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contents NEWS:

Exploring the Proud Boys rally through the lens of those on both sides of the fence by Josh Schlossberg

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....................................................................... ADVENTURE:

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Kristina Lucero Horticulturist

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BMoCA’s new exhibit encourages viewers to question their art preferences by Billy Singleton

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The Haunted Windchimes’ vision quest by Sarah Haas

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....................................................................... ARTS & CULTURE:

Jennifer Pettus infuses her art with meaning, but it’s up to the audience to figure it out by Amanda Moutinho

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Day trip Colorado on the road to more tasteful stuff by John Lehndorff

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5 THE HIGHROAD: General Trump’s Twitter bombs 6 THE ANDERSON FILES: Infrastructure for the 1 percent 8 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 13 NEWS: Mayor of Lafayette seeking open County Commissioner seat in 2018 31 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go SCREEN: ‘It Comes At Night’ is awful good FILM: ‘Cars 3’ tackles the generational divide D  EEP DISH: After 21 years, B.O.B.’s Diner is still going strong — with less gluten DRINK: Tour de Brew: Pumphouse Brewery ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny S  AVAGE LOVE: We’re rooting for you WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Sessions seeks to undo medical marijuana protections CANNABIS CORNER: Why asset forfeiture reform riles sheriffs and police chiefs IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent view of the world

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Entertainment Editor, Amanda Moutinho Special Editions Editor, Caitlin Rockett Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley, Emma Murray Interns, Mana Parker, Alvaro Sanchez SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Marketing Consultant, George Hardwick Inside/Outside Account Executive, Andrea Ralston Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

June 15, 2017 Volume XXIV, Number 45 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2016 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

Boulder Weekly

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

the

Highroad General Trump’s Twitter bombs by Jim Hightower

D

oggonit, Donnie Trump missed his opportunity to become a General Pattonstyle military commander and glorious war hero back in the Vietnam era. He surely would’ve been the greatest! Ever in history! But, he says — alas — some unspecified foot problem (or something or other) kept him from the privilege of actually getting to go fight in that war. Bad luck, I’m sure. But now that The Donald is the By-God Commander-in-Chief, his inner-warrior has been given a sec-

ond chance to bloom, and this time he’s fully enlisted. In recent weeks, President Trump has 1) escalated a running war of words against Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, 2) bombed the European leaders of NATO with explosive charges that they’re unworthy of his support, 3) launched a fierce new barrage of tough rhetoric in his extralegal offensive to ban all travel to the U.S. by anyone from six Muslim nations, and 4) opened an entirely new battlefront by attacking the mayor of London with one of his Twitter missiles. In last year’s presidential campaign, Trump declared with typical modesty that, “No one is bigger or better at the military than I am.” Well, I’m certainly no expert on war, but if a president is going to pick a

mess of foreign fights, wouldn’t it be better, strategically speaking, to pick on actual enemies, rather than on America’s allies? After all, there might come a time when we need friends to stand with us. In a twist of historic irony, it looks like Boss Trump and his military team might need those European allies sooner than they figured. His national security chief and the Pentagon are pushing a new strategy for America’s long, horribly messy war in Afghanistan — but it depends on our NATO allies sending some of their troops into the fight. Oops, how awkward for the impetuous Tweeter-in-Chief. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. June 15 , 2017 5


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he American Society of Civil Engineers grades our national infrastructure a D-plus. We desperately need to modernize our roads, bridges, schoolhouses, railways, airports and water systems. Donald Trump has made big, bold but vague promises of rebuilding America’s infrastructure. However, Trump’s proposed federal budget actually cuts infrastructure spending by $55 billion, according to an analysis by the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Budget Model, a nonpartisan research organization. CNN reports that his proposed budget also seriously maims or eliminates several important federal infrastructure programs. An organization representing water utilities in rural areas condemned Trump’s proposal to eliminate a $500-million-per-year program that helps rural communities build and improve water, sewer, trash and street-drainage systems. Trump also wants to eliminate the decades-old $3-billion-per-year Community Development Block Grant program, which has provided about $280 million per year to local infrastructure improvement projects in low-income neighborhoods. Richard White, president of the American Public Transportation

Association — which represents transit systems — said Trump’s proposed cuts would jeopardize 56 public-transit projects in early development stages. “It’s been a long time since we started a budget process where there was a major scale back or retreat from a federal role” in supporting transit infrastructure, White said. The White House assures critics concerned about these infrastructure cuts that everything will be much better once the Trump administration rolls out its infrastructure bill. However, all indications are that Trump’s plan is really a hoax. As Congressman Jamie Raskin (D-Maryland) said, it is “just a private money-making operation for the bigbusiness buddies of the president.” Economist Robert Reich said Trump’s plan is essentially “a giant public subsidy to developers and investors, who would receive generous tax credits in return for taking on the job.” Reich notes that in one version of the plan that he saw, “for every dollar developers put into a project, they’d actually pay only 18 cents — after tax credits — and taxpayers would contribute the other 82 cents through their tax dollars. see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 7

Boulder Weekly


the anderson files THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 6

“No one should be surprised at this scheme. It’s what Trump knows best. After all, he was a developer who made billions, often off sweeteners like generous tax credits and other subsidies. “The public would also pay a second time. The developers would own the roads and bridges and other pieces of infrastructure they finance. They’d then charge members of the public tolls and fees to use them. “In place of public roads and bridges, we’d have private roads and bridges. Think of America turning into giant, horizontal-like Trump Tower wherever you looked.” As the ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee, Bernie Sanders released a report on Trump’s infrastructure package. Sanders says that under Trump’s plan, “billionaires on Wall Street, wealthy campaign contributors and even foreign governments would receive hundreds of billions in tax breaks to purchase our highways, airports and water treatment plants.” He goes on: “Trump’s plan to rebuild America relies heavily on the use of public-private partnerships to finance infrastructure projects with private equity capital. Such financing, whether through private equity or traditional tax-exempt municipal bonds, is repaid by ordinary citizens through a combination of taxes and user fees. Private equity financing is markedly more expensive than traditional government financing, however — by as much as three to six times. Considering the scale of infrastructure development under consideration, that difference could be enormous. For example: The charge for a $100 million investment using traditional government bond financing (at 3 percent, over 30 years) is about $90 million. For private equity capital, at a 15 percent return, the total skyrockets to $450 million.” Sanders lists 10 failed public-private partnerships. For example, the City of Chicago in 2008 sold the right to manage the city’s parking meters for 75 years to a private investor group led by Morgan Stanley. From 2009-13, parking rates in Chicago increased by as much as 800 percent. The city has to pay Morgan Stanley $31 million to cover their lost revenue each time streets are closed in Chicago. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) provided an analysis of the infrastructure plan Trump’s Boulder Weekly

campaign released last October. The group noted that there isn’t any mandate in the Trump plan to guarantee that the tax breaks would actually go toward new infrastructure, instead of subsidizing projects that were already going to happen or that would have been undertaken anyway. The CBPP report said, “The plan has no mechanism to ensure that

FREE

infrastructure projects flow to communities already underserved by infrastructure investment — to towns that have lost a major employer, rural communities lacking easy access to amenities, and low-income communities that lack basic necessities such as clean water. Instead, the investments likely would flow much more heavily to higher-income, more-

developed communities where investors are more assured of ongoing income streams.” In conclusion, the Trump plan is a cruel con job and a gigantic gift to the rich. Sad. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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letters What’s behind CPW’s actions on bears?

After reading [“Off target, part 6,” News, June 1], I have a few questions. Is the reason Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) is relocating bears to an area where there’s nothing much to eat but fawns a move to prove the need for their predator control plan? Or is CPW relocating “nuisance” bears to that area so they can kill them there and avoid the public attention and bad PR of killing the bears in more populated areas? And could CPW have purposely caused the bear problem in the Piceance Basin in order to divert attention from the environmental damage caused by the oil and gas industry? Could the answer to all three questions be yes? CPW isn’t talking. But, maybe the public will get some answers when the two lawsuits filed against CPW by environmental groups go to trial. Mary Bauman/Longmont

More options for treating sex offenders

This is from someone who used to work in the criminal justice system. Very good, non-hysterical article that was factual [Re: “Communities on the edge,” News, June 1]. However, some aspects are not quite “nobody knows what to do.” Among experts (not politicians) but researchers and experts in the field, there are some facts about sex offenders that are not controversial: Private, police-only sex offender registries that are limited in scope so police can focus on high-risk registrants reduce recidivism. Public, American registries (no other country has them) increase recidivism as they cause homelessness, social marginalization and unemployment — the key dynamic risk factors for reoffending. Cognitive-behavioral therapy reduces recidivism. Insight-oriented therapy has no effect. “Confess all your sins and admit your crime” group therapy increases recidivism as it feeds fantasies of high-risk offenders (it is constant graphic verbal porn) — that is why the Correctional Service of Canada got rid of this in the ’90s. Supportive housing and halfway houses reduce re-offence; homelessness increases it — in one California study by a factor of six. GPS does not do anything but cause rashes to legs. Parole/probation/sex offender registry fees all increase absconding dramatically as people are afraid they will be revoked for non-payment. Lengthy U.S.-style sentences do not have any benefit at reducing crime — if

they did, the crime rate would be lower than Switzerland’s, not vastly higher. Truth in sentencing and other American-style no-parole rules are associated with increased recidivism as there is no hook to get inmates to do programming, so when they are released, they are more dysfunctional than when they entered prison. Bans on social housing, welfare and student loans also lead to higher recidivism as they prevent rehabilitation and reintegration. Terry Evans/ via internet

Affordable housing shell game

As a longtime resident of the Mapleton Mobile Home Park, I often get asked by people who would love to live here how they can get in. Most understand that of the 137 homes in the park, 70 are reserved for residents who are at or below the HUD very low income level. These prospective residents assure me that they qualify for that lowest tier but they never see units for sale in that tier. That’s when I explain to them that folks in the affordable tiers tend to swap with someone in the market tier before they sell in order to avoid resale restrictions. This tier swap seemed like such a glaring loophole to me that I have been bringing it to the attention of City Council and staff for the last year and a half. I recently received the response that because people must income qualify in order to swap to an affordable tier, it is of no concern to the City whether they bought in or swapped in. This response made me realize that many homeowners in the City’s homeownership program might want to swap out from under their resale restrictions. Conversely, market homeowners who have had a loss of income may want to swap to affordable to have their housing payment reduced and then swap back to market when it is time to sell like the homeowners in the Mapleton Park. I have inquired with the staff of the Planning, Housing and Sustainability department and they have given no reason why the tier swap could not be extended to the City’s homeownership program. I consider it an act of oppression to force the homes of lower-income homeowners to lose value with respect to inflation. Allowing these homeowners to swap out of the onerous simple appreciation resale restrictions which have been imposed on them will eliminate this inequity. Paul Keaton/Boulder Boulder Weekly


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NEWS

Yuki Ward

Locals pick sides in ‘free speech/hate speech’ debate Exploring the Proud Boys rally through the lens of those on both sides of the fence by Josh Schlossberg

F

ree speech? Hate speech? Both? Neither? Depending on who you talk to, all of the above were on display on Saturday, June 3 in downtown Boulder in front of the County Courthouse, where roughly 30 members of Proud Boys Colorado and the group’s supporters held a “Free Speech Rally.” Penned in behind two rows of metal fences erected by the Boulder Police Department, the free speech ralliers waved American, “Don’t Tread On Me” and Trump flags. They also held signs reading “Muh Feelings!” and “Working Class Against AntiFa.” Outside the fences, a far larger crowd of around 250 gathered, made up of those protesting the Proud Boys, those voicing their support, and others just curious about what was going on. The scene was loud and chaotic, with people yelling, chanting, beating buckets and drums, and setting off smoke bombs. About 25 members of the Boulder Police Department and other law enforcement agencies were on the scene, including some in riot gear who brandished pepper spray and what appeared to be pepper ball guns, which shoot projectiles filled with a powdered form of pepper spray. One protester was arrested for throwing a firecracker and several more were detained by police per media accounts.

Who are the Proud Boys? The organizer of the rally, Proud Boys Colorado, is a chapter of the national Proud Boys organization, which was formed in 2016 by writer, comedian and cofounder of Vice Media, Gavin McInnes. According to Proud Boy Magazine, the Proud Boys are a “fraternal organization of Western chauvinists who will no longer apologize for creating the modern world.” J, a Proud Boys Colorado member from Denver, defines Western chauvinism as being “prideful [of ] the great things that have been achieved through Western culture.” For instance, J points out that it’s Western countries that have “led the charge when it comes to gay rights.” Proud Boys support some traditionally right-wing positions such as “minimal government,” closed borders and gun rights, while also championing libertarian views like opposition to the “drug war” and taking a stand against political correctness. Boulder Weekly

Despite their political stances, Proud Boy Vince Hubbard of Elizabeth says, “We’re more like the Shriners or the Knights of Columbus than a political organization. We are mostly about cracking cold ones with the boys.” While not a member of Proud Boys, Denver resident Martin Meyers, 27, joined the group behind the barricades to advocate for the “promotion of liberty, for people to be able to say what they want.” Dressed in a Trump T-shirt, Jennifer Archer, 31, from Louisville, stood with the Proud Boys to show “solidarity for free speech” and to express her concerns about illegal immigration. Mingling with the larger crowd outside the fences in a “Make America Great Again” hat, G, a 27-year-old Boulderite, says he supports the right to free speech, and voted for Trump as a “gigantic middle finger to [Washington,] D.C.” He says he voted for Barack Obama in previous elections for the same reason. Tyler, 27, from Denver, attended the rally in support of “allowing people to say what they want.” He sees this and similar free speech events popping up across the U.S. as a backlash to events in Berkeley, California, in February and April, where protests from the political left — some of which turned violent — compelled conservative speakers Ann Coulter and Milo Yiannopoulos to cancel speaking engagements.

Sticks and stones Though the rally was billed as promoting free speech, not everyone buys that claim. A flyer circulated by the People’s Protection League and the Front Range Socialist Party maintained that groups such as the Proud Boys use free speech to “conceal their intentions to people who do not know who they are or know about their violent goals.” “Free speech is code for the normalization of far right organizing and violence in public discourse,” read the flyer. “I do not think hate speech should be free speech,” says B, a 30-year-old resident of Longmont and member of AntiFa, a loosely knit international movement opposed to fascism. Like a dozen or so other protesters at the rally, B dressed in black with a bandana covering the lower half of his face to hide his identity. AntiFa tends to be comprised of leftist anarchists who often view themselves as the polar

opposite of white nationalists, white supremacist or alt-right groups. “If you read the Constitution, free speech is what the government will or will not allow, it has nothing to do with people versus people,” says B. “Even if it is free speech, we don’t have to stand out here and take it.” Kyle Newbrough, 23, from Boulder, believes the concept of hate speech is all too often used to silence opposing viewpoints. “You can’t say that just because I say something that makes you feel bad, that that’s illegal.” Thomas, 23, of Denver agrees, adding that, “Words aren’t hurtful, actions are hurtful.” Yet the People’s Protection League and the Front Range Socialist Party have a different take, with their flyer insisting that “speech is inseparable from action and organization.” “I think that they have a right to be here,” says Kaila Spencer, 27, from Boulder. While not a supporter of the Proud Boys, she says, “freedom of speech is allowed for everyone. But once that starts to harm other people...”

Dialogue lacking In one sense, those opposed to the Proud Boys and their supporters communicating their message accomplished their goal, in that it was nearly impossible for attendees to hear them over the noise of protesters. While this was a relief to some in the crowd, a number of locals were disappointed that they didn’t get a chance to listen to what the organizers had to say. Eighty-five-year-old retired Boulder high school teacher, Jacqui Goeldner, has lived in Boulder for 50 years. As a Bernie Sanders supporter, she assumes her politics don’t align much with the Proud Boys. Still, she wanted to find out what they stood for in hopes of starting some sort of dialogue. “This was an opportunity for communication,” she says. “An opportunity that we missed.” Boulder’s David Rosdeitcher, aka street performer Zip Code Man, says that while his own politics are “not on the spectrum,” he’s curious about the Proud Boys’ take on things. “They have a point of view and you might be surprised ... that you might agree with them.” If Rosdeitcher had his way, he’d “take these police blockades away and get representatives from this group to speak and this group to speak.” See SPEECH Page 12

June 15, 2017 11


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SPEECH from Page 11

NEWS

Tanya, in her mid-40s, lives in the Boulder area and says she’d like the Proud Boys to be given the opportunity to speak so as to expose their agenda. “Once they show what they are to the town,” she says, “more people are going to reject them.”

Racist? Do the Proud Boys have a Neo-Nazi, white supremacist, and/or fascist bent or not? The People’s Protection League and Front Range Socialist Party flyer contended that groups such as the Proud Boys organize in order to “spread their hateful ideology” and “incite violence with their thinly veiled white-supremacist views.” Recently in Colorado Springs, the Colorado Springs Anti-Fascists hung up flyers with the name, address and photo of a member of Proud Boys Colorado under the heading “Our Neighbor is a Fascist.” The poster read, “We can’t say decisively that [the individual] holds racist, antisemitic, homophobic, or misogynist views, but he has chosen to affiliate himself with an organization that does, and should be considered a danger to the community.” Ethan Au Green, 37, of Boulder, thinks the Proud Boys and their supporters are a “mix of Nazis, fascists, white supremacists and Trump supporters. ... I don’t know if they all share the same identity, but they surely keep company with each other, which implicates them all with the worst noxious ideologies present in their group.” Yet the Proud Boys say their support for “Western chauvinism” is about culture, not race, which is why they have adopted “anti-racism” as one of their main tenets. “We aren’t racists. Period,” says Proud Boy Vince Hubbard. “If we were racists, we wouldn’t have people from other races in our group.” Proud Boy J adds that, “we have had tons of people contact us looking to join up with our group, many of [whom] are minorities who heard about the rally through some of the lies being pushed about it.” A handful of individuals thought to espouse pro-fascist and white-supremacist views did attend the rally, one of whom wore a “Proud to Be a Fascist” T-shirt. A YouTube video is circulating of a Proud Boy confronting this individual, saying, “As Proud Boys we do not believe in fascism. We do not appreciate you coming out here. If I would’ve known you were coming out here, I would’ve told the police not to let you up here.” Minutes after the confrontation, the Proud Boys disbanded the rally. Proud Boy supporter Jennifer Archer admits that the arrival of these folks was the reason organizers ended the rally early. “We don’t want to be associated with that kind of thing,” she says.

Conflicting ideologies Asked whether he supports violence against the Proud Boys, AntiFa member B says, “I actually do.” “Their ideology is violence. Against my family, against other families, against my neighbors and my community,” says B. “So I don’t think we should just sit around and wait.” “The new political spectrum is freedom to authoritarianism,” says Proud Boy supporter Martin Meyers. He says AntiFa and other anti-fascist groups “lean heavy towards authoritarianism, because they want people to be controlled. That’s really their ultimate goal. They want their ideology to impose itself on everyone else, while we want people to be free to do what they want.” While concerned about racism in the community, Boulder resident C.T. Hutt, 34, is neither a proponent of Proud Boys nor AntiFa. Standing quietly by himself throughout much of the rally, he says he was there simply to “keep calm and bear witness.” Hutt doesn’t believe violence will accomplish anything worthwhile for either side, but will only exacerbate the conflict. “Anger,” he says, “breeds anger.” The views of those behind the barriers and those protesting in front of them make it clear that in the era of Trump, free speech is up for debate. An increasing number of folks on the left seem unwilling to view speech they perceive to be masking hate and discrimination as protected. And those on the alt-right claim that it is most often the left these days who use violence to impose censorship on the political speech of those who see themselves as pro-white or pro-American rather than anti anyone else. And lastly, there are those of all political stripes who still believe free speech is more important than anything that might be said and allowing all viewpoints, no matter how repugnant to others, is always better than forcing silence on anyone. Hate speech is controversial because the line our words must cross to be considered such is drawn in a different place by each of us. Hate speech to one group is simply patriotic free speech to another. What is certain is that limiting anyone’s speech today will nearly always lead to someone else’s speech being limited tomorrow. Thanks to the current political environment, that is a lesson Boulder County residents will be learning one way or another over the next few years. Boulder Weekly


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n Earth Day 2017, Christine Berg, Mayor of Lafayette, sat down and filled out her candidate affidavit to run for Boulder County Commissioner in 2018 and filed with the Colorado Secretary of State. Term-limited in her work with Lafayette City Council, she knew she had to stay engaged in the political process in a significant way. “It’s a culmination of so many of the feelings people are having about wanting to get involved and to make a significant shift in how we work with our governments,” Berg says. “Earth Day was symbolic in many ways.” With the unraveling of many federal environmental regulations, such as the Clean Power Plan and the recent EPA methane rules, Berg wants to put her past experience both in Lafayette and elsewhere to use at the county level, running for the District 3 seat that will be vacated by current Commissioner Cindy Domenico, who is also term-limited. Berg has worked on oil and gas regulaCourtesy of Christine Berg tions for many years, and, if elected, is determined to do everything within her power as commissioner to guarantee public health and safety in the face of energy development. Although the current commissioners “have come up with the strictest regulations in the state of Colorado,” Berg knows there could still be many challenges ahead. “We’re at a crossroads where we have depleted all of our options to some degree from a regulatory perspective from the local and county levels,” she says. Regardless, she’s committed to do “whatever it takes to make sure we are safe.” This includes advocating for statelevel elected officials “who are willing to be courageous enough to work through and pass legislation that is going to protect our citizens.” At the same time, Berg believes the fight against climate change starts at the local level, given that “essentially one-third of emissions [in the U.S.] are from cities.” And it includes transitioning to 100 percent renewable energy, something she’s worked on in Lafayette. She’s also concerned with transportation and affordable housing, two causes she championed within the last year as mayor. Although the initiative for citywide Eco-passes in Lafayette failed to pass in 2016, Berg is committed to continuing the conversation on a county level. She also advocated for the successful $3.5 million affordable housing deal the City made with Flatirons Community Church last month. “For me it’s about keeping our diversity,” she says. “We know through Boulder County Transportation, most people are paying 20 percent for transportation in their budgets. We also know there are some folks that are paying 50 percent for housing costs. That doesn’t leave a lot of money for anything else.” The election may still be more than a year away, but Berg is already meeting with local farmers to talk about transitioning away from GMOs on County open space, and other groups. So far she’s up against State Senator Matt Jones in the Democratic primary election next June, which will also mark the first time unaffiliated voters can participate in party primaries, creating some unpredictability statewide as well as at the County Commissioner level. Regardless of who makes the ballot in November 2018, Berg says, “We need candidates who are forward-thinking and candidates who are willing to take on these complex issues.” Boulder Weekly

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boulderganic

Bob Yost stands beside windrows of finished compost, one of the by-products of the Heartland anaerobic digester facility. The large domed digestion tanks stand in the background.

Requiem for a digester Billions of microbes, and a $100 million waste-to-energy project, quietly dying

N

eat rows of tanks, each with a capacity of 1.7 million gallons, tower above the plains. Three lagoons border the site to the west and north. Pipes of various sizes interconnect the tanks, along with the intake facility, unseen underground pipes, a tapered smaller tank, compressors and other mechanisms, creating a single organism. An unassuming rectangular building, small beside the tanks, houses the control room that oversees the entire site. To the far northern end is one last pipe, which connects to an interstate gas pipeline. We’re in LaSalle, 60 miles northeast of Boulder in Weld County, the heart of the state’s oil and gas production. But this isn’t another oil and gas site: it’s an anaerobic digester. With its six “bioreactor” tanks, the facility is capable of turning vast amounts of agricultural and food waste into biomethane, a win for both waste diversion and renewable energy. It’s the only facility of its kind in Colorado, and the largest in North America. And for about nine months, billions of microbes churning inside the bioreactors — specifically methanogens, microorganisms that live at high temperatures and produce methane in oxygen-deprived environments — turned nearly 1,000 tons of waste into energy every day. Lots of energy: at full capacity, the facility could produce 4,700 dekatherms of energy daily, roughly the capacity of a 20-megawatt power plant, which could service around 20,000 homes. The methane, injected into a gas pipeline and sold to

14 June 15 , 2017

Sacramento to support its clean energy goals, was the highest-value product of this digestion process. But it wasn’t the only one. The digester also produced a superior-quality, pathogen-free compost as well as a liquid soil amendment (LSA), both certified by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) and suitable for organic use. In the process, it produced almost no waste. Of the nearly 30,000 tons of material that fed the digester each month, much of which would otherwise go to landfill, it was only trashing about 100 tons — about .003 percent of its intake. Everything else was digested into methane, compost or LSA, or sent to be recycled. The digestion facility also accepted packaged food waste — expired milk, cheese, lettuce or otherwise, still wrapped in plastic, or inside a can or cardboard box, or all of the above. It filtered out the packaging using separator machines called a “Doda” and a “Tiger,” as powerful as their names sound. The digester was eating through the equivalent of 243.1 million pounds of food waste and 546 million pounds of dairy manure annually. But all of that ended Jan. 28, when Heartland Biogas, who owns the facility, stopped feeding its anaerobic digester. The billions of microorganisms have died. Rows upon rows of finished compost are still curing in the sun. The lagoons are filled to capacity with LSA with no destination. Sacramento has to source its clean energy elsewhere. Bob Yost, owner of A1 Organics, which operates the intake portion of the Heartland facility, grows animated as he explains this history.

photos and story by Christi Turner “I’m using my outside voice again,” says Yost, a Weld County native and respected veteran of the national compost industry. “My wife says, ‘Bob, use your inside voice. Take a deep breath, Bob.’” Yost has every reason to let the situation get the better of him. He spent nearly a decade helping bring the digester to life, and more than 40 years processing the Front Range’s yard waste and food waste into finished, organic compost at his three A1 facilities. His company invested millions into its portion of the Heartland operation — a $102 million project overall — and spent years negotiating contracts with dozens of large companies to get their food waste sent to the digester, including haulers servicing thousands of smaller businesses. Others in the industry speak of Yost with admiration, and credit much of Colorado’s waste diversion success to his steadfast commitment to composting, or “organics recycling.” Dan Matsch, another leader in the Front Range recycling scene, manages both the composting program and the Center for Hard-toRecycle Materials at Eco-Cycle in Boulder. He’s worried about the impact the digester shutdown will have on the City’s newly expanded zerowaste initiative. “Because we have such a dedicated partner like Bob, he’ll probably let us keep doing what we do,” Matsch says — meaning, sending high volumes of food waste his way, but to be composted instead of digested. “But if he were to decide no, forget it, then we and every food waste collection effort in the Front Range would be in great jeopardy.” Boulder Weekly


boulderganic

The anaerobic digester in LaSalle was taking in thousands of tons of industrial food waste, which would otherwise end up in the landfill, each month.

“To walk away from this project — it’s just crushing,” he adds. Perhaps more remarkable than the forced shutdown of the digester (more on that shortly) is just how much “waste” this project had quietly been turning into energy for nearly a year. Food waste from Boulder, Denver, Fort Collins and beyond, and manure from two nearby dairies, which sent up to 600 tons of manure per day, entered the Heartland facility in a steady procession of semi-trucks. McDonald Farms, a 50-yearold local environmental services company, was a primary transporter of material to the digester. The highest-volume material they hauled was grease, pumped out of thousands of grease traps in restaurants, hotels and other facilities around the city — eight truckloads of it every day. “We do 180,000 gallons a day, just of grease, and every bit of that was being used by Heartland to make gas,” says Scott McDonald, owner of McDonald Farms. He’s spent $100,000 outfitting his company to service the digester, and another $60,000 to revert equipment to the pre-digester days. “The cost is going to go up for our customers, which makes it tough on everyone, because a vast majority of that is [now] going to the landfill.” “It’s just a shame,” McDonald adds. “An absolute shame.” He raises an important point: with the digester, a company’s decision to not send food waste to landfill wasn’t just a responsible one. It was an economical one. Because of the volume and scale of digestion, the high value of its products, especially the methane, and what seemed a stable 18-year contract with Sacramento, sending food Boulder Weekly

waste to somewhere other than the landfill was a cheaper choice for the first time. “The biggest reason we have a low diversion rate is because the landfill is so cheap, and the economic way to combat that is by bringing down the cost of alternative diversion programs,” says John Griffith, owner of Alpine Waste, Denver’s only commercial compost hauler. Alpine grew its compost services to include a number of large commercial grocers sending tons of packaged food waste that would otherwise be landfilled to the digester in LaSalle. “It costs more to compost than it does to landfill. But with the digester, they’re about equal.” “Without this digester, composting will never be able to compete,” he says. The Heartland digester changed that paradigm, briefly. But now, the anaerobic digester is slated to close permanently. That’s according to the most recent civil action filing from Heartland’s lawyers. Heartland, a subsidiary of the multinational energy corporation Electricité de France (EDF), is suing the Weld County Board of County Commissioners, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and four of its staff, and the Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA). They’re citing a taking of Heartland’s private property without just compensation, deprivation of due process and misapplication of the law, in eight counts against the defendants. Here’s why: In the first half of 2016, nearby residents complained of odor from the digester. According to the lawsuit, 80 percent of complaints came

from 10 people. Around that time, Weld County inspectors conducted odor testing, and cited one violation — a type of violation which, according to Jeremy Neustifter, planner at the CDPHE Air Pollution Control Division (APCD), is rare and difficult to document. Nonetheless, when Heartland received a compliance order from the APCD in response to the violation, it immediately took action, spending more than $1 million and committing an additional $3 million to odor mitigation technology. An additional 800 odor tests yielded no further violations. “They were on time with all of their compliance requirements,” Neustifter says. “The idea is, OK, you’re having odor issues, let’s figure out how to mitigate it first.” That’s how the state entity charged with regulating air quality handles such issues. But along the way, the odor issue went before the Weld County Commissioners as well. And there, in what’s described in the civil action as a “kangaroo court,” the hearing about odor transformed into something else entirely: a controversy around the facility’s Certificate of Designation (CD). That’s the all-important document the County must grant for this type of facility to operate in its jurisdiction. The validity of Heartland’s CD had recently been called into question in a November 2016 letter from First Assistant Attorney General at CDPHE, David Kreutzer. Kreutzer wrote that in his determination, when Heartland Renewable Energy was purchased by EDF in 2013 and took on the new name Heartland Biogas, the CD didn’t transfer to the new entity, although ownerSee DIGESTER Page 16

June 15 , 2017 15


DIGESTER from Page 15

ship of the facility did. Thus, Kreutzer wrote, he considered the Heartland CD invalid. This was just weeks before the county hearings, and the first Heartland had heard of any issue with its CD, according to the civil action filing. In the nearly four years since the 2013 transfer of ownership, no issue with the validity of the CD had ever been raised. “When Kreutzer wrote his letter, he did not have and did not review the multiple agreements, approvals, and other historical documents in which the Commissioners and the CDPHE acknowledged again and again that Heartland did in fact have a valid CD,” the civil action reads. “Kreutzer’s conclusion was directly contrary to three years of acknowledgements and commitments made by Weld County and CDPHE.” For this unexpected reversal and the dramatic impact it had on Heartland’s digester operations, Kreutzer is named a defendant in the lawsuit. While the CD controversy was taking hold, another issue cropped up: in a similar, unexpected reversal, staff of the CDPHE Solid Waste Management division told Heartland that its LSA was suddenly being considered solid waste instead of a soil amendment. That meant that Heartland’s distribution of the LSA — at this point already approved by the Colorado Department of Agriculture and certified organic by OMRI — would be considered illegal. According to the civil filing, this arbitrary change in position unjustly threatened Heartland’s ability to operate, and got three more names — CDPHE Solid Waste Management staff — added to the list of defendants. (In just the past few weeks, however, CDPHE and CDA retreated from their position and once again allowed the LSA to be distributed as a soil amendment.) Over the course of the county hearings, one Commissioner in particular — Barbara Kirkmeyer — seized on the CD issue as a reason to shut down the facility. According to the lawsuit, the County Commissioners looked “for any pretext” to justify a shut-down, and “conducted no less than seven separate compliance inspections of the Facility, most of which were unannounced or conducted with little notice,” with an unprecedented level of scrutiny. (The County declined to comment for this story.)

By Dec. 28, 2016, the County Commissioners demanded that Heartland cease operations. “We presented, and we still believe, that we have a valid certificate of designation. In the spirit of cooperation we gave (the Commissioners) some options to look back at the documentation we provided, and vote or do whatever they needed to do to get themselves behind the certificate of designation,” says Jason Thomas, plant manager at Heartland Biogas. “We’re

just really disappointed in the way that the Commissioners looked at that. They had a lot of options… suspension is a pretty severe one, based on a facility that’s proven compliant.” But in January, seeing no other recourse, Heartland complied and suspended operations — then sued. Now it’s June, the methanogens are dead and the lawsuit is ongoing. It’s now up to the courts to determine whether the actions against the Heartland digester facility were irrational, arbitrary and a misuse of authority, as alleged in the lawsuit, or whether a shutdown was truly warranted. In the lawsuit, EDF/Heartland make clear that their intent is to recoup their losses, not to restart the digester. But once the lawsuit is finished a resale of the facility is possible, and sources confirm that there have been inquiries from potential buyers already. Even if that happens, it will take time. Despite this possibility, Yost still seems to be in a bit of shock. “It’s a travesty what’s going on. It’s beyond logic,” he says. “Weld County had the potential to be the fossil fuel and renewable energy capital of Colorado.” For now, the story of the Heartland anaerobic digester may become an elegy for that potential.

Pipes, including a pipe transporting methane away from the biodigester, pass in front of an apparatus that “cleans” the methane and prepares it for injection into the gas pipeline.

Six digestion tanks, or bioreactors, were digesting up to 30,000 pounds of food waste and agricultural waste every month and turning it into clean energy at the Heartland Biogas anaerobic digestion facility.

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Courtesy Vail Valley Foundation/ Rick Lohre

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t’s a hot and sunny weekend in Vail, the first real weekend of the summer, with temperatures that nearly make you wish for the frozen days of January, if only to cool off a bit. But the guys and girls on Gore Creek aren’t too hot. The water is swollen with snowmelt and it’s icy and cold and running fast. It’s a perfect day to be out there chasing the rapids and eddies. But these watermen aren’t in kayaks, they’re on stand-up paddleboards, or SUPs, and they’re having the time of their lives and wowing the crowds on the edge of the stream as they careen down rapids and bounce off rocks. The inclusion of SUP events at GoPro Mountain Games, a festival of action and adventure sports like rock climbing, mountain biking and trail running, is only one of the many visible manifestations of the explosive growth of SUP. And, despite the intensity of the display in Vail, SUP is a

Boulder Weekly

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WILD TO MILD from Page 19

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MeDiCare, MeDiCaiD anD va aCCepteD 20 June 15, 2017

A SUP athlete works her way down the Gore Creek at the GoPro Mountain Games in Vail. Technology improvements in stand-up paddleboards allow participants in this fast-growing sport to easily and safely take on Colorado’s whitewater.

fun it is and how much farther they can take it,” says Tom Boyd, spokesman for the GoPro Mountain Games. “Someone from Iowa or Florida can come out here and try Class I, and then Class II or Class III whitewater.” And, according to Boyd and Calloway, it’s easy to develop the skills to move up to bigger challenges because the equipment is so good. “When buying a paddleboard, if you are not sure you are going to like it, rent and take a lesson,” Calloway says. “If you think you like it, buy a decent board from a reputable retailer who has been around; get their input. You will get a better product and you will have a better experience. That’s one of the most important things.” “The boards are getting better and the equipment is getting better,” Boyd adds. “The pioneers of this sport are doing a great job improving the equipment so the novice will have an easier time figuring it out.” Boyd has a point. Things are better today, especially when it comes to SUP. Experts usually point to Hawaii as the birthplace of modern-day SUP. Sure, there are examples of people standing in canoes in Africa and paddling, as well as the traditional reed boats of Peru, paddled standing up by fisherman and estimated to have been in use for thousands of years. There are also the Venice gondolas, which feature a stand-up method of propulsion using a pole instead of a paddle. But, Calloway says, contemporary SUP “came from the Waikiki beach boys.” Canny entrepreneurs according to Calloway, these watermen of the ’40s and ’50s would “take a paddle and stand up on one of their surfboards and go out wearing a camera around their neck to take photos of tourists surfing to sell to them. They didn’t have waterproof housings for the cameras, so that’s how they kept them dry.” But it wouldn’t be until the 1990s when SUP would take on a life of its own, courtesy of the living legend Laird Hamilton. Hamilton was an immensely talented surfer who pioneered tow-in surfing on monster waves using jet skis and modified surfboards with straps for foot placement and security. He started playing around with large, tandem surfboards, standing up and paddling around the Hawaiian coast he called home with fellow big-wave surfer Dave Kalama in the late 1990s. By 2001, Laird had developed a specialized paddle for the activity (canoe paddles being used previously), and the modernization of SUP was on its way, with sport-specific board designs and other gear quick to evolve. Boulder Weekly


SUP RESOURCES:

Of course, this evolution didn’t come without controversy, particularly when it came to catching waves. In places like Southern California, as Calloway notes, “good waves are a limited resource.” The abilRocky Mountain ity of SUP practitioners to outmaneuver surfPaddleboard: Lessons, rentals ers and catch numerous swells led to friction, and sales in Boulder, Denver and Longmont. including SUP bans at San Clemente’s legrockymtnpaddleboard.com endary San Onofre surf spot, where stand-up Surfs Up Colorado: Rentals, paddleboarders have been relegated to a lessons and sales, based out small, fickle break called Dog Patch at the of Morrison, Colorado. surfsupcolorado.com southern end of the zone. Even Hamilton, despite his impressive surfing resume, has 5280 Paddlesports: Full service outfitter including SUP yoga, been criticized for promoting SUP, although rentals and more with a he deflects that by pointing out that SUP variety of locations. 5280paddlesports.com existed in its historical forms along with surfing for many, many years. In Colorado, though, the battles over surf breaks and wave protocols don’t apply. Here it’s about whitewater, and given this year’s plentiful runoff, there’s plenty to go around. And the potential and appeal of SUP is obvious and welcomed by those involved in action sports, even if, like Boyd, they’re kayakers. “We were one of the first events to incorporate SUP,” Boyd says. “It appeals to people because they want to kayak but they don’t want to get into a boat. It’s a much more natural thing to be standing there in an athletic stance, having fun on the river. SUP has opened up river sports to so many people.” Looking at the crowds watching the show at the GoPro Mountain Games, it’s obvious that people dig it. This year, 179 people competed in the Yeti Downriver Surf Sprint, a timed downwater race on Gore Creek that covers three miles of mixed whitewater ranked up to Class III from East Vail to the Vail Village. This is way more than those who signed up for a similar downriver kayaking event also held during the weekend. “It’s our biggest whitewater event,” Boyd says. It’s also one of many SUP competitions across the state, from flatwater races at Chatfield Reservoir to Denver’s South Platte River Festival to Get the Girl Out Paddle Jam in Frisco on Lake Dillon. But for truly extreme SUP, the ocean is still where the sport is breaking boundaries and pushing the limits. This ranges from races like the Red Bull Heavy Water, an elite event for the world’s best that traverses a 7.5-mile, open water course featuring 10-foot waves, sharks and other hazards, to surfing waves at monster breaks on off-shore reefs. While this sounds slightly scary for landlubbers in Boulder, don’t worry. It’s almost always calm paddling for anyone who wants to give SUP a go out at Boulder Reservoir. Colorado SUP Club: Provides information and support for all abilities, including event and river festival schedules and more: coloradosup.club

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buzz

Drawing us in BMoCA’s new exhibit encourages viewers to question their art preferences

photos and story by Billy Singleton

P

aper has always been a staple throughout JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey’s life. She grew up receiving handwritten letters from her grandfather, and she sold stationary as a teenager. But it wasn’t until much later, after she spent years collecting drawings, that she grasped the connection between these early experiences and her current passion for art on paper. The spirit of slowing down and asking questions — why is it that we like the art we like? — is the driving force behind Walk the Distance and Slow Down, showing at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA) through Sept. 10. It’s composed of the works of 28 artists from the JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey collection, and it runs in conjunction with the Denver Art Museum’s Word Dance, based on the same collection. Tasked with narrowing the 1,400 works down to 40 for the exhibition, BMoCA curator Mardee Goff selected a cross-section of art that captivated her, rather than adhering to any one theme or cherry-picking big names. She aims to inspire the same reaction in viewers. “We want people to engage and really look,” she says. “There are lots of ways that people are going to get pulled in — each work has something that draws you.”

Hickey hopes that viewers will pay close attention not only to the art but to their personal reaction to the art. “Both exhibitions are asking the viewers to slow down — to slow down and look and be with the work, to look close, to step in and step out of it. We’re so used to just flying by works because everything is so big and bold and easy to consume. Paper requires something very different, a different kind of engagement,” Hickey says. “If you’re aware and you’re paying attention, you will have feelings.” What we feel when we interact with art comes as much from ourselves as it does from the outside, she continues. Rather than thinking about what we should like, we should pay attention to what we already do like. These preferences, Hickey suspects, come from our life experiences and unconscious memories. She first noticed this several years ago while talking to the artist of a painting she’d bought. She told the artist that she had been drawn to the work because it conjured up music in her head. The artist, surprised, mentioned having worked in a pipe organ factory, a possible unconscious influence for the abstract drawing’s musicality. “That just took my breath away because I spent all of my youth and years in college playing pipe organ,” Hickey says. “I was a pipe organ major.”

Top to bottom: Isabel Albrecht/“Z23 and Z24, 2009”; BMoCA provides magnifying glasses for a closer look; “War Drawing Book”/Kim Jones; “Principio de Polaridad”/Jose Luis Landet

22 June 15 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


ON THE BILL: Walk the Distance and Slow Down: Selections from the Collection of JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10.

“At that moment I thought, ‘OK. From now on when I’m really looking at work [to buy], I’ve got to pay attention not only to the visual pleasure of the work to my eye, but I have to have a deep internal response,” she continues. BMoCA plans to work with a CU Boulder neuroscientist to examine the art’s effect on the brain and explain how it may relate to our memories, as a kind of bonus feature midway through the exhibition’s run. Walk the Distance and Slow Down also encourages questions about the medium itself, challenging notions about what drawing is. The varied works contain media that aren’t typically associated with drawing — paint, watercolor, tape, photos, maps, written words, books and the heavy manipulation of the paper itself. “When you talk about drawings, people are going to think of a still life, or they’re going to think of a figurative drawing,” Hickey says. “People have no idea what drawings have become. That’s always the shock — it’s so much more than they ever imagined.” Though most of us associate drawing with representation, nearly all of the works in the show are abstract. This invites another set of questions: What does it mean? Why was it made? And not only are the media nontraditional — it’s often unclear how the drawings were made at all. Martí Cormand’s painstakingly photorealistic drawing of a work of art on crumpled paper leaves the viewer momentarily unsure what’s paper and what’s drawn. Simon Schubert’s “Treppenabgang + Spiegel + Tur” seems to depict an intricate architectural scene using only the shadows where the now flat paper was previously folded. Other works borrow elements of painting, sculpture and poetry, playing with the boundaries of the medium. Despite their variety, the works are united by their common use of paper and prominent lines, and of course, their mystery.

The exhibition requires detailed exploration, and fortunately its presentation facilitates it. Magnifying glasses are available for inspecting the art. The card beside each work contains only basic information, but can be turned over to reveal more. And the exhibition sits in a circular hallway, meaning it has no beginning and no end. All of these things give the viewer a great deal of freedom in how to connect with each piece.

Ultimately, Hickey says that it’s these connections that make art worthwhile. If we don’t slow down and pay attention, how can we understand ourselves and relate to our world? “I hope I’m playing a small role in helping people look,” Hickey says. “That’s again that human exchange. Isn’t that what art is about? Whether we go to the theater, or whether we read books, it’s that human exchange.”

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June 15 , 2017 23


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overtones

I

Like a prayer to the ethos

The Haunted Windchimes’ vision quest

naiah Lujan, frontman of The Haunted Windchimes from Pueblo, Colorado, needs help finishing a song. He’s got the intro, the verse, the chorus and the coda, but he needs something to bring it all together, a bridge to lead the music to its point. He scrawls a sentence on a piece of paper, folds it into an airplane and sends it flying into the air like a prayer to the ethos. It lands softly on the far away desk of Windchime’s member Mike Clark who immediately offers the perfect solution from across the ether, a nod to the enigmatic ways of creative inspiration. The finished song starts slowly and simply, a few rising notes picked by Lujan on the strings of a lone guitar. Soon enough the progression is overtaken by mimicking chords and decorated with an alluring and high harmony as Lujan’s wife and vocalist, Chela, along with Desirae Garcia, add in their siren like song.  In the band’s self-produced and self-directed music video for the song, “Sun Shining Bright,” Lujan appears seated in a lone chair in an otherwise vacant desert with only cacti for company, some towering and spindly, others squat and bulbous. Together the plants fill the desert with props, perfect fodder for anthropomorphic transformation. And, soon enough, they do come to life and Lujan is greeted by their spirits — one who paints a thick eye in the center of his forehead, another who smudges him with sage before he embarks on a journey, crows circling all around him, cacti growing legs and waving in his direction. He wanders among them with open and unfocused eyes.  Lujan is on a vision quest, entertaining spirits by playing a poppy and upbeat song on the guitar, which eventually gives way to a wicked and rocking guitar solo. Neither Lujan nor the music seems to know the way forward, but they walk nonetheless, step-by-step.  For Lujan and the Windchimes, the desert is the setting of self-discovery, an important symbol of the artist’s lonely and inward quest. It’s a symbol he came to know early on as a boy growing up on a Navajo reservation in Southern Colorado he describes as a small, rural community that was a bubble from the rest of the world.  When he talks about his upbringing, it isn’t overtly spiritual. He doesn’t offer up grand soliloquies of a man’s connection to the land or of his relationship to the spirit world. Instead, he diverts the conversation to his earliest memories of music, watching MTV on his parent’s tiny box TV or talking to his older brother about the musical world beyond the reservation. Although undeniably influenced by his Boulder Weekly

Courtesy of The Haunted Windchimes/ Malissa Ahlin

ON THE BILL: The Haunted Windchimes. 9 p.m. Friday, June 23, Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Gold Hill, 303-443-6461.

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by Sarah Haas Navajo upbringing, Lujan’s spirituality isn’t tied to any one tradition, philosophy or religion (although he says he has studied them all). “I keep coming back to the biblical idea of ‘know thyself,’ because it is only in self discovery that you find the infinite,” he continues. “The desert provides powerful imagery for such an initiation of the individual, of a single person committing to and experiencing self discovery, of letting go. You have to tell the universe you are ready to go on a journey to find out who you are, knowing that the universe will meet you half way, that it will provide the means to discover yourself and so the world.” The Haunted Windchimes’ journey of self-discovery began in the late aughts when the band first came together, inspired by chimes that kept ringing out from the depth of still summer days, leading them to wonder about the music that lay latent inside of them, too. What they found and are finding still is ambiguously Americana — not quite folk, not quite bluegrass, not quite blues. When it’s at its best, it’s a little bit rock ‘n’ roll, a little bit punk. At first this uncertainty felt like a curse but, in their willingness to explore what they were made of over the years, The Haunted Windchimes have found their identity from the daunting depths of no man’s land. The band achieved some notable success in 2012 when they played on Prairie Home Companion and won a spot in the national spotlight, although today Lujan seems disinterested in such measurements of external success. After all, The Haunted Windchimes is a band on a spiritual quest and their rewards will come on those terms. They find success in adding a link to the immemorial chain of folk music — in bumbling around Colorado in their old 15-passenger van, playing music to people in small towns, telling their stories to intimate crowds. Lujan believes in the intimate moments of artistry and that they have the power to change the world. The Haunted Windchimes’ greatest ambition is to be just as they are, which is just like the rest of us — wandering, sometimes immersed in a sort of major key joy and happiness; at other times lost in minor key excursions into the dark and melancholy. It’s all a part of the muddiness of humanity that can connect us. “From an early age I found magic in music,” Lujan says. “Music is this beautiful unifying force, a universal language and, as cliché as it sounds, it has a power to bring people together. Music is my spirituality, my invocation of spirit — it is the great equalizer. It creates a place where people can put their differences aside and just be.”

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BELLA GAIA: BEAUTIFUL EARTH 9:30 PM

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LASER FLOYD: WELCOME TO THE MACHINE SATURDAY JUNE 17 1:00 PM

PLANETS AND LASER: GALACTIC ODYSSEY 2:30 PM

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www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 June 15 , 2017 25


26 June 15 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


arts & culture

Jennifer Pettus/”Ensemble”

Courtesy of Jennifer Pettus

EVENTS JACK KEROUAC SCHOOL OF DISEMBODIED POETICS presents

The New Weathers Summer Writing Program

Implied function

JACK KEROUAC SCHOOL OF DISEMBODIED POETICS

Jennifer Pettus infuses her art with meaning, but it’s up to the audience to figure it out

SUMMER WRITING PROGRAM

by Amanda Moutinho

AT

first glance, it’s not quite clear what Jennifer Pettus’ artwork represents. Upon further inspection, it’s still not clear. But that’s the point. “I’m never trying to make a definitive statement with my work,” Pettus says. “I’m trying to open it up and leave it to question instead of refining it to one topic. The goal I work with in general is to kind of blow things up, rather than put a box around them.” In her new exhibit, Plot Twist at the Firehouse through June 25, Pettus showcases her fiber-based mixed media sculptures. The pieces feature various types of fabrics and objects assembled into unusual shapes. While many of the materials Pettus uses are easily recognizable — rubber gloves, snaps, suspenders, sticks, googly eyes — their meanings and functions are left up to the imagination. The one clue Pettus does provide is in the exhibit’s name. For Plot Twist, Boulder Weekly

she drew inspiration from theater. With props and costumes in mind, she wondered how her pieces would be used on stage. “I think with a lot of my work there’s a function that isn’t disclosed,” she says. “There’s something about that I like. People are prompted to figure out what the rest is. What am I looking at? What is it supposed to be used for? The hanging pieces are leaning more toward costuming; the standing ones are more theater props. I want to imply a function, but I don’t want to impose a function.” Pettus was involved with theater as a kid, and she says its influence continues to seep into her work. Just as a “plot twist” is unexpected, she hopes the show will be the same. “You go to the theater and productions have these tools they use to take you on this journey,” she says. “I was kind of hoping to do that visually here to some extent: defy expectations of what people are going to see in an art gallery.”

Pettus’ interest in art started at an early age. In college, she began studying art and had an aha moment in a basic sculpture class. “I realized you could make art out of anything,” she says. “To me, it felt more accessible. I could make art that included material that we see in our everyday lives that maybe people would connect with more. I certainly did. I connected with art that wasn’t just sort of an oil painting on a wall or a metal sculpture.” She uses mostly found objects, frequenting thrift shops and garage sales. One of her pieces can include a variety of things from multiple genres: metal, clothing, jewelry, sticks, furniture, toys and more. She collects items knowing that eventually they’ll find their way into her art.   “There’s a little bit of hoarding involved,” she says with a laugh. The found objects give viewers visual cues that can guide meaning. A couch see IMPLIED FUNCTION Page 28

JUNE 11–JULY 2, 2017

? THE NEW WEATHERS June 11–July 1 Readings begin at 7:30 p.m. Naropa University Performing Arts Center 2130 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder,CO

Free and open to the public For a full schedule of readings, visit naropa.edu/ swp-readings June 15 , 2017 27


arts & culture IMPLIED FUNCTION from Page 27

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leg can insinuate a piece is something to be lounged on or a button can propose it’s something to be worn. While we know the purpose of a doorstopper, Pettus places it in an odd location that questions its past and future function. By working with used items and antiques, Pettus infuses history into her art — taking the old to make something new. “I’m always looking for something that has a story of its own: What it’s been used for, and how can I bring that story into what I’m making, making another story out of its story,” she says. A lot of her process involves what she calls “making the stuff to make the stuff.” She utilizes various techniques including embroidery, quilting, needle felting, flocking, hand stitching and pencil drawing on fabric — all of which she taught herself to do. “After my first child was born I had a show scheduled. I needed to figure out a way to make work with a fussy baby who needed to be held most of the time,” she says. “I had pencils and fabric, so I started drawing on fabric with the hand that wasn’t preoccupied. I created an entire body of work literally one-handed. I loved the limitations of making do and the convenience of learning at home but also the resulting frailty of the work.” She chose many of the techniques she uses because they specifically don’t require specialized training. And after

becoming a mom, she was spending a lot more time at home. In the end, her art mirrors the flow of her everyday life. “In my ‘real life,’ I feel like I’m switching gears constantly between trying to be an artist, trying to be a mom, trying to do this or that. That is naturally going to find its way into my work because that’s naturally how I function,” she says. “So I like that sort of back and forth. You’re on one train of thought and then you’re on another.” Pettus draws a lot of inspiration from the home. She likes the association with the feminine and domesticity. “I think a lot about things that are valued in our society, and how women are often undervalued, especially women’s work. And craft has always been a lesser form of expression,” she says. “I’m always trying to highlight things that are maybe not as visible in the world — things that have been thrown out or cast aside or things that haven’t been given the same kind of voice as other things have been. The handicraft is part of that — highlighting it as an art form, rather than something that is simply functional or a lesser art form.” When crafting a piece, Pettus plays around with different elements, combining whatever feels right. She works on many pieces at once, allowing her to jump around. She lets it come organically and admits she can’t really explain the reasoning behind her artistic choices. In the past, she’s called her work a “calculated hodgepodge.” “It’s really a description of putting these disparate materials together in a way that makes sense, but I can’t explain how it makes sense,” she says.

“Hodgepodge is one of those colloquial terms that I find interesting. It brings a little humor into the work, which is another way to get people engaged. It can mean chaos or that it’s not well thought out. In this case, I try to temper that yes, it’s a hodgepodge, but it has a system, and even I’m not privy to exactly how that system works.” As her art is governed by intuition, so is the meaning behind it. She’s telling a story, but she doesn’t know the story she’s telling. “I don’t want to be analyzing what I’m doing all the time. That would sort of kill the joy of making the work,” she says. “I don’t know that I want the answer to the story. I really enjoy the journey in watching other people sort of figure out what’s going on.”

ON THE BILL:

Plot Twist — Jennifer Pettus. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Through June 25.

Jennifer Pettus/”I See London”

TICKETS: eTOWN.org 28 June 15 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Weekly


Peter Strand

ZIKR DANCE ENSEMBLE PRESENTS ANCIENT SHADOWS.

The Post Chicken & Beer Presents: American Classics Car Show and Auction. 11-3 p.m. June 17, 1258 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 720-588-2883.

7:30 p.m. Friday, June 16 and Saturday, June 17, The Gordon Gamm Theater, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Courtesy of The Post Chicken and Beer

Come celebrate Father’s Day with an afternoon of American classics! The Post Chicken & Beer in Longmont is hosting a car show in their parking lot this Saturday, June 17, featuring 24 cars from Stephen Tebo’s decade-spanning collection. Top off the afternoon with Post Brewing Co. beer, barbecue fresh off the grill and, of course, fried chicken. The event is free to the public and will include an auction for your chance to drive home in an American classic. —Alvaro Sanchez

Mortified Live: Summer School. 7:30 p.m. June 16, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. This Friday, June 16, head to Boulder Theater to watch adults take a look back at their school days and share hilarious and entertaining stories with total strangers. In this interesting take on conventional storytelling, Mortified takes stories from regular people — not actors or comedians — and transforms them into a stage show that has been hailed by Newsweek as a “cultural phenomenon.” Tickets $15-18. —Alvaro Sanchez The Hip Photo

Thursday, June 15 Music Adult Ukulele & Songwriting Bootcamp. 6 p.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. The Also — with Basline, Blink 90210. 7 p.m. Marquis Theater, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. At the Drive In. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 N. Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360 Beginning Flamenco. 6:30 p.m. Kay Carol Gallery & Priscila Working Art Studio, 364 Main St., Longmont, 303-956-0703. Beginning Ukulele Camp. 9 a.m. Foothill Elementary, 1001 Hawthorn Ave., Boulder, 720-561-5969. Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW. Borgeous. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver, 303-383-1909. Boulder Swing Collective. 8:30 p.m. Waterloo, 809 South Main St., Louisville, 303-993-2094. The Cosmic Throat Singer: Matthew Kocel. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon Drive, Boulder, 303-245-8452. The Gay Boys and WestOasis... A Touring Treat! 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Locals Appreciation Night. 5 p.m. Hotel Boulderado, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-440-2880. The Lonesome Heroes. 8 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Music & Magic on the West Patio. 10 a.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-776-6050. Outback Saloon Open Mic Night. 9 p.m. Outback Saloon, 3141 28th St., Boulder, 573-569-0370. Parker Millsap — with Garrett Owen. 8 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666. Pickin’ On the Beatles, featuring members of DeadPhish Orchestra, Lyle Divinsky’s Soul Survivors, The Silver String Band, Lil Skoops. 8 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Sean Curtis and the Divide. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Star Wars, Electronic Guitar Loops and a Big Pom Pom. 7 p.m. Museum Of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. The Picturebooks — with Television Generation, Silver. 8 p.m. Moon Room at Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Taiko Camp with GONNA-Wadaiko x Marimba. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411.

Flatirons Chamber Music Festival “Crossing the Divide” Grand Finale. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. eTown Hall in Boulder hosts the grand finale of the Flatirons Chamber Music Festival this Sunday. Beethoven, Ravel, Mendelssohn and Benjamin Park will be featured in an interactive show that aims to cross boundaries between composers, performers and audience members. Including open-rehearsals, pre-show workshops and a variety of other interactive events, the Flatirons Chamber Orchestra looks to end their festival in style. Tickets $12.50. —Alvaro Sanchez PublicDomainFiles.com

Minecraft Flix/Bear Creek/PM Camp/Ages 7-10 and 11-13. 12:30 p.m. Bear Creek Elementary, 2500 Table Mesa, Boulder, 720-561-5968. Romeo & Brewliet — A Drunken Retelling (Comedy Night). 7 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Events

Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335.

The Heavy Pets. 9 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-849-8458.

Cult Classics & Cocktails: Best in Show. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

Third Thursday Improv. 7 p.m. Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-588-0550.

Kasbo. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

Hanuman Festival. 8 a.m. Boulder High Great Lawn, 1604 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 619-569-0167.

Trivia & Comedy. 7 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 970-302-7130.

Nancy Walker Trio. 7 p.m. Por Wine House, 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville, 720-666-1386.

Magic Camp (Ages 7-10). 9 a.m. Foothill Elementary, 1001 Hawthorn Ave., Boulder, 720-561-5969.

Wildflowers of Boulder County Slide Program. 6 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

Gloria Trevi vs. Alejandra Guzmán. 8 p.m. Bellco Theatre, 700 14th St., Denver, 303-228-8000.

see EVENTS Page 32

Boulder Weekly

June 15 , 2017 31


events

EVENTS from Page 31

Friday, June 16 Music 2017 Boulder Dance Coalition International Festival. 6:30 p.m. Pearl Street Mall, 1325 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-8303. The Austrian Connection. 9 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Barrel of Blues. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 720-398-8172.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY JUNE 15 8PM

BRAZIL NIGHT

FRIDAY JUNE 16 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE SATURDAY JUNE 17

JARED JANZEN 8PM SILVER STRING BAND 9PM SUNDAY JUNE 18

TONY ROCKS 8PM BAY BRYAN 9PM ALLIE CHIPKIN 10PM MONDAY JUNE 19 8PM “SO YOU’RE A POET” PRESENTS

SPECIAL GUESTS & AN OPEN POETRY READING TUESDAY JUNE 20

RACHEL PRICE 8PM EXIT LIBERTY 9:30PM WEDNESDAY JUNE 21 8PM

JAZZETRY NIGHT FEAT. VON DISCO THURSDAY JUNE 22 8PM

GRUPO CHEGANDO LÁ and FRANCISCO MARQUES Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 32 June 15 , 2017

Beginning Ukulele Camp. 9 a.m. Foothill Elementary, 1001 Hawthorn Ave., Boulder, 720-561-5969. Bearracuda Denver. 8 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Best of Open Stage. 7 p.m. Tuft Theatre, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. The Billy Shaddox Band. 9 p.m. The Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Gold Hill, 303-443-6461. Black Lips — with Timmy’s Organism, Dirty Few. 9 p.m. The Gothic Theater, 3263 S. Broadway, Englewood, 303-789-9206. Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 10, Boulder, 262-719-8795. Bonfire Dub with Special Guests. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Cat Jerky with Howlin’ Goatz and Dykotomy. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Johnny Johnston — Colorado Blues. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Keith Rea. 6 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown, 303-442-5847. Kirk, Kate, Ben and Bram. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-249-8458. Lee Johnson. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Lee Hill), 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 20, Boulder, 303-449-2911.

arts

Derrick Velasquez: Obstructed View. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 27.

Paper.Works. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through Aug. 20.

Divas — Leona Lazar. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through July 30.

Home: American photography at the CU Art Museum. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through July 15.

Jennifer Pettus stitches together fiber art with repurposed mixed media to create objections for an unknown plot. Read more on page 27.

Drive-By Truckers. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Illustration, Design, Art & Photraphy by Michael Hamers. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through July 29. Jenny Morgan: SKINDEEP. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 27.

Maur0 Giaconi: Cae a plomo/falls to lead. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10.

Electric Funeral Fest 2017. 4 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

Live Music: SOUND TRAVELS Street Faire #2. 9:30 p.m. Por Wine House, 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville, 720-666-1386.

Flatirons Chamber Music Festival “Crossing the Divide” — Opening Night. 7 p.m. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

A Live One (Phish Tribute) — with Kessel Run. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Forever Dangerous — A Tribute Honoring Michael Jackson. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. The Gospel of Mary Magdalene: An Opera by Mark Adamo. 7:30 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder. Honey Touché’s Vixens of Vinyl Burlesque Review — with Sparkle Jetts. 7:30 p.m. The Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. House of Joy Musical Duo. 2:30 p.m. Golden West, 1055 Adams Circle, Boulder, 303-939-0883.

Sherefe — Arabic Mediterranean Fusion. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Paper on Paper: The Art of Chine-Collé. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through Aug. 20.

Dion Timmer. 9 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666.

Do At The Zoo. 7 p.m. Denver Zoo, 2300 Steele St., Denver, 720-337-1400.

Sandra Jean MacDougall. 8 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Dasha Shishkin: Tram Pam Pam. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10.

Courtesy Jennifer Pettus

Dispatch — with Guster, Jake Shimabukuro. 7 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494.

Redlands — with Vallenta, Vynyl, Silver and Gold, 1000 Miles of Fire. 7 p.m. Marquis Theater, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Mi Tierra. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Oct. 22.

Enhanced Photography by Marc Bernardi. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through July 29.

Dion Timmer — with DISSOLVES, Shank Aaron. 9 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666.

The Rippingtons feat. Russ Freeman. 6 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver.

Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through June 24.

The Denver Greek Festival. 11 a.m. Assumption of the Theotokos Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 4610 E. Alameda Ave., Denver, 303-388-9314.

Denver Moth Storyslam (Theme: Celebration). 7:30 p.m. Daniels Hall, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-7771003.

Quemando Salsa Party! 9 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-6685.

Louisville Street Faire. 5 p.m. Steinbaugh Pavilion, 824 Front St., Louisville, 720-236-5206. Lucas Swafford. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Mat Zo [DnB Set]. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver, 303-383-1909. Mile High Party Weekend. 9 p.m. City Hall, 1144 Broadway, Denver, 303-832-2383.

Mountain to Sound Presents: Patrick Dethlefs + Anna Tivel. 9 p.m. The Deer Pile, 206 E. 13th Ave., Denver, 303-831-6443. Nym. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

Plot Twist — Jennifer Pettus. Firehouse Art Center, 667, Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Through June 25. Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 20. Stan Meyer: Poetic Presence. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through Aug. 6. Shade. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through July 16. Then, Now, Next. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Aug. 31. Tran-‘zi-sh(e)n & ‘Chanj. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through June 18. Walk the Distance and Slow Down: Selections from the Collection of JoAnne Gonzalez Hickey. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through Sept. 10. The Western: An Epic in Art and Film. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Sept. 10.

Under The Radar Songwriters. 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver, 303-295-1868. Venus Cruz & Big Wheel featuring Greg Tanner Harris: B-Side Music. 5 p.m. Museum Of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Events Adult Gymnastics. 5:30 p.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717. Boulder Juggling Festival. 4 p.m. Casey Middle School, 1301 High St., Boulder, 303-506-7724. Dance Nia. 6 p.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800. Family Films. 2 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-776-6050. Fun on the Farm: This Little Piggy. 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Ute Highway, Longmont, 303-776-8688. see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly


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June 15 , 2017 33


events

EVENTS from Page 32

Magic Camp (Ages 7-10). 9 a.m. Foothill Elementary, 1001 Hawthorn Ave., Boulder, 720-561-5969. Minecraft Flix/Bear Creek/PM Camp/Ages 7-10 and 11-13. 12:30 p.m. Bear Creek Elementary, 2500 Table Mesa, Boulder, 720-561-5968.

June THE 30 ALCAPONES & FOXFEATHER

Motrified: Summer School. 8:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

July 1

Saturday, June 17

REBIRTH BRASS BAND

w / The Casey Russell Trio

Aug PETER ROWAN w / Danny Shafer 6 Aug 18

TROUT STEAK REVIVAL w / 300 Days

Official Nedfest After Parties

Aug 25

GENETICS

Aug 26

GASOLINE LOLLIPOPS

Oct 28

NEDERLAND WITCHES BALL

Feat. The Widow’s Bane

Nov 3

DONNA THE BUFFALO

LIVE MUSIC SPECIAL EVENTS PARTIES RECEPTIONS & MORE /thecaribouroom 303.258.3637 www.thecaribouroom.com

NEDERLAND 34 June 15 , 2017

Movies in the Park. 7 p.m. Waneka Lake Park, 1600 Caria Drive, Lafayette, 303-661-1460. Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335. Music

words

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store/Debi Lorenc

Thursday, June 15 Silvia Pettem — The Long-Term Missing. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. The Hill Gathering. 2 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Saturday, June 17 Al Franken (signing only) — Giant of the Senate. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. José Faus and Shawn Pavey. 3 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

Before he made a name for himself as a nature writer, David Gessner devoted his 20s to ultimate frisbee, the topic of his new book, “Ultimate Glory.” Hear Gessner talk about the cultish sport at Boulder Book Store on Tuesday, June 20.

Monday, June 19

Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

Ballet in the Park. 7 p.m. Central Park Bandshell, Boulder.

Gary Ferguson — Land on Fire. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

The Band Style. 9 p.m. The Wild Game Longmont, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Suite A, Longmont, 720-600-4875.

David Gessner — Ultimate Glory. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

“So, You’re a Poet” Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

Wednesday, June 21

Bikes, Blues & Brews. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Tuesday, June 20

Afrodisiac — Fela Kuti Tribute. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

BMA Spring Soiree — Ales 4 Trails Fundraising Party. 6 p.m. The Roadhouse Boulder Depot, 2366 Junction Place, Boulder, 303-443-2167.

Robert Castellino — Life and Light on the Land. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Ben Bentele. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

the CBDs Trio. 5:30 p.m. The Tasting Room, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 14, Boulder, 303-499-1829.

Fred Everything. 9 p.m. Club Vinyl, 1082 Broadway, Denver, 303-860-8469.

Jackson Cloud. 8 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847.

Chamber Music at the Barn. 7 p.m. Ruby Red Farm, 6927 Jay Road, Boulder.

Keith Rea. 8 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Cirque du Soleil’s LUZIA. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver, 303-405-1100.

Gramatik — with Mr. Carmack, Ekali & Flamingosis. 6 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494.

Coldplay Guitar Tour. 6:30 p.m. Liquid Mechanics, 297 U.S. Highway 287, Suite 100, Lafayette, 720-635-6563.

Hail the Sun — with Capsize, Eldola, Limbs, Post/War. 6 p.m. Marquis Theater, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

DeadSet Colorado. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339.

Denver Deluxe. 2 p.m. Walnut Street between 26th and 27th streets, Denver.

Icelandic Musicians. 2 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Dotsero. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

An Italian Feast — 2017 FOD. 6 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599.

Drive-By Truckers. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. An Evening of Bite-Sized Opera. 6 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-900-3430.

theater

Jack Russell’s Great White. 8 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840.

Lipbone Redding. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder, 303-530-7423. Manufactured Superstars. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver, 303-383-1909. Marissa Russo: “Top of the Hill” Faculty Concert Series. 8 p.m. Tuft Theatre, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Mortified: Summer School. 7 and 9:30 p.m. The Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Mountain Madness. 12 p.m. 22955 Peak to Peak Highway, Nederland. Old’s Cool Rock. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-682-6762.

Adam VisCom

Cabaret. Miner’s Alley Theatre, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden, 303-935-3044. Through June 25. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through June 18. DragOn. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through June 25. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through Aug. 19. The Luckiest People. Curious Theatre Company, 1080 Acoma St., Denver, 303-623-0524. Through June 17.

Lionel Young. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985.

In DragOn, running at the Denver Performing Arts Complex through June 25, The Taming of the Shrew. Mary Rippon Outdoor a young queen must go through the Theatre, University of Colorado, 303-492-8008. tests and trials of cosplay drag queens Through Aug. 13. to find her swagger.

OVERLOAD Festival — with Code Black, Da Tweekaz, GAMMER, LNY TNZ, Noisecontrollers, Imperium, Waffle & Hartshorn. 6 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Paper Bird + The Shook Twins ft. Katie Gray. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Paula Poundstone. 8 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Portugal. The Man — with Boogarins. 9 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666. The Prairie Scholars — with Daniel Markham & Claire Morales. 8:30 p.m. The Roost, 526 Main St., Longmont, 303-622-5021. Riff Raff. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Ruckus Summer Fashion Show and Concert. 9 p.m. Cluster Studios, 3881 Steele St., Denver, 303-350-1401. see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

Jun

18

Jun

24 Jun

28 Jul

8

Concert:

Flatirons Chamber Music Festival “Crossing the Divide” Grand Finale We look forward to collaborating with you through interactive programs of the highest caliber of chamber music while crossing cultural, geographic, and temporal divides between composers, performers, and audience members.

eTown Live Radio Show Taping:

Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors & Tift Merritt eTown Live Radio Show Taping:

Chicano Batman & Special Guests TBA Talks & Forums:

Activate A Life You Love

A live, full-day, 8+ hour personal growth & development experience. With Ali Reti as your leader and coach, the day’s activities are designed to improve the quality of your life. It is both fun and invigorating.

eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce St. Boulder, CO 80302

Boulder Weekly

eTOWN.org

June 15 , 2017 35


events

EVENTS from Page 34

Sam Burns. 5:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Boulder Weekly staff pick

Sant Pe (Members of Black Lips/Diamont Rugs/Chill Fantastic). 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Silver String Band. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

Courtesy of Robert Castellino/Rodney Swanstrom©2016

The Summer Day Party Series. 2 p.m. Lincoln Station Bar, 776 Lincoln St., Denver. Trace Bundy. 7 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214.

After a near-death experience with blood clots in his lungs, Robert Castellino had an epiphany. His brush with death put him in a strange and humbling position that reminded him about the fragility of life.

Wash Park. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. The Wheel Workers. 8 p.m. Monkey Barrel, 4401 Tejon St., Denver, 720-638-3655.

That brush with death motivated Castellino to create another project. A prolific author, publisher and photographer of Colorado landscapes, he put together a series of photographs that reminded him of how precious life is. The result was Colorado: Life and Light on the Land. In this 116-page book of photographs, Castellino’s message is clear: Colorado is our home, our life and our responsibility.

XXXTENTACION. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Wonderbound — with Divisions, Flobots. 7:30 p.m. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through June 18. Events

Castellino will be at the Boulder Book Store on June 21 signing and speaking about the making of the book, the near-death experience that inspired it and why preservation of public land is so important. For any fan of Colorado landscapes, and of photography in general, this event is an easy way to get in touch with nature and with the humanity that it depends on.

American Classic Cars Show & Auction. 11 a.m. The Post Chicken & Beer, 1258 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 720-588-2883. Boulder Juggling Festival. 10 a.m. Casey Middle School, 1301 High St., Boulder, 303-506-7724. Celebrate Summer Hike. 10 a.m. Mud Lake Open Space, 2 miles north of Nederland on County Road 126, Nederland, 303-678-6214. Louisville Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m. Downtown Louisville, 916 Main St., Louisville, 303-902-2451.

Sunday, June 18

Ninth Annual 1940s WWII-Era Ball with the World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra. 6 p.m. Boulder Municipal Airport, 3393 Airport Road, Boulder, 720-924-1945.

Ballet in the Park. 7 p.m. Downtown Boulder Bandshell, Boulder.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Sunrise Photography Session. 5 a.m. Agricultural Heritage Center, 8348 Ute Highway, Longmont, 303-776-8688.

36 June 15 , 2017

Robert Castellino’s Colorado: Life and Light on the Land. 7:30 p.m. June 21, Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Music

Blues and BBQ with Denny Driscoll. 2 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Blues Is Dead featuring Tinsley Ellis. 7 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-849-8458. Brainsong No Shushing Concert Events. 1 p.m. East Boulder Community Center, 5660 Sioux Drive, Boulder, 720-255-9831.

City Park Jazz. 6 p.m. City Park Pavilion, 1700 N. York St., Denver, 303-744-1004.

Gypsy Swing Revue. 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dazzlejazz, 1512 Curtis St., Denver, 303-839-5102.

The Denver Greek Festival. 11 a.m. Assumption of the Theotokos Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 4610 E Alameda Ave., Denver, 303-388-9314.

Kurt Travis — with Amarionette, Andres, Ghostpulse. 7 p.m. Moon Room at Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Forever Young: A Bob Dylan Tribute Concert. 7 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 720-749-2530.

Many Mountains. 3 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910.

George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. The Gospel of Mary Magdalene: An opera by Mark Adamo. 2 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder.

Mason Jennings — with Hannah Samano. 8 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds. 8 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. see EVENTS Page 38

Boulder Weekly


Friday June 16

eric Bellinger, Mila J & Brhandi rae Thursday – sunday June 15-18 @ huMingBird ranch:

sonic BlooM

FeaT giganTic cheese BiscuiTs, The Polish aMBassador, The Floozies, claude VonsTroke, oTT & More

Friday June 23

esTa.

w/ The whooligan & Mosis

saTurday June 24 suMMer solsTice ParTy 2017

FeaT MysTikal & JuVenile w/ JuBee, gracie Bassie & More TBa!

Friday, saTurday & sunday June 23-25

ride The Bus To widesPread Panic Thursday June 29

azizi giBson’s “ProTein shake Tour” w/ J-kruPT, liFenoize, Maze & XXog

Friday June 30 saVage collecTiVe PresenTs

VisualiTy FT. eTc!eTc!, k Theory, Vaski & Bare Friday, saTurday & sunday June 30 – July 2

ride The Bus To uMPhrey’s Mcgee Thursday July 6

clozee

w/ charlesTheFirsT, lucid Vision & Brede

Friday July 7 • dual VENuE

hooTenanny all sTars FeaT nicki BluhM, JeFF coFFin (dMB), eric krasno, Bill Payne (liTTle FeaT), Tony hall (duMPsTaPhunk), alwyn roBinson (leFToVer salMon), JeFF ausTin, JereMy garreTT (inFaMous sTringdusTers), andy Thorn (leFToVer salMon) & Jon sTickley Trio FeaT andy Thorn

saTurday July 8

oMegaMode w/ aweMinus B2B deFiniTiVe, crowell B2B codd duBBz, JooF B2B MorF, uVs gang & arT – The hiVe

eVery Thursday @ The oTher side

grass For ThaT ass

Free BeFore 8PM & Free BeFore 9PM For all TeXT Message suBscriBers

TeXT cerVanTes To 91944 To sign uP 6/15: Pickin on The BeaTles FeaT MeMBers oF deadPhish orchesTra, lyle diVinsky’s soul surViVors (laTe seT), The silVer sTring Band & lil skooPs 6/22: Tangled & dark – a TriBuTe To Bonnie raiT FeaT eMily clark, daVe waTTs (The MoTeT) & sasha Brown (sisTer sParrow & The dirTy Birds) w/ The MighTy Pines, hawThorne rooTs (PaTio seT) & sTeePland sTring Band Friday June 16

aFrodisiac

TriBuTe To The Music oF Fela kuTi FeaT daVe waTTs (The MoTeT), aMayo (anTiBalas aFroBeaT orchesTra) & MeMBers oF eurForquesTra & aToMga w/ Joey PorTer’s ViTal organ

saTurday June 17

a liVe one – eXPloring The Music oF Phish w/ aMoraMora

Tuesday June 20

FaT Tuesdays

w/ sTruTTin’ – TriBuTe To nola Funk, soul & r & B FeaT The Music oF The MeTers, dr. John & allen ToussainT

wednesday June 21

re: search – dJ logic w/ caPTac, yak aTTack, Mikey Thunder & JuBee

Friday June 23

The Funky knuckles & Pho w/ Judo choP

saTurday June 24 widesPread Panic aFTershow

new orleans susPecTs w/ aFrolicious

sunday June 25

queen iFrica

w/ Tony reBel, lion soulJahs & MounTain lion (dJ sysTeM) & selecTa c – hosTed By eMcee rasTa sTeVie

Monday June 26

Monday nighT Menagerie

scoTT law & ross JaMes’ cosMic Twang FeaT scoTT law & ross JaMes (Phil lesh / circles around The sun) & scoTT Padden (goodnighT TX / TerraPin crossroads)

Tuesday June 27

FaT Tuesdays

wednesday July 12

w/ sTruTTin’ – TriBuTe To nola Funk, soul & r & B FeaT The Music oF The MeTers, dr. John & allen ToussainT

ride The Bus To ween

wednesday June 28

saTurday July 15 oFFicial lohi aFTer ParTy

BleeP BlooP, Beak nasTy, wMiod, Mikey Thunder & JuBee

Tauk & Friends

w/ Tiger ParTy FeaT eddie roBerTs (new MasTersounds) & JeFF Franca (ThieVery corPoraTion)

saTurday July 29

herBie hancock TriBuTe FeaT doMinic lalli (Big giganTic), daVe waTTs, Joey PorTer & garreTT sayers (The MoTeT) & dan schwindT (kyle hollingsworTh Band)

Friday, saTurday & sunday augusT 4-6 @ sunrise ranch:

arise Music FesTiVal

aTMosPhere, TiPPer, ani diFranco, rising aPPalachia, The eXPendaBles, BroTher ali, deserT dwellers, doPaPod & Many More

Friday augusT 11

zaPP

w/ sPecial guesTs

Friday augusT 18

JoJo sliM’s wednesday FeaT John “JoJo” herMan (widesPread Panic) w/ naughTy ProFessor & sPecial guesTs

re: search saTurday July 1

Menagerie 2 year anniVersary

FeaT waBakinoseT, TheoreTically, MoonlighT BlooM, high VolTage silenT disco & Jew Tang clan

Monday July 3

shakewell + raMirez + gerM wednesday July 5

re: search

BondaX w/ congo sanchez, aaron Bordas, Mikey Thunder & JuBee

Friday July 7

Town MounTain

w/ TenTh MounTain diVision & good graVy! (PaTio seT)

saTurday July 8

casey russell & The soul shack & cBdB

w/ henry & The inVisiBles (PaTio seT)

Tuesday July 11

soB X rBe

w/ young Pinch, oMB Peezy, lil sheik

saTurday July 22

soBer roB, whereisaleX, zoTTi

saTurday sePTeMBer 2

w/ snuBluck & BiMyo cVillou world series 001

FeaT Big Freedia

ignaTius reilly

The soul reBels Friday ocToBer 27

saTurday July 29

w/ JeFF crosBy & The reFugees & hyona

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Boulder Weekly

June 15 , 2017 37


events

EVENTS from Page 36

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Once Human, Gabriel and the Apocalypse, Elete, 13 Nails. 7 p.m. Marquis Theater, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Portugal. The Man/Local Natives — with Car Seat Headrest. 6 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494. Queer in the Headlights 2017 Pridefest Party. 3 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Tom Weiser Jazz Quartet. 6 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Toney Rocks Soul Stirring Americana. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628. Vinyl Sundays with the Denver Kush Club. 12 p.m. Spangalang Brewery, 2736 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1276. Weston Smith. 5 p.m. The Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main St., Gold Hill, 303-443-6461. Events 1940s Ball. 1 a.m. Boulder Airport, 3393 Airport Road, Boulder, 720-924-1945.

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Film on the Rocks: The Fifth Element — with Slow Caves, Decollage. 7 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Movie Mondays! 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Old Fashioned Playdate. 10 a.m. Walker Ranch Homestead, 8999 Flagstaff Mountain Road, Boulder, 303-776-8848. Ribbon Cutting. 4 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335. Summer Dance Camps. 9 a.m. Reverence Academy of Dance, 1370 Miners Drive, Suite 111, Lafayette, 303-661-0719. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder, 303-444-7888.

Anime Club. 3 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8470.

Young Artists at Work Summer Camp: Tales of the Trees. 9 a.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

Boulder Juggling Festival. 10 a.m. Casey Middle School, 1301 High St., Boulder, 303-506-7724.

Tuesday, June 20 Music

Dance Nia. 11 a.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800.

Third Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents: Brazilian Jazz. 12 p.m. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Dustin Thomas + Numatik Hanuman After Party. 6 p.m. Shine Restaurant and Gathering Place, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0120. Father’s Day. 9 a.m. The Post Chicken & Beer, 1258 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 720-588-2883.

Have You Ever Had a Concussion?

Events

Father’s Day Craft. 12 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Father’s Day Special. All Day. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Hanuman Festival. 8 a.m. Boulder High Great Lawn, 1604 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 619-569-0167. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Truth Be Told Story Slam: Game. 7 p.m. The Dairy Center for the Arts, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 502-751-8482. Monday, June 19 Music Bandshell Boogie — Boulder’s Largest Outdoor Dance Gatherings! 7 p.m. Downtown Boulder Bandshell, 1212 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 720-971-1972. Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., 303-447-BREW. Dave Honig’s New Standards Project Duo — with Ron Bland. 5 p.m. Hotel Boulderado, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-440-2880. Noches de Verano: Tango at the Teahouse. 6 p.m. Plaza beside the Dushanbe Teahouse, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-718-4798.

Concert at Sandstone Ranch. 5:30 p.m. Sandstone Ranch, 3001 Sandstone Drive, Longmont, 303-651-8404. Emporium Presents Morgan James. 6:30 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Fat Tuesdays — with Struttin’. 8 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Folk Dancing on the Plaza. 7 p.m. Plaza beside Dushanbe Teahouse, 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-499-6363. From the Ashes. 7 p.m. The Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Gasoline Lollipops. 8:30 p.m. Waterloo, 809 South Main St., Louisville, 303-993-2094. The Hang — Denver Fashion Concert. 7 p.m. City Hall, 1144 Broadway, Denver, 303-832-2383. Hip Hop Yoga: Tupac vs. Biggie. 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. The Beat, 1221 Pecos St., Denver, 720-809-9985. HomeVibe Presents: Caitlin Canty & Friends. 8 p.m. Shine Restaurant and Gathering Place, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0120. Light up the Sky/Youth in Revolt — with Versa Collide, Thousand Below. 6 p.m. Marquis Theater, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Mediterranean Medley — 2017 FOD. 6 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599.

Open Mic Night. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884.

Open Mic & Rockstar Karaoke. 8 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840.

Prospect Sound Bites Presents Soul School. 5 p.m. Prospect Park, 700 Tenacity Drive, Longmont, 303-249-4492.

Open Mic with the Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Solid Gold — 2017 FOD. 6:30 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599.

Phish Phour.O. 7 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-849-8458. Boulder Weekly


events Ryan Adams — with The Infamous Stringdusters, Nicki Bluhm. 7:30 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494. Tuesday Tapping and Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. The Wailing Souls. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Events Adult Gymnastics. 7:30 p.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717. Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4845. Festival Plaza Story Time. 10 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Getting Started with Adobe Photoshop Elements. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Kids Film Series: Beauty and the Beast. 10 a.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Open Mic. 6 p.m. Twisted Pine Brewing Company, 3201 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-771-4940.

Nathan Rivera & Jessie Andra Smith. 6:30 p.m. Four Mile Historic Park, 715 S. Forest St., Denver, 720-865-0800. Oliver Jacobson. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Re:Search - DJ Logic w/ CapYac, Yak Attack, Mikey Thunder & Jubee. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver. Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-997-4108. Shooter Jennings & Waymore’s Outlaws. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. The Wallpaper House Band. 4 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th St., Boulder, 303-939-0594.

Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335.

Events #IMOMSOHARD Mom’s Night Out: Summer Break Tour. 8p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

Swing Dance Lessons. 6:30 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S Hover St., Ste D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Children’s SRP: “Big Bubble Circus.” 2 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4821.

Swing Dancing. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Comedy at Tandoori. 8 p.m. Tandoori Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 970-302-7130.

Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway Suite 65, Boulder, 303-444-7888.

Film on the Rocks: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. 7 p.m. Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 W. Alameda Parkway, Morrison, 720-865-2494. Influential Infographic Design. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Visit with Denver Zoo Animals. 10 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424.

The Thrill Starts with the Grill

Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Summer Ballet Camps & Classes. 10 a.m. Longmont Dance Theatre Academy, 1422 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303-772-1335. Teen Tuesday: Anime & Steampunk Cosplay Afternoon. 2 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8477. Visit with Reptiles. 10 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Wednesday, June 21 Music Cirque du Soleil’s LUZIA. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver, 303-405-1100. A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie — with Trayce Chapman, Ken and Ryu, Low Hanging Fruit. 9 p.m. The Gothic Theater, 3263 S. Broadway, Englewood, 303-789-9206.

Father’s Day

Free. Open to the public.

10am-3pm

Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Foxxes (Album Release). 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Hurray for the Riff Raff — with making Movies. 8 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-337-1666. Mammoth Water. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840.

Food provided by Coors 11am – 1pm

Nathan & Jessie: Shady Grove Picnic Series. 6:30 p.m. Four Mile Historic Park, 715 S. Forest St., Denver, CO 80246, Denver, 951-303-590 SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@boulderweekly.com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

Boulder Weekly

® ®

June 15 , 2017 39


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by Ryan Syrek

It Comes at Night is a chilling and intimate end-of-the-world moral conundrum that will leave you feeling icky. In a good way!

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screen

E

verything about It Comes at Night is frickin’ uncomfortable. From the unfathomable interpersonal horror at the film’s center to the way everyone is all tired and sweaty and has to keep, you know, burning the bodies of recently deceased family members, the movie is the first thing that made me think, “OK fine, maybe America in 2017 isn’t the literal worst.” Writer/director Trey Edward Schults knows that good apocalyptic fiction makes you ask, “What would I do to survive?” but the genre’s best gives you absolutely no morally acceptable answers to that question. And what’s more fun right now than escapism that reminds you to trust no one and we’re all gonna die, right?! Paul ( Joel Edgerton) and his wife, Sarah (Carmen Ejogo), and son, Travis (Kelvin Harrison Jr.), are trying to survive a highly contagious plague that’s wiping humanity off of the map. Holed up in a boarded-up home with a good supply of drinking water, endless firewood around them and a loveable pupper, the trio fakes normalcy while knowing inside that it will never, ever return. Then Will (Christopher Abbott) breaks into their home, looking for supplies. Will claims to have a wife and son waiting for his return. Sarah and Paul go round and round reasonably discussing all potential scenarios and subsequent actions they could take. What unfolds is not the “something goes bump in the night” nonsense the title and trailers suggest, but a complex, gut-wrenching sequence of events that will leave everyone who watches feeling super-icky-awfulgross. The beauty is in the horror, which is far less about the unspeakable sickness and far more about how both fragile and unbreakable human bonds are and how understandable the most unthinkable actions can be. Edgerton, who is prone to either gruff overacting or being completely nonpresent, is a tremendous ball of fatherly coiled fury. Ejogo and Harrison ably humanize his obsessive protection, helping Paul feel less like the gun-toting redneck relative who buys you camo sweatpants for Christmas and more like Pa from Little House on the Prairie. Abbott is equally compelling as the unreadable stranger who deserves either heartfelt pity or both barrels of buckshot. But what makes the movie work best is the effective pacing. The run time barely bumps an hour and a half; any longer would have felt either cruel or boring. The horror elements, which are wisely relegated mostly to hallucinatory moments, aren’t simple “jump scares for the sake of BOO!” They serve to heighten the larger stakes without ever having the action breach the borders of the home and immediate surroundings. Much as we no longer need every superhero movie to contain an origin sequence, we no longer require the origins of an apocalypse to recognize the end of days are at hand. Get Out cunningly demonstrates the horror of modern racism, and It Comes at Night celebrates paranoia while making our collective extinction seem quietly inevitable. How apropos that the two best films of the year thus far are designed to scare the living shit out of us? This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

Boulder Weekly


film The art of winning while losing

‘Cars 3’ tackles the generational divide by Michael J. Casey

ON THE BILL:

Cars 3. Century Boulder, 1700 29th St., Boulder, 303-444-0583, cinemark.com. Tickets start at $7.65.

Speed. I am speed. Faster than fast, quicker than quick. I am Lightning.

Y

ou are until you’re not. When racecar Lightning McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson) showed up on the Piston Cup circuit, he was the rookie hotshot. Faster than the rest, McQueen shot his way up the standings with cocky arrogance. Then a detour through Radiator Springs and a chance meeting with former champ Doc “The Fabulous Hudson Hornet” (Paul Newman) taught McQueen to slow down, take life in and not race faster, but smarter. McQueen learned, and McQueen grew. Now he was not only capable of winning the Piston Cup but deserving of it as well. Several years have passed since the events of Cars (2006), and though McQueen is still a champion racer, he is starting to have doubts. Even the mantra he recites before each race — “Speed. I am speed.” — brings him pause. Though he won’t admit it, he’s starting to feel his age. Like Doc, McQueen wants to hang up his Lightyear Tires on his own terms. But, like Doc, he won’t get that chance. The newer, faster, sleeker rookies will dictate his retirement with little ceremony. Such is the way of things. Directed by Brian Fee, Cars 3 completely sidesteps the spy-caper events of Cars 2 and continues the mentor/student relationship of Cars with McQueen finding his way into Doc’s tires. McQueen doesn’t go willingly at first, but neither did Doc. No one wants to be told the world has passed them by, but it does whether they like it or not. That next generation of racers is substantially faster thanks to a heavy reliance on metrics. Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer, more a presence than a character) tops out at 210 miles per hour on the track because he can hold the line providing the fastest route, leaving McQueen — a racer who relies on sheer talent and instinct — in the dust. Not exactly where McQueen wants to be, and he enlists the help of trainer Cruz Ramirez (Cristela Alonzo) and old-timer Smokey (Chris Cooper) to find a way to go faster. But while seeking speed, McQueen finds something more than just the thrill of winning. He finds his place in this new world. That sounds a little like a schmaltzy Disney-fied message, but Pixar has a knack for presenting their stories with a healthy dose of pathos. Much like Inside Out, Up and Toy Story 3, Cars 3 understands that all things must pass. At some point, you have to get out of the way and let the generation behind through. Not everyone does, but those who do find news ways to participate and a new glow to bask in. Though thoughtfully mature, Cars 3 is not top-tier Pixar. The story drags at times and some characters can be grating, but they cannot undo the charm of a visit to the sleepy town of Thomasville, the electricity of a demolition derby and the magnificent animation that makes talking cars look believable and the grain in the asphalt look real.

Thank You for Voting for Us!

Best Pizza Slice Best Food Delivery

People tell us it’s Real New York Pizza!

Family Owned and Operated, Making Every Pizza with Love! 3060 Pearl Pkwy #112, Boulder • (303) 442-4949

Boulder Weekly

June 15 , 2017 41


SI M P L E

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FA R M

T O

TA B L E

BEST NEW RESTAURANT THANK YOU for voting for us!

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BRUNCH

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Boulder Weekly


deep dish

Caitlin Rockett

BY CAITLIN ROCKETT

Bob’s in

After 21 years, B.O.B.’s Diner is still going strong — with less gluten

I

f you’re one of the lucky ones, Bob will be in when you are. Bob Thiele is the owner of B.O.B.’s Diner in Louisville. He’s not in the shop as much these days since his son Trevor has mostly taken over the day-to-day operations of the family business, but every now and then, Bob’s in the house. I wasn’t so lucky when I dropped by the diner for lunch about a week ago, but I hit pay dirt when I called back a few days later. “You’re one of the lucky ones,” an employee informed me. “Bob’s in.” B.O.B’s Diner has been a fixture in Louisville since October 1996, taking over the space formerly known as Kevin’s. Yes, B.O.B’s is named after Thiele, but the periods in between the letters give the impression there’s something more to the name. Truth is, there is and there isn’t. “The long story — the real story — is when my kids were little, we used to go to Kevin’s. So when we decided to start a restaurant, we decided to call it Bob’s. My niece suggested we put periods in it.” And so they did. But there wasn’t any deeper meaning behind it — at least not at first. “My wife started saying, ‘Better On a Bun,’ or ‘Best Of Bob’s Sandwiches,” he says. And for the past 20 years “there’s not a day that goes by that someone doesn’t ask what it stands for.” B.O.B’s is the quintessential American diner, with its black and white checkered floor, window-lined front wall, counter and table seating with the red vinyl

chairs flecked with sparkles. But B.O.B’s wasn’t always a recreation of Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks.” About six years ago, flooding from a burst pipe forced Thiele to renovate the diner, resulting in the counter seating and retro chairs. Opportunity often disguises itself as misfortune. Thiele’s worked in the food service industry his whole life, so opening a diner was a no-brainer for the Old Town Louisville resident. When B.O.B’s first opened, it was a five-table operation serving “basically just sandwiches.” “Then we’d grab some more space and evolved into a diner doing full breakfasts,” Thiele says. “That’s our big bread and butter now. We do a lot of breakfasts.” Everyday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. B.O.B’s is serving up a smattering of American breakfast delights: biscuits and gravy, bacon and eggs, cornbeef hash, chicken fried steak, pancakes, French toast and omelets. For lunch you can build your own burger or enjoy one of B.O.B’s burger creations, like the breakfast burger topped with bacon and a fried egg. There are classic diner sandwiches like the turkey club, French dip and reuben, but you can also grab a blackened salmon sandwich or a veggie wrap. Salads are a viable option too.

About five years ago, Thiele’s son Trevor joined his dad at the diner with a few ideas for some changes. “He wanted to go with gluten-free stuff,” Thiele says. “So we came up with how to make gravy and green chili gluten free — which we sell a lot of, all gluten free. Now we use all natural Boar’s Head (deli meats and cheeses), Red Bird chicken. He improved us that way. I was the old style: ‘We’ll just do a burger,’” he says with a laugh. These days Thiele says his son is “basically running the place now.” “I don’t wanna brag too much on him, but he’s got a great personality, and he’s a people person and he really does it well.” From the diner’s windows over the past 21 years, Thiele has watched Louisville blossom into the vibrant town it is today. “It’s just nice seeing the changes that have come through town,” he says. “It’s been a good 20 years because we hit a period there back in the early ’90s when you could have shot a cannon off on Main Street and not hit a person. It’s really been revitalized.” B.O.B.’s Diner. 820 Main St., Suite 100, Louisville, 303-665-1056.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday Boulder Weekly

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

2016

June 15 , 2017 43


Celebrating 12 years of a new taste experience and 39 years of family tradition

the Praha

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Boulder Weekly


nibbles

Kim Long

HE ROAD TO T M ON

ASTEFUL ST U ET F OR

RIP COLORAD T O AY

BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

Magical Culinary Tour F

D

G

rowing up in New England, we enjoyed what were called “day trips.” Really, these summer road excursions never lasted all day even if you passed through three states in the process. Maybe it was the lousy roads or a car full of kids, but after maybe two or three hours of actual driving my parents would start looking for a motel with free “cawffee” in the room. My Kodachrome takeaway was that day trips were really excuses to stop for Reuben sandwiches, fried clam rolls and ice cream sundaes along with some swimming. In Colorado, everything is bigger, from the mountains and skies to distances and smothered burritos. People here drive an hour just to get coffee on a particularly pretty patio. My true there-and-back day trips in Colorado tend to consume all the daylight hours and some of the dark ones, too. In that spirit, I’m sharing a point-to-point Nibbles Summer 2017 Colorado Taste Trip. Buckle up. Don’t make me turn this car around. Who wants paczki?

Ronald Brooks slices brisket at his smokehouse in Aurora.

Stop No. 1: Smoking at home You will swear there couldn’t be a restaurant in this Aurora neighborhood, but then you see the smoke and catch the meaty aroma emanating from Ronald and Louella Brooks’ place: Brooks Smokehouse & Catering. On Fridays and Saturdays they serve takeout barbecue and you can hang out and eat in the backyard. The fall-apart brisket and ribs are wonderful, but don’t miss the Cajun-style smoked gator, corn maque choux and sweet coleslaw with pineapple. Tip: Sometimes they serve at festivals, so always call ahead. 800 Oakland St., Aurora, 720-297-0017.

Stop No. 2: Chilling with shaved snow After that carnivorous experience, clear your palate with finely textured xue hua bing (or Taiwanese shaved Boulder Weekly

snow) at Snowlab. Try the vegan green matcha teainfused version or elevate it with a topping of sweetened condensed milk and mocha bits. 4360 E. Evans Ave., Denver, snowlabco.com

Stop No. 3: Monumental cheeseburger It’s highly unlikely that Louis Ballast was first to top a beef patty with cheese at Colorado’s first drive-in restaurant. The site at 2776 N. Speer Blvd. in Denver is now a Key Bank, but in the parking lot is a small granite monument engraved thusly: “The cheeseburger trademark was registered by Mr. Ballast on March 5, 1935.” Take a moment to contemplate, then head to the nearby Jack-N-Grill for a Juarez Burger topped with cheese, ham, a grilled hot dog, fresh green chile,

mayo and guacamole. Other toppings available. 2524 Federal Blvd., Denver, jackngrill.com

Stop No. 4: Spudnuts and krautburgers A short highway excursion to Greeley will build your appetite for Red’s Dogs and Donuts. Appetizers are the Slavic classics: fruit-filled kolaches and krautburgers, dough-encased ground beef and cabbage. Red’s also fries spudnuts, extramoist doughnuts made with potatoes. Appreciate the subtleties of a chocolate glazed before succumbing to a heavily glazed cherry fritter. 2608 11th Ave., Greeley, redsdogsanddonuts.com see NIBBLES Page 46

June 15 , 2017 45


NIBBLES from Page 45

Kim Long

It looks harmless enough, but US Thai’s tom kha has a serious bite.

Cafe

Stop No. 5: Puffy paczki

Dine Al Fresco!

– On Our Beautiful Patio – Summer Hours: 7:30am until 9:00pm

1377 Forest Park Cir. Lafayette • 303-604-6351

Follow us on Facebook or visit our website for information and deals

MorningGloryCafe.org

Continue your doughnut research at the Royal Bakery. This old-school, full-service Polish establishment specializes in paczki, yeast-raised treats with creamy dough, jelly filling and a dusting of powdered sugar. 9606 Ralston Road, Arvada, royalbakeryco.com

Stop No. 6: Tom kha therapy Now is the time to expand your consciousness. Go where the iron mouths eat at US Thai Cafe and order a bowl of chunky tom kha “Thai hot.” This assures that the chicken and veggies in a tart coconut broth will explode on your palate and cover your forehead in sweat. The beautiful pain will wash those doughnuts right out of your system. 5228 W. 25th Ave., Edgewater, 303-233-3345.

Stop No. 7: More melty cheese, please

AST? E E H T N I E LIV ULDER? O B N I K R O W

If it is Wednesday, head to the Truffle Table because it’s “all-you-can-eat raclette” night. Simply put, raclette is fromage heaven. You melt great cheese on a tabletop heater and scrape it onto potatoes, pickles and other morsels. Tip: Pique your buds with sriracha caramel corn. 2556 15th St., Denver, truffletable.com

Stop No. 8: Recreational chocolate Recognized for our outstanding Greek cuisine, excellent service and friendly staff.

ITA! L A K T A T A E Known for our modern interpretation of classic dishes and its insistence on only using high quality fresh ingredients.

TOWN! N I S O R Y G BEST

It’s a long haul to Colorado Springs but a candy lifestyle experience awaits at Patsy’s Candies, dispensing sweets since 1903. There are free candy samples at this factory store — lots and lots of tastes of everything, including peanut butter nuggets, butter caramels, peanut brittle and chocolate fudge. The noisy backstage tour of the candy-making process is pretty cool and culminates at the cauldron filled with 2,500 pounds of liquid chocolate. Then there are more free samples. 1540 S. 21st St., Colorado Springs, patsyscandies.com see NIBBLES Page 48 John Lehndorff

During late summer, almost every treat at the Family Bakery in Grand Junction includes peaches.

ORDER ONLINE • ASK ABOUT CATERING 2426 ARAPAHOE AVE. • BOULDER • OPEN M-SA 11AM-8PM 303.443.0596 • KALITAGRILL.COM 46 June 15 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


All DAy TuesDAy • WeD - sAT 4pm - 6pm

sAT 10Am - 2pm • sun 9Am - 2pm

Boulder Weekly

June 15 , 2017 47


NIBBLES from Page 46

nibbles Kim Long

COMINGTH ! JUNE 19

The Snarf’s Strawberry Salad featuring rotisserie chicken, feta cheese, fresh strawberries, and candied pecans. It pairs perfectly with our Raspberry Vinaigrette!

You won’t care what you look like in a hairnet after sampling treats at Patsy’s Candies.

Stop No. 9: All things peachy If it’s August, head to the wonderfully traditional Home Style Bakery for fresh peach pie, fried peach hand pies, peach muffins and peach-yeasted morning ring. If it isn’t August, the Grand Junction bakery sells Cherry Pie, Chocolate Creme Pie, Lemon Meringue Pie and many other varieties. Have a slice of each and judge the crust, filling, flavor and overall memorability. Discuss. 924 N. Seventh St., Grand Junction, homestylebakerygj.com

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WWW.EATSNARFS.COM 48 June 15 , 2017

Local Food News Shine Restaurant and Gathering Place will close at 2027 13th St. later this summer and reopen in a new location minus the brewery. ... The closed Sushi Tora space at 2014 10th St. will be filled by Chimera, a new eatery from next door restaurateur Edwin Zoe and his mom of Zoe Ma Ma fame. ... Coming soon: Verde Restaurant in part of the former Blue Parrot space in Louisville. ... Boulder’s Hatch Lab hosts a workshop June 16 at Longmont’s McCauley Family Farm on fermenting hot sauces from local ingredients. Upcoming: Family Fermentation ( July 9). hatchlab.net/gather-hatch

Taste of the Week Father’s Day is my favorite holiday, but I have noticed a disparity in how dads are treated. Yes, it’s wonderful to get single malt Scotch, football tickets, dangerous power tools and wood pellet smokers, but why is it that moms get all the chocolate, the food of the gods? Chocolatier Robin Autorino of Longmont’s Robin Chocolates understands our plight with her dude-worthy Father’s Day collection of filled chocolates flavored with spirits and craft ales. My manly favorites include the Oskar Blues Beerito version with candied serrano chile and the stellar sweet filled with Ricardo’s Decaf Coffee Liqueur from Lyons’ Spirit Hound Distillery.

Words to Chew On “A person who observes the rules of proper nutrition is a person who should never be placed in charge of a barbecue.” — Dave Barry John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU, 88.5 FM. Podcasts: news.kgnu.org/category/radio-nibbles. Boulder Weekly


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drink Tour de brew: Pumphouse Brewery

A sports bar for the craft beer drinker

BOULDER BOULDER BEER’S BEER’S

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by Michael J. Casey

W

Susan France

here you drink is just as important as what you drink. I once advised my sister to always survey the crowd when she entered an unfamiliar watering hole; if everyone in the bar is drinking Bud Light, you drink Bud Light too. Even if they have Fat Tire or Stella Artois on tap, drink Bud Light. Why? Because you can be fairly sure that the Bud will at least be fresh. Who the hell knows how long that Fat Tire has been sitting in the tap line? That modus operandi holds especially true at sports bars. Though most offer a plethora Pumphouse Brewery bartender Caitlin King of local craft beers on tap, they all seem to taste a little off. Maybe the keg has been sitting around too long, maybe the line hasn’t been cleaned recently, or maybe there is too much soap residue on the glass. Whatever the reason, the beer simply isn’t what it should be. Thankfully, the Pumphouse Brewery in Longmont solves that dilemma. Here is a sports bar ON TAP: where the local craft is what everyone is quaffing. Pumphouse Brewery. Originally opened as a single-unit brewpub in 540 Main St., Longmont, 303-702-0881, 1996 by Craig Taylor, Tom Charles, Dave D’Epagnier pumphousebrewery.com. and Dennis Coombs, Pumphouse offered food and a couple of craft brews inspired by the governing firehouse theme: Red Alert Amber and Wildfire Wheat. In 2004, Pumphouse turned the adjoining annex into the Red Zone, a sports bar loaded to the gills with TVs, heaping plates of food and more beers than you can shake a stick at. Both the Red Alert Amber (5.7 percent alcohol by volume) and Wildfire Wheat (5 percent) are still available for your drinking pleasure, though you might want to wait for cooler temperatures before diving into Red Alert. With plenty of roasted malts and caramel, this beer tastes like fall and it’s anything but outside. For summer drinking, Pumphouse has plenty to quench your thirst, particularly the Old World Pilsner (4.8 percent), an unfiltered lager with more body than you might expect from your everyday pils. That unfiltered quality not only contributes a cloudy look but also dulls the sharp metallic edge that puts my friend off to the world of pale lagers. The other benefit is the pilsner’s low alcohol content, making it a perfect beer for day drinking — or the more commercially acceptable term: sessionablity. Same goes for Pumphouse’s Turning Point (4.1 percent), a session IPA that is subdued, tamed and just the sort of beer you can quaff while watching a baseball game and still remember who won the next day. My favorite was the Petite Buckwheat Saison (5.1 percent), a yeast-forward brew that has the aroma of European whole-grain bread with a distinct spice and fruit midway down the palate. My friend found her way back to the Wildfire and its fruity cousin, Raspberry Wildfire (5 percent), relieved she wasn’t stuck inside another microbrew garage drinking “boot leather and thistle-flavored beer.” Boot leather and thistle-flavor certainly have their time and place, but for those looking for well-made, properly served craft beer in a sports bar, Pumphouse is the place to be.

Boulder Weekly


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boulder marketplace HELP WANTED Veranda Sun Boulder Flexible part time work. All ages sought. Great benefits, complimentary red light for health. email for consideration: info.verandasun@gmail.com

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Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

ARIES

LIBRA

like sugar and sugar resembles salt. This isn’t usually a major problem, though. Mistakenly sprinkling sugar on your food when you thought you were adding salt won’t hurt you, nor will putting salt in your coffee when you assumed you were using sugar. But errors like these are inconvenient, and they can wreck a meal. You may want to apply this lesson as a metaphor in the coming days, Aries. Be alert for things that outwardly seem to be alike but actually have different tastes and effects.

sure that’s buried out under the cherry tree next to the ruined barn if you stay in your command center and keep staring at the map instead of venturing out to the barn. Likewise, a symbol of truth may be helpful in experiencing deeper meaning, but it’s not the same as communing with the raw truth, and may even become a distraction from it. Let’s consider one further variation on the theme: The pictures in your mind’s eye may or may not have any connection with the world outside your brain. It’s especially important that you monitor their accuracy in the coming days.

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: You have to admit that salt looks

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Here’s a possible plan for the next

10 days: Program your smart phone to sound an alarm once every hour during the entire time you’re awake. Each time the bell or buzzer goes off, you will vividly remember your life’s main purpose. You will ask yourself whether or not the activity you’re engaged in at that specific moment is somehow serving your life’s main purpose. If it is, literally pat yourself on the back and say to yourself, “Good job!” If it’s not, say the following words: “I am resolved to get into closer alignment with my soul’s code — the blueprint of my destiny.”

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Actress Marisa Berenson offers a

line of anti-aging products that contain an elixir made from the seeds of a desert fruit known as prickly pear. The manufacturing process isn’t easy. To produce a quart of the potion requires 2,000 pounds of seeds. I see you as having a metaphorically similar challenge in the coming weeks, Gemini. To create a small amount of the precious stuff you want, I’m guessing you’ll have to gather a ton of raw materials. And there may be a desert-like phenomena to deal with, as well.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: There are three kinds of habits:

good, bad and neutral. Neutral habits are neither good nor bad but use up psychic energy that might be better directed into cultivating good habits. Here are some examples: a good habit is when you’re disciplined about eating healthy food; a bad habit is watching violent TV shows before going to bed, thereby disturbing your sleep; a neutral habit might be doing Sudoku puzzles. My challenge to you, Cancerian, is to dissolve one bad habit and one neutral habit by replacing them with two new good habits. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, cosmic forces will be on your side as you make this effort.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: “Dear Dr. Astrology: Good fortune

has been visiting me a lot lately. Many cool opportunities have come my way. Life is consistently interesting. I’ve also made two unwise moves that fortunately didn’t bring bad results. Things often work out better for me than I imagined they would! I’m grateful every day, but I feel like I should somehow show even more appreciation. Any ideas? — Lucky Leo.” Dear Lucky: The smartest response to the abundance you have enjoyed is to boost your generosity. Give out blessings. Dispense praise. Help people access their potentials. Intensify your efforts to share your wealth.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Years ago, a fan of my work named

Paul emailed to ask me if I wanted to get together with him and his friend when I visited New York. “Maybe you know her?” he wrote. “She’s the artist Cindy Sherman.” Back then I had never heard of Cindy. But since Paul was smart and funny, I agreed to meet. The three of us convened in an elegant tea room for a boisterous conversation. A week later, when I was back home and mentioned the event to a colleague, her eyes got big and she shrieked, “You had tea with THE Cindy Sherman.” She then educated me on how successful and influential Cindy’s photography has been. I predict you will soon have a comparable experience, Virgo: inadvertent contact with an intriguing presence. Hopefully, because I’ve given you a heads up, you’ll recognize what’s happening as it occurs, and take full advantage.

Boulder Weekly

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: You’ll never get access to the trea-

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Maybe it wasn’t such a good idea to go gallivanting so heedlessly into the labyrinth. Or maybe it was. Who knows? It’s still too early to assess the value of your experiences in that maddening but fascinating tangle. You may not yet be fully able to distinguish the smoke and mirrors from the useful revelations. Which of the riddles you’ve gathered will ultimately bring frustration and which will lead you to wisdom? Here’s one thing I do know for sure: If you want to exit the labyrinth, an opportunity will soon appear.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Over the years I’ve read numerous

news reports about people who have engaged in intimate relations with clunky inanimate objects. One had sex with a bicycle. Another seduced a sidewalk, and a third tried to make sweet love to a picnic table. I hope you won’t join their ranks in the coming weeks. Your longing is likely to be extra intense, innovative and even exotic, but I trust you will confine its expression to unions with adult human beings who know what they’re getting into and who have consented to play. Here’s an old English word you might want to add to your vocabulary: “blissom.” It means “to bleat with sexual desire.”

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Your life in the coming days should be low on lightweight diversions and high in top-quality content. Does that sound like fun? I hope so. I’d love to see you enjoy the hell out of yourself as you cut the fluff and focus on the pith ... as you efficiently get to the hype-free heart of every matter and refuse to tolerate waffling or stalling. So strip away the glossy excesses, my dear Capricorn. Skip a few steps if that doesn’t cause any envy. Expose the pretty lies, but then just work around them; don’t get bogged down in indulging in negative emotions about them.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Inventor, architect and author Buckminster Fuller lived to the age of 87. For 63 of those years, he kept a detailed scrapbook diary that documented every day of his life. It included his reflections, correspondence, drawings, newspaper clippings, grocery bills, and much other evidence of his unique story. I would love to see you express yourself with that much disciplined ferocity during the next two weeks. According to my astrological analysis, you’re in a phase when you have maximum power to create your life with vigorous ingenuity and to show everyone exactly who you are.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: You have a cosmic license to

enjoy almost too much sensual pleasure. In addition, you should feel free to do more of what you love to do than you normally allow yourself. Be unapologetic about surrounding yourself with flatterers and worshipers. Be sumptuously lazy. Ask others to pick up the slack for you. Got all that? It’s just the first part of your oracle. Here’s the rest: You have a cosmic license to explore the kind of spiritual growth that’s possible when you feel happy and fulfilled. As you go through each day, expect life to bring you exactly what you need to uplift you. Assume that the best service you can offer your fellow humans is to be relaxed and content.

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Dear Dan: I’m almost 30 and I’m a virgin. I’m an overweight, straight-ish guy (I’m attracted to a few men, but those cases are exceedingly rare). I’ve also gone through an absolute hell life thus far, losing a testicle to cancer and having an abusive father who threatened a teenage me into celibacy by invoking the phrase “penile lobotomy” should I have sex with any girlfriends. I’ve barely dated in 10 years, and while I’m free from my father and the aforementioned mortal dick terror, I’m also INCREDIBLY scared about putting myself out there. I’m disabled, I’m not conventionally attractive by most standards, my whole zone down there is scarred up from surgeries, and, to top it all off, I’m on the small side. The last time I had the opportunity for sex, I went for it, but I was so terri- © Rachel Robinson fied that I couldn’t keep it up. The woman I was with said something to the effect of “Well, I can’t do anything with that, now can I?” after which I asked her to leave because, seriously, that’s kind of an asshole thing to say. I’m notionally on Tinder and Bumble, but I really don’t know what I’m doing — and more often than not, I feel like the right thing for any theoretical partners would be for me to just stay in hiding and not inflict my grotesque presence on them. I’m scared of another humiliation, as that’s most definitely not my kink, and I’m at an age where my complete lack of experience and physical deformity are (I would have to imagine) major issues for anyone I might encounter. I truly want romance, sexuality and companionship in my life. I haven’t fought through poverty, disability, physical and emotional abuse and my genitalia trying to kill me to stay entombed in my office alone and unloved. I just do not know where to even begin. — The Virgin Who’s Been Fucked A Whole Lot Just Never In The Good Way Dear TVWBFAWLJNITGW: Off the top of my head... Hire a sex worker. It will allow you to separate your anxieties about finding romance and companionship from your anxieties about being sexually inexperienced. A kind, indulgent, competent sex worker can relieve you of your virginity and help restore — or instill — confidence in your dick’s ability to get and stay hard in the presence of another human being. Be totally honest about your inexperience and your concerns. If you get the sense during negotiations — which should be brief and to the point — that the woman you’re talking to is impatient or uncaring, thank her for her time and start over. There are kind, caring, compassionate sex workers out there. Boulder Weekly

Presumably you’ve got a computer in your office, TVWBFAWLJNITGW. Use it to find one. Get out of the house. Go places, do things — as much as your disability and budget allow. Even if you have to go alone, go. Even if the things you want to do are unlikely to put you in front of many/any women, do those things. You’re likelier to meet someone if you’re out of the house and moving through the world. Even if you don’t meet someone right away, you’ll feel less isolated and less alone. Even if you never meet someone (I’m not sugarcoating things — some people don’t), going places and doing things means you’ll have a rich and full and active life regardless. You’re not alone. Okay, you’re alone — but you’re not alone alone. Meaning, there are women (and men) out there who feel just as paralyzed as you do — because they’re 30-year-old-or-older virgins, because they’re not conventionally attractive, because their first/only sexual experiences were just as humiliating, because they had traumatic childhoods and bear emotional scars. You want a woman to come into your life who is patient and accepting and kind and willing to look past your disability and your inexperience and your difficult history. Be patient, accepting, kind and similarly willing. Get over those scars. I had a boyfriend a long time ago who had significant scarring on his balls and taint. He was a farm boy (sigh), and he fell on a piece of farm machinery and wound up straddling a scalding-hot pipe. I don’t know how that worked exactly, because I don’t know from farm machinery, but the pipe burned through his jeans and left third-degree burns on his balls, taint and upper-upper thigh. Ten years later, we started going out — and guess what? I didn’t notice his scars. And not for want of opportunity: He was my first serious boyfriend, and I spent the better part of three months with my face in his crotch. The scars that were so obvious to him and left him feeling self-conscious about his genitals? They were invisible to me until he needlessly apologized for them. Genitals are a jumble of flesh and folds and hairs and colors and bits and pieces and sometimes scars, TVWBFAWLJNITGW. If you’re worried your scarring is noticeable, mention that you’re a cancer survivor and lost a ball but gained a sick (as in cool) scar. Good luck, TVWBFAWLJNITGW. We’re rooting for you. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

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EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Matt Cortina

Sessions seeks to undo medical marijuana protections

I

n a letter to legislators made public this week, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions asked Congress to get rid of laws that have helped the medical marijuana industry avoid federal prosecution. Sessions outlined in the May 1 letter his belief that the Department of Justice (DOJ) should have authority to fund drug prosecutions, “particularly in the midst of an historic drug epidemic.” He also expressed his belief that “smoking marijuana ... has significant negative health effects.” Legislation in effect since 2014 has prevented the DOJ from using funds to prevent certain states “from implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession or cultivation of medical marijuana” — even though, Sessions points out, marijuana remains illegal under the Controlled Substances Act. The Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals also ruled last year that the DOJ couldn’t use funds to prosecute entities on matters regarding medical marijuana, unless those entities are in violation of their state’s medical marijuana law. But Sessions thinks this too should be opened up for DOJ funding. “The Department must be in a position to use all laws available to combat the transnational drug organizations and dangerous drug traffickers who threaten American lives,” he writes as justification for allowing the DOJ to use their own discretion in funding prosecutions. Drug traffickers already cultivate and distrib-

Boulder Weekly

Gage S kid

more/Wikimedia Commons

ute marijuana throughout the U.S. under the “guise” of medical marijuana operations, he writes. Sessions pulled out Colorado as an example of how he thinks criminals are abusing the medical marijuana system. Citing the recent indictment of 16 people in a drug trafficking ring, Sessions noted that the “ringleader” of the operation held an active Colorado medical marijuana license. Details of the case are still being sorted out, and

in the same Denver Post article Sessions cited, George Brauchler, the 18th Judicial District Attorney, which is prosecuting the case, couldn’t say if the operation was using marijuana laws to shield their activities. Sessions then concluded his letter with a rundown of all the ways marijuana is harmful: It’s “linked to an increased risk of psychiatric disorders such as psychosis, respiratory ailments ... and substance abuse disorder and addiction.” People who started smoking pot in their teens lose an average of eight IQ points by middle age, Sessions writes. Nowhere in the letter, unsurprisingly, does Sessions provide research or testimony that contradicts his thesis that marijuana use is sinful and medical marijuana is nothing but a cover for drug traffickers. He also doesn’t mention, even in the “midst of an historic drug epidemic,” that most people are dying from opiate abuse, which many folks have to turn to because it’s easier to get a prescription from a doctor than access medical marijuana. The funding stipulation is set to expire in September, so that means in order for it to stay, Congress would have to renew it. If it doesn’t, the medical marijuana industry, and those who rely on it, will likely be left in the dark about the future of the industry. However, the good news is that the amendment has wide, bipartisan support. If Sessions’ letter has any impact on lawmakers in this politically charged time remains to be seen.

June 15 , 2017 57


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Why asset forfeiture reform riles sheriffs and police chiefs

I

f there is any lingering doubt as to the extent to which the war on drugs has corrupted the American criminal justice system, consider the reaction of Colorado law enforcement to the passage of House Bill 1313. House Bill 1313, which was signed into law by Governor Hickenlooper last Friday, is a compromise civil asset forfeiture reform bill that the Colorado Legislature passed this session. The measure, which had strong bipartisan support, does four things: 1) It requires law enforcement agencies and DAs to report twice a year to the state Department of Local Affairs how their agencies came by the proceeds from any forfeitures they received and how they used the boodle — including how much was spent on snitches, expert witnesses, vehicles, firearms, computers, furniture, meals, entertainment, training conferences, etc. 2) It requires the seizing agencies to file their reports by specified dates. If they fail to file or file late, they will be subject to civil penalties — a $500 fine if the report is 30 days late and a fine of up to 50 percent of the value of the property seized during the reporting period if its 75 days late. 3) The bill directs the Department of Local Affairs executive director to submit an annual report on seizure and forfeiture activity in Colorado to the Governor, the Colorado Attorney General and the judiciary committees of the legislature. 4) The bill prohibits the seizing agencies from receiving forfeiture proceeds from the federal government unless “the aggregate net equity value of the property and currency seized in the case is in excess of $50,000” and “the federal government commences a forfeiture proceeding that relates to a filed criminal case.” As reform bills go, this one seems pretty modest, but that didn’t keep Colorado sheriffs and police chiefs organizations, along with the Colorado Municipal League, from (unsuccessfully)

Boulder Weekly

mounting a full-court press to get Hickenlooper to veto the measure. That’s because even the modest reforms in House Bill 1313 stand to derail law enforcement’s and local governments’ asset forfeiture gravy train. Civil asset forfeiture involves the seizure of money and property from people suspected of being linked to crime — sometimes before someone is even charged, never mind convicted. Sometimes the “linkage” is pretty indirect — like seizing a rented house that was turned into a marijuana grow facility without the knowledge of the owner, or seizing the car a pot dealer borrowed from his girlfriend to go to a deal. “Government should never keep assets seized from innocent people,” Hickenlooper said in a written statement issued when he signed the bill.

Both Colorado law and federal law allow asset forfeiture, but Colorado law is more restrictive as to when and how seizures can take place. Colorado law enforcement agencies have evidently gotten around the state restrictions by getting the feds to do the seizing. The feds then split the plunder with the locals. This is why the local sheriffs and chiefs organizations and the municipal league got their shorts in a knot over the provision of House Bill 1313 that bars them from receiving forfeited money and property from the feds that falls below the $50,000 threshold. According to the Colorado Springs Police Department, had House Bill 1313 been in place since 2012, the department wouldn’t have received a share of the seizures grabbed under federal law in 85 percent of its cases. Colorado Springs officers spent over 42,000 hours investigating cases with federal partners, the department said. Those numbers explain a lot about what the war on drugs and asset forfeiture are doing to law enforcement and the criminal justice system. Follow the money. The bounty from asset forfeiture goes a long way toward explaining why a police department will devote 42,000 man hours to chasing drug dealing, an activity whose violence is almost entirely the product of drug prohibition, instead of focusing on non-drug-related crimes like murders, robberies, rapes and burglaries, which don’t produce much in the way of seizable assets. Follow the money. The ongoing asset forfeiture windfall also may explain why so many police chiefs and sheriffs oppose marijuana legalization, even though they know from personal experience that marijuana is less harmful than booze, and marijuana prohibition is a failure. Follow the money. The proceeds from the seizures go to the investigating agencies. That explains why asset forfeiture looks more like buccaneering than law enforcement.

June 15 , 2017 59


icumi

ONE SMALL STEP FOR CHICKEN

The first living creatures to leave the planet — and return alive, nonetheless — were fruit flies back in 1947. All together, humankind has sent 32 monkeys, a mouse, some stray dogs from Russia, a rabbit, a French cat named Félicette, some chimpanzees, tortoises, meal worms, plants, spiders, jellyfish, amoebae, algae and artificial satellites meant to help us monitor the weather and transmit data into space. In the middle of all of that, in 1961, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin left Earth’s atmosphere. Since then, the human species has managed to send a total of 536

An Errant Knight/Wikimedia Commons

(IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world

people from 38 countries into the ever expanding cosmos. And now, this summer, space will receive another visitor from our humble planet. I think you know what this calls for (cue French horns): Space — the final frontier. These are the voyages of the KFC Zinger Sandwich. Its

It’s just the inspiration you need.

four-day mission is to explore strange new sauces; to seek out new telemetric data and new herbs and spices; to boldly go where no chicken sandwich has gone before. The Colonel is partnering with balloon maker World View to send its spicy chicken sandwich into space on June 21 for what it claims will be the longest controlled stratospheric balloon flight with a

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commercial payload in history. It will, indeed, bring back telemetry data, and hopefully a handful of that Finger Lickin’ Good sauce because they just never give you enough. And you thought Katy Perry had gone overboard with the marketing stunts lately. Odds are the chicken sandwich will return to Earth before you can receive a chicken sandwich at the drive-thru window.

IT’S HAPPENING. ROBOTS ARE COMING FOR US.

If the 1983 documentary War Games taught us anything, it’s that the world is safe until the computers start mastering video games. Back then, Matthew Broderick was able to save us by tricking the computer to play itself in tic-tac-toe, but in 2017 our computers play much more sophisticated games: Ms. Pac Man. Just this week, Microsoft announced it has built an artificial intelligence that earned 999,990 points in Ms. Pac Man, the highest score possible in the game. (Because if you’re gonna build a robot, why not build a robot that plays old-school video games?) The AI’s score sailed past the human high score of 266,330 — admittedly a pretty pathetic score, proving that humans are basically worthless. By using real-time problem-solving, the software made quick decisions in deciding which moves would yield higher rewards. Microsoft chose Ms. Pac Man because the game is notoriously more unpredictable than the original Pac Man. This is supposedly so the computer can get even smarter — which is always a good idea. By dealing with the volatility, the hope is the computer can translate this problem-solving to real-world solutions. Or maybe it’ll just go on to more complicated games like Angry Birds or Candy Crush. Following the announcement, Microsoft released another statement looking for a test subject who’s willing to get the AI implanted for further testing. The casting call is looking for heavily accented, burly Austrian men. They’re calling the project Skynet.

EVOLAB.COM BeZet, ilovemypit/ Wikimedia Commons

60 June 15 , 2017

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Valid 6/15/17 - 6/30/17

Limit 2 per order. Valid 6/15/17 - 6/30/17

ATM ONSITE! *some restrictions apply

www.karingkind.com • www.karingkindlabs.com 5854 Rawhide Ct., Boulder CO 80302 (1 Mile North of Boulder on HWY 36)

303-449-WEED (9333)

2801 Iris Ave., Boulder, CO

See our full-page ad on PG ??!

Colorado’s #1 Source for Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

& Oregon’s Only #4 Soil.

Guaranteed lowest price! Wholesale Pricing & Free Delivery for Qualifying Commercial Accounts! 1387 E South Boulder Rd., Louisville, CO

303.66.HYDRO (664.9376) victoryhydro.com

www.terrapincarestation.com See our ad below

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 57. THE

TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, BOULDER REC & MED SKIP THE WAIT! 1909 Broadway St. LL

21+ Counter Now Open Taste the Difference, 2897 Mapleton Ave Ste 800 303.539.6525 @14erBoulder

Love the Price!

21+ Counter Open *Full Menu and Specials Now now on Weedmaps* 2897 Mapleton Ave Ste 800 303.539.6525 @14erBoulder

Deals

Enter to

PURA FORMALLY KNOW AS RX GREEN, IS BLOWING THE LAST OF THEIR STOCK OUT.... $25.00 FOR A 500MG CARTS & $35.00 1000MG CARTS $420 OZ OF WAX AND SUGAR WAX $450 OZ OF SHATTER + TAX

Some restrictions may apply. While supplies last. Not valid with any other offers.

FOR JUNE FLOWER SPECIALS! THIS WEEK’S COUPONS:

$20 FLOWER 1-8 (REC)* BUY 2 PRE-ROLLS GET 1 FOR 1¢ (MED)* BUY EVOLAB OR O.PEN 500 MG CARTRIDGE, GET 2ND FOR 20% OFF (MED/REC)* OPEN 8AM-9PM MON-SAT, 11AM-5PM SUNDAY 1750 30th Street, Suite 7, Boulder

720.379.6046

*See ad on PG 53 for restrictions.

HPC/EPC’S WANTED $1,350 OTD CALL STORE FOR DETAILS

Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Olio, Spherex, Bolder Extracts, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar

Craft Cannabis

to

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

While supplies last.

MED ONLY See Ad on PG 53

Win Free Tickets

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

Voted Boulder’s Best Recreational Dispensary 2015-2017! Now open daily until 9:45pm Save Time, Skip the Line! Order Ahead Online! Same day pickup. Now available everyday from open to 9pm. Early Bird Special* Shop Between 8-10 am Monday - Friday, 9-10 am Saturday, Receive 15% off your entire purchase! Strain of the Week* Gorilla Glue 20% off all quantities. $100 HALF OZ Strains* Golden Goat, Afghani, Blackberry Kush, Clementine, Fire On The Mountain, Karma Bitch, Sugar Magnolia, Tangerine Haze * Not to be combined with other discounts. While supplies last. Some exclusions may apply.

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com

303.440.1323

sign up for MMJ America’s text blasts at mmjamerica.com and be automatically entered to win a pair of tickets to see the big gigantic at red rocks

TUES-SAT 9AM-9:45PM • SUN & MON 9AM-6:45PM • 303-862-4064 • MMJAMERICA.COM MMJ America offers free parking in our private lots. If our lots are ever full, we’ll pay for your parking! SHERIDAN REC & MED • 5201 W. 48th Avenue • 303-993-6424 Check out our expanded selection of edibles. 21+

1534 55th St., Boulder 303-444-0861

8a- 6:45p Sun-Tues • 8a- 9:45p Weds-Sat

www.elementsboulder.com

WHERE NATURE & MEDICINE MEET

RECREATIONAL:

OUNCES

1/2 GRAM STRAIN SPECIFIC KIEF FOR $10 (PRETAX) STARTING AT

MEDICAL: $150.00

1/2 GRAM STRAIN SPECIFIC KIEF FOR $9Everyday (PRETAX) Open 15% OFF DABBA CHOCOLATE BARS 303.442.2565 20% OFF SEASONAL INCREDIBLE BARS 5420 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder While supplies last • Valid through 6.22.17

www.boulderwc.com Open Everyday 5420 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder www.boulderwc.com • 303.442.2565

6 15 17 boulder weekly  
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