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Are residential co-ops a solution to Boulder’s affordability and energy goals? by Emma Murray

2019


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Are residential co-ops a solution to Boulder’s affordability and energy goals? by Emma Murray

news:

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Local community hopes to prevent the deportation of Cameroonian friend by Angela K. Evans

Natural Habitat Adventures to offset air travel emissions for all clients by Will Brendza

Christi Cooper named first Focus on Nature Artist in Residence at Jacob Burns Film Center by Caitlin Rockett

Boulder’s folk hero Gregory Alan Isakov on touring and farming by L. Kent Wolgamott

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Crack Pie, Irish Car Bombs, Wopburgers and tales of culinary correctness by John Lehndorff

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Looking at the U.N.’s latest study on the potential extinction of 1 million plant and animal species from a food perspective by Matt Cortina

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departments The Highroad: Big Mac’s new Big Data ‘innovation’ Danish Plan: The coming lithium wars: what we know Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views News: BW wins numerous awards at Top of the Rockies journalism contest Lab Notes: Forecasting nature Arts & Culture: Boulder Symphony and Boulder Chorale join forces Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘The Devil’s Advocate is a Pacifist’ by Maggie Saunders Screen: ‘High Life’ has zero gravitas Film: America’s tenuous separation of church and state in ‘Hail Satan?’ Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Tour de brew: Cellar West Artisan Ales Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Best wishes Weed Between the Lines: Cannabis-inspired gifts for Mother’s Day Cannabis Corner: The legislature comes through for pot

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Editorial interns, Giselle Cesin, Lenah Reda Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Coordinator, Lara Henry Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar Bookkeeper, Veronica Turner PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama

May 9, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 39 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

Big Mac’s new Big Data ‘innovation’ by Jim Hightower

T

he great thing about corporate giants is that they are such amazing business innovators. For example, in the category of “wheel-spinning” innovation — i.e., trying to change a corporation’s course without actually changing anything — it’s hard to top McDonald’s. For several years, the fastfood chain has been losing customers to younger chains with healthier, more-stylish offerings. So, CEO Steve Easterbrook has tried to recoup the losses with PR tricks, such as calling the menu “healthy” and “fresh.” But a McNugget and fries are still what they are, so people have not bitten the PR bait. I

Now, though — Eureka! — he’s hit on an innovation that’ll surely cause hungry eaters to flock to the Golden Arches: artificial intelligence. Yes, exclaimed Steve-the-Innovator, consumers need a robotic order-taker to advise them on what to order — all based on AI’s ability to digest unlimited data about the weather, traffic, time of day and what other people are ordering. “Decision technology” it’s called, and the CEO spent 300 million McDollars to buy these so-called thinking machines, which the maker claims will provide “the rapid and scalable creation of highly targeted digital MAY 9, 2019

interactions.” Now, what could be more inviting than that? Easterbrook adds excitedly that his innovative deployment of this artificial intelligence network will provide an “even more personalized customer experience.” Sure, Steve, nothing like more computers to add a warm, personal touch to make a meal more appealing. Far from helping customers, McDonald’s snazzy new AI ordering system will be helping the corporation by silently compiling personal information on you, ranging from your “movement patterns” to your license plate number. As Easterbrook admits, McDonald’s will use the technology to “make the most” of the data collected. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. I

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The coming lithium wars: what we know By Paul Danish

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e all know that we have only a mere 11 years to save the planet from the global warming apocalypse. We know this because everyone from Boulder Weekly to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has told us so. We also know that the only way to prevent said apocalypse from happening is to eliminate the use of fossil fuels (coal, petroleum and natural gas primarily) by replacing them with electric energy from renewable sources (wind and solar primarily). We also know that the principal technological bottle-neck clogging the transition to an all-electric powered civilization is the absence of batteries with the performance to power the transition. (Battery performance is measured by metrics like how much electricity can they hold [energy density], how fast can they deliver the energy stored in them [power density], how many times they can be charged and discharged, how fast they can be recharged, and how much it costs to make them.) We know that without producing enough batteries to hold enough energy to power more than 200 million electric cars and trucks, the U.S. won’t be able to quit using gasoline and diesel (more than four billion barrels of it a year) for ground transportation. Without high-performance batteries, wind and solar power will be unable to provide more than a third (if that) of the country’s electricity due to wind and solar energy’s erratic nature. We also know that the only currently available batteries up to the task are lithium-ion batteries. There are theoretically better non-lithium batteries under development, but we know that we have only 11 years to save the planet, and that it will take a national effort equal to what it took to win World War II to get off of fossil fuels by 2030. Thus the putative Green New Deal.

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We also know that, in the words of former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you wish you had. The same applies to the war against fossil fuels. In the war against fossil fuels, lithium-ion batteries are what we have. And that makes lithium a strategic material. We also know that global lithium production capacity will have to be increased by two or three orders of magnitude to implement a U.S. transition to an all-electric economy by 2030, never mind the needs of the rest of the world. And we also know that most of the world’s current lithium production capacity is outside of the U.S., which means that the country is dependent on foreign suppliers for a strategic material needed to meet an existential threat. In light of all this, what are we supposed to make of a story that appeared in last Tuesday’s Los Angeles Times headlined, “A war is brewing over lithium mining at the edge of Death Valley”? It seems that an Australian company named Battery Mineral Resources, Ltd. has asked the federal government for permission to drill four exploratory wells targeting lithium deposits in the Panamint Valley, which is on the edge of Death Valley National Park in California. According to LA Times reporter Louis Sahagun, “The drilling request has generated strong opposition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the Sierra Club and the Defenders of Wildlife, who say ‘lithium extraction would bring industrial sprawl, large and unsightly drying ponds, and threaten a fragile ecosystem that supports Nelson’s bighorn sheep, desert tortoises, and the Panamint alligator lizard, among other species.’” So now we know that American environmental organizations don’t take their own narrative about global warming very seriously. If they see DANISH PLAN Page 8

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Scapegoating immigrants Is it scapegoating immigrants or scapegoating illegal immigrants? I think it is the latter as my Swiss wife is a naturalized American citizen and I don’t see anybody scapegoating her as well as the millions of other naturalized citizens. In this case, I support a hard line stance against illegal immigration for one reason... its negative effect on our public education system. I have no ill will against any illegal immigrant but the decades of disregarding our immigration laws has put a burden on our schools that is just too much. Let me ask, how many illegal immigrants are taken in by charter schools? And yet our education secretary wants to use public funds for charter schools? Another question... why would we expect state sheriffs to enforce the new red flag laws when cities refuse to enforce immigration laws? The lost left and right extremes seem as nutty as ever. Michael Ortiz/Lafayette

If not collusion, then what?

Everyone seems to assume the Mueller report found no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Trump, of course, is crowing he’s been “exonerated.” But the language in the Mueller report is overly cautious and confusing; it says Trump and Russia were on parallel paths regarding anti-Hillary electoral sabotage, admits that both parties repeatedly talked together about this; yet, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Last week’s correct answer was: C) The following inventions are be attributed to the historic Italian bike manufacturer, Bianchi: the first ever women’s bike commissioned by Queen Margaret in 1895, AND The first ever mountain bike commissioned by Italian Army in 1915.

strangely, “the investigation did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities. ... A statement that the investigation did not establish particular facts does not mean there was no evidence of those facts.” If Trump and company were not coordinating or conspiring with the Russians in their many documented contacts, what were they doing? It’s clear the White House ghostwrote Attorney General Barr’s summary and directed the extensive redactions in the released report. Barr is no public servant: he’s Trump’s unscrupulous Yes Man. Is it coincidence that his conclusions parrot Trump’s own extravagant claims of innocence? Barr’s obfuscation and refusal to talk honestly about the Mueller report is just more Trump obstruction of justice. Much more important than election matters are Trump’s business dealings with Russian oligarchs and related parties like Deutsche Bank. If Trump is secretly beholden to Russia or any nation, he’s compromised. It’s a form of treason. Since Trump has chosen to ignore the Constitution’s Emoluments Clause, which forbids a president from conducting personal business in foreign countries, he’s set himself up for such a damning con-

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LETTERS from Page 7

flict of interest. Trump’s response to accusations, criticism or even requests for information is always the same: deny, lie, cover up, legally stonewall and then launch vicious personal attacks against the media and his accusers. We never hear a convincing case for his innocence. After learning of the Mueller investigation, he said, “This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I’m f—ed.” The man stinks of guilt. It all points towards impeachment. Remember, Trump’s likely treason is one of many impeachable offenses from campaign-finance violations to obstruction of justice to tax fraud to emoluments issues to undermining American democracy to inciting violence against minorities to a closet full of skeletons investigating Congressional investigators are attempting to reveal. Trump hasn’t been “exonerated” of anything; let’s rid our nation of this reckless scoundrel. Paul Dougan/Boulder

Russia aligns with GOP

Russia offers nothing that the GOP hasn’t been fighting for in decades. Voter suppression, caging and gerrymandering are well-established GOP ploys that undercut our democracy, a word that you rarely hear exiting their mouths because they don’t believe in democracy anymore. By asserting that corporations are people, Citizen’s United, a right-wing Supreme Court product, gave corpo-

rations unlimited advantage to influence voters in our elections. Commandeering votes from the courthouses, porches and mailboxes of the aged and unsuspecting are well established and recently exposed GOP crimes to try to overcome the fact that their message is no longer palpable to the youth, minorities and the educated. Cheating them is not a weakness, it is a necessary muscle used to pry wins away from the rising democratic majority. That Russia is willing to jump in and lend a hand squelches no morals that haven’t already been squelched. “God made him president so we must follow and swallow” are comments I don’t swallow from those who have previously claimed that “Our country has lost its moral compass.” Truth is, Vladimir Putin helped make Trump president because the GOP couldn’t do it all on their own and are now finding themselves desperately without a moral compass. That we are sliding into fascism is OK to the GOP as long as whites only are in control. No more messy voting, women’s rights, minority equalities, religious freedoms or gay rights to consider. All gone for good. Yeah, yeah, what could be better?... Freedom and democracy would be much better but not easier as we were told by our forefathers who had seen the worst in the old country then gave us a template and the vision to realize the importance of always fighting to keep freedom and democracy alive. Tom Lopez/Longmont

DANISH PLAN from Page 6

really thought climate change was the existential threat they claim it is, they would be doing everything humanly possible to expedite lithium mining and lithium battery production, even if the mining is going to trash the environment around the mine. And they certainly wouldn’t do anything to interfere with it. If you want to wage war on fossil fuels in order to save the planet, you ought to be adult enough to realize there is going to be some collateral damage and that you are going to have to live with it. C’est la guerre. We also know that American environmentalists are incapable of setting meaningful priorities. Most I

sane people would tell you that saving the planet is more important than saving the desert tortoise, or even saving the desert. Today’s enviros seem to be having trouble with the concept. And we know intuitively that if there is one place in the United States that had to be declared a national sacrifice area in the interest of saving the planet by 2030, it would be the desert region the environmental groups are currently exercised about. It’s called Death Valley for a reason. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER WEEKLY


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COURTESY INGRAM CO-OP

M

alik Salsberry waves his hand toward the backyard. “We’re going to do new sod on this half,” he says, explaining the landscaping project he’s planned for the Ingram House, one of Boulder’s newest legal co-ops, where he lives with 11 other residents under one roof in the Martin Acres neighborhood. A honeycrisp apple tree will go in one corner, a Japanese lilac tree in another. There’s just enough space for a small greenhouse and a few planter boxes. “Then I’m going to

House since November 2018, when he moved to Boulder from Iowa to work on food-waste reduction initiatives as an AmeriCorps VISTA member. Like many folks moving to or already living in Boulder, Salsberry was searching for a place to live that was not only affordable and easy to access within city limits, but also supportive of social diversity and environmental sustainability. Of course, finding such a situation in Boulder is challenging. According to Zillow’s rental data, in the final months of 2018, the median rent for a one-bedroom Boulder apartment hovered above $1,600 per month. That means a salary of at least $64,000 a year is necessary for someone trying to spend no more than 30 percent of their income on rent. In other words, most folks working the jobs that make Boulder function (grocery store managers, teachers, bus drivers, chefs, nonprofit employees) are simply not earning enough to afford 600 square feet or less of living space, not to mention a two-bedroom apartment or a house. The scarcity of affordable living in Boulder has driven the exploration of nontraditional housing opportunities. Now that it’s been two and a half years since the City implemented a proper licensing process for residential co-ops (intentionally shared living spaces and resources), they’re gaining a foothold. While still

MALIK SALSBERRY (right) and Eric Budd (left) are two of 12 members in the Ingram Co-op, located in the Martin Acres neighborhood.

Welcome home

Are residential co-ops a solution to Boulder’s affordability and energy goals?

By Emma Murray decide between another apple tree or a sweet cherry pie cherry tree,” Salsberry says. Right now, though, Ingram’s yard is filled with lava rocks, mismatched flagstone and a dysfunctional garden shed. “We’ll get there,” he says, heading back inside, where the kitchen smells like a popular Japanese-Hawaiian fusion joint. Another co-op member stirs the tempeh frying on the stove. Salsberry steps in to fluff the rice. Salsberry’s been living in the Ingram 10

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


working through some early obstacles, it’s becoming clear that co-ops could play a role in solving Boulder’s increasingly unaffordable housing market, while also helping the City reach its energy-reduction goals. “Residential land use [in Boulder] is entirely focused on perpetuating simply what’s become expensive singlefamily housing,” says Bryan Bowen, chair of the City Planning Board. “Right now the paradigm of Boulder as a predominantly single-family-homeowner-run place is problematic.” Limited housing and income options restrict who can live in Boulder. Hollowing out the working class and narrowing the pool of families that can afford to live in neighborhoods has stunted Boulder’s diversity growth. Last year the City reported 88 percent of the population identifies as white. The working class continues to leave the city, seeking lower home and rent prices in east county and beyond. What remains is a wealthier community — a median household income of $97,800 and rising — which prices out more and more people by the year. When folks can’t live where they work, they commute, increasing not only traffic and individuals’ stress, but also county-wide emissions. All these factors together make single-family homes not only the least affordable, but also the least energy-efficient form of city dwelling. “If we intend to do anything about climate change or social justice, perpetuating the single-family suburban lifestyle is not going to do it,” Bowen says. Co-op living is at once a lifestyle that maximizes affordability, encourages community and enhances energy efficiency through the sharing of resources that are normally confined to a user pool no greater than the nuclear family. Bowen says, “It’s a really essential piece of the solution to Boulder’s housing and also carbon footprint problems.” When Salsberry found the Ingram House, moving into one of its rooms seemed like an obvious solution to his needs as a new Boulder transplant, recent college graduate and nonprofit employee. The Ingram House is owned by the Boulder Housing Coalition (BHC), a decades-old nonprofit invested in creating affordable, community-enhancing, cooperative housing for Boulder County. Like BHC’s three other co-ops, most of the rooms in the Ingram House are BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

designated as permanently affordable; residents must earn less than $30,440, $38,050, $45,660 or $60,423 a year (depending on the room and house) to qualify. The seven other independent coops in Boulder, outside BHC’s network, don’t have the same income restrictions, though the shared living situation usually results in rents cheaper than the market rate.

Split across three floors — a basement, ground-level and upstairs — there are 12 bedrooms and four and a half bathrooms; the large kitchen has a floor-to-ceiling pantry with shelves stacked with dried goods like beans, rice and spices, two industrial fridges, two stoves and an elongated dining room table; the common room is lined with couches, chairs, art and instruments. It’s clean and orderly. COURTESY INGRAM CO-OP

THE INGRAM CO-OP resides in the Martin Acres neighborhood and can house up to 12 people at a given time. Each resident contributes 4-6 hours of weekly work to keep the co-op functioning and orderly. Pictured above, current housemates Justin Justin Trammell and Caelynn Christoff enjoy a meal.

At Ingram, monthly rent and utilities, which make the 4,600-square-foot house run, are split between all 12 people, which comes out to approximately $685 each. Food is bought in bulk, divided among house members who pay an additional $150 every month. Every Monday night the 12 residents of the Ingram House gather for dinner and then a house meeting, where they debrief the prior week and plan for the week ahead. Each house member periodically rotates chores and responsibilities — like cooking dinner, cleaning the refrigerator, shoveling snow, buying bulk food, coordinating social events, mediating and accounting — that generally add up to around 4-6 hours a week. I

The night of stir-fried tempeh and steamed rice, nine of the 12 Ingram House members gathered around the table, passing the soy sauce and spicy mayo. One is an architecture student, one is an engineer, one is a software developer, one is an energy strategist. They host communal meals three nights each week so co-op members can come home to a warm, familystyle dinner; individuals make other meals as they please with the food stocked in the kitchen. For most of the Ingram House, this way of life is a welcome contrast to the individual-centric and increasingly transient trends of modern society — particularly as the app-heavy, Uberdriving gig economy continues to swell. Most young professionals are moving away from their families, hometowns or college communities, and while technologies like social media help people stay connected to old friends, it doesn’t always completely replace the support that in-person communities can provide. “I think cooperative housing and MAY 9, 2019

cohousing are beacons of a future paradigm,” Bowen says, “where your quality of life can go way up through the sharing of resources and through sharing your lives and through relying on each other as opposed to the sort of isolation that we get from the way most Boulder neighborhoods are designed.” A 2015 study used by co-op advocates during the legalization debate analyzed a year’s worth of per-capita energy consumption in each of Boulder’s known-but-illegal co-ops at the time and compared them to the typical Coloradan consumer. The study found that people living in coops use about 25 percent of the electricity, 30 percent of the natural gas and 30 percent of the water that average Colorado consumers use. They share appliances, heat, tools and, in some cases, cars. In the context of household energy use, co-ops represent the housing model that comes closest to meeting Boulder’s commitment to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 80 percent by 2050 — all without changing their electrical supply or significantly investing in infrastructure upgrades. Even so, plans for solar panels and electric car chargers are in the works at several co-op locations. Co-op residents also learn a variety of essential skills while living in the community. “Each house has a lot of autonomy,” says BHC’s Executive Director, Lincoln Miller. “People are doing a whole bunch of stuff. They’re doing maintenance, they’re doing accounting, they’re doing food ordering, they’re doing a consensus process, they’re serving on the nonprofit board, they’re doing management. So our residents are getting all of those skills, which is super important and that’s what makes this model so different. It’s not only the affordability but the rights commensurate with ownership, and the skill-building we provide.” For all co-op living’s social and environmental boons, however, a proper licensing process wasn’t formalized in Boulder until January 2017. Since then, only eight co-ops have successfully navigated the licensing process. The issue is how tightly the current single-family-household paradigm is woven into the fabric of Boulder and most other urban/subursee CO-OP Page 12

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CO-OP from Page 11 EMMA MURRAY

ban areas across the U.S. If Salsberry had moved to Boulder two years earlier, the Ingram House wouldn’t have been an option for him. That said, since at least the ’70s, illegal co-ops have existed in Boulder in many iterations, as ways for community-oriented folk to find inclusive living spaces and for residents to create more stability and comfort for their lifestyles. These group-living arrangements would violate the City’s longstanding occupancy ordinance ject to neighborON THE BILL: Boulder that prohibits more than three Housing Cooperatives hood harassment, and Intentional Living and at risk of or four unrelated people Communities meetup. eviction. (depending on the density zone) 6 p.m., Tuesday, June 4, from living together in an apartThese co-ops Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe. 131 ment or house. intentionally Pennsylvania Ave., innisThis occupancy limitation is outed themselves freepoetr y.com not unique to Boulder, and, in order to lobby according to Miller, it’s part of a for a new conational housing system “created to operative housing ordinance, one that enforce classism.” He says, “The occu- would create a pathway to living in pancy limit makes sharing [resources] community, in accordance with lifeillegal.” styles they believe best serve signifiMiller has been advocating for co- cant sectors of Boulder’s current popuoperative living since the mid-’90s, lation, and also future populations, too when BHC first formed to explore the — more working class folk who want possibility of creating affordable cosustainable lifestyles. operative housing opportunities in Miller says, “It took four years of Boulder. In 2002, he helped BHC incredible effort and an enormous secure an affordable housing grant amount of savvy political work by a lot from the City and buy its first coof impressive young people” to unravel operative (and Colorado’s first affordthe decades of policy and laws able rental co-operative), known as the designed to keep residential neighborMasala House, an 11-bedroom fourhoods as they are: filled with neatly plex that still houses people in perma- spaced rows of quiet single-family nently affordable rooms today. houses bookended front and back by The building’s technical status as a small yards with two cars parked in fourplex in a high-density zone the driveway. allowed for four residents per unit, The years-long battle for co-op totalling 16. However, as BHC sought legalization revealed some concerns to expand its co-op operations — that the Boulder residents who can envisioning its eventual network of afford current traditional rentals and/ community co-ops — it recognized or home purchases have about the the severe limitations of the City’s changes new populations and generoccupancy ordinance, coupled with the ations bring; many didn’t want coincreasingly hot real estate market, ops infiltrating their neighborhoods, necessitated legal changes to Boulder’s fearing the challenges high-density residential occupancy system. living can bring: influxes of parked Though BHC was legally operatcars on the streets, the difficulty of ing three co-ops by 2013, thanks to its enforcing occupancy numbers, trash status as a Community Housing and noise concerns, and decreases in Development Organization and daft property values. political maneuvering, no other groups “People were saying, ‘I don’t want had successfully navigated the process. more cars. I don’t want more people A handful of illegal co-ops were sprin- because I got what I want. I own a kled around the city, sometimes subhouse.’ It was all kind of like what 12

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Trump is saying to the immigrants: This country is full,” Miller says. “It’s a pretty selfish way of thinking about things, and it’s not helping us with climate change.” The co-op debate also illuminates some of the hypocrisies in “Boulder’s so-called culture of open-mindedness and friendliness and environmental causes,” says Jennifer Fluri, a geography professor at the University of Colorado Boulder and the principal investigator of the Boulder Affordable Housing Research Initiative. “I think it’s a little bit of a case of the ‘NIMBY,’” Fluri says, the “not in my backyard” philosophy. “[Co-ops] are considered alternative, or radical, or new or different, when actually it’s just a really old way of living. There’s nothing new about it.” Hundreds of comments were filed and hours of testimony were recorded in opposition to a new co-op housing ordinance during the public hearings leading up to an eventual City Council vote in favor of co-ops in January 2017. Social justice and environmental advocates alike celebrated. As Miller puts it, “co-ops are actually a pretty radical, revolutionary idea. Ninety-nine percent of the housing in the U.S. doesn’t work like that. You’re either rich and you buy it, or you rent from somebody who has money and controls it. This is different. This is saying, ‘Hey, how about the people who live there getting control?’” Most agree that within the last two and a half years, the co-op licensing process has proven itself robust enough to weed out groups who aren’t serious about legitimate co-operative living and addresses both the needs of co-op groups and the concerns of established neighborhood residents that potentially I

bought into residential locations with certain lifestyle expectations. The first step in the licensing process for a budding co-op group is to work with a vetted expert co-operative housing organization — either the BHC or Goose Creek Land Trust in Boulder — to draft a series of bylaws. Then a few of checks must be sent to the City of Boulder, which add up to around $800 and the group must notify the future neighbors of the dwelling. Then, “if you’ve got everything, if you’re complying with the terms at the co-op ordinance, then after a couple of weeks you get a license issued,” explains City Councilman Aaron Brockett. “It’s a substantial application process ... but it’s doable. If you have a genuine co-op where you have a group of people who really want to live together in community, it’s a hurdle that you can get over.” There’s a three-car-per-co-op rule so streets don’t fill with extra vehicles. Like any other rental or residential zone, noise and trash limitations apply. With four co-ops now under its purview, BHC provides substantial support for its houses — providing everything from eGo CarShare and Community Cycles memberships for its 64 residents, to new cooperative living trainings and mediation resources. These are resources it hopes to eventually provide to all community members invested or interested in co-operative living. The concern that a million-dollarhomebuyer might not want to purchase a house next-door to a 16-person co-op, thus reducing the buyer pool and subsequent home value, remains central to discussions about where to potentially place new co-ops, but Professor Fluri reports there is no literature or data to support these concerns. It’s just people “trying to live in peace and harmony, quite literally,” she says. Often they’re great neighbors. As for the task of enforcing the number of people in each licensed co-op, “it’s based on complaints,” says Councilman Brockett. “And what I’ve heard is that there have not been any complaints.” see CO-OP Page 14

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CO-OP from Page 12

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Perhaps the biggest hurdle that the co-op movement has faced since 2017 is finding members. Jan Trussell, one of the Boulder residents originally opposing the cooperative housing ordinance, says, via email, “I can tell you from my observations since [legalization], some of these co-ops are having difficulty finding and keeping people. I always see openings posted at our closest co-op and elsewhere. I don’t know if it’s the cost of rent or what I’ve been saying since the beginning, that most people, regardless of their situation, don’t wish to live with eight or more people in the same dwelling.” Eric Budd sees this firsthand. A political organizer and software developer, Budd moved into the Ingram House as soon as it was licensed in January 2018, where Malik Salsberry would eventually join him. Budd now serves on the BHC board and is the Ingram House’s membership coordinator. He says the law works well enough to create the co-operatives, but “now the need is actually to work more on the supporting organizations,” and facilitating connections between folks interested in building more coops in town. Recruiting new folks to fill vacancies in any co-op is particularly tricky. Not only must the person jive with the residents already living in a given house, but in the case of BHC, some rooms are income-restricted based on Boulder’s affordable housing criteria. While the independent co-ops are not necessarily limited by income restrictions, all co-ops strive to maintain a strong community foundation that necessitates interviewing and carefully selecting residents, an intentional and democratic process that can sometimes take months. Moreso, finding enough people ready at the same time to create a new co-op can be difficult. To tackle this and foster more dialogue about cooperative housing, Budd and four other Boulder residents formed a meetup group called Boulder Housing Cooperatives and Intentional Communities. In March they started hosting monthly meetings that are designed to encourage strategic discussions, facilitate relationships between like-minded folks, and feature a rotating speaker focused on I

growing the cooperative housing movement. At their April meeting, nearly a dozen people gathered in a room at the Boulder Main Library. “We’re looking for people who are interested in building human connections and pooling resources in one way or another,” Marshall Poland, one of the group’s co-founders, said to the crowd. He and his wife are interested in creating a new co-op. “The hardest thing about starting a co-op is probably meeting the right people because you’re really putting a lot on the line with these strangers, and you have to do a lot of searching before you can find the right group of people.” Co-op living isn’t for everyone, but “it’s a great option to have for housing in town and I hope it’s one that’s some more folks take advantage of,” says Councilman Brockett. “It’s a great way for people to live affordably and in community.” Eventually co-op advocates like Miller, Budd and Poland hope to strengthen the network of support for new and existing co-ops, making them accessible to folks interested in affordable, socially and environmentally conscious living in Boulder. They envision co-ops becoming a housing option as ubiquitous as any other. “Personally, I feel like I’m getting quite a bit out of it in terms of the personal growth aspect. I’m definitely developing community, for sure, not just with other house members and what not, but in the Boulder community,” says Salsberry, whose role as Ingram House’s gardening steward also lets him pursue his passion for being outside and in nature. His room is up the stairs, a few doors down to the left. In the hallway, there’s a little shelf holding a row of cardboard cartons filled with dirt, a bright light shining down on a few tiny sprouts poking through. He points to one carton and identifies the baby leaves as San Marzano tomatoes, “really good for sauce,” he says. The others are eggplants, bells and Spanish padron peppers. “It’s definitely been a place with a lot of constant changes going on,” he says. But he wouldn’t have it any other way. “There’s a lot of growth.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BW wins numerous awards at Top of the Rockies journalism contest by Boulder Weekly Staff

B

oulder Weekly took home 29 awards — including eight firstplace honors — at this year’s Society of Professional Journalists Top of the Rockies contest on May 3 at the Denver Press Club. BW competed in the 30,000 to 75,000 circulation category against news media from Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. FIRST PLACE Emma Murray won in the Arts and Entertainment and Food: Enterprise Reporting category for her story, “SMiLE it’s good for you,” on an incognito Boulder street artist. She also won a first-place prize for her sports columns on trail running. Angela K. Evans won first place in Religion: General Reporting for her story, “Sanctuary 360,” about a local church providing sanctuary to an undocumented immigrant. She also won in Health: Enterprise Reporting for “Silent Screams,” about a young man who plucked out his own eyes while in custody at Boulder County Jail. Susan France won in the Front Page design category for, “Opening up: Learning to talk about suicide.” She also won in the Single Page Design category for “Travel Time.” Adrienne Pastula won in Sports: Enterprise Reporting for her story, “Eclipsing Fear,” about overcoming anxiety while on a running trip. Boulder Weekly also won for its 24th anniversary edition in the Special Section category. SECOND PLACE Caitlin Rockett won in the Arts and Entertainment and Food: Single Story category for “No spectators.” She also won for her music coverage. Joel Dyer won in the Feature Photography category for his “Windows, Walls and Invisible Lines: Portraits of life in sanctuary” series. He also won in Legal: Enterprise Reporting for his story, “Paula Oransky never dreamed she could be fired for protesting against oil and gas BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

wells near her home.” Will Brendza won in Science and Technology: General Reporting for his story, “Biologist recruits rock climbers to help save Colorado’s bats.” Rico Moore won in the Ag and Environment: Enterprise category for “Will Coloradans free wolves on state public lands?” Angela K. Evans won in Best Solutions Journalism for “Opening up: Learning to talk about suicide” She also won in Legal: General Reporting for “A closed gate, a lawsuit and the First Amendment.” Josh Schlossberg won in the Sports: Enterprise Reporting category for “Bikepacking the Maze.” Susan France won in the Feature Page Design category for “Caution: High Voltage.” BW also won for its 2018 Vote Guide in the Special Section category. THIRD PLACE Matt Cortina won in the Arts and Entertainment and Food: Enterprise Reporting category for “A new wave of grain.” Mark Goodman won in Front Page Design for “Anti-Democracy.” Rico Moore won in the Politics: Enterprise Reporting category for “The kings forest or the peoples land.” Angela K. Evans won in Business: Enterprise Reporting for “Opportunity knocks.” She also won in News Reporting: Single Story for “With HOA costs surpassing their mortgage payments, owners of affordable housing appeal to City of Boulder.” Josh Schlossberg won in Best Solutions Journalism for “Out of the Fryingpan and into the forest.” Addie Levinsky won in the Sports: Enterprise Reporting category for “It’s me or Ukiah.” Bruce Hoppe won in Marijuana: General Reporting for “The elephant in the grow house.” Will Brendza won in Health: Enterprise Reporting for “Waiting for an emergency.” Susan France won in the Single Page Design for “Worldly Bites.” I

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COURTESY OF DARREN STRAUS

MARTIN with the Straus family

M

artin hadn’t planned on coming to the U.S. He really hadn’t ever thought about leaving his native Cameroon. Part of the Anglophone minority, he grew up near Mamfe in the southwestern region of the country. The oldest of five children, he went to school and church regularly while helping on the family cocoa farm. By the time he had finished high school, Martin began his own business, hoping to become a cocoa exporter, a bridge between farmers and large companies. He got his passport with the idea of bringing Cameroon’s cocoa to the rest of the world. But in October 2017, he used that passport to flee the only home he had ever known. Now, he’s being held at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) contract detention facility in Aurora, awaiting deportation back to the very place he fled. In recent years, Cameroon has seen increasing violence in the Anglophone region, and major news outlets have reported the country is on the brink of civil war. Hundreds of people have died, and hundreds of thousands more (some estimates are as high as 500,000) have been displaced as Francophone government forces clash with Anglophone separatists. The country is a result of decolonization in the region, whereby the French colony gained independence in 1960, with the adjacent British colony joining the new country the following year. While the two communities lived in relative harmony for decades, the Anglophone minority has repeatedly made claims of marginalization and neglect, with a lack of basic infrastructure and opportunity compared to the Francophone region. The conflict escalated in 2016, and government forces have been accused of jailing and beating susBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Case pending

Local community hopes to prevent the deportation of Cameroonian friend

by Angela K. Evans pected separatists, as well as burning villages and shooting unarmed protesters. Groups of separatists have also been accused of violence. Martin says he experienced some of this firsthand. Since 2016, he and his family have had to live in the bush for periods of time to escape the violence of government forces, he says. At times, they would have no electricity or internet, as the Francophone-controlled government tried to quell the protests. He became involved in the protest movement late that year, and protests continued throughout 2017. So did the violence, he says. One Sunday, Martin says he faced tear gas while leaving church along with the rest of his family. In September 2017, his father was arrested at the family farm with some of his workers, while Martin and others fled among gunfire. Martin hasn’t seen or heard from his father since. On Oct. 1, 2017, Martin partook in a large protest, calling for an independent, English-speaking country of Ambazonia. “It was a general peaceful protest for the independence of southern Cameroon,” Martin says. “We were holding peace flags but the government opened gunfire on the population and people were killed. I was I

beaten.” In the week following the protest, as he recovered, Martin decided that in order to protect his family and save his life, he had to leave. “I told my mom I can’t continue like this,” he remembers. “And my mom, she was scared and she started crying.” Still, he grabbed his passport and headed for the closest airport. On the way, he went to collect a debt from a friend, hoping to gather as much money for the journey as he could. When he arrived at his friend’s house, the military had it surrounded. He says a soldier tried to stun him but missed, giving Martin time to escape. It took him more than a day walking through the bush to get to the city of Douala. From there, “I figured out how to get out of the country,” he says. Learning that Cameroonians don’t need a visa to enter Ecuador, Martin boarded a flight to Quito on Oct. 15, 2017, with stops in Liberia, Ghana and Spain. But life in Quito wasn’t what he expected. Not only was he in an unfamiliar place, but he hadn’t realized no one would speak English, and he had no way of communicating. “I wish I could speak Spanish, I would have stayed in Ecuador,” MAY 9, 2019

Martin says. “But it wasn’t easy for me, so I decided to leave.” Martin started moving north, hoping to find a place where his English would help him communicate and he could start working. He describes a harrowing journey full of bribes, dangerous river crossings and narrow escapes. He took trains, buses and boats, sometimes walking for days on end through jungles he didn’t know. He barely ate, often going days without any food. Other times he paid to stay at refugee camps, waiting for immigration waivers to continue his journey north. At one point the group he was with was robbed by six men, four carrying machine guns, the other two with machetes. He survived off the kindness of the other migrants with whom he was traveling, people who had access to money from back home. At one point, he contacted a German missionary he knew who sent him money to continue on his journey. He traveled through Colombia, Panama and Costa Rica. He bypassed most of dangerous Nicaragua by taking a boat in the raging seas, almost sinking multiple times, he says. He made it through Honduras and Guatemala but by the time he got to Mexico he was exhausted and sick — coughing up blood, which required spending time in the hospital. “I was so weak,” he says. It’s obvious the memories are difficult for Martin. As he talks, he constantly picks at his fingernails. He often pauses, shaking his head and sucking air through his teeth as he remembers these painful moments. Eventually, Martin got on a bus to Tijuana and walked across the border into the U.S., presenting himself to immigration authorities and claiming asylum. It was Jan. 25, 2018, three and a half months since he had left home. see MARTIN Page 18

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MARTIN from Page 17

“I don’t think people fully underknown this is what I would have to stand the human diaspora exists go through, I wouldn’t have come,” because people are unsafe wherever he says. “Why did I even make the they are living and that’s not just a mistake of coming here?” problem centralized to the Northern He was lonely, with no friends or Triangle and Mexico, that’s a probfamily to communicate with, no one lem across the world,” says Laura to talk to at the detention center. A Lunn, detention program managing few weeks into his detention, howevattorney at the Rocky Mountain er, he started getting volunteer visiImmigrant Advocacy Network tors from Casa de Paz, a local non(RMIAN), which hosts legal orienta- profit aimed at helping people and tion classes at the Aurora detention families affected by detention. “I facility. “As a result, we see clients talked with them, I explained my sitfrom all over the uation to them, COURTESY OF DARREN STRAUS world coming to they really wanted the United to know who I States to seek am,” he says. For asylum because the next eight they’re afraid for months these local their lives.” volunteers visited Anglophone him each week as Cameroonians his asylum case have been showmade its way ing up at the through immigraU.S. southern tion court. border since Without any 2015, Lunn legal aid, Martin says, but what represented himstarted as just a self, eventually loshandful of peoing his asylum case. ple has steadily “Everything increased, espethe judge said cially within the went over my last year. head,” he says. “I Continuing prowas fighting a lostests and clashes ing battle.” with government forces have caused But he appealed to the Board of “an influx of people from Cameroon Immigration Appeals. And then he right now,” she says. waited. “It’s government soldiers that By early fall 2018, he was at his have been responsible for a lot of the wit’s end, frustrated by the months harm we’ve heard about,” Lunn says. spent in immigration detention, and “Generally speaking, when somebody the inability to contact friends and is being persecuted based on their family back home. political opinion or imputed political Seeing how distraught Martin opinion, that is a pretty straightforwas, some of the weekly volunteers, ward asylum claim.” Sarah and Darren Straus, offered to Martin says his first interview sponsor him and apply for his parole. with the asylum officers occurred To the surprise of everyone, Martin around 4 a.m. and he was completely was released at the end of September disoriented, as he tried to explain the and moved in with the Strauses in conditions he left back home. Highlands Ranch. “I was totally depressed, I hadn’t “We lived happily,” Martin says talked to my family yet, I didn’t even about his time with the Darren, Sarah and their daughter. “We ate together. know what I was saying,” he says. We sat in the living room together. From the border he was transWe played games. We watched TV.” ferred to the detention center in He joined Darren’s soccer team Aurora as his asylum claim processed. and immersed himself in a nearby But once here in Colorado, things church, taking comfort in the religion only got worse. He grew even more he’s practiced since childhood. He depressed as he couldn’t reach his befriended neighbors in the predomifamily through the phones at the nantly affluent and white community, facility. “I was thinking, if I had I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


and was often asked to house-sit or dog-sit in the neighborhood. He also went to monthly checkins with ICE, until December, when he was told he didn’t need to come back for a check-in until April. With the help of the Strauses and others in the community, Martin hired an immigration lawyer who filed a motion to reopen his case in January, even as they awaited the verdict of his appeal. Citing Martin’s poor mental health during his asylum hearing, as well as new witnesses who can attest to what he experienced back in Cameroon and the increasing violence since he left, the motion asks the Board of Immigration Appeals to reconsider his case. However, it appears his original appeal was denied back in October, and the notice was sent to the detention center, despite the fact that ICE had his address at the Strauses’. Regardless, Martin says he never received it and was unaware his appeal had been denied when he showed up at the ICE office in Centennial for what he thought was a routine check-in on April 24. Several of Martin’s new friends, including Daniel Larson, along with Larson’s three kids, accompanied him to the scheduled ICE check-in. After waiting for a long time, Larson says, an ICE officer told Martin’s friends they had to leave the building. “They kicked us out,” he says. “We had to wait outside.” Awhile later, an official came out and informed the group that Martin had been arrested and was being transferred back to the detention center to await deportation. “They didn’t allow us to say bye. I persisted and persisted and talked to all of the supervisors, and finally they let us talk to him in a visitation room through glass,” Larson says. “We were all in tears.” That night, Martin had planned to go to his weekly Bible study. The next day he was going to play soccer with his team. Now he’s back in detention more unsure of his future than ever. Since leaving Cameroon, he says, “nothing has changed” in the country. In early April, Human Rights Watch published scathing reports condemning the Francophone government for torture, illegal detention and deadly attacks of BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Anglophone separatists. The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights recently visited the country, acknowledging “the killings and brutal human rights violations and abuses,” warning that if the government didn’t address the issues quickly, the situation could spiral out of control. The U.N. Security Council is set to discuss the crisis on May 13 for the first time. Martin says his father’s farm, house and church have all been burned down. One of his brothers spent time in a hospital after he was shot in the leg. His younger siblings are living with an uncle in the Francophone part of the country so they can attend school. He can only hope his mom is still safe and well. He’s afraid that if he’s sent back, he will be immediately arrested or killed. “If people who have never partook in anything are being killed, and I was teaching people the national anthem and I took part in a peaceful protest?” he asks. “Put yourself in my situation: If I go back, what do you think will happen to me?” Larson says an ICE official he spoke with in Centennial said it could take anywhere from one to three months to arrange travel documents for Martin’s deportation. The official also told Larson that Martin should receive a few days’ notice, and have time to alert his friends and say goodbye. “Hopefully he won’t just disappear, but he could,” Larson says. Martin’s lawyer has asked for a stay of deportation while the motion to reopen his case is pending. And Martin’s friends have started an online petition addressed to ICE through change.org, asking that Martin be allowed to remain in the U.S. “ICE intends to deport Martin to Cameroon, where he will be imprisoned and likely killed,” the petition reads. “Martin is a good man, hard worker and gentle spirit. He has touched many lives in the community in just a short time, and would give you the shirt off his back if you needed it. He deserves to be free and safe, and build a life for himself in America.” As of this publication, nearly 2,000 people have signed it. “I’m missing them a lot,” Martin says. “I miss my church, my neighbors, I miss my soccer team, too. Now I have a family here, I have a big family outside.” I

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MAY 11 · 4-8 PM Forecasting nature by Travis Metcalfe

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n 1973, science fiction writer Arthur C. NEW DATA FROM Boulder’s NEON project Clarke suggested that any sufficiently will allow researchers to advanced technology is indistinguishable from watch climate change magic. Accurate predictions of the weather play out in real time. several days into the future might seem routine now, but hundreds of years ago it would have appeared miraculous. Imagine if scientists had the capability to forecast other aspects of nature: What regions will be most at risk for wildfires this summer? How bad will the mosquitoes be at your favorite campground? When and where will autumn leaves burst into color? This year, a network of ecological observatories headquartered in Boulder is ramping up to provide exactly the types of data needed to make nature forecasting possible. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will soon complete the construction of 81 scientific observing stations, sampling the full range of regional climates and environments across the continent. About half of the sites are at fixed locations, divided equally between land and water, while the other half can be relocated periodically over the expected 30-year time frame of operations. The project was initiated more than 20 years ago by then-Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Rita Colwell, and like many top-down initiatives it has struggled to build a constituency. “In the late 1990s, the ecological community began discussing and considering what a large-scale ecological network might look like,” says Sharon Collinge, former scientific director of NEON and a professor of environmental studies at the University of Colorado. “Many people who were involved at the time identified Boulder as a central hub of environmental science research.” Collinge grew up in rural Kansas, where her parents both came from I

BOULDER WEEKLY


farm families. She recalls that she was always curious about the natural world and was intellectually stimulated by the complexity of ecological systems. After studying biology at universities in Kansas and Nebraska, she earned a doctorate in landscape ecology from Harvard. She moved to Boulder in 1998 to join the faculty at CU, just as the idea for NEON was being hatched. Twenty years later, she took a leave of absence from CU to become the scientific director of NEON, but less than a year after starting, she stepped down in protest of some controversial decisions by the project’s corporate manager. The NEON project was originally contracted to NEON Inc., a local organization that was specifically created to manage the unprecedented facility. Construction of the field stations began in 2012, but after the project fell behind schedule and significantly over budget, the NSF decided to pull the contract and seek new bids. In 2016 the contract was awarded to Battelle Memorial Institute, a corporation based in Columbus, Ohio, that has primarily served the Departments of Energy and Homeland Security. By the end of 2018, Battelle had completed 80 of the 81 field stations, and ended up spending $10 million less than the revised $469 million construction budget. Shortly after the new year, while the U.S. government was still shut down, executives from Battelle came to Boulder and fired two senior managers at NEON without informing or consulting with Collinge. One of those managers was Wendy Gram, an ecologist with 10 years of experience on the project, who was effectively the deputy director under Collinge. Battelle insisted that it was just trying to streamline management for the shift from construction to operations. But the move forced Collinge and other members of the ecological community to question whether the scientific director of NEON would have the authority to successfully lead the project. “Being asked to be accountable for the success of a multi-million dollar project without any capacity to make budgetary or personnel decisions is just unheard of,” Collinge remarks. Within hours after Collinge resigned in Januray, Battelle also dissolved a scientific advisory committee of experts from around the country, reinforcing the tension between the contractor and the scientific community that NEON was designed to serve. Within a week Battelle reconstituted the committee in response to the outcry, but questions remain about how NEON will operate in the future. Without broad support from the ecological community, NEON could become a high-tech facility with no users. Despite these stumbling blocks, Collinge remains optimistic about the potential of the project to transform ecological research. In a recent editorial, she wrote: “At this moment, nearly 300 field scientists are out in deserts, grasslands, forests, and streams taking measurements that will turn into over 180 freely available NEON data products. The collection and delivery of these data are designed to enable transformative research on U.S. ecosystems at previously unimaginable spatial and temporal scales.” The focus of previous efforts to forecast ecological systems has been on time scales from decades to centuries, seeking to understand the likely plant and animal responses to climate change, for example. The new data provided by NEON will allow researchers to watch these changes play out in real time, and make recommendations for better management and conservation of ecosystems that we all depend upon, like agriculture and fisheries. Just as with weather forecasting, the feedback between predictions and observations will also gradually improve the accuracy of the forecasts, improvements that might proceed much more slowly without the new data. It may seem far-fetched now, but NEON has established the foundation for the next revolution in our understanding and eventual prediction of natural systems. If Arthur C. Clarke were alive today, even he might find it indistinguishable from magic.

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Travis Metcalfe, Ph.D., is a researcher and science communicator based in Boulder. The Lab Notes series is made possible in part by a research grant from the National Science Foundation. BOULDER WEEKLY

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hen Court Whelan isn’t in the process. The company has been leading zero-waste advenoffering sustainable travel adventures tures through Yellowstone, since 1985, but now, if you travel with watching polar bears from Natural Habitat Adventures to Africa, a rover in the Canadian Asia or even up into the Arctic, you Arctic, or taking teachers and curious can do so with a carbon-clean-coninsect aficionados down to Mexico to science, knowing that your trip is netwatch the migration of some 400 mil- zero from start to finish. lion monarch butterflies, he spends his “It’s not cheap and it’s not easy, days counting carbon emissions by the but it’s absolutely the right way to do pound. it,” Whelan says. As the director of sustainability In 2017 Natural Habitat and conservation travel for a world Adventures became the world’s first leader in sustainable travel, Natural net-zero travel company, offsetting all Habitat Adventures, Whelan is conof its emissions from both field and stantly balancing tons of carbon emitoffice operations. With this new ted against tons of car- JJ HUCKIN bon sequestered. “I do a lot of calculations for vehicle miles per gallon,” Whelan says. If a group is traveling by car, he’s keeping track of the distance traveled and gasoline burned. If they need a boat he’ll talk with the captain or supply company to see how much diesel is burned per nautical mile. And, of course, NATURAL he’s always thinking HABITAT about air travel. “At announcement, Whelan says, the Adventures is a the end the day the company is hoping to inspire othleader in sustainable travel, and it flights are the biggest ers in the travel industry to step just upped the factor,” he says. up, too. ante. One single air mile “What we’re really hoping to produces about 53 do is influence the influencers, pounds of carbon dioxide, according spread information throughout the to Blue Sky Model, an online open industry and raise the bar,” Whelan source estimate of carbon dioxide says. “If they want to be competitive in emissions. It’s an ominous figure when this marketplace, truly in a business you consider that more than 87,000 sense they’re going to have to do what flights crisscross this country every we do and that’s what we feel really day. According to carbonbrief.org, warm and fuzzy about.” worldwide tourism accounts for 8 perTo accomplish this carbon councent of global greenhouse gas emisterbalancing, Natural Habitat sions. Adventures is investing carbon credits That’s why the Boulder-based in three separate sustainability projects Natural Habitat Adventures recently scattered around the globe, all in placannounced a promise to offset all cares where the company hosts explorabon emissions produced by their clition programs. ents’ air travels, saving approximately In India, it’s investing in the 450 million pounds of CO2 annually Mytrah Wind Power project, which BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHRISTI COOPER

H

umans like taking the scenic route when we can. It means we have a little time to appreciate the world around us, to sit with our thoughts awhile, maybe figure out if we really want to go where we’re heading. That’s as true for road trips as it is for life journeys. You could say Christi Cooper took the scenic route to becoming a filmmaker. But you could also say it took every twist and turn in this Boulder native’s journey to make her capable of documenting one of the most important environmental lawsuits in American history, Juliana v. United States. Or, as Cooper calls it, Youth v. Gov, her documentary about the journey of the 21 plaintiffs in this historic case. Cooper was recently named the inaugural Focus on Nature Artist-in-Residence at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville, New York. Her residency will give Cooper a stipend and, mostly importantly, the time she needs to edit the documentary. Cooper’s been following these 21 plaintiffs — all of them under 25, most of them under 20, the youngest 11 — for the last eight years, since Mother’s Day 2011 when the nonprofit organization Our Children’s Trust began filing lawsuits on behalf of the young plaintiffs against their home states and the federal government. (Perhaps you’ve heard of one of the plaintiffs, 18-year-old Boulder resident/rapper/ tireless activist Xiuhtezcatl Martinez.) The plaintiffs argue that the federal government has abused the public trust doctrine by knowingly polluting the atmosphere and creating an unsafe environment for current and future citizens. Despite the federal legal case repeatedly being dismissed in the early days, the plaintiffs and their legal team continued to refine the legal standing for the case. They finally made a breakthrough in 2016 when U.S. District Court of Oregon Judge Ann Aiken upheld the idea that access to a clean environment was a fundamental right. The case continues to languish at the district level as the federal government BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

The greatest scientists are artists

Christi Cooper named first Focus on Nature Artist in Residence at Jacob Burns Film Center

by Caitlin Rockett

CHRISTI COOPER films Levi, the youngest of 21 plaintiffs in the groundbreaking ‘Juliana v. United States’ case. Cooper’s documentary, ‘Youth v. Gov,’ follows these young plaintiffs.

continues to file motions to dismiss it. But these young folks aren’t backing down. And Christi Cooper plans to ride out the storm with them. • • • • Cooper’s love of the natural world was cultivated as a child “climbing the hills up in North Boulder” where she lived with her parents and two siblings. Mount Sanitas was the unofficial playground for her elementary school on Fourth Street. Her father took the family camping and skiing and biking. It was a quintessentially 1970s I

Boulder childhood. “Just living in Boulder as a child really empregnanted me with a love for the outdoors and wanting to protect it,” Cooper says from her home today in Bozman, Montana, where she lives with her 18-year-old daughter Hannah. “It shaped a big part of who I am and what my ideals are.” Cooper took her love of nature with her to the University of Nebraska where she studied microbiology. She planned to become a veterinarian. But her love of the mountains pulled her back to Colorado. She completed her graduate and undergraduate degrees at Colorado State University, working at the animal hospital. Still, her curiosity of the natural world drove her deeper into the world of science. Cooper moved to Germany, where her MAY 9, 2019

father’s from, and completed a Ph.D. program in neuroscience. She got married, had Hannah, and before long Cooper and her husband were recruited to run a stem cell research center at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. By now it was 2004. “I was dismayed by what was happening in our politics in the U.S., in how science was being demoted and denigrated and funding was being pulled during the Bush era,” Cooper recalls. “I distinctly remember the Bush-Kerry election, stem cells were the hot topic. It led the discussion on science, on abortion, and I felt like it was done with so little understanding of the science. It just became this political agenda with pundits not really knowing what they were talking about, just using their beliefs to discuss the topic. I really felt drawn to being able to educate and talk with people about what was at that time my topic, stem cells. It felt really important to me for people to have an understanding of why [stem cells] were used in research and the potential they have.” While Cooper never worked with embryonic stem cells — the heart of the controversy in the stem cell debate — many of her colleagues did. She understood that the future of scientific breakthrough relied on educating the public about how research could shape their lives, how it could shape their children’s children’s lives. She threw herself headfirst into public discussions about stem cells, doing print and radio interviews. Cooper became a part of an EU interdisciplinary consortium and helped develop traveling science fairs through Europe that focused on educating the general public on all kinds of sciencebased issues, not just stem cells. All the while, Cooper was feeling more and more like academia wasn’t the path she wanted to follow; fighting the tenure system sounded daunting... and fruitless. And she wanted to make her way back to her beloved Rocky Mountains. “I didn’t know anything about Montana; see COOPER Page 26

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even growing up in Colorado we never made it as far north as Montana,” she says. “But I found a master’s program in Montana. I have an uncle and grandfather in Germany who are documentary filmmakers. I always admired the work they did but thought I was a scientist and not a creative. When I saw this program it was the perfect blend of what wanted to do. I was so driven toward stories and human faces around those stories, and the program felt like a perfect blend. I came to Bozeman and got into the grad program here. That was my entry into the film work.” The program was at Montana State University, an MFA in Science and Natural History Filmmaking. It’s geared specifically toward training students with formal education and experience in science, engineering or technology to become professional filmmakers. Phil Savoie was one of Cooper’s professors in the program. Savoie is a lifelong environmental filmmaker, journalist and educator who currently lives in Wales. “When we take in students [into the Science and Natural History Filmmaking program], it’s just the top 1 percent of students who would apply,” Savoie says. “Christi was a really good example. She’s motivated, clever, keen, with a creative side she was just starting to explore. She’s carried on with that well.” Savoie and Cooper have remained in contact over the last 10 years, their daughters becoming friends in the process. “Because of Christi’s background with neuroscience, that did make her rather unique,” Savoie says. “She was the first student that I’d taught with a neuroscience background. She’s hungry, she’s learned, she has the curiosity. A lot of people who are in science and people who are of that disposition, they have insatiable curiosity. It keeps them young and keeps them sharp.” • • • • When Cooper entered the program at MSU, she thought she’d be doing “super science-focused documentaries about how the brain works.” But life had different 26

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plans for her. During her second year in film school, Cooper got an internship with WITNESS in Brooklyn, New York, an international nonprofit that trains and supports people using video to promote stories about human rights. “I came on board this project working with youth, at the infancy of this whole ... youth movement around climate litigation,” Cooper says. That’s where she met Kelsey Juliana, the led plaintiff in Juliana vs. United States, and Xiuhtezcatl Martinez. Cooper co-produced a series of 10 films with Juliana at WITNESS about her own litigation, as well as the lawsuits of the other young folks around the country suing their state governments in the name of environmental justice. “That was my entry into climate justice world,” Cooper says. When the BP oil spill happened in 2010, Cooper packed up her film gear and drove to Louisiana with hopes of connecting with other scientists there. She and a few scientist friends hoped to offer their expertise in media to help get the word out about the seriousness of the spill. What happened was as edifying for Cooper as any work she’d ever dreamed of producing about the oil spill. “There was a Native American tribe on the outskirts of Louisiana, outside of the levy system,” Cooper says. “I connected with them and stayed with them for three weeks. I learned a lot during that time about how oil exploration and exploitation has impacted primarily people of color and indigenous people. There is a whole racism component to environmental justice and to climate justice. I learned a lot through that whole project. That tribe had been through decades of oil exploration. More than 10 thousand miles of pipeline runs through their land and has destroyed the ecosystem and homes of people who have lived there for thousands of years.” Cooper went on to work on other projects, one with Montana PBS that won her and her team two Emmy awards for a BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


documentary called Indian Relay. But she never took her eyes off of what was unfolding with the youth climate change litigation. Cooper eventually took a job with Our Children’s Trust, the organization that has helped the 21 youth plaintiffs file their cases. During the few years she worked with the nonprofit, Cooper had the opportunity to travel with Martinez to the 2012 United Nations climate summit in Rio de Janeiro, and to the 2014 People’s Climate March in New York. Meanwhile, other young folks working with Our Children’s Trust continued to press litigation at the state and federal level. “I had it in my mind that I wanted to tell a longform story about this litigation,” Cooper says. “But I had other projects going on in my life at the time. When [Our Children’s Trust] filed a new federal lawsuit in August 2015, I was watching it very closely. … When [Judge Aiken] ruled in favor, and I knew it was at least going to appeal and the kids had won the first standing in the courts, I decided I wanted to tell this story. I put everything else on hold and kind of closed down my other projects and began to focus solely on this.” That was three years ago and the story continues to unfold. The federal government continues to find new ways to hold the case at the district level. And the young plaintiffs continue to fight for a better world. • • • • When Sean Weiner, director of the Creative Culture Initiative at the Jacob Burns Film Center, was looking to fill the brand new Focus on Nature residency at the film center, Christi Cooper’s name cropped up. “In the documentary film world you’ll see 10 grants behind one project,” Weiner says. “We asked [other filmmakers] what are the two or three projects that haven’t gotten that kind of attention. That’s where we prefer to support. We have leverage to put support behind that. Our only goals are filmmaker and artist development. We seek no financial gain from this.” Cooper’s doc fit the bill. “The subject matter of the film is really compelling on all levels for us,” Weiner says. “And with this project we have a golden opportunity for our resident to engage with local students in middle and high schools around the area.” Weiner says he plans to build one or two events where students from the area will come in to see some or all of Cooper’s movie and talk with her about filmmaking and activism. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

“A lot of our student programs focus on young protagonists,” Weiner says. “That’s exactly the case with Christi’s film. Seeing someone their age engage in activism is important to show.” While Cooper can’t say what will happen with Juliana v. United States, she knows this is only the beginning. “I see these kids looking at their future in a much different way than I did,” she says. “I didn’t think, ‘Are species going to be extinct?’ every day as a child. I didn’t think, ‘Are we still going to

have an Arctic shelf? Will I be able to live where I want to live?’ I was planning my whole life and I see kids questioning whether they should have children, whether their family members are going to be harmed, whether they will be safe having a house near the woods. I feel compelled to provide a platform for them. They have as much to say about the future as adults, and these kids often know more about the science and policies and impacts than adults do.” As for taking the scenic path, maybe

that’s the only way to really get where you need to go. And Cooper’s not the first. Kurt Vonnegut studied chemistry at Cornell. Samuel Morse studied at London’s Royal Academy of Arts before co-founding the National Academy of Design in Manhattan. Da Vinci, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, John James Audubon, all artists and scientists who took their own meandering paths to greatness. Like Einstein — who played piano and violin — said: “The greatest scientists are artists as well.”

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T

here are two seasons for Gregory Alan Isakov — touring and farming. That’s why you only find the singer/songwriter on the road primarily in the fall and winter. For much of the summer, he’s got work to do on his small farm near Boulder starting in the springtime. “My season’s about 18 weeks of production,” Isakov says. “I do salad vegetables for restaurants, mainly. I’m working pretty hard at it from May through the end of September, which is why I tour in the winter.” Isakov’s work on his tiny farm starts in March and really gets rolling in May. He has about an acre of speciality greens that he hand-tends, from planting to harvesting to delivery to the restaurants and farmers’ markets where they’re sold. “The last two years, I’ve got it dialed,” Isakov says in a a recent phone interview from the farm. “It’s pretty intense. I’m not farming with a tractor or anything. I use a plow once a year. It’s mostly by hand. I’ve got a walkbehind tractor I use. Those are pretty cool.” So is there any overlap between farming and music, any way one influences the other? “I’m sure there is, but I don’t know. I’ve been doing both for so long,” Isakov says. “I just feel too much of one isn’t good for me.” When he’s touring — or, this spring and summer, playing one-off dates — Isakov is supporting Evening Machines, the album he released late last year. “I’ve never put out a record in the fall before,” Isakov says. “I always love new albums in the fall. But from a label perspective, your record’s only new for a month or two, then it’s last year’s record.” Isakov is often tagged as a folk musician. But Evening Machines is pretty far from a folk record, adding organ, piano and electronics to the strings and acoustic sounds usually associated with the genre. And the songs aren’t straightBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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by L. Kent Wolgamott ahead folk either. “I like to play with those old time cliches, I guess you could call them,” he says. “I was never a ‘folk musician’ like you think of. I have friends, we’ll be sitting around a fire and I’ll have the guitar and they’ll say ‘Gregory, play us a song with a chorus.’ I don’t have any.” Isakov, who lists Leonard Cohen, Townes Van Zandt, Paul Simon, jazz saxophone and old folk records among his influences, can’t explain how he writes his songs, particularly how he comes up with his insightful, personal, yet universal lyrics. “I have no idea,” he says. “I don’t have a lot of understanding of the process at all. I feel it’s all kind of ineffable. As writers, I’m sure you can relate to this, you kind of take in your experiences and something comes out, I don’t really know from where. I don’t even know what songs are about when I’m writing them.” Isakov primarily writes for his band with Wurlitzer and electronic sounds, then he brings the musicians into the portion of his barn that he’s converted into a recording studio. I

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STOLL VAUGHAN 8PM THE JACK HADLEY BAND 9PM MONDAY MAY 13

“I used to arrange more than I do now,” he says. “We just know each other so well now, it happens really organically and seamlessly.” Recording a song can happen fairly quickly, Isakov says. But that doesn’t mean it’s immediate. “I have a lot of material and the process ... takes so much time,” Isakov says. “We’ll record them and then step away for a few months and then come back to them.” For Evening Machines, that process ended in mid-2018, just in time for farmer Isakov to turn into recording artist and touring musician Isakov and hit the road. It’s old hat by now, but Isakov still can’t quite believe it. “I was always playing [music], but I never thought I’d get to do it as a job,” Isakov admits. “I’d do it after work. I’d be writing a song at work. Now I’ve got two things I’m super stoked about... It’s funny, I’ve been farming for a long time and it’s great to feel like you’re really good at something. I’ll never master either of them, for sure. But I’m getting pretty close in both.” MAY 9, 2019

DAVID BURCHFIELD & MONICA MARIE LABONTE 8PM TUESDAY MAY 14

CLARE THÉRÈSE 8PM ADRIAN NYE 9PM GAH-BÉ 10PM WEDNESDAY MAY 15

JAZZETRY NIGHT FEAT. VON DISCO 8PM THURSDAY MAY 16

IZZY HELTAI 8PM MATT COX 9PM CAROL PACEY & THE HONEY SHAKERS 10PM FRIDAY MAY 17

THE WILDLINGS 8PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM I

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the sound of roManticisM May 23, 2019 at 7:30PM 345 Mapleton Avenue Festival Orchestra, period instruments Mina Gajić, Érard grand piano, 1845 Haydn Symphony “La Passione,” Chopin Concerto #2 in F Minor, Brahms Motet Op. 29 No. 1

Tickets: BoulderBachFestival.org

announcinG our 2019-2020 season VanishinG Point

PhilosoPher’s stone October 9 at eTown Hall - Boulder Distinct, poetic, and rarely-heard works by Buxtehude, Piani, Pandolfi, Stradella, Couperin, and J.S. Bach. Ian Watson, harpsichord | Guy Fishman, cello | Zachary Carrettín, violin

secret Garden Thursday, November 14 at eTown Hall

J.s. Bach’s GoldBerG Variations

Angela Hewitt Tuesday, March 3 at eTown Hall Of all the piano soloists in the history of the instrument, one has garnered the undisputed reputation for her mastery of J.S. Bach’s oeuvre: Ms. Hewitt performs in Boulder for the first time, on a Fazioli concert grand piano.

COmpass Resonance Ensemble, our CoRE of resident musical artists performs works of extreme beauty composed by Schmelzer, Rosenmüller, Marini, Salomone Rossi, Francesca Caccini, and J.S. Bach.

art of duo Thursday, February 6 at eTown Hall Works by Saint-Saens, Liszt, Franck, and J.S. Bach. Top Prize winners of Boulder International Chamber Music Competition 2018 travel from Warsaw to Boulder for this splendid program featuring accordionist Iwo Jedynecki and pianist Aleksander Krzyżanowski. COmpass Resonance Ensemble—CoRE joins the duo for a double concerto by J.S. Bach in a special transcription for this event.

Photo credit: K Saunders

“I know of no musician whose Bach playing on any instrument is of greater subtlety, beauty of tone, persuasiveness of judgment or instrumental command than Hewitt’s is here.”

Thursday, May 21 at eTown Hall COmpass Resonance Ensemble returns in a performance that begins with the Colorado premiere of a minuet by Giuseppe Antonio Capuzzi (1755-1818), then, Mina Gajić performs Mozart’s brilliant, charming, and poignant Piano Concerto in A Major K.414. The Festival Chorus performs the finale of our 39th season, with the deeply profound and ecstatic motet, Jesu meine freude, by Johann Sebastian Bach. Additionally, for subscribers only, we present an intimate concert in April, featuring virtuoso 10-string guitarist Nicolò Spera performing the Bach Chaconne, extraordinary mezzo-soprano Abigail Nims singing Erbarme dich from the St. Matthew Passion, and CoRE performing Zachary Carrettín’s Caprice, original music commissioned by Project Bandaloop and Bachiana Chamber Orchestra. Other musical surprises as well—and FREE raffle tickets with fun gifts for you!

—BBC Music Magazine

We expect the entire season to sell out soon as 25% of the seats were sold on the first day we announced the season, May 1. If you wish to participate in the experience of this programming and these artists—don’t hesitate—order today! BoulderBachFestival.org/2019-20-subscriptions/

coMPass resonance enseMBle


‘Underrated masterpiece’

A gathering place for... live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks

Boulder Symphony and Boulder Chorale join forces for Dvořák’s ‘Stabat Mater’

by Peter Alexander

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Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com

COURTESY OF BOULDER SYMPHONY

ntonín Dvořák has written some of the most, and least, familiar works in the classical music repertoire. On the one hand are the “New World” Symphony, the Cello Concerto — both written in the United States — and a handful of other pieces that are immediately recognizable to most concertgoers. And on the other hand are many piecON THE BILL: “Spirit” es almost never heard out— Boulder Symphony concertmaster Keynes Chen side of the composer’s and principal oboist Ingrid with the Boulder Chorale, Vicki Burrichter, Anderson. Chen will lead the native Bohemia, including conductor. 7 p.m. most of Dvořák’s operas and Saturday, May 11, 2:30 performance. almost all of his sacred vocal p.m. Sunday, May 12, The Stabat Mater is clearly First Presbyterian Church, a text of grief, portraying Mary music. 1820 15th St., Boulder. Among the latter is the mourning Jesus at the crucifixTickets: Stabat Mater, a large-scale ion. Dvořák wrote his Stabat bouldersymphony.org/ tickets religious cantata for chorus, Mater at a time of great mournorchestra and four soloists, ing in his life as well: It was writbased on the 13th-century sacred hymn ten immediately following the deaths of his “Stabat mater dolorosa” (Grieving mother, three children in the first four years of his standing at the cross). Now the Boulder marriage. Symphony and the Boulder Chorale have “How can any of us even begin to joined forces to bring Boulder audiences a understand that kind of loss?” Burrichter piece that conductor Vicki Burrichter calls says. “That’s incomprehensible grief to most “an underrated masterpiece.” people. The text revolves around Mary [sayBurrichter, who is artistic director of the ing], ‘Let me feel feel your pain as my pain,’ Boulder Chorale, says that when she disAnd at the end there’s the ‘Paradisum, cussed the collaboration with Devin Patrick Gloria,’ which is the rise of the soul into Hughes, music director of the Boulder heaven, and it ends on a hopeful and tranSymphony, he asked her what piece she scendent note.” would like the two groups to do together. Of the cantata’s 10 movements, “I said I have a piece that I’ve long Burrichter calls particular attention to the first wanted to do,” Burrichter says. “And he said and last. “He uses much of the same materi‘OK, let’s do it!’” Since Hughes has another al from the first movement in the last moveconcert on the same date — conducting ment,” she explains. “The overwhelming Mahler’s Fifth Symphony with the Arapahoe sense of it — it starts out with the orchestra Philharmonic — Burrichter has led rehears- quite soft, and then it builds and builds and als of the Boulder Symphony and Boulder builds, and there’s all of these ebbs and Chorale and will conduct both concerts. flows. There’s something like seven major The program includes one work in addi- climaxes in the first movement. tion to the Stabat Mater: J.S. Bach’s “One of the things that’s so brilliant Concerto for oboe, violin and strings will about that movement, and the 10th movefeature members of the Boulder Symphony, ment, is that Dvořák managed to capture BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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that sobbing feeling of grief in the body, through these ebbs and flows of dynamics, and the stuttering almost of the tenors, almost like you can’t speak when you’re in that kind of grief. At the same time, it’s such a transcendent text and, in the end, so cathartic.” There are two challenges for the choir, Burrichter says. One is that, unlike many cantatas and Requiem settings, the text is not familiar to most choral singers. “There was a lot of having to go through the text and talk about pronunciation, which is not often the case,” she says. The second challenge is to express the grief and transcendence that are found in the text and music. “They have to be willing to go there, and enter into that state of grief, and take that journey [to] transcendence” she says. “That is the sublime part of this piece.” In addition to the outer movements and other choral sections, the Stabat Mater includes a number of virtuoso arias and duets for soloists that are almost operatic in nature. “There’s some absolutely stunning work for the soloists,” Burrichter says. “We have phenomenal soloists — some of the best soloists I’ve worked with.” As little known as the Stabat Mater may be, people are won over when they hear it. It was the last piece recorded by the great choral conductor Robert Shaw, who said he wished he had learned the piece sooner. Burrichter says that with the Boulder Chorale, “when it comes to rehearsal, people are saying, ‘Oh my god, this is so gorgeous, this is so fun!’ And that makes it easy for them to learn.” She hopes audiences will embrace the piece in the same way. “Take the leap and experience this piece,” she says. “If you love the choral masterworks and you haven’t experienced the Stabat Mater, you’re going to be thrilled.” MAY 9, 2019

BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, benefit, or wedding at Nissi’s – award winning cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting.

www.nissisevents.com

Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday May 9

LUCKY ME! BOULDER LEGENDS “Rock” Friday May 10

THE CHAMPIONS “Arena Rock” Saturday May 11

THE STEVE THOMAS BAND PRESENTS...MCCARTNEY “Tribute to Paul McCartney”

Wednesday May 15

BOURBON & BLUES DAVID BOOKER BAND “Blues” FREE ADMISSION Thursday May 16

DUELING PIANOS “Arena Rock” Friday & Saturday May 17/18

THAT EIGHTIES BAND “80s” Sunday May 19

DAKOTA BLONDE “Americana – Folk” Saturday May 25 BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

SONS OF GENESIS “The Genesis Tribute”

& PARADISE THEATER “The Styx Tribute”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 I

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ROOSTER PRESENTS: SUMMER HAAS PARTY

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MARY LYNN RAJSKUB THUR. MAY 16

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CHANNEL 93.3 PRESENTS

ELLE KING

ROOSTER, PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

ROAD TO SONIC BLOOM FT. OF THE TREES

BARNS COURTNEY SAT. MAY 18

DORFEX BOS, MADDNETO

FOUNDER FIGHTS 4

FRI. MAY 17

SUN. MAY 19

RADIO 1190 & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

THE BEEVES (ALBUM RELEASE) AUGUSTUS, NATE COOK (OF THE YAWPERS), MEETING HOUSE

ETOWN PRESENTS

NICK FORSTER’S HIPPY BLUEGRASS CHURCH TUES. MAY 21

SUN, MAY 19 CPR OPENAIR, ROOSTER AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

CALPURNIA FRI. MAY 24

TRUTV, 107.9 KBPI & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

TACOMA FD’S HEFFERNAN LEMME LIVE FRI. MAY 24

BOULDER WEEKLY & BOULDER BEER PRESENT: SPEAK OF HEAVEN ALBUM RELEASE

FLASH MOUNTAIN FLOOD

RIVERSIDE

SAT. MAY 25

WED. MAY 29

CONTRIVE

KIND HEARTED STRANGERS, EXTRA GOLD

TWIST & SHOUT PRESENTS

BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

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BIG BUSINESS

MORSEL, BOWREGARD

THUR. MAY 30

FRI, MAY 31

SIRIUSXM PRESENTS: A CAREER-SPANNING EVENING

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND, WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

THE INDIVIDUALIST TOUR

GRANT FARM (ALBUM RELEASE SHOW)

DREW EMMITT (OF LEFTOVER SALMON), CORAL CREEK SAT. JUNE 1

TODD RUNDGREN SAT. JUN 1 BOULDER WEEKLY, TERRAPIN CARE STATION & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

DEAD FLOYD

FREE BEFORE 9PM, JUST $10 AFTER! 21+

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FRI. JUN 14 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT: AN EVENING WITH

RICKIE LEE JONES

TUES. JUNE 4

GHOSTEMANE

HO99O9, HORUS THE ASTRONEER THUR. JUNE 6 PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

TALIB KWELI

THUR. JUL 4 REX FOUNDATION, BOULDER WEEKLY & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT A DEAD & COMPANY PREPARTY

SHAKEDOWN STREET AND NICK GERLACH PERFORM 3/29/90 FREE BEFORE 10:30PM, JUST $10 AFTER! 21+

VOZ 11, 1-NATVSON-1, TIME (CALM)

FRI. JUL 5

THUR. JUNE 13

REX FOUNDATION & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT DEAD & CO AFTER PARTY: AN EVENING WITH

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88.5 KGNU & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

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GREEN BUDDHA, LEY LINE, MASANGO FRI. JUNE 14

SAT. JUL 6 REX FOUNDATION & 97.3 KBCO PRESENT: DEAD & CO. AFTER PARTY

THE MARCUS KING BAND TUES. JUL 23

103.5 THE FOX, BOULDER WEEKLY, TERRAPIN CARE STATION & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

STEELY DEAD

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

THE GIPSY KINGS

SWITCHMAN SLEEPIN’, JON STICKLEY TRIO

FT. NICOLAS REYES AND TONINO BALIARDO WITH SIMI

SAT. JUNE 15 PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

SAT. JUL 27

SADISTIK FEAT. KNO (OF CUNNINLYNGUISTS)

JOEY ALEXANDER

TRIZZ, RAFAEL VIGILANTICS, LES ONE

WED. JUL. 31

FRI. JUNE 21

SUZANNE VEGA

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

XIUHTEZCATL + THE REMINDERS

SIOBHAN WILSON

WRITE MINDED

SAT. AUG 3

WED. JUNE 26

97.3 KBCO PRESENTS: AN EVENING WITH

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WESTWORD & CO JAM PRESENT

YAK ATTACK + GOOSE

WED. AUG 7

THE GREAT SALMON FAMINE

ARTURO SANDOVAL

THUR. JUNE 27 RADIO 1190 PRESENTS

SAT. AUG 10

JUICE + LOW HANGING FRUIT

SHAME SMITH & THE SAINTS

TUES. JULY 2

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

STEPHEN DAY

SAT. AUG 17

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND & WESTWORD PRESENT

BONNIE AND THE CLYDES

AARON LEE TASJAN

FRI. SEP 6 & SAT. SEP 7

WED. JULY 3

DARK STAR ORCHESTRA

BOULDER WEEKLY & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

SHRED IS DEAD + TULA

SUN. SEP 8

KAEPORA

SAT. JULY 6 REX FOUNDATION PRESENTS: DEAD & CO AFTER PARTY

CYCLES + FLASH MOUNTAIN FLOOD WED. JULY 10 CHANNEL 93.3, WESTWORD AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

ROSE HILL DRIVE PLAYS LED ZEPPELIN

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MAY 9, 2019

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


A STILL FROM ‘STANDUP FOR DRUMMERS’ FROM NETFLIX

FRED ARMISEN: COMEDY FOR MUSICIANS BUT EVERYONE IS WELCOME. 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 14, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030 Tickets are $30-$35.

see EVENTS Page 34

events VIEWS AT THE MUSE.

LONGMONT SYMPHONY POPS CONCERT: THE LSO IN SPACE! 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11, Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-772-5796.

FUNGAL TECHNOLOGIES WORKSHOP.

COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF BOULDER

Longmont — the final frontier. These are the voyages of the Longmont Symphony Orchestra. Its continuing mission: To celebration more than 60 years of spaceflight in an auditorium named after local astronaut Vance Brand. To boldly feature music from Star Wars, Star Trek, ‘E.T.,’ ‘Apollo 13,’ Strauss’ ‘Also Sprach Zarathustra’ (from ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’), plus selections from Holst’s ‘The Planets,’ ‘Voyage’ and more. The LSO Guild’s Dessert Social is held before and during intermission of this concert. It features cobblers, bar cookies, brownies, carrot cake and ice cream. Desserts are $5; drinks are $1. All proceeds benefit the LSO.

This free workshop at BMoCA will consider how fungus complicates notions of technology by presenting an overview of mushrooms and mycelium. First, representatives from the Colorado Mycological Society will discuss the ways in which mushroom underground networks facilitate plant communication, and address general protocols for mushroom foraging in Colorado. Then, workshop attendees will get hands-on as they learn to use mycelium (the branching structures under mushrooms) as a technology to produce sustainable materials. Attendees will get to take home starter kits to make their own fungal notebook cover.

5 p.m. Friday, May 10, Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder, 303-449-3464. Start your weekend off right with an after-hours visit to the Boulder Museum. Check out the current exhibits — about wolves, dinosaurs and a Nicaraguan potter — and then enjoy the view from the top of the museum with food, drinks and a silent disco presented by The Center for Transformative Movement. You also have the opportunity to experience a movement meditation session, a fusion of stretching, meditation and freeform dance that’s sure to leave you feeling energized, clear-minded and ready to make the most of the rest of your weekend. Free admission for museum members. General admission is $8-10, museumofboulder.org.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

DYLAN O’DONNELL, DEOGRAPHY.COM

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MAY 9, 2019

6:30 p.m. Monday, May 13, Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. NETHA HUSSAIN

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Our Longmont location is celebrating it’s 10th anniversary May 21st by giving every customer ...

words

A FREE BAGEL

WITH PLAIN CREAM CHEESE! No purchase necessary and no substitutions. Longmont location only.

WE THANK YOU for making us a success!

THURSDAY, MAY 9

HEAD TO INKBERRY BOOKS on Saturday, May 11 at 6 p.m. for a presentation by Manuel Ramos, best-selling author of ‘The Golden Havana Night’ and other Chicano noir crime fiction. Manuel is a twotime winner of the Colorado Book Award, an Edgar© finalist and has received several International Latino Book Awards honorable mentions. The presentation will be followed by an author reception.

Open Improv: Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. Leonard David — Moon Rush. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, MAY 10 Author Reading and Reception with Elizabeth Hyde. 7 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot. Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

LONGMONT

Prospect Village • 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237 Also serving you in Boulder, Golden, & Lafayette

BAFS Second Sundays Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

Minor Disturbance Weekly Workshop + Open Mic. 1 p.m. Prodigy Coffeehouse, 3801 E. 40th Ave., Denver.

Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Author Reading and Reception with Manuel Ramos. 6 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot.

Mesa de Português. 4 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

SUNDAY, MAY 12

MONDAY, MAY 13

Heidi Ganahl — SheFactor. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, MAY 14 Older & Bolder: Creativity Cafe with Katie Curtin. 2 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Queer Creative. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. The Living Poets Society Poetry Bookclub Meeting — Catchment. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

SATURDAY, MAY 11 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

Ted Floyd — How to Know the Birds. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 Mirabai Starr — Wild Mercy. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 33 Kelsey Wilson & Alexander Beggins of Wild Child Aldrine Guerrero | Troy Fernandez of Ka’au Crater Boys Victoria Vox | Stuart Fuchs | The Council

Bands. Beers. Bites. & Boogie MAY 18

for a Cause.

6-10 PM

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT OUR COMMUNITY OUTREACH EFFORTS

JUN 06 2019 @ FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

THURSDAY, MAY 9 Music Arlo Guthrie. 8 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Bobaflex — with Dark Sky Choir. 8 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Clandestine Amigo (solo). 6 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont, 303-485-9400. David Sedaris. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Felix Martin (featuring Hedras) & Sarah Longfield. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Henry Jamison. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

AN EVENING WITH JD SOUTHER

J.Wail Live Band and Phour Point O — with Grassfed (2 Sets on the Patio). 7:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver. Johnny O. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Boz Scaggs OUT OF THE BLUES TOUR

06.12

For a full list of all upcoming concerts and events, visit

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The Little Road: Songs of Journey and Home. 7 p.m. Pine Street Church, 1237 Pine St., Boulder, 303-473-8337. Second performance on Saturday, May 11 at 5 p.m. Lucky Me. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Paa Kow and his Afro-Fusion Orchestra. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

MAY 9, 2019

Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Running Touch. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Snow Tha Product. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. The Songwriter Hour featuring Carolyn Hunter and Alexa Wildish. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Vijay Iyer Sextet. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-7720. Yacht Rock Revue. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Events Introduction to Genealogical Publishing: Exploring Your Options in the Digital Age. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Open Mic — with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. Out Boulder Pridehouse, 2132 14th St., Boulder. Spirit Nia Dance. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Taylor Tomlinson. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through May 11, comedyworks.com.

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FRIDAY, MAY 10 Music Berlioz Symphonie fantastique. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Call Of The Void Album Release. 8 p.m. HiDive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. The Champions. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Cory M. Wells, Nick and Luke, Vince Giambattista. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Denver Ukefest. 5:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Through May 11. FEVER! Two Nights! Featuring New Breed Dance Company, The Funkettes, and Hard Times. 7:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Through May 11. Gasolina: A Night of Reggaeton, Salsa and Cumbia. 9 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Handel with Care, a benefit concert for the Community Infant Program. 7 p.m. Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 7077 Harvest Road, Boulder, 303-530-4422. Kate Farmer Live Music. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


LIVE MUSIC! Mad Dog Blues Duo. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Nite at the Rec. 7 p.m. Recreation Center, 900 West Via Appia, Louisville, 303-335-4920. Picture This. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Ravin’Wolf Acoustic Mountain Sagebrush Blues Duo. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewery at Lee Hill, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Boulder, 720-606-1734. The Revival. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Snow Patrol. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Spring Music Series. 7 p.m. Georgia Boys BBQ, 250 Collyer St., Longmont, 720-999-4099. Superb Beats Collective Takeover. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. The Unified Field featuring Break Science — with kLL sMTH, ill-ēsha, Moontricks, Janover, Melody Lines, LowPro (Official SONIC BLOOM Pre-Party). 8:30 p.m. Cervantes’ and The Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Wylie. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Events Art Opening for James Tyson — with music by Allison Lorenzen. 4:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Colorado Chocolate Festival. 4 p.m. Denver Mart, 451 E. 58th Ave., Denver, 303-292-6278. Through May 11. Conversaciones en español. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Fridays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

FILMS The Boedecker Theater is located at the Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Thursday, May 9 ‘Breaking Habits.’ 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Diane.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Friday, May 10 ‘Breaking Habits.’ 2:30 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Boedecker. Local Filmmakers’ Showcase: ‘American Rebel’. 7 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. Local Filmmakers’ Showcase: ‘Mondo Hollywood’. 6 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway. ‘Hail, Satan?.’ 8:45 p.m. Boedecker. ‘The Iron Giant.’ 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road.

Bonnie and the Clydes. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Boulder Symphony Presents ‘Spirit.’ 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 1820 15th St., Boulder, 720-383-1610. Casa Del Soul. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Cory Henry and The Revival featuring TaRon Lockett and Isaiah Sharkey — with Venus Cruz, Envy Alo. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Finn O’Sullivan. 10 p.m. No Name Bar, 13131325 Broadway, Boulder, 303-447-3278.

Downtown Art Pop Up. 6 p.m. Kitchen Company, 464 Main St., Longmont.

The High Road Home. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

The Hip Abduction — with LITZ. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

The Liturgists. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Jeff White, Sugar Britches. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Music and Movement. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Nobo Branch Design Update and Opening Reception for Living in Nature City Exhibition. 5 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. One-Year Anniversary Party. Longmont Climbing Collective, 33 S. Pratt Parkway, Suite 300, Longmont. ‘Peter Pan.’ 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-245-8272. Through May 11.

SATURDAY, MAY 11 Music Abbigail Dawn & The Make Believe. 10:30 a.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Adelitas Way. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

The Joe Cool Band. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720-600-4875. The Johnny O Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Laser Beastie Boys. 9 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Live Music by Crick Wooder. 8 p.m. Longs Peak Pub & Tap House, 600 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. McCartney — A Tribute to Paul McCartney. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Musical Adventures. 10:30 a.m. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Nite at the Rec. 1 a.m. Recreation Center, 900 West Via Appia, Louisville, 303-335-4920. Nothing But The Sax featuring Dee Lucas, Tony Exum, Jr., Marqueal Jordan. 8 p.m.

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Saturday, May 11 90 second Newberry Film Festival. 3 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave. ‘Breaking Habits.’ 6 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Diane.’ 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Boedecker. Sunday, May 12 ‘Ariadne auf Naxos.’ 1 p.m. Boedecker. Monday, May 13 ‘Ariadne auf Naxos.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker.

The Foggy Tops Bluegrass Band The Tune Up at Full Cycle Friday, May 10 7:30-9:30 PM

1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

Wednesday, May 15 ‘Ariadne auf Naxos.’ 1 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Ask Dr. Ruth.’ 4:30 p.m. Boedecker. ‘Transit.’ 7 p.m. Boedecker.

Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. O’Connor Brothers Band. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Perpetual Motion Pre Release Concert. 7 p.m. The Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 303-377-1739. Respect Vol 4 (Women’s Wrestling). 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Sensory Friendly Performance. 1:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. ‘Signor Deluso’ & ‘Cavalleria Rusticana.’ 7:30 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-731-2036. Through May 12. Steinway Pianist Lenore Raphael. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Summer Haas Party — with Haasy, Syrenne. 7:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. William Black. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Events

THURSDAY MAY 9 7:00 PM

DREAM TO FLY 9:00 PM

LASER BRUNO MARS FRIDAY MAY 10 7:00 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 9:00 PM

LASER STRANGER THINGS 10:30 PM

LIQUID SKY PRETTY LIGHTS 11:59 PM

LASER FLOYD: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON SATURDAY MAY 11 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & HABITAT EARTH 2:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES 7:00 PM

INCOMING! 9:00 PM

2019 Colorado Independent Women of Film Festival. 1 p.m. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver, 303-477-5977. 2019 Spring Horseshoe Market. 10 a.m. Broncos Stadium, Lot G, 1701 Bryant St., Denver, 720-301-4293. Through May 12, horseshoemarket.com. Bacon & Beer Classic. Noon. Sports Authority Field at Mile High, 1701 Mile High Stadium Circle, Denver, 720-258-3000. Cartoons & Cannabis Cereal Jam. 10:30 a.m. Dean Ween’s Honey Pot Lounge, 1753 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-842-3724. Écho D’Afrique 2019 Celebrating African Culture Through Music & Dance. 7 p.m. Su Teatro Cultural & Performing Arts Center, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, 303-296-0219. see EVENTS Page 36

MAY 9, 2019

LASER BEASTIE BOYS 10:30 PM

LASER QUEEN 11:59 PM

LIQUID SKY THE WALL SUNDAY MAY 12 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS & PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 3:00 PM

WE ARE STARS 4:30 PM

DREAM TO FLY

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 I

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theater Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21.

The Language Archive. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Opens May 10. Through June 16.

Between Us. Denver Center for Performing Arts Off Center, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through May 26.

Magnets on the Fridge. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Shows the first Wednesday of the month from February-June.

The Boys in the Band. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through May 26. Chess, the Musical. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. Through May 18. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theater Company. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through May 19. The Diary of Anne Frank. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humantiies, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 17. Disney’s Freaky Friday, the Musical. 7:30 p.m. CenterStage Black Box Theatre, 901 Front St. , Koko Plaza, Lower Level, Louisville. Through May 12. Hay Fever — presented by Germinal Stage. John Hand Theater, 7653 East First Place, Denver. Opens May 10. Through June 8.

LYNN FLEMING

The Marvelous Method: An Improvised Tribute to Stan Lee. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. Thursday evenings through May 23. The Memory of Water. Theater Company of Lafayette, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. Through May 18. The Moors. Arvada Center, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 18. Oliver. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through May 26. Outside Mullingar — presented by Coal Creek Theater of Louisville. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville. Through May 18.

ANTHONY AND ROSEMARY are two introverted misfits straddling 40. In this very Irish story, these yearning, eccentric souls fight their way toward solid ground and some kind of happiness. Coal Creek Theater of Louisville presents ‘Outside Mullingar’ through May 18.

Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 19.

Sanctions. Curious Theater Company, 1018 Acoma St., Denver. Through June 15.

Show of Force — presented by And Toto too Theatre Company. Studio Loft at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through May 12.

Sin Street Social Club. Arvada Center, Black Box Theatre, 6901

Wicked. DCPA Broadway, Buell Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through June 9. The Wizard of Oz. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through July 7.

EVENTS from Page 35

Liyana Screening to Benefit Cultural Center in Ghana. 7 p.m. Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. The Pump & Dump Show Seventh Annual Mother’s Day Eve Show and Dance Party. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Spring Pole Dance Showcase 2019. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Voices of Spring. 7 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder, 303-442-1787. Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. What So Not. 10 a.m., noon, and 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482.

SUNDAY, MAY 12 Music Be Our Guest. 10 a.m. Heart of Longmont Church, 350 11th Ave., Longmont, 303-776-3523. Bootstrap LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. The Boulder Chamber Orchestra Presents ‘Earthly Delights.’ 3:30 p.m. Boulder Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton Ave., Boulder, 303-442-1522.

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MAY 9, 2019

Cowgirl Clue. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. David Booker. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Espresso! 9:30 a.m. Spruce Confections, Eighth & Pearl streets, Boulder.

The Velvet Elvis’ Mother’s Day Brunch. 10:30 a.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Weekend Coffee Shop Jazz Jam (Boulder). Noon. Vic’s Again, 3305 30th St., Boulder. Events

The Jack Hadley Band, Stoll Vaughan. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328.

Music in the Galleries: Altius Quartet. 1 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 303-388-9839.

Double Feature: ‘Life of Trees’/Laser Galactic Odyssey. 1:30 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

Rascal Martinez. 6 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

Double Feature: ‘We Are Stars’ / ‘Perseus & Andromeda.’ Noon. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

Registration for Sing the World Green Music Camp. Unitarian Universalist Church of Boulder, 5001 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 720-387-9182. Rob Vicious of Shoreline Mafia — with Ransteez, Lil Manie, Rhymesight, EJAY and special guests. 8 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. SambaTonk, Americana meets Brazil. 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. ‘Signor Deluso’ & ‘Cavalleria Rusticana.’ 2 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-731-2036. ‘Spirit.’ 2:30 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 1820 15th St., Boulder, 720-383-1610.

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Fold MacDonald: Beginner Origami. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. A Glass for Mom. 11 a.m. Vero Boulder, 2525 Arapahoe Ave H5B, Boulder, 702-496-7963. Go Club for Kids & Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Mother’s Day Outing on Coal Creek. 2 p.m. Public Road Trailhead, 1881 S. Public Road, Lafayette. see EVENTS Page 38

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


TALKS

Open Range Competition Teams Summer Day Camps Classes & Private Lessons

TEDxBOULDER: WITHIN & WITHOUT

Target & Hunting Full Service Retail Pro Shop & Service Recurve & Compound

High Altitude Archery 455 Weaver Park Rd #500 Longmont, CO 80501 720-491-3309

JUN 1 | 7:30 PM TICKETS: chautauqua.com 900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

coloradochautauqua

colochautauqua

Cinderella Friday, May 17 at 7:30pm Saturday, May 18 at 2:00 and 7:30pm Sunday, May 19 at 2:00pm Dairy ARTS Center, Boulder www.thedairy.org or 303.444.7328

Enjoy brunch at Shine Restaurant on Saturday or Sunday A portion of sales will go directly to Boulder Ballet. Reservations required: www.shineboulder.com or 303.449.0120 (please let them know you are going to the show) Photo by Amanda Tipton

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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MAY 9, 2019

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37


arts All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Aftereffect: Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Painting. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26.

DAIRY ARTS CENTER/MICHAEL MCCAFFREY

Amanda Wachob: Tattoo This. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26. Andrew Jensdotter: Flak. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26.

‘MOTHERS, FATHERS, Sons & Daughters,’ a new exhibit at the Dairy Arts Center, speaks to how our parents influence us, how we influence our children and how our children influence all of us. Showing May 10-June 16.

Our Planet — Art Exhibition on the Environment in a Changing Climate. National Center for Atmospheric Research, UCAR Gallery I & Gallery ll, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through May. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1.

Ansel Adams: Early works exhibit. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26.

Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8.

The Art Of Resilience: Nicaraguan Perspectives. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through June 3.

Reconstructing the Past. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont.

Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit. Don Coen: The Migrant Series. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St.,Boulder. Through May 27. Dinosaurs: Land Of Fire and Ice. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 12. Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2019.

Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change. The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9. Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18. Living with Wolves. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 20.

Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17.

Mothers, Fathers, Sons & Daughters. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16.

Evan Cantor, New Work (oil paintings). Seeds Cafe (Boulder Public Library), 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder. Through June 26

Nicole Banowtz: Concerning Plants. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16.

Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit.

Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 23.

Through April 28.

Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Opens May 5. Through Aug. 25. Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through January 2020. The Unknown Polly Addison. Dairy Arts Center, Polly Addison Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Vance Brand: Ambassador of Exploration. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Water Flow: Under the Colorado River. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26. World War II Diary Transcribed at the Museum. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit.

EVENTS from Page 36

Mother’s Day Paint & Plant Workshop. 10 a.m. Tinker Art Studio, 693B S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-503-1902. Mother’s Day Special. 10 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Mother’s Day Brunch Experience at The Ritz-Carlton, Denver. 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., and 12:30 p.m. The Ritz-Carlton, Denver, Hotel Plaza Level, 1881 Curtis St., Denver. Reynolds Teen Advisory Group (TAG) Meeting. 2:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

MONDAY, MAY 13 Music Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Can’t Be Satisfied: Blues Night. 9 p.m. HiDive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. David Burchfield & Monica Marie LaBonte. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

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Julia Jacklin. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Reign. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. Events Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Archaeology and Historic Preservation Awards Ceremony. 6 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Babies and Board Books. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Drop In Aerial Foundations. 5:45 p.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Fungal Technologies Workshop. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Toddler Time. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. see EVENTS Page 40

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

Friday May 10 - dual venue!

The uniFied Field Break Science & ShluMp w/ kll SMTh, ill-éSha, MoonTrickS, Janover, Melody lineS & lowpro. oFFicial Sonic BlooM pre-parTy

SaTurday May 11

cory henry & The revival

FeaT Taron lockeTT & iSaiah Sharkey w/ venuS cruz & envy alo

Friday May 17 - dual venue!

wookieFooT & Mike love w/ yak aTTack, analog Son, a-Mac & The heighT, grahaM good & The painTerS on The paTio: pick & howl, Modern whiSkey MarkeT SilenT diSco: dozier, ooMah (oF evanoFF) & Tropical waFFle

SaTurday May 18

nepali evenTS colorado preSenTS

neeTeSh Jung kunwar & BarTika eaM rai w/ Jaanvi gurung

TueSday May 21

ThurSday May 9

J.wail live Band & phour poinT 0

w/ graSSFed (2 SeTS on The paTio)

SaTurday May 11

The hip aBducTion w/ liTz

Sunday May 12

roB viciouS oF Shoreline MaFia w/ ranSTeez, lil Manie & rhyMeSighT

w/ Flokid, Blaine legendary, Talien gang, devin lee, caMeron airBorne & JoTiki

wedneSday May 15 re: Search

BrighTSide & dorFeX BoS

w/ gryMeTyMe (laTe SeT), Mikey Thunder & Jordan polovina

ThurSday May 16

Magnolia norTh

FeaT STeve FolTz oF TrouT STeak revival & grace clark w/ liver down The river (laTe SeT), Thunder and rain (paTio SeT), JacoB MoSS & MaTT FlaherTy oF parT & parcel (paTio SeT)

SaTurday May 18

SaTurday May 25

w/ collierad & MounTainuS

Xavier wulF Friday May 31

hieroglyphicS

(all original MeMBerS) w/ rap noir, SToney hawk, S.a.v.e.1 & Mike wird

SaTurday June 1

nle choppa ThurSday June 6

TSuruda & eSSekS w/ gryMeTyMe & kavSko

Friday & SaTurday June 7 & 8 @cenTral ciTy

cenTral Jazz

duMpSTaphunk, The new MaSTerSoundS, george porTer Jr. & runnin’ pardnerS, Melvin SealS & JgB, Michal MenerT Trio, new orleanS SuSpecTS & The color red all STarS

SaTurday June 8

The crySTal MeThod w/ Mikey Thunder & avry

Sunday June 9

Sold ouT!

J.i.d.

w/ SaBa, MereBa & deanTe hiTchcock

Friday June 14

long Beach duB allSTarS & The aggroliTeS

w/ ToMorrowS Bad SeedS

ThurSday, Friday, SaTurday & Sunday June 20-23 @ huMMingBird ranch

Sonic BlooM graMaTik, opiuo, eMancipaTor enSeMBle & More Friday June 21

BaSS inFerno

w/ he$h & BoMMer, SweeTTooTh & kleavr B2B TanTruM

FeaT george porTer Jr (The MeTerS), ivan neville (duMpSTaphunk), ian neville (duMpSTaphunk) & Terrence houSTon (The Funky MeTerS) w/ JoeBaBy all-STar JaM FeaT JerMal waTSon (dirTy dozen BraSS Band)

re: Search

w/ caSual coMMander (SunSquaBi), aaron BordaS (laTe SeT), Mikey Thunder & Jordan polovina

ThurSday May 23

Bloodkin

w/ daniella kaTzir Band (FeaT gaBe Mervine, Brian Mcrae oF kyle hollingSworTh Band, Mike TallMan & auSTin zalaTel oF euForqueSTra), Big TiMe raScalS (2 SeTS on The paTio; 1 original & 1 pickin’ on nirvana) & The MoveS collecTive

Friday May 24

upSTaTe

w/ eMMa MayeS & The hip, plain Faraday

SaTurday May 25

TriBuTe To allMan BroTherS Band By The FaMily peach

FeaT vaylor TruckS, Melody TruckS, JeFF Franca (Thievery corp), Todd SMallie (JJ grey & MoFro), JaMeS duMM, Billy Mckay & eric SanderS w/ coral creek (TriBuTe To The graTeFul dead)

ThurSday May 30

coral creek

FeaT drew eMMiTT (leFTover SalMon) & Todd SheaFFer (railroad earTh) w/ Todd SheaFFer Solo SeT, ruM creek FeaT MeMBerS oF coral creek & hoT BuTTered ruM & Mary-elaine JenkinS

Friday May 31

ScoTT law & roSS JaMeS’ coSMic Twang FeaT nicki BluhM, keiTh MoSeley & aleX koFord w/ The higgS

SaTurday June 1

Tor

w/ BloSSoMn, andrew roThSchild & The Moon Frog Band

Jun

6

Community Event

Boulder In The Round

Featuring Kyle Donovan, Pamela Machala and Jackson Emmer

6/26 Souvenir de Florence

Flatirons Chamber Music Festival

ThurSday June 6

w/ Bunch oF STrangerS (paTio SeT)

SaTurday June 8

w/ evil dave FeaT Shawn eckelS (andy FraSco & The un), Todd SMallie & Shaun gilMour (JJ grey & MoFro) & grooveMenT

ThurSday June 13

Jon STickley Trio SaTurday June 15 ThurSday June 20

dooM FlaMingo

FeaT ryan STaSik (uMphrey’S Mcgee) w/ Funk you

ThurSday June 27

The Funky knuckleS

Check out eTown.org

for upcoming announcements of summer shows & eTown tapings! WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

w/ graTeFul BluegraSS BoyS (2 SeTS on The paTio)

TeXT cervanTeS To 91944 For TickeT giveawayS, drink SpecialS, diScounTed TickeT proMoTionS & More

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

19 at eTOWN HALL 6 PM - 9 PM

re: Search

avenharT

SuicidegirlS BlackhearT BurleSque

featuring: Harry Tuft, Monocle Band, Mollie O’Brien & Rich Moore, Danny Shafer, Masontown & more

w/ pigeon hole, kyral X Banko (laTe SeT), Mikey Thunder & Jordan polovina

w/ dirTy revival

ariSe MuSic FeSTival

May

wedneSday May 29

SaTurday July 27

ThurSday & Friday SepTeMBer 12-13

All-Star Tribute to Bob Dylan

hoMeMade SpaceShip

w/ The wrecklundS (paTio SeT), Tara roSe & The real deal (paTio SeT)

Friday, SaTurday & Sunday auguST 2-4 @ SunriSe ranch in loveland

10 AM – 12 PM

wedneSday May 22

ghoST revue

BuTcher Brown

"Guilt Free Gospel" at Boulder Theater!

dynohunTer

Friday June 28

new orleanS SuSpecTS

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TueSday May 21

circuS no. 9 & FireSide collecTive (paTio SeT)

FeaT John “JoJo” herMan (wideSpread panic), eric McFadden (parliaMenT Funkadelic) – wideSpread panic red rockS aFTer Show

Nick Forster's May Hippy Bluegrass Church

The elovaTerS

SaTurday June 22

dizzy wrighT

Featuring comedians Al Jackson & Lucas Larson

TueSday May 14

porTer neville quarTeT

w/ Beau young prince, MarTy griMeS, reco havoc & indigo ace

16

eTown Comedy Live!

eric BiddineS & Malc STewy

The Funk SeSSionS

FeaT iSaac Teel (Tauk) w/ Marc BrownSTein (The diSco BiScuiTS), JenniFer harTSwick (Trey anaSTaSio Band), nick caSSarino (The nTh power), Joey porTer (The MoTeT) & nicholaS gerlach (Michel MenerT & The preTTy FanTaSTicS)

May

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Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact jenny@etown.org MAY 9, 2019

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EVENTS from Page 38

Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-4413100.

TUESDAY, MAY 14 Music Adrian Nye, Clare Thérèse, Gah-bé. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Apocalyptica Plays Metallica by Four Cellos. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106,. Dinner with The Ricky Earl Band featuring Cherise. 6 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Eric Biddines & Malc Stewy — with Flokid, Blaine Legendary, Talien Gang, Devin Lee, Cameron Airborne, Jotiki. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. An Evening with Hollywood Vampires. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Face Vocal Band. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Falling In Reverse — with Ice Nine Kills, From Ashes To New, New Years Day. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Fred Armisen: Comedy For Musicians But Everyone is Welcome. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Garbage. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 720-931-6947. Hellogoodbye. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Lamont Bassoon Ensemble. Noon. Saint John’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1350 Washington St., Denver, 303-831-7115. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Ukulele Club. 7 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Events All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Bourbon & Blues — with the David Booker Band. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Jazzetry Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Kevin Garrett. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. The Late Ones. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. MahlerFest: Elgar & Beethoven with pianist David Korevaar. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-310-8946. The Radio Latina Music Awards. 7 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-832-2383. Re:Search featuring Brightside and Dorfex Bos — with GrymeTyme (Late Set), Mikey Thunder, Jordan Polovina and special guests. 8:30 p.m. Venue Information, Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver. Events Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder Start Up Week. 9 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. BTAB @ Main. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Comedy Open Mic. 7 p.m. Vapor Distillery, 5311 Western Ave., Suite 180, Boulder, 303-997-6134.

Flatirons Mineral Club. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500.

The Jogging Jamboree — Time to Play featuring Rickey Gates. 5:30 p.m. Neptune Mountaineering, 633 S. Broadway St., Unit A, Boulder, 303-499-8866.

Drop In Tech Help. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder

MAY 9, 2019

Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Conversations in English Tuesdays. 12:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777.

Colorado’s Green Building Goals. Noon. Boulder Commons, 2440 Junction Place, Boulder.

Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Lap Babies. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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‘Paris to Pittsburgh’ — Free Documentary Film Screening. 6 p.m. The Alliance Center, 1536 Wynkoop St., Denver. Wobblers & Walkers. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303441-3100; 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


The Devil’s Advocate is a Pacifist By Maggie Saunders

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/SETIMMP

As I stared into the eyes of Michael Cohen on the Lucky’s market television; blinded by humanity or lack thereof. I saw a system which breeds dehumanization. Is this really justice? Does it make a person soft to look into the eyes of a shmuck, and wonder if he has a family he loves dearly? Who know he has good sides too. Corruption is learned behavior. This cycle of violence is embedded in the DNA of America. Courtrooms become the nucleus of looking into semantics more so than eyes. Looking at Michael Cohen’s, I was no longer a Democrat, Libertarian, or Socialist. Still not a Republican, either. Maybe, instead of needing more political parties, we need to condense down to one. Humanitarian: a person promoting human welfare and social reform. For the people, by the people / For each other, with each other / United we stand. Until that day, our liberty is shackled and shacked up with civil obedience. Governed by those who know our names only from canvassing data. We pay the price of fearful fates for a slice of regulated freedom. We are grown up children with timeouts in prison beds, so we’ll learn to do better next time. After the trauma and the fear, post overstimulation and undernutrition, through cut off neural connections, pruned from society, corrupted socially, emotionally, you’ll learn to be better. Better at propagating violence. Better at turning off the image of a scared face. Studies show lack of recognition of a scared face can predict sociopathy. Social reform through hijacking social wiring. None of us are meant to be in cages with wings clipped. The bald eagle’s been stripped of every last feather and put on the butcher block for public nudity. Most recent interview said he’s not even sure how he got there. Inside sources say Michael Cohen said the same thing, behind closed doors. Headlines say, “Three-year sentence will start in Spring”. This issue is larger than three years. Mass incarceration a 229 year old issue. 2.3 million lives slept on American prison beds in 2018. Insidious violence is a crime of which no one is being committed, but of which we are all guilty. Are you prepared to raise your right hand? Leave a red handprint with the left. Swear to tell the whole truth? That society hasn’t evolved much from Witch Trials, and public thrills of watching another human suffer. I’m not saying Michael Cohen’s innocent. I’m not saying we are either.

Maggie Saunders is a composition notebook poet, preschool teacher and professional empathetic based out of Boulder.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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In space, no one can hear you yawn ‘High Life’ has zero gravitas

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H

igh Life is basically a broody teen freshman sitting in ROBERT his very first college course, finally free to ask what PATTINSON pouts in space, as the last he feels are profound questions about sex. Writer/ remaining astronaut director Claire Denis’s talent and cinematic acumen on a ship once filled are beyond reproach, but even Aristotle has lesser with prisoners. He’s now raising a baby works, right? Her first English-only film is, sadly, a sleepy whose origins represlog seemingly content to half-postulate philosophical quansent whatever passes daries without ever doing the hard work of proposing any as a plot here. Boring measure of an answer. Were it not for the impeccable pediand nowhere near weird enough, writer/ gree of its creator, High Life’s staying power would disappear director Claire faster than the carbonation in an open can of the Denis’s first English“Champagne of beers” on a summer day. only film is a forgetMonte (Robert Pattinson) is the sole remaining astronaut table slog. on a ship once filled with criminals that was shot into outer space for a combo of research and capital punishment. Denis is likely right in assuming that welding murderous revenge onto science is likely the only way the public will ever go HAM for STEM. Monte does have company: a baby. Discovering how this baby came to be is the crux of what passes as a plot. It involves a disgraced doctor who slaughtered her family (Juliette Binoche), a steelwilled female prisoner (Mia Goth), loads of pulse-pounding gardening and a self-pleasure room so vile, E.L. James thinks it doth protest too much. High Life seizes from the past to the present and back again without ever even accidentally generating suspense. Instead, the whole thing is a journey to a black hole, a metaphorical bellybutton that makes all the navel-gazing quite literal. Honestly, High Life should have been weirder. From the clunky rationale for why the ship has gravity to the tamest possible event horizon encounter, nothing about the film feels as dreamlike or hallucinatory as would be warranted. It’s mostly just Pattinson pouting, intermittently interrupted by sexual assault and dog murder. If that sounds unpleasant, please know there’s also the most embarrassing scene Binoche has ever filmed, and she appeared in the live-action Ghost in the Shell. Pattinson acquits himself just fine, although he’s never asked to do much more than frown. Denis seemingly asks more of her audience than she did of her performers. If this is meant to engage issues about morality, the human capacity for survival or whether procreation is a substitute for purpose, those debates all happen between the viewers and themselves. High Life is a Philosophy 101 term paper, where every sentence ends in a question mark. The collision between weird, obtuse art and science-fiction can make for provocative, exciting cinema. High Life is not any of that. Instead, it is a leaden, posturing misfire from a renowned artist. That’s totally fine. It happens. Every rabidly positive review of the film feels like it was either written by someone who saw an entirely different version or, far more likely, by someone replacing High Life’s actual banality with the spirited creativity they expected. This review first appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska. I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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Satanist or satirist?

America’s tenuous separation of church and state in ‘Hail Satan?’

by Michael J. Casey

F

ew words in the English language come as charged as “Satanism.” Conjuring images of blasphemy, rituON THE BILL: ‘Hail Satan?’ 8:45 al, sacrifice and perversion, Satanism seems to be p.m. Friday, May 10, the sort of thing people can oppose on name alone. Dairy Arts Center, Then again, few know what Satanists believe. Or The Boedecker what Satanists do. Or what, if any, threat they pose. Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303Led by Lucien Greaves — not his real name — The 440-7825, thedairy. Satanic Temple (TST) formed, more or less, in 2013 as a org way to troll Florida Governor Rick Scott. It probably would have gone unnoticed, but thanks to a 24-hour news cycle hungry for a story, what started as a lark quickly gained national attention. As one Satanist says, “Once you realize how the media is constructed, it’s incredibly easy to manipulate.” Soon Greaves was being interviewed and covered on cable news. Some were furious, others baffled. “Do people think you’re kidding, or do they think you’re evil?” a reporter asks. That question forms the heart of Penny Lane’s documentary Hail Satan?, a movie that takes its subject seriously but contains a well-placed punctuation mark in the title. Though there is a good deal of prankishness in TST, their overall aim carries a validity not easily dismissed. One of America’s founding tenets is the separation of church and state, but many assume the Founding Fathers were Christians and, ergo, America is a Christian nation. They point to “In God We Trust” printed on money, “one nation, under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance and the presence of Ten Commandment statues on government land. But these examples don’t date back to 1776, but to the 1950s. How and why? That story is a magnificent intersection of politics, paranoia and pop culture; easily one of the best anecdotes found in Hail Satan?. Lane uses Hail Satan? to expose the silliness of superstition and the hypocrisy of righteousness. The opposition she finds abhors even the thought of Satanism. In the 1980s, the Catholic Church instigated the so-called “Satanic Panic” and urged paranoid parents to peer into their children’s rooms searching for Dungeons & Dragons books and Iron Maiden records. All while perpetrating and covering up sin so wicked, so depraved, we have yet to grapple with it properly. But Lane’s aim is not merely to point fingers. Interspersing an array of archival footage, Lane interviews dozens of members of TST — all photographed against the same third-grade school photo backdrop — paying particular attention to their personal beliefs and diverse background. Most documentaries use talking head interviews as a crutch to fill the audience in on key pieces of information unimaginatively; Lane wields these interviews like an archeologist carefully uncovering a forgotten civilization. Rare is the movie that makes discovery this alluring. Movies are a window into the world. Sometimes that window overlooks the familiar and the comforting; other times, it frames landscapes both new and challenging. Hail Satan? offers a bit of both. You might not like everything you see here, but it certainly will change how you see it. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Helping Deliver An Environmental Message For The Front Range Business Community Since 1987

WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM/QUICKQUOTE | (303) 571-5719

Nick Forster’s

@ Boulder Theater

Sunday, May 19 • 10am - 12pm

Peace • Love • Joy Join us for a morning full of good community vibes, live music, and poetry. Sing along to Nick Forster’s “Guilt Free Gospel” service. All welcome! Tickets $10 at www.BoulderTheater.com

For More Information Visit www.HippyBluegrassChurch.com

MAY 9, 2019

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Red IPA

Tacos Al Pastor

S

T

Finkel & Garf Brewing Company 5455 Spine Road, Unit A, Boulder, finkelandgarf.com

PHOTOS BY STAFF

pringtime in Colorado often means, sure, we get a few temperate days, but mostly we’ll get one day of summer, then one day of winter, then one day of summer, on and on until the Fourth of July. For this season, may we suggest Finkel & Garf’s Red IPA. It’s malty, rich and smooth for when the days are cold, but it’s hoppy, fruity and crisp for when the weather gets warm. At 6.5 percent alcohol by volume, with 60 international bittering units, it’s a perfectly balanced beer for a season that often seems out of balance. Prices vary.

Black Bean and Veggie Burger Morning Glory Cafe 1377 Forest Park Circle, Unit 101, Lafayette, morningglorycafe.org

Tacos Aya Ya 1206 Centaur Village Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-1336. ucked inside a shopping center off South Boulder Road, Tacos Aya Ya delivers hefty portions of straightforward, delicious Mexican street food. At just $1.75 per taco, you don’t have to break the bank to fill your belly or to try a smattering of their offerings. Grab a couple of al pastor tacos, with warm, street-taco-sized tortillas filled with richly spiced, slow-cooked pork. It’s comfort food, plain and simple. Add some salsa from Tacos Aya Ya’s condiment bar — we opted for a mildly spicy verde — and you’re in taco heaven. $1.75.

W

hat’s not to love about Lafayette’s Morning Glory Cafe? A classic breakfast, lunch and dinner spot with a cozy, casual vibe and a large menu of farmfresh dishes. We picked from their selection of vegan and vegetarian dishes with the hand- and house-made black bean and veggie burger. It’s darn good. Crisp on the outside, tender on the inside, with deep flavor built in. And it’s served alongside, hands down, some of the County’s best fries — crispy, substantial and irresistibly spiced. $12.

Expresso Burrito

Three Margaritas 3390 28th St., Boulder, 3margaritasmex.com

I

f you haven’t been out to Three Margaritas in Boulder, or in one of its other Denver-area restaurants, you might be surprised the local chain whips up some pretty formidable fare. Take the expresso burrito — it’s a flavorful tortilla wrapped around tomato-cooked rice, beans and pork cooked in tomatillo chile verde. The pork is succulent, and the brightness of the tomatillos actually make it through into the meat. Topped with salsa, avocado and sour cream, it’s really all you can ask for in a burrito. $10.75.

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SUSAN FRANCE

CRACKING DOWN By JOHN LEHNDORFF

N

ames have great power, particularly when it comes to foods we hold near and dear. Take the case of Crack Pie, one of the most famous American desserts of the past quarter-century. Created by pastry chef Christina Tosi, Crack Pie sets a gooey, sweet, salty, satiating filling of heavy cream, egg yolks, vanilla and sugar in a buttery oatmeal cookie crust. After tasting Crack Pie, my first thought was: “This stuff is Crack Pie, dangerous, really addictive. Irish Car Bombs, Where can I get some more?” That’s the common reaction. Wopburgers and Not everyone found this reference to crack cocaine appealtales of culinary ing, particularly in light of the of communities, many correctness number African-American, that have been devastated by the drug. After lengthy protests including comments suggesting that the bakery also offer Heroin Cupcakes, Tosi recently announced that the name would be changed. Her bakery website now refers to it as “Milk Bar Pie, formerly known as Crack Pie®.” Are we getting a little bit too sensitive and inflicting culinary correctness? Or, is it about time some of these 46

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verbal offenses were addressed? It’s complicated, says Dana Derichsweiler, owner of the Walnut Cafe restaurants, which occasionally feature Crack Pie. “We are sticking with the name Crack Pie, at least for now. It’s how customers know the pie,” she says. Derichsweiler is no spring chicken when it comes to food name controversy. “Back in the 1990s we had Killer Brownies on the menu. Some of our customers complained. We had a contest and chose The Slab. We would never call anything ‘Killer’ now,” Derichsweiler says. In fairness, a lot of menu items were called “Killer” back then. Even today, the best-selling organic, nonGMO bread in the U.S. is Dave’s Killer Bread. Derichsweiler notes that in the ’90s a half-caf, halfdecaf espresso drink was commonly called a “schizo” by baristas, but no longer. “Now we have to make sure food names don’t have any gender connotations,” she adds. The Walnut Cafe Boulder menu includes Duzzer’s Breakfast Burrito. The vegetarian item topped with cheddar, salsa, sour cream and black olives is named after a longtime customer, filmmaker and do-gooder Ryan Van Duzer. The eatery donates $1 for each burrito to the Kirk “Rocky” Derichsweller Foundation, named after Dana’s late brother. “The burritos have raised more I

THE WALNUT CAFE makes a version of Crack Pie, and owner Dana Derichsweiler says they’re sticking with the name for now. The pie’s creator, esteemed pastry chef Christina Tosi, recently announced she’d change the name of the pie to Milk Bar Pie, named after her bakery.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


than $22,000 to fund the foundation’s holiday bike giveaway. More than 400 kids a year get bikes, helmets and locks,” Derichsweiler says. “I want to focus on what brings us together, not what offends us,” she says. That said, she ignored folks who complained because she used Girl Scout cookies in a pie crust. “Come on!” she says. If you look into many beloved foods and beverages you’ll find names fraught with cultural appropriation, misogyny, exploitation, racism, environmental harm and heaping helpings of sheer stupidity. There has been a movement to remove Confederate monuments, yet we keep buying Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben’s, names born out of slavery, plantations and segregation. Native American groups have long objected to the imagery on Land O’ Lakes Butter and the Inuit people to Eskimo Pies. I’m not sure whether the Quakers appreciate Quaker Oats. Just the other day my naming radar blipped when I heard about a brand-new Denver eatery called Pistol Whip. Um, here’s the definition of pistol whip: “To hit or beat (someone) with a pistol generally in the head.” It reminds me of the Denver bar that insisted, for a while, on pouring a drink called the Donkey Punch. You’ll have to Google that one yourself. Alcoholic cocktails have a long, obnoxious history with bartenders creating and naming everything from Irish Car Bombs to Date Grape Kool-aid. The hot sauce industry is also home to a legion of misogynist and racist food product names. Go to hotsauce.com to order your bottle of, well... we can’t really print many of the names. Other food names like Chick-fil-A are now controversial because of what the companies do. Colorado-born Illegal Pete’s has fought various entities concerning its name for a quarter century including a recent Delaware lawsuit alleging the burrito restaurant’s name had “racist connotations.” In fact, Pete Turner named the place after his dying, hell-raising father, Pete Turner Sr., and displays exceptional corporate values. Times have changed. The Blue Parrot Restaurant, which closed in Louisville after 90-plus years in business, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

had a popular Italian sausage patty sandwich on the menu. They called it a “Wopburger.” “Wop” is a derogatory term for a person from Italy and it was once hurled as an insult at some of my relatives. Here’s the way it was explained to me: It was OK because the owners were Italian. An Italian could call another Italian a “wop,” but it was never OK for a nonItalian. By the way, Crack Bacon is available at Syrup, a brunch place in Denver. LOCAL FOOD NEWS The Gold Hill Inn is open for its 57th summer season of mountain dining, live music and mystery dinners. Meanwhile, the Boulder Cork is celebrating 50 years of serving teriyaki steak. … Gaku Ramen is open at 1119 13th. St., Boulder ... Boulder’s Hoplark Tea will open their new taproom at 3220 Prairie Ave. on May 22 serving hop-infused sparkling iced tea … Broomfield’s award-winning 4 Noses Brewing will open a SUSAN FRANCE barrel house and taproom, Oak Addendum, at 2205 Central Ave. TASTE OF THE WEEK I unexpectedly made potstickers on a recent Tuesday because I unearthed a package of wonton wrappers from the freezer. I had leftover chicken roasted with carrots, potatoes, onions and apples. I put a tablespoon of the mix on a wrapper — essentially a fresh pasta sheet — folded and sealed them with a wet finger. The dumplings got pansizzled ’til crispy in hot olive oil. It was so easy and appealing that I filled another one with sautéed onions and extra sharp Cheddar cheese, then another with posole and salsa. My finale was a banana, cinnamon and toasted hazelnut potsticker.

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WORDS TO CHEW ON “In our house we break a fast/ with dates from Huun/ and glasses of buttermilk/ Then on to bowls of lamb soup flavored with mint, trays/ of stuffed grape leaves/ spiced fava beans drenched/ in olive oil and lemon juice.” — From the poem “Ramadan” by Khaled Mattawa John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU. Listen to podcasts: news.kgnu. org/category/radio-nibbles I

MAY 9, 2019

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NILA NEWSOM/SHUTTERSTOCK, COURTESY OF IPBES

Spoiled

Looking at the U.N.’s latest study on the potential extinction of 1 million plant and animal species from a food perspective

by Matt Cortina

ABOVE: A young man prepares Ayurvedic medicine in a traditional way. RIGHT: Stumps are caused by deforestation and slash and burn type of agriculture.

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DUDAREV MIKHAIL/SHUTTERSTOCK, COURTESY OF IPBES

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nother day, another devastating report about the impacts of humankind on the environment. After a three-year review of 15,000 research sources from 50 countries, the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) announced on May 6 that the Earth is facing the extinction of about a million plant and animal species. And, surprise, we’re to blame. In the past, the specter of total selfannihilation has been obscured somewhat by hypothetical, hazy forecasts and plans for action that ultimately don’t come to fruition — “If we don’t curb fossil-fuel use by 40 percent by 2050, critical institutions will begin to de-blah blah blah.” MAY 9, 2019

But the IPBES study feels different. In a vast summary, the study’s 145 expert authors outline exactly what has led to this impending extinction, what will likely fuel it in the years to come, and, thankfully, what we might be able to do to prevent its worst-

case scenario. “The overwhelming evidence of the IPBES Global Assessment, from a wide range of different fields of knowledge, presents an ominous picture,” writes IPBES Chair, Sir Robert Watson, in the summary. “The health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide.” Yikes. What’s different about this report, too, is its focus on the role of global food production in the largest extinction in human history. If you doubt it, here are a few stats from the study that ought to make you reconsider: — 55 percent of the world’s oceans I

are covered by industrial fishing. — 75 percent of fresh water is devoted to crop and livestock production. — 386,000 square miles (about three Colorados, plus New England) of agriculture expansion took place in the tropics from 1980-2000, mostly for cattle grazing and palm oil production. — The equivalent of 60 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions are sequestered in land and marine ecosystems. It’s that last point that’s most concerning: The more we cut down or otherwise degrade natural ecosystems, the more species we off, and the more we release CO2 into the atmosphere. About 25 percent of greenhouse gas emissions are already caused by land-clearing, crop production and fertilization, the report shows, with animal-based food contributing 75 percent to that figure. Agriculture’s rampant growth will have long-lasting effects, too, the report’s authors found, as it will limit biodiversity, which could come in handy as the climate changes. Of the 6,190 breeds of animals humans had historically domesticated for food and agriculture, about 10 percent went extinct by 2016, with 1,000 more breeds currently threatened. Why does that matter? “Reductions BOULDER WEEKLY


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in the diversity of cultivated crops, crop wild relatives and domesticated breeds mean that agroecosystems are less resilient against future climate change, pests and pathogens,” the report states. Large-scale trade, increased agricultural operations, market preferences and loss of knowledge from local farmers have all contributed to the loss of these breeds. The report notes that there are communities that have worked with certain breeds, sometimes over millennia, and indigenous communities around the globe are one of the last places where people are raising (and know how to raise) certain breeds. The report indicates, however, that protections of these areas has deteriorated. It’s not better in the oceans — onethird of fish stocks are over-fished, while another 60 percent are at their max. In response, industrial fisheries, comprised of mainly a few countries and corporations, have fished in deeper waters and farther out than they had previously. On top of that, one-third of the world’s global catch is illegal, the report states. And this is all being done with the backdrop of global food insecurity: 11 percent of the world’s population is undernourished. So what do we do? Fortunately, the report has a few answers. Feeding the undernourished and making our food system more sustainable “are complementary and closely interdepenBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

TRADITIONAL VIETNAMESE PHO HOUSE dent,” the report’s authors write. Both can be done through major policy changes that mandate and incentivize sustainable landscape planning and agricultural procedures, and empowering consumers and food producers to transform supply chains. That may sound like wonkish jargon, but here’s an example: Major commodity farm producers in the U.S. have access to insurance and subsidies while small, organic, sustainable farms don’t. In a bad year, commodity farmers have options to recoup some of their losses, sustainable farms often go out of business. As for the ocean, the report’s authors suggest implementing stricter fishing quotas, increasing protected areas and using the legal system to punish violators. Is there global political will to implement these changes? Is there consensus the need is dire? Are these changes actionable? A better question is: Do we have a choice? “This essential report reminds each of us of the obvious truth: the present generations have the responsibility to bequeath to future generations a planet that is not irreversibly damaged by human activity,” said Audrey Azoulay, director-general of UNESCO, in a press release. “Our local, indigenous and scientific knowledge are proving that we have solutions and so no more excuses: we must live on Earth differently.” I

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Tour de brew: Cellar West Artisan Ales Stepping up in Lafayette

by Michael J. Casey

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n its former location, Cellar West Artisan Ales, one of Boulder County’s smallest breweries, was not happened upon by accident. Located on the edge of North Boulder, behind The Bustop — the gone-but-not-forgotten strip club — the RTD bus stop, a homeless shelter and an endless array of automotive repair shops, Cellar West had more to overcome than the usual brewery opening in an increasingly crowded and competitive market. But that was 2017, and Cellar West’s tiny taproom — it sat not many more than a dozen — managed to attract the right sort of crowd. Owned and operated by Zach Nichols, Cellar West’s specialty from the start has been barrel-fermented ales loaded with wild Brettanomyces yeast. His Make Hay won silver at the 2017 Great American Beer Festival in the MICHAEL J. CASEY specialty saison category and has been noted by many to be one of the best beers in the county. Jump ahead two years, and you can now find Cellar West out east, in one of Lafayette’s industrial strip malls along West Baseline Road. The digs are larger; the taproom is considerably nicer, the parking lot is paved; even the stuff in the glass seems to be tastier. High marks all around. Better beer does not always follow a better facility, but the extra space seems to be working in Nichols’ favor. The focus ON TAP: Cellar West Artisan Ales. on barrel-fermented farmhouse ales remains, as does the 778 W. Baseline wonderful funk and flavor Brettanomyces brings to the table. Road, Lafayette. What’s changed? It seems Nichols has managed to wrangle cellarwest.com that temperamental yeast to his will, producing a line of beers that are both invigorating and inventive. Naturally, you’ll find Make Hay on tap and in bottles, but start instead with Sun Nectar, a farmhouse ale lightly dry-hopped with Comet hops and finished on Key limes. The brew sports a cloudy, golden hue with a loose pile of foam giving off aromas of zesty citrus and fragrant wild grass. In the mouth, the beer is creamy and full with enough funk to keep things interesting. It’s not the sort of brew one often reaches for after a long day of yard work, but one really should. Ditto for Valley Bier, a pale ale perfect for an afternoon session of copious drinking. Clocking in at a lunchtime-pleasing 4.5 percent alcohol by volume, Valley Bier has a dry, bready nose with a hint of pine needles and a rustic flavor of toasted malts and spice (clove and anise) in the mouth. To pair it with a baguette and butter would be heaven. And yet, it is the Prophet of Bloom that draws you to Cellar West — possibly one of the best beers you’ll find in Lafayette. Prophets of Bloom sports a brilliant bright color of dandelion yellow, a thick, creamy collar of foam, a nose of bright fruit, a symphony of rounded malt, farmhouse funk and a finish that bursts with citrus. Bring a bottle or six to your next summer picnic; it’ll blow every other beer off the table. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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LYONS

BOULDER


BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Time to shake things up! In the next

three weeks, I invite you to try at least three of the following experiments. 1. See unusual sights in familiar situations. 2. Seek out new music that both calms you and excites you. 3. Get an inspiring statue or image of a favorite deity or hero. 4. Ask for a message from the person you will be three years from now. 5. Use your hands and tongue in ways you don’t usually use them. 6. Go in quest of a cathartic release that purges frustration and rouses holy passion. 7. Locate the sweet spot where deep feeling and deep thinking overlap.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: According to science writer Sarah Zielinski in Smithsonian magazine, fireflies produce the most efficient light on planet Earth. Nearly 100 percent of the energy produced by the chemical reaction inside the insect’s body is emitted as a brilliant glow. With that in mind, I propose that you regard the firefly as your spirit creature in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you, too, will be a dynamic and proficient generator of luminosity. For best results, don’t tone down your brilliance, even if it illuminates shadows people are trying to hide.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Here’s a message from author Susan

J. Elliott: “This is not your week to run the Universe. Next week is not looking so good either.” Now here’s a message from me: Elliott’s revelation is very good news! Since you won’t have to worry about trying to manage and fine-tune the Universe, you can focus all your efforts on your own self-care. And the coming weeks will be a favorable time to do just that. You’re due to dramatically upgrade your understanding of what you need to feel healthy and happy, and then take the appropriate measures to put your new insights into action.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: The next three weeks will be an excellent

time to serve as your own visionary prophet and dynamic fortune-teller. The predictions and conjectures you make about your future destiny will have an 85-percent likelihood of being accurate. They will also be relatively free of fear and worries. So I urge you to give your imagination permission to engage in fun fantasies about what’s ahead for you. Be daringly optimistic and exuberantly hopeful and brazenly self-celebratory.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Leo poet Stanley Kunitz told his students,

“You must be very careful not to deprive the poem of its wild origin.” That’s useful advice for anyone who spawns anything, not just poets. There’s something unruly and unpredictable about every creative idea or fresh perspective that rises up in us. Do you remember when you first felt the urge to look for a new job or move to a new city or search for a new kind of relationship? Wildness was there at the inception. And you needed to stay in touch with the wildness so as to follow through with practical action. That’s what I encourage you to do now. Reconnect with the wild origins of the important changes you’re nurturing.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: I have no complaints about the measures you’ve taken recently to push past unnecessary limits and to break outworn taboos. In fact, I celebrate them. Keep going! You’ll be better off without those decaying constraints. Soon you’ll begin using all the energy you have liberated and the spaciousness you have made available. But I do have one concern: I wonder if part of you is worried that you have been too bold and have gone too far. To that part of you I say: No! You haven’t been too bold. You haven’t gone too far.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: “Dreamt of a past that frees its prisoners.” So wrote Meena Alexander in her poem “Question Time.” I’d love for you to have that experience in the coming weeks. I’d love for you be released from the karma of your history so that you no longer have to repeat old patterns or feel weighed down by what hap-

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

pened to you once upon a time. I’d love for you to no longer have to answer to decayed traditions and outmoded commitments and lost causes. I’d love for you to escape the pull of memories that tend to drag you back toward things that can’t be changed and don’t matter any more.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: “Desire is a profoundly upsetting force,” writes author Elspeth Probyn. “It may totally rearrange what we think we want. Desire skews plans and sets forth unthought-of possibilities.” In my opinion, Probyn’s statements are half-true. The other half of the truth is that desire can also be a profoundly healing and rejuvenating force, and for the same reasons: it rearranges what we think we want, alters plans and unleashes unthought-of possibilities. How does all this relate to you? From what I can tell, you are now on the cusp of desire’s two overlapping powers. What happens next could be upsetting or healing, disorienting or rejuvenating. If you’d like to emphasize the healing and rejuvenating, I suggest you treat desire as a sacred gift and a blessing.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: “So much of what we learn about love is taught by people who never really loved us.” My Sagittarian friend Ellen made that sad observation. Is it true for you? Ellen added the following thoughts: so much of what we learn about love is taught by people who were too narcissistic or wounded to be able to love very well; and by people who didn’t have many listening skills and therefore didn’t know enough about us to love us for who we really are; and by people who love themselves poorly and so of course find it hard to love anyone else. Is any of this applicable to what you have experienced, Sagittarius? If so, here’s an antidote that I think you’ll find effective during the next seven weeks: Identify the people who have loved you well and the people who might love you well in the future — and then vow to learn all you can from them.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Capricorn fantasy novelist Laini

Taylor creates imaginary worlds where heroines use magic and wiles to follow their bliss while wrangling with gods and rascals. In describing her writing process, she says, “Like a magpie, I am a scavenger of shiny things: fairy tales, dead languages, weird folk beliefs and fascinating religions.” She adds, “I have plundered tidbits of history and lore to build something new, using only the parts that light my mind on fire.” I encourage you to adopt her strategies for your own use in the coming weeks. Be alert for gleaming goodies and tricky delicacies and alluring treats. Use them to create new experiences that thrill your imagination. I believe the coming weeks will be an excellent time to use your magic and wiles to follow your bliss while wrangling with gods and rascals.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: “I was always asking for the specific thing that wasn’t mine,” wrote poet Joanne Kyger. “I wanted a haven that wasn’t my own.” If there is any part of you that resonates with that defeatist perspective, Aquarius, now is an excellent time to begin outgrowing or transforming it. I guarantee you that you’ll have the potency you need to retrain yourself: so that you will more and more ask for specific things that can potentially be yours; so that you will more and more want a haven that can be your own.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: I’m not a fan of nagging. I don’t like to

be nagged and I scrupulously avoid nagging others. And yet now I will break my own rules so as to provide you with your most accurate and helpful horoscope. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you aren’t likely to get what you truly need and deserve in the coming days unless you engage in some polite, diplomatic nagging. So see what you can do to employ nagging as a graceful, even charming art. For best results, infuse it with humor and playfulness.

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Trichomes, Tassels & Moms. Oh My.

What a weekend in Boulder. Congratulations to graduates and mothers everywhere! Whatever your special occasion, start the celebration at Drift. You’ll find a smart selection of flower, concentrates and edibles at Drift, served by a half-dozen graduates and current students from the ivory towers up the hill.

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BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: I’m a 43-year-old straight woman, and I spent the majority of my 30s celibate. At 40, I realized that while I wasn’t interested in dating, I was tired of my vibrator. I also realized that it was time to go forth and fuck with the body I had instead of waiting for the idealized body I was going to have someday. Over the past three years — despite being as fat as ever — I’ve consistently had fun, satisfying, exciting, creative, sometimes weird, occasionally scary, but mostly awesome sex. One guy I met on Craigslist was particularly great: awesome kisser, amazing dick. He came over, we fucked, it was excellent, we chatted, he left. This happened about four times. And then CL shut down the personals section. The only contact info I have for the guy is the anonymous CL address, and it no longer works. He has my Gmail address (the one I use for dating sites), but he has not emailed me. I’m not a crazy stalker (I swear!), but he once told me he teaches at a university in our area, and I managed to find his photo and contact info on the school website. So I know how to reach him — but that’s a spectacularly bad idea, right? Unless you think it

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isn’t? If a dude I’d fucked a few times tracked me down at my job, I would freak out. But I keep thinking: Would it really be SUCH a bad idea to send him ONE e-mail? Should I just accept that it was great while it lasted? Or should I email him and run the risk of pissing off/freaking out a nice guy? —Can Really Envision Every Possibility Dear CREEP: Don’t do it, CREEP — don’t do that thing you already know you shouldn’t, that thing you wouldn’t want some dude to do to you, that thing you were probably hoping I’d give you permission to do. That thing? Don’t do it. You’re engaged in what’s called “dickful thinking” when guys do it — at least that’s what I call it, CREEP. It’s like wishful thinking, but with dicks. Men convince themselves of something improbable (“I bet she’s one of those women who like unsolicited dick pics!”) or unlikely (“Showing up at her workplace will convince her to take me back!”) because it’s what they want. Think of all the guys you’ve ever known who said, “She wants me!” when in reality he was the one who wanted her. Clitful thinking may be rarer than dickful thinking — women being less likely to think with their genitals and/or being more risk-averse due to socialization, slut-shaming, and the ever-present threat of

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gendered violence — but it’s not unheard of for a woman to rationalize unacceptable behavior (contacting this man at work) or deploy a self-serving justification (it’s just ONE email) or solicit a “You go, girl!” from a sex-advice columnist when what she needs to hear is “Hell no, girl!” Again, don’t do it. This guy has your email address and he knows how to reach you. And since you didn’t have all that fun, satisfying, exciting, creative sex over the last few years with only him, CREEP, I shouldn’t have to tell you to focus on your other options. But since your clit is doing your thinking for you right now, I must: Leave this dude alone and go fuck some other dudes. Dear Dan: I have a desperate question for you. I’ve worked with a vivacious 30-year-old for five years. For three and a half years, she had a live-in boyfriend. She had a different boyfriend recently. I’m 58 years old and not good-looking. She is always sweet to me and always compliments me. She’s said that I’m a genius and a gentleman, that I’m a hoot, and that I have a confident walk. I’ve also overheard her say that she likes older men. However, a few months ago she walked up to me out of the blue and said that she just wants platonic relationships with coworkers. Then I overheard her say to another coworker: “I put out a sign, he will figure it out eventual-

MAY 9, 2019

ly.” But which sign did she mean? The “platonic” thing or the constant kindness? —Wondering On Reciprocated Kindnesses Dear WORK: This probably isn’t what you wanted to hear either, WORK, but this woman isn’t interested in you — and if you weren’t engaged in dickful thinking, you’d know that. But your dick has somehow managed to convince you that you’re the “he” she was referring to when she talked about sending someone a sign. But you need to ask yourself — and it’s best to ask right after you masturbate, as that’s when we’re least prone to dickful thinking — which is likelier: she went out of her way to let you know she’s not interested in dating anyone at work and you’re the “he” she was referring to, or the “he” she was referring to was one of the roughly four billion other men on the planet and not a coworker? I don’t mean to be cruel, WORK, I just want to stop you from doing something that could get you fired or screw up what has, up to now, been a pleasant work relationship. While kindness can sometimes signal romantic interest, the full weight of the evidence here — including the fact that she didn’t send an unambiguous signal when she was briefly single — indicates otherwise. On the Lovecast, is it time for a gay homeland? Listen at savagelovecast.com.

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Cannabis-inspired gifts for Mother’s Day by Sidni West

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other’s Day is a time to show Data also shows that moms are more the woman who gave you life open with their kids about cannabis than just how much you appreciate dads. her. I mean, there’s really no By a lot. A recent survey found that way to make up for destroying women are nearly twice as likely to be her pelvic floor and turning her hair gray open with their children (61 percent vs. from the 18-plus years of stress that con37 percent for men). So that could be sumed her life because she was legally one reason for the increase in cannabis obligated to keep you alive, but TIM REGAN/FLICKR a regular bouquet of flowers certainly doesn’t cut it. Your mom deserves better flower. If you live in a liberal town and your mom had all of her coming of age moments in the ’60s, there’s a good chance she enjoys toking up, or at the very least, is open to the idea. So, this Mother’s Day, consider giving your mom the gift of weed. According to data provided by Headset, an analytics service for the cannabis industry, weed sales on Mother’s Day weekend in 2018 were higher than average weekend sales. Maybe some of us were buying Mother’s Day gifts while others were just trying to medicate themselves gifting, as well as adult offsprings’ own enough to make it through brunch. Either growing comfort level with weed. New way, one in five dispensary customers is a Frontier Data’s study, “Cannabis parent. Consumer Series: Alcohol vs. Legal First of all, parents are becoming Cannabis Consumption in North more and more comfortable using cannaAmerica,” found that millennials are combis as part of their wellness routine. Those fortable replacing some of their alcohol who might have stopped using it as they consumption with cannabis. That could entered parenthood may have picked it up be why Mom’s “wine of the month club” again once you fled the nest or even gift is no longer the standard, possibly decades later as they entered retirement being replaced with cannabis-infused — a testament to the impacts of modern chocolates and gourmet edibles. research, wellness branding, legalization If you think she’s open to it and need and decreasing social stigmas. some inspiration, here are some ideas:

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Take her to a dispensary. The weed your mom smoked at your age no longer exists. She was practically smoking hemp compared to the strength and variety of cannabis that dispensaries carry today. That can be overwhelming for someone who has been out of the game that long. If you know more about weed than she does, help her out so she doesn’t have to depend on you every time she wants to get stoned in the way that she calls you every time she needs to edit a PDF. Help her pick a favorite strain, show her some of your favorite edibles and products or ask a budtender for their advice on choosing something to match her loving spirit. Get stoned and creative. Weed goes hand in hand with leisurely activities, aka mom stuff. Get stoned and do some scrapbooking together to really drive home the nostalgia she wants to feel on Mother’s Day. There are so many different arts and crafts you could do together. Even walking around stoned, perusing the aisles of JoAnn’s Fabrics together would mean a lot to her. Other things like cooking classes, “Puff, Pass, and POTtery” classes or even amateur glass blowing classes are easy to find around Boulder and Denver. Get stoned and active. If knitting baby blankets or taking a cooking class isn’t your mom’s idea of a good time, get her out into nature. It’s a gorgeous time of year, so roll a couple joints for a sunset hike. For most people, cannabis and

MAY 9, 2019

nature go together extremely well, as senses and connections can be heightened. It provides an opportunity to let your guard down and maybe even strengthen your relationship. If your mom isn’t feeling the weather, try doing a yoga class together instead. If you’re both way too full from brunch and want to do absolutely nothing together, look into CBDinfused massages. Go on a tour. There are several local cannabis tours that take guests through new experiences, where you learn new things about the rapidly evolving industry. Colorado Cannabis Tours provide a weed-mom-approved experience, with a 420-friendly limo, a stop at Cheba Hut, dispensary visits, a glass blowing demo, live cannabis grow tours, and a few samples of your favorite cannabis products. If you don’t want to do something that organized, make up your own tour. Get stoned with mom and tour all the local food trucks, art districts and shops you know she would love. No matter what you end up doing, you can’t go wrong since mom just wants to spend time with you and will appreciate all of your thought and effort. Bake together. Some moms show their love by trying to get you as fat as possible, and they’re pretty good at it, like you can taste when something is made with love. From brownies to cookies to cakes, there are a lot of delicious things you can bake weed into. Though there are plenty of dispensary options that sell edibles, cooking something together at home is more meaningful. Pot brownies are a classic hit and there’s a million different recipes and instructions online to discover together.

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The legislature comes through for pot By Paul Danish

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he just-concluded session of the Colorado legislature passed a clutch of marijuana reform bills that ensure the state will continue to be in the vanguard of the marijuana legalization movement. The two most important are House Bills 1230 and 1234. HB 1230 allows restaurants, hotels and marijuana dispensaries to STAVOS/FLICKR

offer social pot use on their premises. HB 1234 allows for home delivery of marijuana, just like pizza. Together they could transform the way pot is bought and consumed in the state. HB 1230 addresses a problem that has bedeviled the state’s tourist industry since pot became legal — there has been no place where visitors to the state could legally consume marijuana. Now there will be. Beyond tourism, the bill puts social marijuana use for everyone on a level similar to social alcohol use. That’s a big deal.

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The law also requires local governments to opt into the program, which probably means there will be a lot of local dithering by out-of-touch electeds. But within a couple of years there should be plenty of places where you can smoke pot besides your home. The law also says that no establishment allowing pot use will be allowed to sell alcohol. That makes good sense from a public safety point of view; mixing marijuana and alcohol can leave you more impaired than using one or the other. But it may also touch off a revolution in the restaurant business. It will only be a matter of time before some restaurants get marijuana licenses instead of liquor licenses, and that could change the whole dining experience. It’ll be interesting to see how they fare. HB 1234 could herald a major change in the way marijuana is bought and sold. Compared with packaged alcohol sales, which take place in liquor stores, convenience stores and now super-markets, marijuana sales are pretty restricted. The only place you can legally buy pot is from a licensed dispensary. Their hours are more restricted than those of liquor stores, and gaining access to the selling room is similar to gaining access to the safe deposit room in a bank — multiple identification checks by multiple gatekeepers. I like the personal service you get from budtenders, but chances are most customers would prefer the convenience of self-service store. And then there are probably a lot of people who are still uncomfortable with going into a dispensary. A lot of dispensaries already offer takeout service, which minimizes some of the

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potential hassle of pot-buying, but home delivery gives marijuana sellers an edge liquor stores don’t have. It will also present the dispensary model of marijuana selling with some business challenges. Legal marijuana marketing is a work in progress. It’ll be fascinating to watch how this evolves. Under HB 1234, home deliveries of medical marijuana will be allowed to start next year. Recreational delivery won’t start until 2021 at the earliest. As of press time, neither bill had been signed by Governor Polis, but given his strong past support of legalization, it would be surprising if he didn’t allow them to become law. Other marijuana reform legislation passed during this year’s legislative session includes: — A bill that allows out-of-state investors, including companies and venture capital funds, to participate in the state’s marijuana industry. Former Governor Hickenlooper vetoed a similar bill last year. He had a point there; the bill might result in consumers having a lot more buying choices, but it also opens the door to the “Big Marijuana” industry that pot prohibitionist Kevin Sabet is always hyper-ventilating about and could drive a lot of industry pioneers out of business. — A bill that allows doctors to recommend medical marijuana to patients instead of opiods. This could lead to huge expansion of the state’s marijuana industry. — A bill that defines autism as a medical marijuana-treatable condition. Hickenlooper also vetoed a similar measure last year. Polis has already signed this year’s version.

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