Beanstalk. Chautauqua Picnic Shelter, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Weekends only through June 30. Magnets on the Fridge. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Shows the first Wednesday of the month from February-June. My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra. Performance Now Theatre Company. Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway, Lakewood. Through June 30. Nirvamlet — presented by Band of Toughs. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1400 Curtis St., Denver. Through Aug. 3.

As You Like It. University Theater, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through Aug. 10. Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21. Be More Chill — presented by Equinox Theatre Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through June 29. Bull in a China Shop. Benchmark Theatre, 1560 Teller St., Lakewood. Through June 29. Discount Ghost Stories. Trident Booksellers and Cafe, 940 Pearl St., Boulder. Through June 29.

Northside. Su Teatro, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, June 30 at 2 p.m. Through June 30. Queen of Conspiracy. Miners Alley, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through June 23. Well — presented by Firehouse Theater Company. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through July 20. The Wizard of Oz. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through July 7. Twelfth Night. Mary Rippon Outdoor Theatre, 277 University Ave., Boulder. Through Aug. 11.

College Radio. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-6524186.

The Well Intentioned. 7 p.m. Collision Brewing, 1436 Skyway Drive, Longmont, 720-9961850.

Dan Navarro. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Zach Heckendorf. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Dizzy Wright: Nobody Cares Work Harder Tour — with special guests. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Events

Drumming with Horses. Noon. Medicine Horse Program, 8778 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 707-599-1908. Josh Walker: Acoustic Americana (Free Concert). 7:30 p.m. Burns Family Artisan Ales, 2505 W. Second Ave., Denver, 720-693-9099. Dale Cisek Band. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720600-4875. Machine Gun Kelly: Hotel Diablo World Tour. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Moonlit Wild. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720-352-4327. Musical Adventures. 10:30 a.m. Museum of Boulder at the Tebo Center, 2205 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-449-3464. One On One. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Silent Bear Trio. 9:30 p.m. Licence No 1, 13th St., Boulder, 303-333-3333. Taylor Shae Duo. 4 p.m. Longtucky Spirits, 350 Terry St., Suite 120, Longmont, 720-2048767.

Anthony Desamito. 8:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Double Feature: ‘We are Stars’ / ‘Laser Galactic Odyssey.’ 1 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Drop In Tech Help. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4413100. Homegrown Yoga. 9:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 412-519-5634. It Grows Wild Cabaret. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Longmont Pride. 2 p.m. Fourth Street between Main and Emery streets, Longmont, 303-499-5777. Longtucky Second Anniversary Hootenanny. 2 p.m. Longtucky Spirits, 350 Terry St., Suite 120, Longmont, 720-545-2017. Murmuration 2019. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303440-7666. Pandorica Pole & Aerial Dance Enchantment. 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. PFLAG Fundraiser Alphabet Soup Comedy Show. 8 p.m. Javastop, 301 Main St., Longmont, 720-229-9599. see EVENTS Page 32

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Thursday, June 20 ‘All Is True.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. ‘Chef Flynn.’ 2:30 and 7 p.m. Boedecker. ‘The Quiet Force.’ 5 p.m. Museum of Boulder at the Tebo Center, 2205 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-449-3464. Friday, June 21 ‘All Is True.’ 2 and 6:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Chef Flynn.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Ralph Breaks the Internet.’ 2 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. ‘Holy Motors.’ 8:45 p.m. Boedecker. Saturday, June 22 ‘All Is True.’ 4 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Chef Flynn.’ 2 and 6:30 p.m. Boedecker. Sunday, June 23 ‘All Is True.’ 4 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Monet: The Magic of Water and Light.’ 1 p.m. Boedecker.

WELCOME DR. LOWELL STEINBERG

Street Food Festival. Noon. Longmont Regent, 2210 Main St., Longmont, 303-651-7022.

Dr. Lowell Steinberg has been providing vision and eye care for the Boulder community for many years at Visions Optometry.

Summer of Discovery: Eunice Embodiment. 1 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Practicing alongside Dr. Terri Oneby, he will now serve both his current and new patients at Boulder Vision Center.

Summer of Discovery: Herbal Skin Care. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

We offer expanded hours as well as the latest diagnostic and eye imaging technologies.

Summer of Discovery: Liquid Nitrogen. 1 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Dr. Lowell Steinberg

Vision exams for glasses and contacts – Prescription eyewear and sunglasses Urgent care and injuries – Diabetic eye care – Infections, glaucoma, macular degeneration and retinal disease – Cataract surgery and LASIK consultations Second opinions – Vision and eye care of athletes

Boulder Vision Center 303-443-4545

or visit bouldervisioncenter.com

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- buffalo village

MOST INSURANCES ACCEPTED 32

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Monday, June 24 ‘The Weight of Water.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. Tuesday, June 25 ‘How to Train Your Dragon.’ 10 a.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. ‘The Third Wife.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘The Weight of Water.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. Wednesday, June 26 ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’ (1923) — with Hank Troy, piano. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. ‘Monet: The Magic of Water and Light.’ 1 p.m. Boedecker. ‘The Third Wife.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker. ‘The Weight of Water.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker.

EVENTS from Page 31

Liz Berube & Kate Farmer, Mississippi Jake. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. McIntosh County Shouters. 2 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303492-8423. Old’s Cool Rock. 3 p.m. Sanitas Brewing Company, 3550 Frontier Ave., Unit A, Boulder, 303-442-4130. Tenbucksixer. 4:30 p.m. Left Hand Brewing, 1265 Boston Ave., Longmont, 530-723-3026.

Summer of Discovery: My Art Canvas Painting at Meadows. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Events

SUNDAY, JUNE 23

Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328.

Music

Dr. Terri Oneby

‘THE QUIET FORCE’ highlights and celebrates the contributions of immigrants who help power the outdoor tourism industry and the challenges they face. Head to the Museum of Boulder on Thursday, June 20 at 5 p.m. for a screening of the film followed by a panel discussion with the film director and community members about the importance of immigrants in our communities, the challenges they face, and the ways the community can support and advocate. Free refreshments will be served from 5-5:30 p.m. Seats are limited, so please register: bit.ly/2KoU3w4

Blues & BBQ Series: Scott “Shack” Hackler. 2 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Bootstrap LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. John McKay. 4 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Suite 130 (east side Alleyway), Longmont, 303-258-6910. John Paul White. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with Anders Osborne & Chatham County Line. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

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Barnyard Critter Day. 10 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Highway 66, Boulder, 303-776-8688.

Go Club for Kids & Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4413100. Jonathan Van Ness: Road to Beijing. 7 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

MONDAY, JUNE 24 Music Anberlin. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-6381623.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Boulder Concert Band. 7 p.m. North Boulder Park, Seventh and Dellwood, Boulder, 303-4783044. Ginger Root. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Lyla, Pamela Machala, Vonnie Kyle. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Midday Music Meditations @ Meadows. Noon. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Musical Instruments (Ages 5-9). 9 a.m. Tinker Art Studio, 693B S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Tommy Emmanuel & David Grisman — with Logan Ledger. 6:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Events All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. High Crimes Book Group. 5:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720379-8299. Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Summer of Discovery: Introduction Qigong Meditation. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Try Guys: Legends of the Internet. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. PEARL iZUMi’s Tuesday Night Thunder Criterium Racing Series. 5:45 p.m. Colorado Technology Center, 101 S. Taylor Ave., Louisville, 800-328-8488.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Bourbon & Blues — with the Stacey Turpenoff Band. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Djipster Django Djazz. 9 p.m. License No. 1, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-0486.

Elephant Collective. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Mike Zito & His Big Blues Band featuring The B.B. King Horns. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303830-9214. Mystic Braves. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. No Vacation. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. RE:Search featuring Amp Live and Nico Luminous — with Jordan Polovina and special guests. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Souvenir de Florence. 6 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Yak Attack & Goose. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events Anime-niacs: Anime Club for Adults. 6 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont.

TUESDAY, JUNE 25

BoulderReads Tutor Roundtable. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Dane Arnold and The Soup. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720201-3731. The Delta Sonics Duo. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-7761914. New Politics. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Open Mic. 3 p.m. Vic’s Espresso, 1055 Courtesy Road, Louisville. Events Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 12:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100; Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Festival Plaza Storytime. 10 a.m. Lafayette

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Locations listed at www.dancewithadoc.org

Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Women of the West AND Beyond. 11:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Music

FREE Dances Last Saturday Morning of Every Month

Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Cosmology and Modern Physics. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dragons & Damsels Slide Program. 6 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 west Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. High Crimes Book Group. 5:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Musical Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4413100. Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-4413100. STEAM Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Summer of Discovery: Hip Hop at the Library. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

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‘LA MACHINE À ÉCRIRE’ BY JACQUES SOISSON

Bukowski, again by Brice MAIURRO oh holy poetic father your long skinny soul scrawled across the backs of thousands of naked spines and how each drop of battery acid dripped from the dots in the eyes and the holy crosses across the t’s that hung suspended in time to reach out like hands with holes just to barfight my liver just to curbstomp my stomach into submission has helped me sift through the madness for the word, the line, the way but here we are at the end of the way and the bottle wasn’t bottomless i’ve seen the bottle dropped off the building

and smashing against reality a fist of misogyny an inability to step away from the drunken typewriter to never grow (as did the flowers you loathed) there are too many great poets who pot shot the page nightly but never stepped out of the square ring to see the round earth desperate for a pair of rugged hands to build the cities they dreamed up in their dreams unrealized unrealized dreams are the worst nightmares and Bukowski sweet devil Bukowski you are the worst nightmare the victim flower that cursed the fiery sun for trying to keep him alive

Brice Maiurro is a poet from Denver and is the author of Stupid Flowers (Punch Drunk Press) and Hero Victim Villain (Stubborn Mule Press). He is the editor-in-chief of South Broadway Ghost Society and the poetry editor for Suspect Press. Boulder Weekly accepts poetry and flash fiction submissions at 450 words/35 lines or fewer and accompanied by one-sentence bio of the author. Send to poetry@boulderweekly.com 34

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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TRADITIONAL VIETNAMESE PHO HOUSE

To infinity, and beyond

Learning to move on in ‘Toy Story 4’

by Michael J. Casey

HAPPY HOUR

ON THE BILL: ‘Toy Story 4.’

Opens June 21 everywhere.

4PM - 6PM

“Why am I alive?” she asks. “I have no idea,” he replies with a kind smile.

T

hose are the final words of Toy Story 4, Disney/Pixar’s latest, and reportedly last, addition to the beloved franchise that launched the computer-generated animation empire back in 1995. There we met Woody (voiced magnificently by Tom Hanks), the leader of Andy’s toys who worked overtime to make sure all the others were accounted for and played with. Obstacles included trying to stay out of next-door neighbor Sid’s vicious hands while convincing new arrival Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen, never better) that he was nothing more than a child’s plaything. Purpose is the heart of Toy Story. “I was made to help a child,” Woody tells anyone who wonders why he doesn’t ride off into the sunset. For years, that child was Andy, but Andy has grown up and gone off to college. No longer needing Woody, Buzz, Jessie, Rex, Potato Head, Ham, Slinky and the Aliens, Andy bequeathed his friends to Bonnie (Madeleine McGraw), a kindergartener who isn’t as enamored by the 1950s cowboy as Andy was. But Woody is a helicopter parent at heart, and he sneaks into Bonnie’s backpack on her first day of school. No one plays with Bonnie at school, so she makes a new friend, Forky (Tony Hale), a discarded plastic spork with stuck-on googly eyes, pipe cleaner arms and a popsicle stick for feet. And by scribbling her name on the sole’s of his sticks, Bonnie breathes life into a hunk of trash that desires nothing more than oblivion. But Bonnie loves Forky, and Woody serves Bonnie, so despite Forky’s suicidal tendencies — and they are numerous — Woody makes it his life’s mission to preserve Forky’s existence. Yes, it raises all kinds of philosophical questions about being and non-being, but the movie more or less dodges them, segueing instead into an adventure story of lost love while continuing to address the franchise’s themes of submission and purpose. There are new toys: Ducky (Keegan-Michael Key) and Bunny (Jordan Peele) provide comic relief, and Duke Caboom (Keanu Reeves) steals the show. Gabby Gabby (Christina Hendricks, outstanding) and her hoard of Charlie McCarthy ventriloquist dummies play the role of antagonist but never slip into outright villainy — much in the same way Woody never fully falls into the role of hero. Toy Story 4 is more reserved than the previous installments. It never reaches for bombastic profundity and lacks a climax as gripping — or terrifying, depending on your view — as the holocaust that marked Toy Story 3. It’s a humble movie, slightly smaller than you might expect for a summer blockbuster, while still being quietly provocative. But Toy Story 4 isn’t perfect: Buzz is uncharacteristically rendered dumb, and it’s the movie’s weakest point. It’s also a little sad to see familiar friends pushed aside for new toys, new challenges and a great, big, beautiful tomorrow. But the more you think about it, the more it works. That’s because the world of Toy Story 4 feels more open and less threatening than ever before. The water is wide, but we’ll cross, my true love and I. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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WINE, BEERS & SAKE Hours: Mon - Sun 11am-9pm 2855 28th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 • 303-449-0350 DINE IN - TAKE OUT • www.boulderpho.eat24hour.com

JUNE 20, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Bubblin’ Brut IPA

PHOTOS BY STAFF

4 Noses Brewing (Coming soon) 2205 Central Ave., Boulder, and 8855 W. 116th Circle, Unit 4, Broomfield, 4nosesbrewing.com

W

e’re excited that 4 Noses is planning to open the Oak Addendum taproom in Boulder later this year (if all goes well), because we’ve enjoyed the Broomfield brewery’s lineup of beer at their taproom and in cans. To celebrate, we recently sampled the Bubblin’ Brut IPA. Simcoe hops make it extra dry and piney, and the carbonation is refreshing. You’ll taste the 7.5 percent ABV if you drink it too fast, but why rush a celebration? Prices vary.

Mortadella Sandwich

Dry Storage 3601 Arapahoe Ave., Unit D-181, Boulder, drystorageco.com

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ou’ve had a ham sandwich before. The kind you assemble hastily with ingredients pulled from the fridge, placed between white bread. Imagine the absolute best possible version of that sandwich, then go to Dry Storage and try it. The boutique deli, coffee, drink and flour shop is the latest from Basta’s Kelly Whitaker and the idea is to make beautiful breads and pastries and marry them with few, but high-quality ingredients in sandwiches and small plates. Back to the ham sandwich: mortadella is thinly sliced and piled high atop thick slices of a Pullman loaf — white bread with a dense, moist interior and a crispy edge. Dijonaise (mayo and Dijon mustard) brings a little spice and fat, and thinly sliced cornichons (French pickles) add some brine and pop. You’ll be blown away by the attention to detail in this sandwich, and you’ll probably rethink your own sandwich creations in the future. $12.

Philly Cheesesteak

Salvaggio’s Deli 2609 Pearl Street, Boulder, salvaggiosdeli.us

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o, Taste of Philly recently closed in Boulder, reducing the number of places to get a cheesesteak by one. Luckily, Salvaggio’s makes a pretty dynamite version just around the corner. Tender chopped steak is topped with your preferred combo of onions, peppers, mushrooms and your choice of cheese. And Salvaggio’s classic hoagie rolls make for a perfect vessel to enjoy the cheesesteak. $7.25-$12.95.

The Ultimate Porker

Still Smokin food truck Mobile, Boulder County, stillsmokinco.com

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hat’s better than a pulled pork sandwich? A pulled pork sandwich topped with bacon and smoked sausage. The appropriately named Ultimate Porker is the flagship creation of the Still Smokin food truck. A chewy bun is filled with tender pulled park, lightly charred and smoked pork sausage and crispy, thick bacon. The addition of one of Still Smokin’s half-dozen sauces (we chose the Georgia mustard with a few dashes of the Atomic) brightens up the mash of meat. $9.

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for our full line of products visit: M O O N M O T H E R H E M P. C O M These products are not for use by or sale to persons under the age of 18. Consult with a physician before use if you have a serious medical condition or use prescription medications. The statements and products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

JUNE 20, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Home of the homebrewed

Thanks, Charlie, for Boulder’s monumental place in world beer history

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

B

oulder has plenty of historic monuments. A new one in North Boulder Park honors the Red Zinger and Coors Classic bicycle races. A statue and a wall mural immortalize running legend Frank Shorter. Colorado Chautauqua is a National Historic Landmark, the Boulderado is on the National Register of Historic Places, hell, even the Holiday Drive-In Marquee and Denver-Boulder Turnpike have historic markers. Yet, there is not one single monument, marker or star embedded in concrete anywhere celebrating the fact that the American craft-brewing renaissance was birthed in Boulder. There should be one of those bronze lifelike statues on the Pearl Street Mall showing Charlie Papazian stirring a batch of homebrew. Charlie who? He is the godfather of America’s homebrewing and craftbrewing renaissance. He wrote the best-selling beer book in U.S. history. Papazian has done more in the past 40-plus years to put Boulder on the map than almost anyone. In the brewing world — literally, anywhere in the world where there is beer — Boulder is famous. Beer fans, homebrewers and mega-brewery owners know that Charlie lives here. Some recognition is finally coming. The famous brewing spoon Papazian used to make homebrew is going on exhibit at the Smithsonian. History Colorado’s new Brewing the New West exhibition tracing the history of beer in Colorado features a faithful reproduction of what the museum describes as “the kitchen that brewed up the modern craft beer industry.” That’s Charlie’s kitchen. If you like tasting rooms, sour ales, beer festivals, pairing dinners and coolers full of porter, weiss and saison, thank Charlie for persevering because things looked grim for American beer in the early 1970s. “Not many people had the foresight to imagine what craft brew is now. Everybody thought I was a nutcase. They told me it was a short, doomed trend. They said people wouldn’t pay more for beer that tasted good,” Papazian says. Papazian arrived in Boulder in 1972, a nuclear engineer looking for another path. He found it teaching at elementary school, where he also famously declared his birthday, January 23, as National Pie Day. “I wasn’t looking to make beer my life. Then the Free School discovered I knew how to brew and asked me to teach classes,” he says. The only beer brewed in Colorado at the time was a regional favorite called Coors. There should be a historic marker placed outside 1834 19th Street in Boulder, former site of Charlie’s apartment and the kitchen where he taught his legendary classes. “It was illegal

CHARLIE PAPAZIAN (in the circle) led a homebrewing movement that helped launch the craft-brewing revolution.

UDO SCHMIDT/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NIBBLES from Page 39

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when I started teaching. My class got visited by a federal [Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives] agent. You could tell by the way he was dressed. I always told classes to make beer, just don’t sell it,” he says. It turned out to be an appropriate venue. “I was told that during Prohibition my house was where they stored the beer,” he says. In 1978, the Carter administration legalized homebrewing, and Papazian and cohorts launched the American Homebrewers Association and Zymurgy, the homebrewing magazine. “Boulder became the world center for information about beer because there was nothing available: No magazines or books on brewing or beer styles,” he says. The house helped create a brewing community that supported the efforts. People who attended the classes went on to open craft breweries. Papazian wrote The Joy of Homebrewing there — it has sold more than 1.3 million copies — and researched recipes. Beer yeast producer White Labs offers Charlie’s Fist Bump Yeast, the strain he developed to brew the beers in his books. “That house was where we drank too much of our own good beer and thought we could change things. The seeds planted there grew and spread,” he says. There should be a roadside historic marker on Sugarloaf Mountain, where the group’s infamous annual Beer & Steer parties were staged starting in ’74. The gatherings of 300plus people inspired the Great American Beer Festival (GABF). I

There should be a plaque outside the Millennium Hotel stating: “The largest and most respected beer event in the United States started here.” The first Great American Beer Festival was held at the then-Harvest House Hotel in 1982 featuring a handful of ales. The always sold-out GABF is now held annually in the Colorado Convention Center. The Association of Brewers followed in 1983 because big brewers dismissed microbrewers as irrelevant. The organization was known for assisting and collaborating with other brewers. “We’d help people with information on brewing and legal issues because brewpubs were outlawed in most states,” he says. In 1984, the brewing world started congregating in Boulder annually for a national conference. “Being enthusiastic about beer was non-existent in Boulder at the time, but we had professional brewers, brewery founders, brewing professors coming from all over the world,” Papazian says. Papazian insists he was just the point person for the revolution. An army of similarly inspired, mostly volunteer spirits got us to beer heaven. “It was the hippies in Boulder risking their life savings who got it all started,” Papazian says. The results of their work are all around us. A recent analysis of 500 U.S. cities ranked Boulder No. 4 among the most well-served populations with 14 breweries per every 50,000 people (and probably the most brewing awards per square mile.) People now vacation here to drink beer. History is fun, but Papazian is busy. Recently retired from the Brewers Association, he was heading home to brew a batch using his home-grown hops based on a beer he recalls tasting in 1982. His next stop was Quito, Ecuador, where he was the honored guest for the reopening of the first brewery in the Americas. The monastic brewery established in 1545 was discovered by Papazian in 1992. When he raised a glass of Ecuadorian beer, he offered an iconic Boulder mantra. “In the mid-’70s, when we were facing various problems, one of us would turn to the others and say: ‘Relax. Don’t worry. Have a homebrew’ — and things invariably got better,” he says. John Lehndorff is the former spokesperson for National Pie Day, Jan. 23. He host Radio Nibbles on KGNU: news. kgnu.org/category/radio-nibbles BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


MICHAEL J. CASEY

Know your brew: Pilsner Return of the classic

By michael j. casey

ON TAP: Brian Hutchinson and Jonathan Lee of Cannonball Creek with their GABF gold medal winning Netflix and Pils

T

he U.S. craft beer revolution was built upon the back of ale. Slightly easier to brew, manipulate and mold than lager, ale takes less time from start to finish, which, from an economic standpoint at least, is key to setting up and building a business. But there are other factors. When Americans started seeking full-flavor, allmalt beers, they were thirsty for something that looked, smelled and tasted radically different from the light, yellow fizzy stuff found in every bar, liquor store and supermarket. And if they did go hunting for a fine pilsner beer, it certainly wouldn’t have been the mass-market lager, Miller Lite. But in recent years pilsner has been enjoying a remarkable resurgence. And why not? Pilsner is the perfect foil to pastry stouts, milkshake India pale ales and fruited sours. Made with nothing more than pale malt, noble hops (Hallertau, Saaz, Spalt, Tettnang), lager yeast and water, pilsner offers brewers a traditional style with nothing to hide behind. Not to mention, a traditional pilsners clocks in at 4.5-5.5 percent alcohol by volume; you can put back a handful without collapsing or blowing out your palate. The story of pilsner, along with pale lager, dates back to 1842, when Josef Groll developed the game-changing beverage for the Bavarian city of Pilsen, now of the Czech Republic. Groll used pale malts, which were new at the time, and Pilsen’s soft water to make a stunningly clear blond lager, the first of its kind. At the time, beers were of varying hues and clarity, and since most were drunk out of earthenware vessels, appearances mattered not. But, by the time Groll brewed the iconic lager, glass manufacturing had become affordable and commonplace. Now drinkers could see exactly what they were imbibing, and pilsner’s attractiveness drove its marketplace dominance. Groll’s Pilsner Urquell can still be found at practically any liquor store — if you find it in a can, buy it — but ancestors of Czech Pilsner, with their aromatic malts and tangy Saaz hops, can be found at any number of breweries in the Centennial State. Seedstock Brewing Company’s Czech Pilsner is crisp, clean and light, while West Flanders Brewing Company’s Hoffmeister Pilsner has the sort of peppery hop bite you want while tackling a hearty bowl of mac and cheese. You can find Sobchak Pilsner at any one of Mountain Sun’s brewpubs, and you should, particularly if you are enjoying a plate of buffalo chicken or cauliflower wings — hops will accentuate the spice of the hot sauce, while malt will calm the mouth and throat. Then there are the North German expressions of pilsner, which highlight hops magnificently and memorably. Cannonball Creek Brewing Company’s Netflix and Pils, winner of a Great American Beer Festival gold medal, will convert any die-hard IPA drinker to the majesty of pilsner; Prost Brewing’s Pilsner has an herbal characteristic — it sings harmoniously with strong mustards — and Bierstadt Lagerhaus’ Slow Pour Pils is simply one of the best beers produced in Colorado. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF PUNCH BUGGY

TRY CONVENTIONAL flavors like cherry, grape or orange, or sample Hawaiian flavors like lilikoi, pickled mango and yuzu citrus at Louisville’s Punch Buggy Shave Ice.

when she was 9 months old) has a different childhood than you and me. Living in a yet-undeveloped portion of the leeward side of the island, near Kona and halfway up a mountain, LaRue says her early years were as magical as you might imagine. “The beach was our babysitter,” LaRue says. “We would spend all our weekends at the beach, and my sister and I would walk down to the beach after school, and my parents would swing by when they were done with work. It was simple and amazing.” Because of its charms, Hawaii has attracted generations of pilt sounds pulled out of a Dickens novel: A woman named Snow grims from around the world — from the early Polynesian settlers to by her half-Canadian parents is raised in Hawaii, moves to the European missionaries to U.S. mainland defectors and military memmainland and opens a shop that sells ice. But truth is stranger bers to Japanese and pan-Asian vacationers and immigrants. As a than fiction, and as of last weekend, Neige LaRue runs Punch result, Hawaii has a unique, global culinary tradition that takes the Buggy Shave Ice in Louisville. islands’ tropical crops and blends them into a wide array of dishes “It came from my dad, who is French-Canadian. I think where you can’t get elsewhere — from poi to sushi to Spam musubi to he grew up was pretty freezing,” LaRue says of her name. “He grew Kalua pork to chicken teriyaki to lomi lomi, and on and on. up in the ’60s and ’70s, and he was a total hippie and moved to One such cross-cultural creation is shave ice, which originated in California and then to Hawaii. They wanted to name me Snow, and Taiwan in the seventh century and was later brought to the islands by he said, ‘How about we do snow in French?’” Japanese immigrants. On LaRue’s home island, in fact, shave ice is It wasn’t the only unique thing about LaRue’s childhood. Anyone still called Japanese-style shaved ice. that grows up in Hawaii (LaRue’s family moved to the Big Island Go to Hawaii and you’ll see long lines outside shave ice bunga-

Frozen aloha

Neige LaRue brings Hawaiian shave ice to Louisville

by Matt Cortina

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BOULDER WEEKLY


PUNCH BUGGY will have at least one fresh Hawaiian flavor on the menu, like dragonfruit.

lows, filled with people eager to taste Hawaii’s tropical flavors on a bed of pillowy, finely minced ice. The ice is usually served atop ice cream or sweet adzuki bean paste and topped with fresh fruit, fruit powders, chocolate, syrups and more. Of course, shave ice was a big part of LaRue’s childhood, but the ice you’ll get at the pocket shop on Louisville’s Main Street will look and taste a little different than what she had in Hawaii. For one, island shops tend to serve shave ice by the bucket. And two, some load it up with artificial syrups. LaRue wanted to add another culture — Boulder County’s — to shave ice at Punch Buggy by slightly reducing the portion size and using allnatural syrups and toppings. That approach also differentiates it from other ice-based treats like snow cones, Italian ice and Slurpies. “It’s light and sweet and fluffy, and I think the consistency of our ice is different,” LaRue says. “When you get a snow cone, it’s thick and chewy, and this is light and airy. I know parents are really happy that the syrups are all natural and it’s not going to stain their kids’ mouths. ... You go to Hawaii, the shave ices are the size of a basketball. We’re doing it smaller, in a cleaner, more natural way.” Punch Buggy serves familiar flavors like cherry, grape and orange, but gears others to more proven palates with flavors like yuzu citrus, dragonfruit, pickled mango and lilikoi. There will always be at least one Hawaii-inspired flavor on the menu, and people can top their ices with BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

fruit, toasted coconut, coconut whipped cream, mochi balls and more. LaRue travels back to Hawaii often — her parents have lived there for 40 years after bouncing around North America. LaRue, her husband and two children did a fair amount of bouncing around themselves, between New York and California before breaking away from the grind and moving to Colorado. “We were living in San Francisco, and [my husband] was working for a startup, and we were miserable. We had a 1- and 3-year-old, and we really did not want that experience for our kids. I had a simple upbringing,” LaRue says. It’s not the same, but LaRue has found a little bit of home through her shave ice venture. It’s a testament to the magic of the islands. If she can’t be on its beaches, LaRue can bring some of Hawaii to Colorado through one of its sweetest, most iconic treats. Punch Buggy will be open daily (except Monday) during the summer months, then weekends during winter, when ice becomes something we shave off car windshields onto pavement instead of from a special block atop ice cream. But if the woman named Neige can make it in tropical Hawaii, she’ll probably figure out how to make aloha work here, no matter the weather. I

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PASSION PLAY Parker Walton is crazy about cannabis. And soccer. Back in the day, he was recruited to play central defense for a D-1 program. Good as he was, Parker soon discovered that his greater talent was squeezing gems from the soil. He set aside his cleats, moved to Colorado and co-founded Cannacraft with his brother. That boutique on the prairie is now an oasis for cannabis connoisseurs across the state and Drift in Boulder. Parker takes a competitor’s passion and discipline, amps it up a notch, and applies it to every phase of growing. From sourcing magic beans to curing epic colas. The result is aromatic, pageant-worthy flower with terpene profiles out of a botanist’s dream. Enjoy.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER OWNED BOULDER GROWN

BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Orfield Laboratories is an architectural

company that designs rooms for ultimate comfort. They sculpt the acoustic environment so that sounds are soft, clear and pleasant to the human ear. They ensure that the temperature is just right and the air quality is always fresh. At night the artificial light is gentle on the eyes, and by day the sunlight is rejuvenating. In the coming weeks, I’d love for you to be in places like this on a regular basis. According to my analysis of the astrological rhythms, it’s recharging time for you. You need and deserve an abundance of cozy relaxation.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I hope that during the next four weeks,

you will make plans to expedite and deepen your education. You’ll be able to make dramatic progress in figuring out what will be most important for you to learn in the next three years. We all have pockets of ignorance about how we understand reality, and now is an excellent time for you to identify what your pockets are and to begin illuminating them. Every one of us lacks some key training or knowledge that could help us fulfill our noblest dreams, and now is a favorable time for you to address that issue.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: In the next four weeks, you’re not likely to win the biggest prize or tame the fiercest monster or wield the greatest power. However, you could very well earn a second- or third-best honor. I won’t be surprised if you claim a decent prize or outsmart a somewhat menacing dragon or gain an interesting new kind of clout. Oddly enough, this less-than-supreme accomplishment may be exactly right for you. The lower levels of pressure and responsibility will keep you sane and healthy. The stress of your moderate success will be very manageable. So give thanks for this just-right blessing!

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Some traditional astrologers believe solar eclipses are sour omens. They theorize that when the Moon perfectly covers the Sun, as it will on July 2, a metaphorical shadow will pass across some part of our lives, perhaps triggering crises. I don’t agree with that gloomy assessment. I consider a solar eclipse to be a harbinger of grace and slack and freedom. In my view, the time before and after this cosmic event might resemble what the workplace is like when the boss is out of town. Or it may be a sign that your inner critic is going to shut up and leave you alone for a while. Or you could suddenly find that you can access the willpower and ingenuity you need so as to change something about your life that you’ve been wanting to change. So I advise you to start planning now to take advantage of the upcoming blessings of the eclipse.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: What are you doing with the fertility and

creativity that have been sweeping through your life during the first six months of 2019? Are you witheringly idealistic, caught up in perfectionistic detail as you cautiously follow outmoded rules about how to make best use of that fertility and creativity? Or are you being expansively pragmatic, wielding your lively imagination to harness that fertility and creativity to generate transformations that will improve your life forever?

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Mythologist Joseph Campbell said that heroes are those who give their lives to something bigger than themselves. That’s never an easy assignment for anyone, but right now it’s less difficult for you than ever before. As you prepare for the joyous ordeal, I urge you to shed the expectation that it will require you to make a burdensome sacrifice. Instead, picture the process as involving the loss of a small pleasure that paves the way for a greater pleasure. Imagine you will finally be able to give a giant gift you’ve been bursting to express.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22:

In 1903, the Wright Brothers put wings on a heavy machine and got the contraption to fly up off the ground

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for 59 seconds. No one had ever done such a thing. Sixty-six years later, American astronauts succeeded at an equally momentous feat. They piloted a craft that departed from the Earth and landed on the surface of the moon. The first motorcycle was another quantum leap in humans’ ability to travel. Two German inventors created the first one in 1885. But it took 120 years before any person did a back-flip while riding a motorcycle. If I had to compare your next potential breakthrough to one or the other marvelous invention, I’d say it’ll be more metaphorically similar to a motorcycle flip than the moon-landing. It may not be crucial to the evolution of the human race, but it’ll be impressive — and a testament to your hard work.

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SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: In the year 37 A.D., Saul of Tarsus was traveling by foot from Jerusalem to Damascus, Syria. He was on a mission to find and arrest devotees of Jesus, then bring them back to Jerusalem to be punished. Saul’s plans got waylaid, however — or so the story goes. A “light from heaven” knocked him down, turned him blind and spoke to him in the voice of Jesus. Three days later, Saul’s blindness was healed and he pledged himself to forevermore be one of those devotees of Jesus he had previously persecuted. I don’t expect a transformation quite so spectacular for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. But I do suspect you will change your mind about an important issue, and consider making a fundamental edit of your belief system.

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SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: You could be a disorienting or even disruptive influence to some people. You may also have healing and inspirational effects. And yes, both of those statements are true. You should probably warn your allies that you might be almost unbearably interesting. Let them know you could change their minds and disprove their theories. But also tell them that if they remain open to your rowdy grace and boisterous poise, you might provide them with curative stimulation they didn’t even know they needed.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Some children are repelled by the taste of broccoli. Food researchers at the McDonald’s restaurant chain decided to address the problem. In an effort to render this ultra-healthy vegetable more palatable, they concocted a version that tasted like bubble gum. Kids didn’t like it, though. It confused them. But you have to give credit to the food researchers for thinking inventively. I encourage you to get equally creative, even a bit wacky or odd, in your efforts to solve a knotty dilemma. Allow your brainstorms to be playful and experimental.

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AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Spank yourself for me, please. Ten sound

swats ought to do it. According to my astrological assessments, that will be sufficient to rein yourself in from the possibility of committing excesses and extravagance. By enacting this humorous yet serious ritual, you will set in motion corrective forces that tweak your unconscious mind in just the right way so as to prevent you from getting too much of a good thing; you will avoid asking for too much or venturing too far. Instead, you will be content with and grateful for the exact bounty you have gathered in recent weeks.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Your inspiration for the coming weeks is a poem by Piscean poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It begins like this: “The holiest of all holidays are those / Kept by ourselves in silence and apart; / The secret anniversaries of the heart, / When the full river of feeling overflows.” In accordance with astrological omens, Pisces, I invite you to create your own secret holiday of the heart, which you will celebrate at this time of year for the rest of your long life. Be imaginative and full of deep feelings as you dream up the marvelous reasons why you will observe this sacred anniversary. Design special rituals you will perform to rouse your gratitude for the miracle of your destiny.

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Dear Dan: I found your column after a Google search. I saw your email address at the bottom and was hoping for some insight. My issue is this: Two years into our 23-year marriage, my wife declared that she didn’t want to kiss me or perform oral on me. Several years ago, she had an affair and confessed that she not only kissed this other person but performed oral on them as well. Why them and not me? Should I just go find someone willing to do what I want? I have a high sex drive, but I find that I don’t want to sleep with my wife anymore because there is never any foreplay and a few minutes into it she’s telling me to hurry up. I don’t feel wanted, and honestly I no longer desire her. What do you make of this? —Hurting Unwanted Husband Dear HUH: Before telling you what I make of your email, HUH, I want to tell you what I wish I could make out of your e-mail: a time machine. If I could turn all those pixels and code and whatever else into a working time machine, I’d drag your ass back to 1996 (and try to talk you out of marrying your wife) or 1998 (and try to talk you into leaving her after two years of marriage). But since time machines aren’t a thing — at least not yet — we’ll have to talk about the here and now. Your wife isn’t attracted to you, and never was, or hasn’t been for a long, long

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

BY DAN SAVAGE time. And now the feeling is mutual — partner would have evaporated in roughly you aren’t attracted to her anymore, the same amount of time, and she would either. And if you’re seriously wondering have lost interest in him and his dick and why she kissed and blew that other perhis spit, as well. Some people have a hard son — the person with whom she had an time sustaining desire over time — and affair — when she hasn’t contrary to popular belief, wanted to kiss or blow you ROMAN ROBINSON women have a harder time for 20-plus years (“Why sustaining desire in committhem and not me?”), HUH, ted, romantic relationships the answer is as painful as than men do. (Wednesday it is obvious: Your wife was Martin wrote an entire NYT attracted to her affair partbest-selling book about it, ner (that’s why them) and Untrue: Why Nearly she’s not attracted to you Everything We Believe (that’s why not you). About Women, Lust, and Now, it’s possible your Infidelity Is Wrong and How wife was attracted to you a the New Science Can Set long time ago; I assume Us Free.) she was kissing and blowOf course, it’s possible ing you while you were dating and during your wife isn’t the problem. You may have the couple dozen months of marriage. said or done something that extinguished (She wouldn’t have to announce she was your wife’s desire for you. Or, hey, maybe going to stop doing those things if she’d your personal hygiene leaves everything never started.) But at some point relatively to be desired. (I’ve received countless letearly in your marriage, HUH, your wife’s ters over the years from women whose desire to swallow your spit and inhale your husbands refuse to brush their teeth and/ dick evaporated. It’s possible her desire to or can’t wipe their asses properly.) Or swallow/inhale the spit/dick of her affair maybe you’re emotionally distant or cold

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JUNE 20, 2019

or contemptuous or incredibly shitty in bed. Or maybe you’re not the problem! I don’t know you, HUH, and other than the very few details you included in your very brief letter, I don’t know what’s going on in your marriage. But I do know this: If you can leave, HUH, you most likely should. But if you decide to stay because you want to stay, or because leaving is unthinkable for cultural or religious or financial reasons... well, seeing as how your wife hasn’t wanted to fuck you for decades, and seeing as how you no longer want to fuck your wife, you should release each other from the monogamous commitment you made more than two decades ago. If you can adjust your expectations — if you can both agree to define your marriage as companionate, i.e., you’re friends and life partners, not romantic or sexual partners — you may be able to appreciate your marriage for what it is. But to do that, you’ll have to let go of the anger and disappointment you feel over what it’s not. And to be clear: If your marriage is companionate, you should both be free to seek sex with outside partners. On the Lovecast, Stéphane Deschênes on living the nudist life. Listen at savagelovecast.com. Please email questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow Dan on Twitter @fakedansavage and visit ITMFA.org

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A Holy high By Seymour

W

hen is a sin no longer a sin? Apparently when it becomes a profitable investment. The Church of England, the biggest religious organization in Beatles Country aka Great Britain, has apparently seen the light. The church, which most of us know from

those big hats worn by its clergy — think “Marwidge” in The Princess Bride — has decided it’s time to reverse its opposition to pot... or, at least, medicinal weed. In recent days, the commissioners who manage the church’s $10.4 billion in assets — yes that is a “b” not “m” in front of “illion” — have decided it’s suddenly all right to invest in companies that sell medical marijuana.

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Edward Mason, the Church of England’s chief of responsible investment, told the Financial Times, “We make a distinction between recreational cannabis and medicinal cannabis. We are content with it being used for proper medicinal purposes.” The church has long been opposed to marijuana use, and considered cannabis companies immoral enough to not qualify for inclusion in its investment portfolio, which is required to only invest in what the church considers ethical and responsible companies. The church’s website describes its investment requirements this way: “We hold a diversified portfolio of investments across a broad range of asset classes, consistent with our ethical guidelines. We are committed to responsible investment. We think that taking account of environmental, social and governance issues in our investment decisions is an intrinsic part of being a good long-term investor. We are also committed to engagement with the companies we invest in, and have an in-house team dedicated to this task.” “Responsible and ethical” seems to be a bit of a moving target for the church’s money managers. For now, according to FT, the church’s

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policies will allow it to invest in companies that make money from medical marijuana but not companies that make money from adult-use pot (read: recreational). But even this distinction gets hazy when it comes to profiteering on its investments. Under its new ethical guidelines, the church is allowed to invest in a company making money from adult-use weed so long as no more than 10 percent of its overall profits come from such a sinful endeavor. Now that’s some fine hair-splitting. A $10 million company selling $1 million worth of weed to stoners in good health who just want to cop a buzz is an ethical company. But a $10 million company selling $1.1 million worth of pot to the same stoners is an unethical company. Can’t you just picture a bunch of investment angels floating on a fluffy white cloud straining to come up with just the right amount of sin a company can commit and still be considered investable? Good and evil have gotten so complicated in the hedge fund era. All kidding aside, what the Church of England is doing is a positive thing. They are acknowledging that marijuana — or as The Princess Bride priest would call it, “mawiwana” (so much for all kidding aside) — has many important medical uses and any industry that is supporting, researching and promoting those uses is worth church support. It would be nice if this massive and influential church would also scrap its 10 percent hypocrisy on recreational weed and just embrace people’s right to recreate responsibly. And it would make life easier for the investment angels as well.

JUNE 20, 2019

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NY pot bill comes back from the dead by Paul Danish

U

p until late last week, it looked like recreational marijuana legalization in the New York legislature was dead, dead, dead for the session. Now it looks like there may be a resurrection underway. Late last week, members of the legislature and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo started meeting to see if they could resolve lingering differences and cobble together a bill with enough support

to pass before the legislature adjourns, which it’s supposed to do June 19. By last weekend, Kyle Jaeger at Marijuana Moment was reporting they had made enough progress that they might be able to get a bill to the floors of both chambers before adjournment. Then on Tuesday, June 18, a New York CBS station reported progress had stalled and lawmakers were focusing on a bill to expunge the minor pot convictions of 600,000 New Yorkers instead of full-on legalization. Then, late Tuesday, Jaeger reported that a newly revised legalization bill was being circulated among lawmakers. He said several media sources had indicated that leadership of both the State

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Senate and Assembly were in agreement about the revised version, but that it was uncertain if supporters in the Senate had the 32 votes they needed to pass the bill. “Insiders say that a vote on the new legalization bill may be scheduled for Friday (June 21) – two days after the legislative session was initially set to end,” according to Jaeger. (Apparently the decision on extending the legislative session to consider the bill is the call of the legislature’s leadership.) A major issue the lawmakers are trying to resolve is how marijuana tax revenues should be allocated. Cuomo’s initial position has been that they should all go to the state’s general fund. Some legislators representing black and Hispanic districts want at least some of the money to go into “community reinvestment” on grounds that their communities have been disproportionately hurt by marijuana prohibition. Democratic Representative Crystal Peoples-Stokes, the Assembly majority leader and the sponsor of the Assembly’s version of the legalization bill, said directing marijuana tax revenue to communities harmed by the war on drugs is “a line in the sand” for her. “If we can’t get to that, I’m not willing to open a market that will garner tons of people multiple billions of dollars if we can’t have a commitment to invest in the communities that have been harmed,” she told Jaeger. Besides the debate over tax revenue, legislators are arguing over whether the local control provisions of the bill should be written in a way that requires communities to “opt in” to recreational pot dispensaries if they want to allow them, or

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“opt out” if they want to prohibit them. According to The Buffalo News, a provision allowing home cultivation for personal use that appeared in earlier versions of the legalization bill may be axed in the latest version. We should know how it all plays out by the weekend. According to a statewide poll taken a couple of weeks ago, New York voters strongly support legalizing recreational marijuana. The poll found legalization favored by a 55 to 40 percent margin. Predictably, support among voters under the age of 35 was overwhelming — 75 percent wanted to see pot legal — while 54 percent of voters 55 and older were opposed. Seventy-seven percent of liberals favored legalization; 53 percent of Republicans were opposed. Those results are consistent with dozens of national and state polls taken over the past several years. However, one result was somewhat surprising. Support for legalization was stronger in upstate New York and in the suburbs than in the state’s cities. Fifty-nine percent of upstate voters favored legalization, as did 55 percent of suburban voters. Only 52 percent of voters living in cities did. Upstate New York is historically more conservative and Republican than New York City, so the finding that it was more willing to back recreational pot than urbanites is counter-intuitive. The fact that recreational marijuana is readily available in neighboring Canada and tax dollars will be flowing northward if New York doesn’t legalize may partially explain the finding. The statewide poll, which was conducted by Siena College, surveyed 812 registered voters from June 2-6. Its margin of sampling error was 4.1 percentage points.

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