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contents NEWS:

As more people find themselves living near oil and gas wells, scientists scramble to fully understand the health risks by Susan Moran/The Story Group

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....................................................................... NEWS:

Changes in ICE protocol limit Congress’ ability to aid immigrants by Angela K. Evans and Matt Cortina

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Men’s & Women’s 5 THE HIGHROAD: How magical is The Donald? 6 THE ANDERSON FILES: What Republicans have proposed isn’t health care 6 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 31 ARTS & CULTURE: Bach and Mahler festivals expand their programming 35 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and

where to go 39 POETRY: by Grace Cavalieri 40 SCREEN: ‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ has hiccups of awesome 41 FILM: Finding ways to overcome loss in ‘One Week and a Day’ 43 DEEP DISH: The Colorado lamb rack at Community is a crowd pleaser, so prepare to share 50 DRINK: Tour de Brew: Crystal Springs Brewing Company 53 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 S  AVAGE LOVE: Secret sexuality and dating app usage; Erectile dysfunction meds 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Dennis McKenna and his beef with religion 59 CANNABIS CORNER: Cheer, cheer the Green Mountaineer! 60 IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent view of the world Boulder Weekly

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Entertainment Editor, Amanda Moutinho Special Editions Editor, Caitlin Rockett Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley, Emma Murray Interns, Manna Parker, Alvaro Sanchez SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Senior Account Executive, David Hasson Account Executive, Julian Bourke Inside/Outside Account Executive, Andrea Ralston Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo Office Manager Lina Papastergiou CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo Cover photo, Ted Wood/The Story Group May 18, 2017 Volume XXIV, Number 41 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2016 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

the

Highroad How magical is The Donald? by Jim Hightower

D

onald Trump, the Amazing Wunderkind of Global Luxury Living — and now Our Nation’s Phantasmagoric, Fast-charging President — is proving to be a legislative magician. In his campaign, Trump’s number one promise was that he would “immediately” repeal the entirety of Obamacare, then — hocus-pocus and abracadabra! — simultaneously replace it with “great health care for a fraction

of the price.” Wow — that’s why his White House media operation calls him “President Action, President Impact.” But — oops — it seems that the Amazing Donald has abruptly learned that what magicians do is not magic, they just perform illusions. In other words, it’s fakery. So, Trump is now caught in the spotlight of reality, unable to produce a workable plan to “repeal and replace” Obamacare, as he had so glibly promised. In fact, the GOP replacement scheme he’s been backing would leave millions of people with no health care coverage, while reducing the benefits and jacking-up insurance payments for millions of others. Frustrated, President Action recently whined to a meeting of state governors that, “Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated.”

Of course, by “nobody,” he meant that he didn’t know, therefore no one could’ve known, since he knows everything. But wait — in a truly amazing magical act, The Donald has now pulled a rabbit out of his hat! His new Trumpcare plan, he brags, will guarantee that every American will have access to health coverage. Before you erupt in applause, however, notice the trick word he’s using: “Access.” That doesn’t mean you’ll get coverage, you’ll just get access to coverage — if you can afford it. It’s the same as promising that everyone will get “access” to owning a private jet and living in a fabulous Florida golf resort, just like Trump. See, he truly is magical! This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. May 18 , 2017 5


the anderson files What Republicans have proposed isn’t health care by Dave Anderson

T

he battle over health care is again charge higher premiums to those literally a life and death people. They would be shoved into struggle. In a piece in the “high-risk pools,” which “historically Washington Post, doctors had very low coverage, waiting lists, David Himmelstein and poorer coverage and high costs,” Steffie Woolhandler concluded that a according to Dr. Atul Gwande, surgeon repeal of Obamacare (Affordable Care and public health researcher. People in Act or ACA) will result in an estimated those pools could pay premiums as high 43,956 deaths each year, even by the as $25,700 a year, according to a report most conservative estimates. from AARP. Himmelstein and Woolhandler are disObamacare imposed some remarktinguished professors at the City ably progressive taxes on the rich to University of New York School of fund Medicaid expansion and insurance Public Health and exchange subsivisiting professors dies. Many liberat Harvard als didn’t notice Medical School. this development They say: but conservatives CONSERVATIVE ESTIMATE “The biggest and were enraged. Trumpcare is their most definitive OF 20 MILLION LOSING revenge. Benjamin study of what Sommers, a prohappens to death COVERAGE IN THE EVENT fessor of health rates when Medicaid coverOF AN ACA REPEAL YIELDS policy and economics at age is expanded, AN ESTIMATE OF 43,956 Harvard’s School published in the of Public Health, New England DEATHS ANNUALLY.” gives the grim Journal of details: Medicine, found — DAVID HIMMELSTEIN, that for every 455 “The AHCA people who repeals hundreds STEFFIE WOOLHANDLER gained coverage of billions of dolacross several lars in taxes on states, one life was high-income saved per year. households and Applying that figure to even a insurance companies, while reducing conservative estimate of 20 million los- the Obamacare tax credits that helped ing coverage in the event of an ACA lower and middle income families purrepeal yields an estimate of 43,956 chase health insurance. The changes to deaths annually.” Medicaid are even more dramatic, with That’s just people who are on more than $800 billion dollars in federMedicaid. Trump’s American Health al money for the program cut over the Care Act (AHCA) will also harm next decade — this will have a huge Americans who receive health insurimpact on the 70 million lower-income ance through their employer. The new children, adults, disabled individuals bill, which passed the House, would and elderly who currently rely on allow each state to set its own rules for Medicaid for their health care. deciding which health benefits are “Add in the termination of the taxes “essential” to providing good coverage. of investment income and the higher Employers who conduct business in tax obligations in general of more afflumore than one state would be allowed ent individuals and the AHCA would to pick and choose which state’s rules lead to a dramatic shift of resources to follow. There are provisions in the away from the poor, working class and law that would outlaw giving any feder- lower middle class, especially for people al funds to Planned Parenthood and with jobs outside of the realm of large similar medical facilities. employers.” Obamacare prohibited insurers from Trumpcare provides a tax cut to banning people with “pre-existing conthe rich, equivalent to $650 billion ditions” and from charging them more. see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 8 Under Trumpcare, states could once

“... EVEN A

6 May 18 , 2017

letters Correction: In the May 11 news story “Buried in the past?” a quote was incorrectly attributed to a 2011 letter from CDHPE and EPA to David Lucas. It is from a 2006 GAO report Nuclear Cleanup at Rocky Flats. We apologize for the inconvenience.

1 microgram of plutonium inhaled is potentially fatal and that it is known that the 1957 and 1967 plutonium fire distributed a great deal of it. Facts are real, and the public should be warned. Anne Fenerty, Boulder

Rocky Flats unsafe for public use

Danish Wrong on GMOs

Thank you for the excellent article on the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant by Josh Schlossberg [Re: News, “Buried in the past?,” May 11]. I am a member of the Rocky Flats Technical Group. We are scientists who were contractors and members of advisory panels, and some of us worked at the plant. The plan to open this contaminated site to public recreation is dangerous. Department of Energy’s “subsurface remaining contaminants” map shows tunnels, imploded building remnants, original plutonium process waste lines and unlined trenches remaining on the Superfund site, which is inside of the Refuge. No cleanup under 6 feet. Additionally remaining are sprayfields and a 40-foot deep ravine called the Original Landfill, which is sliding and polluting Woman Creek. Winds, floods and burrowing animals distribute radioactive carcinogens to the Refuge. Our situation is similar to that of Flint, Michigan, where there was a failure of the local, state and federal authorities to protect the population from lead in the drinking water in spite of repeated warnings from a local pediatrician. DOE, EPA and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) are insisting that there is no problem despite the fact that it is scientifically accepted that

Like most readers of the Boulder Weekly, I stopped bothering to read Paul Danish some time ago. But Paul Monsanto Danish’s column on April 27 [Re: “The March for Science and the missing protest sign”] was hard to avoid, given editorial enhancement by large boxes with half-inch letters quoting some of Danish’s absurd claims. Danish has spouted his spurious claims repeatedly and they were his main platform in his failed run for commissioner. To clarify with facts: All agriculture is scientific, and has been for thousands of years. Agriculture is based on domesticated plants and animals. Don’t underestimate the ability of non-literate humans to engage in systematic observation and experimentation to achieve domestication. The process of domestication involves human selection of desired phenotypic traits effecting and altering genotypes. What Danish erroneously terms “scientific agriculture” is qualitatively different, involving splicing of genes foreign to the organism, that could never occur through natural or human selection. Some have termed this genetic engineering Frankenscience, as in horribly monstrous. But it’s worse than that. The overriding purpose of GMOs is profit. It’s greed science. GMOs are not being developed to see LETTERS Page 8

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increase the food supply and alleviate hunger in Third World countries. They are being developed by corporate capitalist agribusiness to control agriculture for profit in First World countries. Almost all GMO crop production (soybeans, corn, canola and cotton) is for crops not consumed by humans for food, but used for animal feed, oil or clothing, all grown in a few temperate First World countries. GMO “Roundup Ready” corn is not eaten by humans; it is fed to cattle so that First World inhabitants can have tasty steaks. Monsanto Corporation develops GMOs that respond to herbicides they develop so that they can control the sale of seed and the poisons that let it grow unhindered by weeds. Monsanto Corporation develops seeds that produce sterile seeds, so that farmers are dependent on the corporation and must buy new seed every year. There is no profit in developing GMO food crops such as cassava or sorghum for tropical Third World countries. The farmers there are too poor. Even if GMOs were designed to increase the food supply in Third World countries, that would not alleviate hun-

ger. The Malthusian dilemma is that increasing the food supply causes an increase in population, another fact distorted by Danish’s disinformation. The County Commissioners were entirely right to ban greed science GMOs from county Open Space. Pete Gleichman, Ward

Keep municipalization tax going

I want the City Council to know that I am in favor of extending our current tax to support municipalization. While the total amount spent on municipalization is a large number (about $10 million from 2011 through 2016), on a per-person basis it is not very much. If you do the math, it is only about $1.60 per person per month — about the cost of a cup of coffee. I consider this an excellent use of my money in exchange for all the benefits of local control, resilience, local entrepreneurial opportunities and especially for the benefits of clean energy. I’ll gladly pay a couple of bucks a month to help avoid the worst of clisee LETTERS Page 9

the anderson files THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 6

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letters

LETTERS from Page 6

over 10 years. Over 24 million people would lose their health insurance, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Medicaid will be turned into federal “block grants,” which will allow states to reduce benefits and remove people from Medicaid. The Medicare trust fund will be drained of income by ending Obamacare’s surtax on the wealthy. The Republicans say they want to repeal and replace Obamacare by creating something that lowers costs and covers everyone. If the Republicans are serious, they would consider a program like Medicare to be a solution, not a problem. Consider that Medicare covers the people with the highest healthcare costs, including 46.3 million seniors and 9 million Americans with serious disabilities. Yet in 2015, Medicare’s administrative expenses were just 1.4 percent of all of the program’s expenditures. By contrast, private insurers’ combined administrative expenses and profits consumed 20 percent of customers’ premium payments. Policy analyst Nancy Altman says that President Lyndon Johnson want-

ed Medicare to eventually cover all of the American people: “LBJ started with Medicare, expecting Medikids to follow shortly. After that, it would be simply a matter of closing the gap in ages. The initial age of eligibility for Medicare could be gradually lowered from age 65. And the age at which children no longer were covered by Medikids could be gradually increased. And voila! Meet in the middle and we have Medicare-For-All.” Unfortunately, that didn’t happen. But today Medicare-For-All (or single payer) has suddenly become increasingly popular. A majority of House Democrats are now co-sponsors of HR 676, a Medicare-For-All bill introduced by Rep. John Conyers Jr., a Democrat from Michigan. Several progressive organizations are promoting it. However, with a far-right Republican Party controlling the presidency and both houses of Congress, the bill won’t be passed for awhile. In the short-term, we can’t go backward. We have to defeat Trumpcare. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


letters

LETTERS from Page 8

mate change. I’m grateful to the citizens and the community leadership for giving me a chance to do something real right here in my hometown. And when I consider what Xcel is taking from our community, the investment in municipalization seems a real bargain. In contrast to what we’ve spent on municipalization, Xcel’s after-tax net income from Boulder is over $20 million every year. With municipalization, much of this money could stay in our community. Without municipalization, this drain on our economy will continue in perpetuity. Suzanne Spiegel, Boulder

that require the use of ground source heat pumps and solar electric on all new homes permitted in the county to eliminate the need for natural gas heating and coal-generated electricity. 10. Establish building codes by 2030 that provide very strong incentives for not using natural gas heating or coal generated electricity in areas of the county where ground source heating and solar electric are not feasible. 11. Adoption of a Climate Bill of

Rights including the Rights of Nature, whether assumed to be legal or not by county attorneys. 12. Be willing to stand with the community and be arrested if necessary to demonstrate solidarity with Boulder County citizens who are protecting their health and safety. I respectfully make these requests as a private citizen who is concerned about the activities of the oil and gas industry and the proven harm its operations do

to public health and safety and the environment. I would encourage the commissioners to take a more proactive stand against the oil and gas industry and to question any legal advice that claims the above items are not enforceable or are illegal. We are all morally bound to disobey unjust laws, and I ask you to be morally strong and show courage and leadership to the citizens of Boulder County. Jim Wilson/Longmont

Open Letter to Boulder County Commissioners

I am making a formal request that the Board of County Commissioners do the following as soon as possible to protect the health and safety of the citizens of Boulder County: 1. Mapping of all oil and gas wells, active and inactive, within unincorporated Boulder County. 2. Mapping of all flow and gathering lines, active and inactive, within unincorporated Boulder County 3. Inspection of the above by an independent agency not allied with the industry but contracted by the County or answerable to the County alone. 4. Immediate repairs of any defective or unsafe wells and lines to be paid for by the industry, not the taxpayers. 5. Issue an emergency proclamation for the health and safety of county residents that prohibits the approval of any new oil and gas operations within unincorporated Boulder County until it can be clearly shown that such operations are guaranteed to be safe based on the conditions of existing wells and flow lines. (“Safe” to be defined as a failure rate of less than 1 percent based on results of inspection of all existing lines and wells). Any approval of new permits would be in reckless disregard of public health and safety. 6. Meet with the Governor ASAP to demand that he declare an emergency and prohibit further oil and gas operations until such time as all wells and lines are mapped and inspected and determined to be safe and any wells and lines not safe to be immediately made safe. (Bring in other commissioners as needed or appropriate). 7. File an Amicus brief in support of Martinez v. COGCC. 8. Make a public commitment to 100 percent renewable energy in county government by 2030. This is to include all buildings and vehicles operated by the county. 9. Establish building codes by 2030 Boulder Weekly

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NEWS

Ted Wood/The Story Group

The lines between oil and gas extraction and neighborhoods continue to blur due to inconsistencies in the regulation of setbacks between oil and gas operations and occupied buildings. The problem is being further complicated by a growing body of research indicating that there may be serious health problems for those living in close proximity to these operations.

Warning: Oil and gas development may be hazardous to your health As more people find themselves living near oil and gas wells, scientists scramble to fully understand the health risks. by Susan Moran/The Story Group

E

very medical student learns this much Latin: primum non nocere: “First, do no harm.” For centuries, all newly minted physicians have taken the Hippocratic Oath before treating any patients. This central tenet dictates that a practitioner follow two mandates: to strive to do good, or at least do no harm. It appears to some scientists, politicians and residents that Colorado’s top medical officials, tasked with protecting residents’ health, never received the memo. Many residents on the Front Range fear that the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), especially Dr. Larry Wolk, the department’s executive director and chief medical officer, are violating this fundamental pillar of the medical profession when it comes to protecting the public from the known and potential health impacts of oil and gas development. Some scientists who study air emissions and health impacts associated with living near unconventional oil and gas operations also question whether the health department is following basic principles of scientific integrity. A recent case in point highlights both concerns. In February, the CDPHE released a controversial report, 10 May 18 , 2017

which concluded that the risk of harmful health effects is low for people living at least 500 feet from oil and gas activities. It said that concentrations of some substances, including benzene, a well-known carcinogen, were four to five times lower than standard health limits set for short- and long-distance exposure. In its report, which combined a health-risk assessment and a review of 12 previous epidemiological studies, the health department did not recommend immediate public health measures. Rather, it called for more research. Industry advocates and their political allies quickly seized on the study and trumpeted that it proved that oil and gas development was safe to Colorado residents. Some state legislators have criticized the CDPHE and especially Dr. Wolk for not putting the health and safety of patients, namely citizens, first. “Their (CDPHE’s) job is to protect our health,” said Sen. Matt Jones (D-Boulder), in a phone interview. “A physician knows to ‘do no harm,’ but this study was pretty cavalier.” He added, “I don’t think they’re following the precautionary principle or the ‘do no harm’ edict.” CDPHE director Wolk took offense to such charges. “I think it’s completely unfair,” he said in a

phone interview. “It’s putting something like the Hippocratic Oath, which I take very seriously, in a political context. And it attacks what I think is credible science that we try to objectively present.” Wolk is a pediatrician who continues to see patients, most of them uninsured, in his nonprofit clinic practice. “That’s why I get further bruised when somebody tries to question my morals and my obligation to the Hippocratic Oath as a physician, because it’s something I hold near and dear to my heart.” Still, several public health researchers as well as atmospheric scientists working on air-pollution studies argue that a growing body of research suggests the CDPHE is seriously underestimating actual health risks. At a recent science forum in Boulder, Frank Flocke, an atmospheric chemist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), presented muchanticipated preliminary results from research conducted with NCAR colleague Gabrielle Pfister and other institutions. The research team discovered that levels of the carcinogen benzene, which is released as a byproduct of oil and gas production, sometimes spiked to levels that neither he nor the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would consider to be safe for nearby humans. Murmurs erupted in the packed conference room when Flocke said he would not live near high-density oil and gas wells in Weld County. “I’d move away if I lived anywhere near there, and as quickly as possible,” he said. One canister sample drawn from a mobile van near Platteville, a small town in Weld County, showed benzene concentrations as high as 120 parts per billion, or ppb. (There is no safe level of benzene, not even 1 part per million (ppm), according to the EPA). Many times measurements at a fixed monitoring station in Platteville showed concentrations above 1 ppb. The timing of the CDPHE report’s release, less Boulder Weekly


than two weeks after publication of a more alarming sources. The state requires that oil and gas wells be at and Scotland, also have banned the practice. More health study, also raised some eyebrows. That study, led least 500 feet away from homes, and 1,000 feet from than 700 peer-reviewed papers worldwide, most of by Lisa McKenzie, a researcher at the Colorado schools, hospitals, jails and other multiple-occupancy them published in the last four years, show evidence School of Public Health Anschutz Medical Campus, buildings. But operators can file for special permission that fracking and horizontal drilling have environmenfound that children suffering from acute lymphocytic from the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation tal and human health impacts, ranging from contamileukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer, Commission (COGCC) to be closer, and they are nation of groundwater to increased prevalence of asthwere more than four times more likely to be living in rarely turned down. In addition, the setback rules don’t ma, cancer and mental health problems. areas with the highest density of gas wells. “We were a apply to developers who can build homes right next to little surprised at the size of the association — four existing wells, as happened in Firestone. Fractured bodies and communities times higher,” said McKenzie, in an interview in her The state’s top health officials have not questioned auren Bouche doesn’t need an epidemiologist to tell office. the appropriateness of the setback regs of the her that oil and gas operations are threatening McKenzie’s paper was peer-reviewed. That means COGCC, on which CDPHE’s Wolk is a commission- human health. She woke up one morning seven years that other researchers not involved in the paper crier. “I think we can say that, based on the data we have ago gasping for breath in her ranch home on a sleepy tiqued its methods and conclusions before it was pubright now, the risk appears to be low,” said Mike Van dirt road on the edge of Brighton in Weld County. lished. By contrast, CDPHE’s report was not peerDyke, the state’s chief environmental epidemiologist She had experienced mild seasonal allergies over the reviewed, which in the scientific world makes it a little who led the CDPHE’s health assessment in an interyears, but nothing like this. Bouche, 71, went to her like playing an NBA playoff game without any referees. view. He was speaking in reference to health risks, not doctor, who diagnosed her with asthma. The doctor “In the scientific world, when we do a study we acute safety risks such as what occurred in the told her that many other patients who live near oil and don’t talk about it or release the results until we have it Firestone explosion. gas wells are also being treated at the clinic for asthma. published in the peer-reviewed litera- Ted Wood/The Story Group Bouche started taking a steroid ture,” McKenzie said. “Peer review is inhaler twice a day to quell the sympa rigorous process.” toms. At the time of her asthma The discrepancy between these diagnosis, much of Weld County’s two studies’ methods and conclusions landscape, beyond three miles of points to broader questions that gnaw Bouche’s home, already looked like a at the minds of scientists and checkerboard of farms, well sites and Colorado residents like thistle clinghousing developments. ing to a hiker’s sock: Just how safe is Bouche, a Denver native, and her it to place tens of thousands of oil husband, Jack Hauser, moved to this and gas wells in proximity to the rural neighborhood 31 years ago. places people live? Are there negative They were drawn to its quiet, pastohealth impacts from the toxic emisral landscape and the big-sky view of sions that are released into the air the Continental Divide. Her neighthat millions of people breathe? Who bors still include Angus cattle and is monitoring and tracking these horses that spend their days munchimpacts? Many scientists, including ing in grassy meadows, oblivious to some who attended the recent science the seismic shift in the fields around forum, are urging the state health them. and environment officials to listen About five years ago the natural more to scientists and draw on their gas boom moved in much closer. expertise. Diesel trucks started rumbling down Addressing members of the nearby streets, kicking up dust in CDPHE’s Air Quality Control their wake. Soon thereafter drill rigs But even the atmospheric scientist Commission at the recent science forum, which was popped up, their red lights flashing Gabrielle Pétron is an hosted by the commission, Gabrielle Pétron, an atmowhose research the CDPHE is drawthrough the night, followed by the atmospheric scientist at spheric scientist at NOAA, said this: “You are in ing on for a health-risk assessment that periodic roar of helicopters delivering NOAA Boulder, where she is responsible for charge of helping all actors here in Colorado maintain it is currently conducting, questions the parts, then the steady engine hum of measuring methane the beautiful state that we live in.” logic. “Right now, setback distances are drilling, and then fracking. Now, the emissions captured in the tanks seen behind Pétron has conducted studies that show how meth- not based on a lot of scientific inforBouches live within a quarter mile of her. ane and ozone emissions in western Colorado and on two six-well sites, both in production mation, because we haven’t had it,” the Front Range have an identical chemical signature mode. Another half mile to the north, Jeffrey Collett, head of Colorado State to oil and gas activities rather than other potential University’s Atmospheric Sciences Department, said in beyond a stretch of prairie grass, sits a sprawling sources. Her findings also include measuring much 21-well site, operated by Great Western Oil and Gas. an interview at the science forum. higher levels of benzene than regulators had estimated. Ironically, it butts up against one of the largest windLiving near oil and gas activities will become an “What are the big questions you’d like to have energy manufacturing plants in the United States. inevitable reality for thousands more residents if curanswered to guide your decision-making in protecting Denmark-based Vestas makes blades and other parts rent trends continue. And this conflict will likely people’s health and the environment with adequate for wind turbines there. expand even faster if the price of oil continues to regulation?” Pétron asked the health department comBouche squarely blames toxic emissions from oil rebound. The COGCC regulates the permitting of missioners. “We scientists like to contribute to wellwells and investigates leaks, but does nothing to moni- and gas activities for her asthma. “I’m sure, but I can’t informed decision-making.” prove it,” she said. Two to three years ago she started tor emissions and public health impacts. That is the Public health concerns have taken on more urgency job of the CDPHE. With so many questions swirling suffering from another ailment, sinus inflammation, in the wake of the April 17 pipeline explosion of a which she attributes to nearby oil and gas emissions. about its methods and conclusions, many around the home in Firestone that killed two men and injured a “I can’t describe how painful it is sometimes — like state are questioning whether they can trust that state woman and her child, and after Boulder County’s five- health officials are doing their best to ensure public battery acid in my sinuses,” Bouche said. year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, Staring out of piercing blue eyes, her reddish bob health and safety. ended on May 1. A surging population on the Front hairdo and multi-colored Inkkas sneakers framing her Other states have already pressed the pause button Range is colliding with the rapid expansion of unconfiery exasperation, Bouche rested on a yellow couch in in response to the growing body of scientific evidence ventional oil and natural gas development, with some her living room after giving me a tour of the dozens of pointing to both health and environmental concerns. permitted sites having as many as 40 wells on them New York and Maryland, for instance, have banned See HEALTH Page 12 within 500 feet of homes, playgrounds and water fracking. Several countries, including France, Bulgaria

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HEALTH from Page 11 Ted Wood/The Story Group

existing and planned well sites within two miles of her home. In January, Hauser was diagnosed with lung cancer. As he shuffled into the kitchen, wearing sagging jeans and a wool cap to hide the chemotherapy effects, Bouche said she couldn’t help but wonder if living near wells is at least partly to blame, given that he quit smoking 25 years ago. Proving that Bouche’s asthma and sinus inflammation, or her husband’s cancer stem from oil and gas development is a difficult task. Epidemiology, the science that explores the spread of disease, can rarely pinpoint a specific patient’s illness to a single source. McKenzie’s leukemia study is one step along this path of proving “causality,” but this kind of research takes time and money. McKenzie’s study, based on data from the CDPHE’s cancer registry, was not actually designed to explore or prove a causal link. It showed only a link between the distance from oil and gas wells and increased risk of childhood leukemia. McKenzie cautiously stressed in her study that more research is needed to determine if living near oil and gas wells causes or contributes to cancer or other health problems. Nonetheless, among the attacks on her by the oil and gas industry and its proxies were claims that she did not prove a causal link and that her findings were misleading. Dr. Wolk of the CDPHE has said he didn’t think the McKenzie study supported the conclusions it made. In late March, McKenzie wrote a commentary in the Denver Post correcting what she called “misinterpretations” of her team’s study. In an interview in her office at Anschutz days after her article was published, McKenzie was circumspect, choosing not to challenge the health department’s rationale and response to her study. Several other health scientists familiar with McKenzie’s research were less guarded in their reaction. But they asked not to be identified because of concerns the oil and gas industry pulls the strings in the state, even at CDPHE, including purse strings that fund scientific research. “You can connect the dots,” one researcher said during a coffee break at the recent science forum when asked if the state health department’s scientific findings seemed compromised by political pressure from industry. Even if the political situation in hydrocarbonfriendly Colorado makes it hard for people like McKenzie and her colleagues to make strong public statements, other researchers here and elsewhere in the country are not as circumspect. “Mounting empirical evidence shows harm to the environment and to human health,” wrote Madelon Finkel, a professor of clinical healthcare policy and research at Weill Cornell Medical College, in a 2016 article in the American Journal of Public Health. “We have no idea what the long-term effects might be,” she said, and concluded that the stakes were too high to be silent. “Ignoring the body of evidence, to us, is not a 12 May 18 , 2017

findings from CDPHE’s Van Dyke in a briefing to legislators. Held in a church near the state Capitol, the meeting was hosted and organized by the Colorado Oil & Gas Association, an industry trade group. It didn’t sit well with Jones that the CDPHE appeared too cozy with industry reps. In early April, Jones spearheaded a letter to CDPHE director Wolk. Co-signed by 17 other house representatives and state senators, the letter charged that the department’s health-risk assessment was “dismissive of public health risks to Coloradoans” and that it has a “dismissive tone mirviable option anymore.” roring that used by oil and gas Patrick Murphy, a Colorado state health officials reject criticompanies to justify their Boulder County inspeccism that the CDPHE is anything but an operations.” The letter claimed tor, uses his FLIR infrared camera to check for gas honest information broker in the public that the study should have leaks that cannot be health world. Van Dyke said the timing of the used the “precautionary princiseen by the naked eye. release of the CDPHE’s report was “comple that an action should not pletely coincidental,” not aimed to come on be taken if the consequences the heels of McKenzie’s study. “Our goal is to get are uncertain and potentially dangerous.” information out to citizens as quickly as we can,” he Van Dyke replied in a letter to the state General said in an interview in his office, noting that the Assembly in late April. It elaborated on the scientific department was also concerned that it would be permethodology and findings of the report and said its ceived as holding on to important information that conclusions “qualified as ‘based on available data.’” residents and city officials wanted to know if it did not Rep. Mike Foote (D-Lafayette), who signed the release its report when it did. letter to the CDPHE, also recently sponsored two bills But given that the report’s conclusion was that the that would have tightened regulations on oil and gas risk of harmful health effects is low for Coloradans liv- development near homes and schools. Both were ing near oil and gas operations, it seems strange that defeated in the Republican-controlled senate. the department would push the study out, before at Some community groups have taken to the courts, least following the standard scientific protocol of havcharging state agencies with not putting residents’ health ing the study reviewed by an outside board. Van Dyke and safety first. Notably, a state appeals court in March noted that the department will submit the literatureruled in favor of a group of Boulder teenagers, including review portion of the report to a peer-reviewed journal. Xiuhtezcatl Martinez and other members of Earth The department is also conducting a more compreGuardians, who sued the COGCC. The group charged hensive health-risk assessment, using new data from that state agencies are not considering seriously enough CSU, that will be completed in summer 2018. the health and safety of Colorado residents when reviewHere in Colorado, in the absence of certainty about ing applications for oil and gas drilling permits. safety, critics of the CDPHE’s conclusions suggest that Among the health risks, as Bouche knows painfully the health department and the COGCC take a prewell, is asthma. Research clearly shows that higher cautionary approach by pressing the “pause” button on rates of asthma are linked to emissions from oil and further fracking. Attempts to create bigger setbacks gas operations, especially from volatile organic comand insisting on more widespread and frequent air pounds (VOCs) such as benzene, a known carcinogen. monitoring of well sites have both been met with Benzene is one of the constituents of hydrocarbons, industry reluctance if not outright defiance and politiincluding natural gas. By mixing with other hydrocarcal muscle. Many scientists wonder: Why not put the bon emissions, VOCs increase ozone levels, which is emphasis on proving that residents are safe, rather than why they are called “ozone precursors.” Ozone polluletting uncertainty dictate business as usual until it can tion can aggravate lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and it can cause be proven that the operations cause cancer and other chronic lung disease (COPD), according to the EPA. diseases? Residents like Bouche wonder how many Several culprits contribute to the region’s ozone probpeople living near oil and gas wells will have to die or lem, including the oil and gas industry, vehicle exhaust, become ill before state agencies respond. coal-fired power plants and certain weather conditions. Bodies of evidence Forest fires and volcanoes are also natural sources of everal communities on the Front Range and some benzene. legislators are pushing back against what they call The Denver-metro and North Front Range areas the industry’s and state agencies’ saccharine words of have repeatedly violated federal ozone standards in assurance. Soon after the health department’s report recent decades. The EPA will likely designate the was released, Sen. Jones learned about the report’s region this year as “non-attainment,” giving the state

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Ted Wood/The Story Group

three years to show how it will meet the EPA standard, according to the state health department. Several air-quality studies have shown that VOC levels are particularly high in some areas in Colorado where oil and gas is being drilled, especially in Garfield County and more recently on the Front Range. One study, conducted by Jessica Gilman and colleagues at NOAA, found that more than half of the VOC reactivity (meaning the ability of a VOC to promote the ozone formation) in the Denver-Julesberg Basin came from oil and gas activities. “We do have an ozone problem here in Boulder,” said Pam Milmoe, program coordinator for Boulder County Public Health, in an interview in her office. “And we know from studies that oil and gas activities are contributing to the public health and air-pollution problems.” She and other County health officials had suggested to the County Commissioners that they extend the fracking moratorium until the CDPHE releases its next healthrisk assessment next summer. As Boulder County reluctantly opens its gates to new drilling permits, health officials will keep a close eye on ozone levels. The County has no legal authority to extend its five-year fracking moratorium following the Colorado Supreme Court’s 2016 rulings to overturn Longmont’s ban and Fort Collins’ five-year moratorium. “I think it’s important to the public health equation, that local government should have a say like we do with any other source [of pollution],” Milmoe said. “But that’s different for this industry.” Oil and gas operators, she said, are “exempt from the type of controls that help us deal with issues like (well) siting and proximity to people and schools.”

How close is safe?

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ne reason why it’s tricky to pinpoint causal links is that various types of studies take distinct approaches and they sometimes don’t agree with each other. Some focus on emissions, others on exposures and others on pathways to disease. Take for instance the production of hydrocarbons. By definition, this creates emissions. As noted above, multiple studies have shown that the quantity of those emissions is much higher than regulators have estimated. Some of these emissions are made up of compounds known to cause cancer and other health problems. We don’t yet know how much exposure to which chemicals in which population (children, elderly and immuno-compromised, for instance) are most at risk. But some things we know for sure, such as that benzene is carcinogenic, and that children are especially susceptible to exposures from benzene and other toxic chemicals emitted from oil and gas operations. Then there is the question of exposure. In Colorado, McKenzie, her colleague John Adgate and others at the School of Public Health have led the charge on research on health impacts of exposure to VOCs. In one of their previous studies, the team found that babies born with congenital heart defects were more likely to be born to mothers living in the densest areas of oil and gas wells. They also found a relationship with birth defects of the brain and spinal cord. McKenzie’s research related to oil and gas develBoulder Weekly

“People shouldn’t be living within 100 feet from a flowback operation,” Collett said in an interview following his presentation at the science forum. But he added that high concentrations of benzene close to the flowback or other sources may pose a short-term health risk but not necessarily a longer-term risk.

Anxiety on the prairie

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ome health impacts of drilling and processing hydrocarbons are more insidious and lesser known. In fact, very few studies have been conducted on the psychological toll of living near wells, including the constant roar of diesel trucks, the 24/7 hum of industrial activity, the flashing red lights atop drill rigs and the collective fear, opment in Colorado began years ago anger and uncertainty among neighwith a health-impact assessment, pubbors as they worry about their chilLowell Lewis and Dawn Stein live on a pasture in lished in 2010, for Battlement Mesa in dren, their health and their property the Triple Creek Garfield County. The county had been values. subdivision in Greeley. Extraction Oil is drilling a the state’s number one producer of oil For Bouche, the psychological multi-well site in the and gas until the boom shifted to Weld pasture and constructed stress nearly rivals her asthma sympa 30-foot drilling wall. County on the Front Range. toms. “It’s the not knowing what’ll hit The wall crosses in front McKenzie also has drawn from airus next that’s so hard, and the lack of of Dawn’s bedroom window. quality research including a study pubtransparency from companies,” Bouche lished last year and led by Hannah said. Asked if she plans to fight back, Halliday, an atmospheric scientist at she paused and then said: “I love it NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, here. I’m a Colorado native. But we’ve had enough. Virginia (she was at Penn State University when she We’re moving to New Mexico, maybe Santa Fe, as did the research in Colorado). Halliday found that soon as possible. ...I don’t think they have much drill“fugitive” emissions (from leaky equipment) of benzene ing going on there, and it’s beautiful.” She said her from oil and natural gas operations in Platteville were brother and his family, who live nearby, may follow the most likely causes of the area’s elevated benzene them. levels. Her research is part of the ongoing emissionsDespite a lack of specific data, mental health monitoring programs in Colorado, which NCAR’s impacts are beginning to draw the attention of Flocke and Pfister are also working on. Together the researchers. Stephanie Malin, a sociologist at CSU, has programs are called the Front Range Air Pollution and been studying social and mental health impacts of livPhotochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) and ing near oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania, and more DISCOVER-AQ. recently in Colorado. She is collaborating with Adding to the body of research on VOCs, NOAA’s McKenzie at CU Denver on a multi-year study. Pétron was the lead author on a peer-reviewed paper Preliminary data, based on interviews with people livin 2014 that found that benzene emissions from oil ing near oil and gas wells in Greeley and other areas, and gas operations, during a two-day period of samsuggest that many residents are anxious that they’ll get pling from aircraft on the Front Range, were seven sick, their lifestyle will suffer, or their property value times greater than what the EPA had estimated. The will drop. “There’s a combination of uncertainty and study also found that emissions of ozone precursor powerlessness that people feel,” Malin said. compounds doubled EPA estimates. Just ask 60-year-old Dawn Stein. Her white ranch More recently and precisely, research by CSU’s home in Greeley’s Triple Creek neighborhood is preCollett, corroborates Flocke’s and Pfister’s dramatic cariously perched just across a horse pasture from a new 10-acre industrial facility owned by Extraction benzene-concentration findings. One of his studies, Oil and Gas. She knows all too well what anxiety and published last year, captured emissions — including powerlessness feel like. The access road to Extraction’s the rate and dispersion of air toxics, ozone precursors new development is some 35 feet from her bedroom and greenhouse gases — from specific oil and gas sites window. Although Extraction erected a sound-barrier on the Front Range (different from those of Flocke wall between the road and her house (originally so and Pfister), based on canister samplings. Collett dishigh it blocked her view of the Continental Divide, covered benzene concentrations as high as 100 ppm in plumes within 100 feet from certain oil and gas opera- before Extraction lowered it), she said the rumble of a truck passing can still jolt some paintings and some tions. Most other air-emissions studies have captured framed antique arrowheads out of position. Sometimes region-wide emissions, by flying aircraft over a whole basin. Collett’s study also measured emissions from the the roar makes her whole house shake. She said the biggest “boom!” ever came on April various stages of oil and gas operations — from drill10 at 9:13 p.m. “The entire house felt like it moved. ing to fracking to “flowback” (when injected water — Lights flickered and I honestly thought one of the actually a slurry of water, sand and fracking chemicals huge old cottonwoods had a limb come down,” she — comes back out), to production. He was surprised to find that emissions of benzene were highest during See HEALTH Page 14 the flowback process. May 18 , 2017 13


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said. The City of Greeley has offered to buy her already devalued home, which she has lived in for more than 30 years. She’s holding out, but exhausted from battling the City and Extraction.

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ollett’s air-emissions data from the Front Range study as well as another from Garfield County will be the basis of the new health report that the CDPHE plans to finish in summer 2018. That report will incorporate the CSU scientist’s emissions data from particular well sites and from the different phases of oil and gas operations. The data will then be analyzed and modeled to see precisely what the health impacts would be to people at different exposure levels. “That’s the missing piece that we need,” said Milmoe of Boulder County Public Health. “We know what emissions are, but then the question is, one, are people being exposed to them? And two, are they being exposed at levels that are harmful?” Collett welcomes the CDPHE’s use of his data to inform policymakers. “This health-risk assessment will give us a much better insight into whether current setback distances are adequately protective, or not,” he said. Here’s another thing we know: Oil and gas operations leak. Regularly. For instance, researchers at NOAA and NASA, flying aircraft over oil and gas fields, have detected methane leaks from natural gas pipelines in the Four Corners area of the Southwest. The CDPHE’s efforts, partly funded by COGCC, to locate these kinds of leaks are few and far between. The COGCC has its own field-inspection staff (30, up from nine in 2007), but still, scientists argue that this is scant relative to the types of monitoring that should be done. So Boulder County has taken it upon itself to sniff out leaks. On a crisp day in early April, Patrick Murphy, a Boulder County inspector, was aiming his FLIR infrared camera at an operating well pad in eastern Boulder County checking for gas leaks that cannot be seen by the naked eye. He calls it the “look, listen, smell” test. The technical term is AVO, for “audio, visual and olfactory.” His work has shown that leaks are discovered in 45 percent of the wells inspected in the County. Operators have generally fixed the leaks quickly when told about the problem, Murphy said. Today, he found no leaks to report. As scientists continue to measure the growing impacts from oil and gas operations, they are finding that every stage of operations — from construction of well pads to drilling wells to transporting oil, natural gas and byproducts by diesel trucks or pipelines — produces some environmental and human health impacts. The risk of running these activities near houses, schools and hospitals is high enough to warrant that health officials and oil and gas companies at least step on the brakes — not the gas pedal. “What we’re seeing from studies, including those of other researchers and in other states, is that people with an array of health outcomes, which include congenital heart defects, leukemia, asthma and some respiratory irritations, are more likely to be living in the higher-density areas of oil and gas development,” said CU health researcher McKenzie. “There are a lot of limitations to these studies, but they still don’t change that fact.” You can find Susan Moran on Twitter @susan_moran Thanks to The Story Group for making this project possible. Boulder Weekly


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NEWS Changes in ICE protocol limit Congress’ ability to aid immigrants by Angela K. Evans and Matt Cortina

T

Matt Cortina

wo high profile immigrants who took sanctuary in Denver churches were each granted a twoyear stay of removal last week by immigration officials. Arturo Hernandez Garcia and Jeanette Vizguerra were given the temporary postponement of deportation on May 11 after receiving support in the form of personal legislative bills sponsored by U.S. Senator Michael Bennet and U.S. Reps. Jared Polis Eric Leveridge, AFSC and Ed Perlmutter. But in a letter released just before the stays were announced, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Acting Director Thomas Homan laid out changes to ICE protocol that now limit the ability of such legislation to aid undocumented immigrants as they pursue permanent residency in the future. Private immigration bills seek to help individuals who no longer have any other recourse to stay in the country. Garcia and Vizguerra had both been through the court system and upon given final notices of deportation, entered sanctuary, although at different times. Garcia left sanctuary at the First Unitarian Society of Denver almost two years ago after receiving a letter from ICE indicating he was no longer a deportation priority. He left the church, and returned to his daily life until he was detained by ICE again on April 26, 2017 at his workplace. He spent several days at the ICE Denver Contract Detention Facility in Aurora until he was granted a 30-day stay of removal and released. The two-year stay granted on May 11 will give his lawyers additional time to work on his immigration case. Although Vizguerra was given a final deportation order in 2013, she has survived with six-month to year-long stays of removal until her most recent one ran out in the beginning of February. But on Friday, May 12, she walked out of the First Baptist Church in Denver after spending the previous 86 days in sanctuary. The mother of four, grandmother of one celebrated after being granted a two-year stay of removal that allows her to remain in the country without fear of deportation until March 15, 2019. She has a pending U Visa application as a victim of a violent crime that happened more than a decade ago, which if approved will give her a pathway to citizenship. There have been about 50 private bills, like the ones that benefitted Garcia and Vizguerra, introduced in the last two years. Although private legislation rarely gets passed (just three such bills have been enacted in the last decade), they have been an effective legislative tool to postpone deportations while immigrants pursue other legal options for staying in the country. Rep. Polis had previously introduced private Boulder Weekly

legislation for Vizguerra in 2014 and 2015, in addition to 2017. Rep. Perlmutter introduced legislation for Garcia in 2015 as well as this year, and Sen. Bennet supported both of them with bills this year. “In the past, I have used private bills as a last resort after all other avenues have been exhausted, and they have worked to keep families together,” Polis says in an email statement. “The fact is that millions of aspiring Americans are unfairly stuck in a gray area because our system is broken. Private bills used to be a way to give aspiring Americans with exceedingly compelling factors more time to resolve their cases.” Homan outlined the changes to ICE policy regarding private bills in a letter sent to Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. In the past, ICE granted stays of removal to people when they received a request for an investigation into the Above: Arturo Hernandez Garcia. individual case. Stays could be Below: Jeanette granted to a person until Vizguerra. Congress took action on the private bill in their name. But Homan wrote that private bills are regularly reintroduced, yet seldom enacted, effectively granting an ongoing stay of removal for a person. This, he wrote, “could prevent ICE from removing aliens who fall within the enforcement priorities outlined” in a January executive order issued by President Trump that broadened the group of immigrants ICE should be motivated to detain and/or deport. Now, Homan wrote, ICE will issue a one-time, six-month stay of removal only after it receives a written request from the chair of the Judiciary Committee or Subcommittee — requests for further investigation “will no longer trigger an automatic stay of removal,” he wrote. The ICE director, at his or her discretion, can issue a one-time 90-day extension on the six-month stay, and reserves the right to remove people who have been granted a stay if they discover “derogatory information” about the person. “The threshold that ICE has laid out effectively ends private bills as a tool for members of Congress to use to help immigrants who have exhausted all administrative options but whose cases present exceptional humanitarian factors that are above and beyond the norm,” Polis says. After their two-year stays expire, Garcia and Vizguerra will again be subject to deportation unless their immigration status or ICE protocol changes in the meantime.

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Christi Turner

boulderganic SEIZE THE DAY

Celebrating Colorado’s first Public Lands Day by Christi Turner

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his Saturday, May 20 marks the first-ever Colorado Public Lands Day, a holiday created as a non-political celebration of public lands, but whose meaning seems amplified in a national political climate where public lands protection is under threat. More than 100 events of all kinds are planned around the state to ring in the new holiday, which is the only state-specific celebration of public lands (National Public Lands Day happens every September 30). There’s a group run in Durango, a hiking guidebook release in Grand Junction, a roller derby fundraiser in Parker. Of course, countless Colorado breweries will offer specially-themed beers, most donating proceeds to public lands conservation. There are cleanups and guided hikes, and even a few overnight camping trips. Gov. John Hickenlooper will speak at the Grand Junction Off-Road Bike Race, and the marquee event, a conversation with U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter on the future of public lands, will take place in Golden. It seems fitting that Colorado be the first to make this a state celebration. After all, it’s a state where

more than 35 percent of the total land area — around 24 million acres — is publicly managed. Polling shows most people recognize the environmental and economic value of public lands — in one poll, 93 percent of Coloradans agreed public lands are essential to the state’s economy — and a love for the Colorado outdoors seems pervasive and nonpartisan. U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette says she is pleased

Jessica Goad, spokesperson for Conservation Colorado, a Denver-based nonprofit that advocates on behalf of the state’s natural environment, says the creation of Colorado Public Lands Day shows that Coloradans of all stripes value and want to celebrate their lands. “The holiday certainly has heightened significance this year, given that we’re seeing troubling signs from Courtesy of VOC p Washington, D.C. as to where public lands management is going, such as a review of national monuments including Colorado’s Canyons of the Ancients,” Goad adds. Canyons of the Ancients National Monument in Cortez came into being in 2000 under President Bill Clinton, and attracts around 30,000 visitors per year. Earlier this month, Gov. Hickenlooper met with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to try to keep Canyons out of the review process, and assured Coloradans he would work to ensure its ongoing protection. Hickenlooper has said he believes the state needs more public land, not less, although his support of energy development on Colorado is raising the profile public lands is not without opposition in the A group of volunteers of public lands issues through state. Another public-lands focused organizawith Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado lays this new state holiday. tion, the Western Values Project (WVP), wants new trail at Dedisse Park “Our public lands belong Colorado Public Lands Day to highlight the in Evergreen. to all of us, and we must come need to hold officials accountable to their duty together to guard them from to protect public lands. people who want to despoil them,” DeGette says. “This is definitely time to celebrate the legacy of “Now more than ever, public lands are crucial to wild- public lands. They’re interwoven into the economies in life conservation, climate change adaptation and the the West. And they’re directly under threat,” says Chris Saeger, executive director of WVP. “Number one is defpreservation of open spaces.” DeGette introduced the Colorado Wilderness Act initely this monuments review. Secretary Zinke has not been clear enough on what his intentions are.” in Congress in 2015, which would protect 32 wilderSaeger says that for Public Lands Day, ness areas totaling around 715,000 acres across the e imColorado Limited T state, or about 1 percent of the state’s land. She conSee PUBLIC LANDS Page 20 tinues to press for its passage.

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WVP will call on Westerners to stand up to the monuments designation review. A sign guides guests inside San Juan The bill that created Colorado Public Lands Day National Forest in was shepherded through state congress by State Sen. Durango. Kerry Donovan of District 5, which encompasses Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Lake and Pitkin counties. Her district includes another national monument, Browns Canyon in Salida (not under review), where rafting on the Arkansas River generates more than $73 million in annual economic impact. The purpose of the bill and this new holiday, she says, is to unite Coloradans around a shared connection to public lands, leaving politics and partisanship aside. “We really were trying to not make it about the issue of state takeover of public lands or any of that,” Donovan says, although the legislative struggle over the bill’s final content was fraught with partisanship. “Since we passed it, there have been some very real challenges and political discussion around the threat against public lands staying public. I think it has a new significance, showing how important it is that our public lands stay public and accessible to all.” Donovan will stop in four of her five counties Saturday, joining in on a wilderness hike in Spraddle Creek (a proposed addition to Eagle’s Nest Wilderness Area) in Vail, a community cleanup in Leadville, a public lands benefit at a brewery in Poncha Springs and an end-of-day festival in Gunnison. Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado (VOC), an organization that has run more than 1,000 volunteer projects in its 33 years of existence, will spend Saturday celebrating the importance of citizen stewardship of shared public lands. “Stewardship is just what we do. It’s something we feel is an important nonpartisan unifier in this partisan world we operate in,” says Anna Zawisza, VOC director of community relations. “We’re still lacking better stewardship by the public. These lands aren’t just here for our pleasure; they also need to be taken care of.” VOC will offer three different projects in three distinct locations to celebrate the new holiday, including a trail construction at Dedisse Park in Evergreen and a family stewardship day at High Plains Environmental Center in Loveland, each about an hour’s drive from Boulder. Other Boulder County Public Lands Day events include a special brew and discounts at Asher Brewing Co. in Gunbarrel, invasive species removal along the St. Vrain Creek in Longmont, and both archery and fly fishing events at St. Vrain State Park just over the Weld County line. State Sen. Steve Fenberg (D-Boulder), will celebrate with a morning hike up Grays and Torreys Peaks in Clear Creek County, maybe even some fishing later in the weekend. “I think it’s telling that Colorado will be the first state to have a public lands day. Protecting and recreating in our public lands is a core part of the Colorado way of life,” Fenberg says. “The fact that Coloradans will be spending the weekend celebrating our public lands while Trump and Republicans in Congress are discussing selling them off just shows how out-of-step Washington is on this issue.” And aside from the events organized specifically to honor the day, the Front Range forecast should allow for plenty of other ways to get out and celebrate — and contemplate — the state’s public lands this Saturday. From this year forward, Colorado Public Lands Day will happen annually on the third Saturday in May.

MeDiCare, MeDiCaiD anD va aCCepteD 20 May 18 , 2017

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Boulder Weekly


ADVENTURE O

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Jeff Lowe, Colleen Cannon, Arturo Barrios and Steve Bosley enter the Boulder Sports Hall of Fame by Michael Levy

n May 20, climber Jeff Lowe, triathlete Colleen Cannon, distancerunner Arturo Barrios, and BolderBoulder founder Steve Bosley will all be inducted into the Boulder Sports Hall of Fame, celebrating their achievements and solidifying their place in Boulder’s sporting history. The Boulder Sports Hall of Fame is a young institution on the Front Range — the 2017 class is just the fourth wave of athletes to be inducted since 2011. Past inductees include climbing legends like Layton Korr (the inaugural class of 2011) and Lynn Hill (class of 2015), and endurance athletes like Olympic runner Lorraine Moller and winner of the first women’s Tour de France, Marianne Martin (both class of 2012). The Boulder Sports Hall of Fame is a homegrown celebration, established by local athletes to honor world-class athletes who lived and trained in Boulder. This year’s induction ceremony will raise funds for One World Running, a Boulder-based nonprofit that’s been providing shoes and athletic equipment, as well as medicine and school supplies, to countries around the world since 1986. Arturo Barrios was among the first group of Boulder’s elite runners to collect shoes for One World Running. Originally from Mexico City, Barrios was a dominant force in running in the late ’80s and early ’90s. He competed at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, where he finished fifth in the 10,000 meters. His laundry list of achievements includes setting the world record for greatest distance run in a single hour on a track, and becoming the first person in history to run a half marathon in Boulder Weekly

Courtesy of BolderBoulder

less than an hour, both of which he Above: Arturo Barrios accomplished in 1991. won the BolderBoulder But it is the world record that four times between 1986 and 1993. he held in the 10K of which he is Below: Colleen Cannon proudest. won the World Triathlon Championships in 1984. “That’s something that everyone knows about,” he says. “People know about other distances, but the 10K is my best race. To me, Since retiring from competitive that makes me part of history, part triathlon, Cannon has continued to of a small group of people who’ve inspire and motivate. She started held the record for the 10K. Even Women’s Quest, a company that when I’m not here, my children runs yoga and meditation retreats and my children’s children will be all over the world “to help empowCourtesy of Colleen Cannon able to go back to the computer er women,” Cannon says. and see my name right there.” While she has run Women’s Barrios moved to Boulder in Quest retreats in far-flung coun1986, where he trained for each of tries like Malaysia, not long after the record-setting events he eventhe Hall of Fame induction she is tually achieved. hosting a weekend retreat in “So for me,” Barrios says, Boulder, replete with hiking and “Boulder County, it’s my home.” yoga in Chautauqua. Colleen Cannon, after first vis“Brings it back home,” Cannon iting in 1983, moved to Boulder reflects. “There’s magic in the the same year as Barrios, and mountains here, and I think that’s enjoyed her greatest successes durwhy so many athletes want to be ing the same period. In 1984, here. Everyone is just so supportCannon won the World Triathlon ive. The secret is having fun, Championships, and then stunned enjoying life and helping each a stacked field in 1988 by winning both of the other.” National Triathlon Championships that year. Each Boulder Sports Hall of Fame class also “In the ’80s and ’90s, we were more of a family,” includes a “Cornerstone Contributor” who, while not she says of training in Boulder. “We were all togethnecessarily an elite professional athlete, has contriber, it wasn’t like, ‘Here are the triathletes and here are uted to Boulder’s reputation and status as a worldthe runners,’ we would all hang out together, go to see HALL OF FAME Page 24 Pasta Jay’s, just have fun.” May 18 , 2017 23


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ADVENTURE ON THE BILL: Boulder class location for such pursuits. Steve Bosley, Sports Hall of Fame Class of the 2017 Cornerstone Contributor, came to 2017 Induction. 5 p.m. Saturday, May 20, Boulder quite a bit earlier than his fellow Galvanize, 1023 Walnut St., inductees, in 1974. While working at the Bank 303-749-0038. Tickets are $20. of Boulder, he noticed that the quality of community-run athletic opportunities was lacking. While his initial idea was to organize a public track meet, he instead settled on a road race, and the BolderBoulder 10K was born. The BolderBoulder, co-founded by Bosley and Olympic marathon gold-medalist Frank Shorter, has grown into an unrivaled race at the distance, with more than 50,000 participants at recent editions. Ian Tomlinson (Arturo Barrios won the race four times between 1986 and 1993.) “To see what’s happened, to step back, it’s really breathtaking,” Bosley says. “The purpose has always been to serve the community. When you get success with that, there’s a satisfaction that’s hard to describe.” The fourth and final member of the Boulder Sports Hall of Fame is legendary alpinist Jeff Lowe. Originally from Ogden, Utah, Lowe spent the ’80s and ’90s redefining what was possible with ice tools in his hands or in the high mountain ranges of the world. In 1974, he and partner Mike Weis made the first ascent of Bridalveil Falls, an ice climb far ahead of its time in Courtesy of Steve Bosley technicality. Then in 1994, with his first ascent of Octopussy, Lowe ushered in the era of mixed climbing — using ice tools on routes that have both rock and ice. Perhaps his boldest and best climb was Metanoia, a directissima he pioneered up the infamous North Face of the Eiger in Switzerland in 1991, solo, over the course of nine days. In 1999, Lowe developed an “unknown neurodegenerative process” that bears a very close resemblance to ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). Lowe, who now uses a wheelchair, still remains an active member of the Boulder outdoor community, promoting causes he believes in. “Every day I’m still in the present, still trying to figure it all out,” Lowe says. Above: Jeff Lowe pio“Doing the best I can with what I’ve got, neered mixed climbing from where we are right now. If you can be techniques. Below: Steve Bosley coin the present moment of your life, you can founded the BolderBoulder. deal with anything that comes your way.” Perhaps the most touching sentiment shared by all this year’s inductees is the particular appreciation they feel in being honored by their neighbors. “This is emotional for me. This is a big deal,” Bosley says. Upon learning of the award, Cannon says, “I was thrilled. I was amazed. I’ve been in Boulder forever it feels like. And Boulder has so many amazing, talented athletes. I feel very honored to be part of the tribe.” Barrios captured something else that all the honorees expressed: While incredibly humbled and honored, and while their greatest individual accomplishments may be behind them, they have no intention of stopping. “Once you’re a part of the Boulder outdoor community, you’re a part of it forever,” Barrios says. “For me, that’s why I never left. It’s been 31 years, and I’m still here and I’m still running.”

Boulder Weekly


America’s Best Microbrew Pub Now Open in Louisville

Craft beer. Good fun. 100 Taps.

RIBBON CUTTING STARTING AT 4:30 PM Monday, May 22nd followed by Come enjoy the best local and OPEN HOUSE regional craft beers at Louisville’s newest FEATURING neighborhood pub. Some you’ll know; others you’ll come to APPETIZERS AND A love. Enjoy craft cuisine and hand crafted beverages in a FREE BEER. More beers can be purchased comfortable setting. Make yourself at home… only with a with a $2 discount. much, much larger beer selection. Did we mention 100 taps? LIVE ROCK AND ROLL And craft beer? And wine. And ciders. And flavored kombucha MUSIC BY teas, and more. We’re all about comfort and yumminess. THE LAP DAWGS STARTS AT 6PM! Is that a word? It should be.

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buzz

Joshua Black Wilkins

ON THE BILL: Justin Townes Earle. 7 p.m. Friday, May 26, Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-3771666. Tickets are $23 in advance, $25 at the door.

Justin Townes Earle on what defines us by Sarah Haas JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE is far away from home. On the second week of his tour, he’s in Fall River, Massachusetts — exactly 3,091 miles away from Portland, Oregon, where his wife is at home, exactly 30 weeks pregnant. He wishes he could be there with her but knows he has a job to do on the road, and with a baby on the way, he has a newfound sense of purpose in providing for his family. He talks about it matterJoshua Black Wilkins of-factly, as if his relentless touring has always been a labor of love and not the restless wanderings of a boy on the run from his past. His calm isn’t a masquerade, but a sign of growing into a man who no longer measures life by what it lacks, valuing it for what it contains instead. For most of his life, Earle’s focus has been on the absence of his own father, musician Steve Earle, who left him and his mother, Carol-Ann Hunter, to fend for themselves in Nashville, Tennessee, when Justin was just 2 years old. It was his lack of a relationship with his father that would drive his angst and the music it inspired, including his aptly named 2014 and 2015 albums, Single Mothers and Absent Fathers. As an artist trying to make sense of his 26 May 18 , 2017

own life, Earle found himself grappling with his negative space, tormented by the distance between him and the elder Earle. No matter how hard the younger fought to shake his dad’s legacy, it remained, as if his genius only existed insofar as it related to his father’s. He came to wear his father’s name like a ball and chain. “A lot of times who you end up despising is the one that’s not there, the one who never bothered,” Earle says. “When I was young, I didn’t know anything about my dad. He was like this mythic figure that became larger than life. For years I would kind of lie about it, because I didn’t want to be the fatherless kid, like it was no big deal. But it ended up defining me, unfortunately for my mom, who stuck around and was left to deal with me, screaming and yelling like the indignant teenager I was.” His mom still lives in Nashville where she works at the front desk of a local middle and high school. The two remain close and Earle goes to visit her twice a year, despite his growing indignation about the gentrification he sees swallowing up his musically rich hometown. And, as it turns out, he didn’t learn about life as a musician from his father Boulder Weekly


but from his mom who worked setting up musical stages for big amphitheaters and small clubs alike. Earle says it’s important to understand what he does from his mom’s side of the business. “After all, I grew up with roadies, not musicians,” he says. Being in his mom’s world taught him how to put together a stage long before he ever thought about performing on one. But her work also gave him a glimpse into the position he would come to hold at center stage with a guitar over his shoulder. He remembers the times his mom would bring him to shows and let him climb up into the scaffolding so he could watch the musicians play. Still to this day, he doesn’t really see himself as the guy in the spotlight, but as a member of the merry crew of outcasts pulling strings from behind the curtains. His forthcoming album, Kids These Days, is an exemplar of music made from both sides of the stage in mind. To make the record, Earle teamed up with behind-the-scenes master Mike Mogis, producer of Jenny Lewis’s Rabbit Fur Coat and M. Ward’s Hold Time. Hearing these albums, Earle became enamored with the way Mogis’ artful post-production elevated the warm acoustics of the guitar and the rawness of the vocals. To capture that authentic quality on his own album, Mogis asked Earle to do something he’d never done before — to give up creative control. Earle said OK, but then went about doing what he always does, insisting on laying down live guitar, voice and bass. Eventually, he handed over the songs and “gave [Mogis] alone time with the music,” and even though it made him nervous, the gesture taught Earle a crowning lesson about “how to let art breathe.” The result is an airy album stripped of the youthful arrogance that characterized Earle’s earlier work, as if when he handed off the songs he also took the chip off his shoulder. Where once his music sought to pick a fight, now it seeks to reunite, inspired by Earle’s newfound recognition of the weirdness inside each and every one of us. Somewhere along the line, Earle realized he wasn’t as much of an outcast as he thought — everyone else was just as screwed up as him. With that thought, he broke the chains that tethered him to his father in order to be his own man. As if to prove the profundity of his shift in perspective, he starts to talk fondly about something his father used to say: “You know, my dad taught me how to write like him. Over and over he hammered it into me, even when he wasn’t around. He told me not to go outside myself, to know my limitations, to know who I and more importantly what I am. It’s necessary if you are going to express something that rings true to people. “And I can add one more thing to that list: you are what you are confused about and that is why life is what it is. I’m not talking about sensual confusion here, but absolute, existential confusion — confusion about why life is the way it is.” There is a lot of unknown in the world and that can be scary. When we are young, we imagine monsters under the bed. As we get older, the once imaginary villains become real people who have let us down. Forgiveness doesn’t come when we let go of those old harms and replace evil with good. Rather, as Earle has come to demonstrate, forgiveness comes when we come to understand old transgressions in a new way and from a new point of view. Maybe it’s that we come to see some of the evil in the world inside ourselves and the difference between our negative and positive spaces just doesn’t seem to matter as much anymore. “Everything is easier than it ever was before because I no longer feel like I’m setting the tone for my future by looking back,” he says. “Instead, at this point in my life, I’ve come to know that I definitely don’t know what I’m doing, like when this child comes, who knows? All I know is that I am excited instead of freaked like I would have been at 30. “I’m not saying life is all about some sunny, bright future, it’s still gonna be tough. Actually, I bet it gets harder, because now I have to pay attention.”

Saturday May 20

Start Making SenSe (ultiMate talking HeadS tribute) w/ Orka OdySSey

Friday May 26

digable PlanetS w/ tHe reMinderS & Old Man SaxOn

Sunday May 28

Zebbler encanti exPerience w/ SixiS

tHurSday – Sunday June 15-18 @ HuMingbird rancH:

SOnic blOOM Feat gigantic cHeeSe biScuitS, tHe POliSH aMbaSSadOr, tHe FlOOZieS, claude VOnStrOke, Ott & MOre

Saturday June 24 SuMMer SOlStice Party 2017

Feat MyStikal & JuVenile w/ Jubee, gracie baSSie & MOre tba!

Friday, Saturday & Sunday June 23-25 @ red rOckS

ride tHe buS tO wideSPread Panic tHurSday June 29

aZiZi gibSOn’S “PrOtein SHake tOur” w/ SPecial gueStS

Saturday July 8

OMegaMOde w/ aweMinuS b2b deFinitiVe, crOwell b2b cOdd dubbZ, JOOF b2b MOrF, uVS gang & art – tHe HiVe

Saturday July 15 OFFicial lOHi aFter Party

tauk Saturday July 29

eVery tHurSday @ tHe OtHer Side

graSS FOr tHat aSS Free beFOre 8PM & Free beFOre 9PM FOr all text MeSSage SubScriberS

text cerVanteS tO 91944 tO Sign uP 5/18: Pat Fiddle’S Pickin’ On JOHn HartFOrd Feat Pete wernick OF HOt riZe & cHuck MOrriS OF lOtuS w/ MeMberS OF raPidgraSS Feat Mark MOrriS, alex JOHnStOne & carl MinOrkey (late Set) & caribOu MOuntain cOllectiVe 5/25: cOal tOwn reuniOn & MOnOcle band w/ canyOn cOllected (PatiO Set) Friday May 19

eric lindell Saturday May 20

duey & tHe decibelS dO diScO! Feat adaM “SHMeeanS” SMirnOFF, neal “FrO” eVanS (dOPaPOd), daVid “duey” duart (yaMn), auStin Zalatel, Matt bricker, JOrdan lint, blake MObley w/ elder grOwn & eartH like twinS

Sunday May 21

Face OF tHe city SHOwcaSe tueSday May 23

VOOdOO ViSiOnary & Jaden carlSOn band w/ MOrSe!

wedneSday May 24

re: SearcH

Feat kaMinanda w/ andreilien, SOulacybin, Mikey tHunder & Jubee

Friday May 26

wHiSkeyFOlk Feat JOnatHan MeadOwS, cHriS SPeaSMaker, ScOtt lane & raPHael katcHinOFF & alPHa king knigHt Feat tOri Pater & JOnatHan MeadOwS (late Set) w/ tHe drunken FrencHMen (PatiO Set

Saturday May 27

MOntu & teleMetry w/ xOa

MOnday May 29

Herbie HancOck tribute

MOnday nigHt Menagerie

Friday, Saturday & Sunday

Feat bankaJl, HalFred, SHanti, drOPlitZ & HarPerSPectiVe

June 30 – July 2 @ red rOckS

ride tHe buS tO uMPHrey’S Mcgee tHurSday July 6

clOZee w/ cHarleStHeFirSt, lucid ViSiOn & SPecial gueStS

Friday July 7 • dual VENuE

HOOtenanny all StarS Feat nicki bluHM, JeFF cOFFin (dMb), eric kraSnO, bill Payne (little Feat), tOny Hall (duMPStaPHunk), alwyn rObinSOn (leFtOVer SalMOn), JeFF auStin, JereMy garrett (inFaMOuS StringduSterS), andy tHOrn (leFtOVer SalMOn) & JOn Stickley triO Feat andy tHOrn

wedneSday July 12 @ red rOckS

ride tHe buS tO ween Saturday July 15 OFFicial lOHi aFter Party

tauk & FriendS w/ tiger Party Feat eddie rObertS (new MaSterSOundS) & JeFF Franca (tHieVery cOrPOratiOn)

Friday, Saturday & Sunday auguSt 4-6 @ SunriSe rancH:

ariSe MuSic FeStiVal atMOSPHere, tiPPer, ani diFrancO, riSing aPPalacHia, tHe exPendableS,

wedneSday May 31

re: SearcH

Feat eSSekS & gOOPStePPa w/ digital VagabOnd, Mikey tHunder & Jubee

Saturday June 3

cycleS

w/ tentH MOuntain diViSiOn & enVy alO

tueSday June 6

Frank SOliVan & dirty kitcHen Friday June 16

aFrOdiSiac tribute tO tHe MuSic OF Fela kuti Feat daVe wattS (tHe MOtet), aMayO (antibalaS aFrObeat OrcHeStra) & MeMberS OF eurFOrqueStra & atOMga

Saturday June 17

a liVe One – exPlOring tHe MuSic OF PHiSH w/ aMOraMOra

Friday June 23

tHe Funky knuckleS & PHO w/ JudO cHOP

Saturday June 24 wideSPread Panic aFterSHOw

new OrleanS SuSPectS Friday July 7

tOwn MOuntain w/ tentH MOuntain diViSiOn

Saturday July 22

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Boulder Weekly

May 18 , 2017 27


28 May 18 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


overtones

Jean-Michel Jarre Live at The Dead Sea. (Erik Voake)

FUELED BY BIG DADDY BAGELS!

ON THE BILL: Jean-Michel Jarre. 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 24, 1STBANK Center, 11450 Broomfield Lane, Broomfield, 303-410-0700. Tickets are $49.95-129.50.

TIME IS THE KEY

A

mere four days before chatting over transatlantic phone lines with Jean-Michel Jarre, the French electronics master played a show at the iconic site known as Masada, in Israel. The ancient fortification, atop a steep mesa overlooking the Dead Sea and once the site of Herod’s palace, is a popular tourist attraction; for Israelis, Masada is an iconic historical landmark, the place where nearly a thousand Jews committed suicide rather than surrender to Roman siege forces in 74 A.D.

Stockhausen and Wendy Carlos’ Bach interpretations on the Moog. Or to the early 1970s with the flourishing of the so-called “Berlin School,” mainly the German trio Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze, as well as the explorations of Bob Margouleff and Malcom Cecil, who brought their trippy Moog blips and beeps into the pop mainstream through their collaboration with (of all people) Stevie Wonder. But it was Jarre — with his first major release, Oxygène in 1977 — who promoted the genre past theory and reefer-scented planetariums, and into

Jean-Michel Jarre on saving the Dead Sea and working with Edward Snowden by Dave Kirby “Not my first trip to Israel,” Jarre explains in heavily accented English, “but my first free concert there. It went very, very well, except we had a very strong windstorm three hours before the concert. “It was really to provide a showcase to the Dead Sea problem, where the sea is diminishing every year. I was really touched by the people of the region when I went there a year and a half ago, and when I went back, I discussed with the UNESCO people about what I could do, and we came up with the idea of doing a concert to improve the awareness of the problem. This is a problem that can only be solved through awareness and action by the international community.” Arguably the most successful solo electronic musician on the planet, Jarre is accustomed to both milestone-stamping free concerts and defying troublesome weather. Depending on your point of view, the roots of the genre extend back to the 1950s and guys in lab coats, or to the 1960s with angular German compositional theorists like Karlheinz Boulder Weekly

mass accessibility. Recorded in a cramped home studio, Oxygène reached No. 2 on the UK charts in 1977, No. 1 on the French charts and blasted Jarre into international recognition. Its signature single, the gently loping and dreamily melodic “Oxygène Part IV,” remains an enduring radio staple. As a live performer, Jarre’s concerts over the years are mass-attendance legends. He holds the record for the largest outdoor concert attendance (3.5 million in Moscow, in 1997), as well as multimillion shows in Paris in 1990 and 1995, and they are known for grid-stressing light shows, as well as his use of the laserharp, a laser light-enabled synthesizer. Jarre isn’t the first EM artist to employ visuals into his music (Tangerine Dream toured with the Laserium guys in the mid ’70s), but he is the first to use it in sprawling outdoor settings. His attraction to the visual was both practical (who wants to watch a guy by himself turning knobs?) and aesthetic. Trained as a painter in his youth, Jarre, who has done extensive consultation work on performance synthesizer design over the years, says he has always been

sensitive to the visual. “I remember when I first started, I went to see the Rolling Stones,” Jarre says. “They were just playing their rock band music. Now when you see all the massive production and all the visuals, and the fact that you can listen to music everywhere, if you go to a concert and buy a ticket to see a concert, somehow you have a visual expectation. “I just regard it as using the technology of our times.” Jarre brings his stage show on the heels of two recent projects: Oxygene 3, a 40th anniversary and final sequel to the original, and his Electronica project, a two-installment release of shorter collaborations with 30 other musicians, ranging from Moby, Pete Townsend, Massive Attack, Erasure’s Vince Clarke, Laurie Anderson, Cyndi Lauper, Edward Snowden (yes, that Edward Snowden), Armin van Buuren, Gary Numan, The Orb and Tangerine Dream founder Edgar Froese, whose collaboration on “Zero Gravity” would be marked as Froese’s last recorded piece before his sudden death in January 2015. What started five years ago as a wouldn’t-it-be-cool project for the synthesist became a logistical and artistic enterprise of epic, continent-hopping proportion. Even Jarre himself was stunned at the positive reaction he got from virtually every artist he approached. “When you’re doing electronic music, you’re always working in your home studio, as a composer, by yourself,” he explains. “So I made this rule: We wouldn’t do this by making and sending files back and forth, we would get together and talk about composition, talk about the abstract together. And I was very moved and touched that so many people opened their studio, their private gardens, up to me to work together. And to see their work habits, and where they work, and explore their strengths and weakness, and to share these moments. So many great artists ... one of the most extraordinary musical experiences of my life.”

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THURSDAY MAY 18 7:00 PM

COLORADO SKIES 9:00 PM

LASER: GAGA FRIDAY MAY 19 7:00 PM

CLIMATE CHANGE IN OUR BACKYARD 9:00 PM

LASER: FLOYD: WELCOME TO THE MACHINE 10:30 PM

FISKEDM LIQUIDSKY: BIG GIGANTIC & GRIZ 11:59 PM

LASER: ACDC vs GUNS N’ ROSES SATURDAY MAY 20 1:00 PM

STARS AND LASER GALATIC ODYSSEY 2:30 PM

DREAM TO FLY 7:00 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 9:00 PM

LASER: FLOYD: WELCOME TO THE MACHINE 10:30 PM

LASER: ROLLING STONES 11:59 PM

LIQUID SKY RUSH SUNDAY MAY 21 10:30 AM

YOGA IN THE DOME 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES/ PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

MOONS & LASER ROBOT ROCK 3:00 PM

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS 4:30 PM

BACK TO THE MOON FOR GOOD

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 May 18 , 2017 29


JUNE 11-AUG. 13

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW HAMLET JULIUS CAESAR ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD BY TOM STOPPARD

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HENRY VI, PART 3

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30 May 18 , 2017

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Boulder Weekly


ARTS & CULTURE

Courtesy of Kenneth Woods

May 19

w / 300 Days

May 20

C

Boulder Weekly

PAT FIDDLE’S ELECTRIC HARTFORD

Feat. Pete Wernick & More

BACH AND MAHLER FESTIVALS EXPAND THEIR PROGRAMMING BY PETER ALEXANDER olorado MahlerFest and the Boulder Bach Festival, longstanding institutions in Boulder, have major events Friday through Sunday, May 19-21. Both festivals started with annual performances of major works of their composers. Today, they have expanded beyond that pattern to provide a broader context for the music. This means presenting earlier music that influenced Bach or Mahler, later music that was influenced by them, or contemporaneous music that was part of their musical worlds. • • • • MahlerFest is already underway, with a screening of Ken Russell’s film Mahler scheduled Friday, May 19, at the Boedecker Theater, a symposium Saturday on the University of Colorado Boulder campus, and performances Saturday and Sunday of Deryck Cooke’s reconstruction of Mahler’s uncompleted Tenth Symphony. The concerts will also feature Edward Elgar’s String Quartet in E minor, arranged for string orchestra by David Matthews, a British composer who assisted Cooke to reconstruct the Tenth. A reconstruction of the symphony by J.H. Wheeler was played at the 1997 MahlerFest, but this will be the first performance here of the Cooke version, the most often performed of several versions available today. “I would say that nine out of 10 performances would be the Cooke version,” says Kenneth Woods, the festival’s artistic director. “I thought [performing that version] needed to happen at MahlerFest.” Matthews believes the Cooke version is important, both because it was the first to bring attention to the Tenth Symphony, and because of the way it was prepared. “I’m obviously biased in thinking the Cooke version is the best, but it’s the truest I think to the spirit of Mahler,” he says. “The others don’t to me sound particularly like Mahler in

TROUT STEAK REVIVAL

places.” Woods admits that not everyone agrees. “This is an area in which Mahler nuts will see it differently” from one another, he says. “They get quite passionate about these things, but if you’re just listening to the piece as a journey, (the versions) are all more or less the same. Most of the time you’re just hearing the piece.” At one time, the Tenth could not be heard at all. Mahler had left a draft of five movements, of which only the first was in an orchestral score, with the other movements in differing degrees of completion. In 1960, the BBC broadcast an incomplete performance assembled by Cooke. The composer’s widow forbade any public performances of the symphony, but she changed her mind after hearing a tape of the BBC broadcast. Cooke then completed his reconstructed score with the assistance of Matthews and others. An esteemed and influential composer in England, Matthews will attend this year’s MahlerFest and speak on “Mahler’s 10th Symphony, Restored to Life” for Saturday’s symposium. “I think the presence of Matthews is huge,” Woods says. “He’s a living link with the history of this piece. To have someone who can talk about the way the piece came to life is really exciting.” The pairing of Mahler and Elgar fits Woods’ vision of showing new perspectives on the music. With works being repeated in different years, “It’s vital to look at each of the symphonies differently when you come back to them,” he says. “The number of ways you can approach any Mahler symphony is nearly endless.” Woods says the Elgar arrangement fits with the Mahler Tenth for two reasons. As one of Elgar’s very last works, it holds a comparable place in his career as Mahler’s final symsee BACH & MAHLER Page 32

May NEW FAMILY 27 DOG Feat. Sally

Van Meter & The Mile High Horns

w / Zydecoasters

June 9

THE DUSTBOWL REVIVAL

w / The Screaming J’s

June 30

THE ALCAPONES & FOXFEATHER

Aug PETER ROWAN w / Danny Shafer 6 Aug 25 & 26

OFFICIAL NEDFEST AFTER PARTIES

LIVE MUSIC SPECIAL EVENTS PARTIES RECEPTIONS & MORE /thecaribouroom 303.258.3637 www.thecaribouroom.com

NEDERLAND May 18 , 2017 31


arts & culture UPCOMING EVENTS

3rd Thursdays at eTown Hall

May OPEN JAM

18

May

21

Bluegrass Y'all at eTown Hall Eric Thorin & Jordan Ramsey

Full Concert:

11th Annual All-Star Tribute to Bob Dylan

Talks & Forums:

Jun Glue Talk

1

“Not So Newlywed Game” with Dr. Stan Tatkin

Talks & Forums:

Jun Activate A Life You Love

10

Jun

11

A live, full-day, 8+ hour personal growth and development experience.

Concert & Film Screening:

BACH & MAHLER from Page 31

phony. And, he points out, Mahler made and performed string orchestra arrangements of classical string quartets. Matthews also points to the similarities between the two composers. “Although they have very different styles, their attitude toward music was similar,” he says. “It’s late Romantic, it’s very expressive of themselves, and it’s full of passionate melodies.” The varying perspectives that the festival can offer is what makes it exciting for Woods. “At its best, MahlerFest is like Disneyland for the mind and soul,” he says. “There’s a wonderful mixture of thrilling music and interesting ideas that hopefully will stick with you after the concerts are over.” • • • • The Boulder Bach Festival reaches the end of its 2016–17 season Sunday with a concert titled “Greatest Hits.” But Zachary Carrettin, the festival’s artistic director, means that in more ways than one. “The ‘Greatest Hits’ are represented by three composers,” he says. “Johann Sebastian Bach as a greatest composer today, Georg Friedrich Händel as the greatest hit composer in his lifetime as well as today, and the more obscure Gemniniano Giacomelli, a greatest hit composer in his day, a composer of 19 operas.” The works that are included represent some of each composer’s greatest hits. For Bach, that includes the opening chorus from the St. John Passion and the virtuoso double motet Der Geist hilft unser Schwachheit auf (The spirit gives aid to our weakness). For Händel, it includes the arias “But Who May Abide” from Messiah and “Ombra mai fu” (Never was a shade) from the opera Serse. And for Giacomelli it will be the operatic aria “Sposa, son disprezzata” (I am a wife and I am scorned). This was enough of a hit that it was borrowed by Vivaldi for his opera Bajazet and was long attributed to the better-known composer. The program will be played by a 17-piece orchestra of strings with two oboes and bassoon, plus harpsichord, guitar and organ continuo. Soloists include Carretin on violin, mez-

zo-soprano Clea Huston and oboist Max Soto. The choral works will be sung by the Boulder Bach Festival Chorus. Carrettin says the program is planned around what might be called the two “greatest hits” of human life: earthly and sacred love. “The first half of the program is primarily concerned with the earthly — arias that deal with betrayal, deception, misunderstanding, love,” he says. “The second half is focused on the divine, with concepts such as Courtesy of Kenneth Woods redemption, transfiguration and the Holy Spirit. “This juxtaposition is intentional, and there’s also something deeply spiritual in the arias, and something virtuosic and playful in some of the sacred works. So the sacred is not one-dimensional and neither is the secular.” All the threads — the sacred and secular and aspects of love — are brought together in the closing work on the program, which is one of the greatest hits of all time: the final movement of Bach’s Cantata 147, Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben (Heart and mouth and deed and life). The movement is best known by its English name, “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.” “That chorus is in triplets, but it’s also in a larger triple meter, so you have three in three,” Carrettin says. “That refers to the Trinity, and is a reference to the divine, but it’s also an elegant gigue, which is a rustic peasant dance. So you’ve got the juxtaposition of the earthly MahlerFest and the divine.” Artistic Director Love being a central human Kenneth Woods experience, the program aims to touch the audience on a profoundly emotional level. “When we hear great music, we’re in touch with something deeply spiritual, also deeply human,” Carrettin says. “Ultimately what we’re all trying to do as musicians is create an atmosphere where an audience can be deeply moved. “The music on this program is all moving, it’s all beautiful.”

Jake Schepps & Round Window

An original live score to the classic Buster Keaton silent comedy film The Scarecrow.

Jun 24 Radio Show Taping dRew holcomb and TifT meRRiTT WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

32 May 18 , 2017

ON THE BILL Colorado MahlerFest

Boulder.

Mahler, film by Ken Russell. 2 p.m. Friday, May 19, Boedecker Theater, The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, Tickets: 303-444-7328.

Colorado MahlerFest Orchestra Kenneth Woods, conductor, Edward Elgar: String Quartet in E minor, op. 83 (arranged by David Matthews) Mahler: Symphony No. 10 (performance version by Deryck Cooke),7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 20 and 2:30

Mahler Symposium. 8:30 a.m. Saturday, May 20, Room C199, CU Imig Music Building, 1020 18th St.,

p.m. Sunday, May 21, Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, Tickets: 303492-8440. For more information: mahlerfest.org/mahlerfest-xxx/ Boulder Bach Festival Greatest Hits, Bach Festival Orchestra and Chorus, Zachary Carrettin, conductor, with Clea

Huston, mezzo-soprano, Max Soto, oboe, and Zachary Carrettin, violin. Music by J.S. Bach, George Friedrich Handel and Gemniniano Giacomelli 4 p.m. Sunday, May 21, Boulder Seventh Day Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton Ave., Boulder, Tickets: 720-507-5052, boulderbachfestival.org/performance/greatest-hits/

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Boulder Weekly


Courtesy Chautauqua

Murmuration.

7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 20, Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. SEE EVENTS PAGE 36

The Illusionists — Live From Broadway 10:30 am, May 19-21, The Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1385 Curtis St., 303-893-4100. If you’re looking for some mind- Courtesy of the DCPA bending entertainment, look no further than the mystery of a magic show. The Illusionists come directly from Broadway and are hitting the Ellie Caulkins Opera House to showcase seven of the most talented magicians from around the world. This family friendly show is one of the best selling magic shows, and it includes a variety of acts from each performer. Check out tricks from The Anti-Conjurer, The Escapologist, The Trickster, The Inventor and more. Tickets start at $30. —Manna Parker

Boulder Weekly

Latinos in Longmont & The Southwest: Past & Present

Courtesy of Boulder County Latino History Project

6:30, May 18, Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8472. Throughout May and June, Longmont Public Library will feature Moments in Mexican-American History in the Southwest, exploring the history from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848 to the present. To accompany the exhibit, on May 18 CU professors Arturo Aldama and Marjorie K. McIntosh will speak about racism, discrimination and perseverance. Learn about topics from the Ku Klux Klan’s legacy to Latinos in the military to Chicano activism. Register at longmontcolorado.gov. —Manna Parker

Sparks & Spirits 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 20, The Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-579-9537. Taste the finest in local alcohol with The Arts Hub’s event Sparks & Spirits. Craft distilleries from around Colorado will showcase the best of their small batch creations. Sip on innovative cocktails and chat with the people who make them. The night will include rum, whiskey, vodka and more. Sparks & Spirits will also feature music and fire arts. Tickets start at $40. Proceeds go to the Colorado Maker Hub and the Lafayette Arts Hub.

Wikimedia Commons

May 18 , 2017 35


EVENTS from Page 35

Thursday, May 18

A gathering place for great food, drinks & entertainment Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday May 18th

THE SYMBOLS “Rock / Pop” FREE ADMISSION

Tuesday May 23rd

FACE

“All Vocal Rock”

Wednesday May 24th

BLUES & BOURBON with EEF & THE BLUES EXPRESS “Blues” FREE ADMISSION

Thursday May 25th

TERESA STORCH & MISADVENTURE “Rock / Folk” FREE ADMISSION

Friday May 26th

CITIZEN DAN “STRAIGHT-UP STEELY DAN” “Tribute”

Saturday May 27th Boulder Weekly sponsors

FUNK KNUF “Rock / Blues”

Sunday May 28th

RICO JONES QUARTET “Jazz” FREE ADMISSION

Wednesday May 31st

WINE & JAZZ WITH NELSON RANGELL “Jazz”

Friday June 9th Special Engagement

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE

Music Alive Inside Screening. 5:30 p.m. The Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-579-9537. Outback Saloon Open Mic Night. 9 p.m. Outback Saloon, 3141 28th St., Boulder, 573-5690370.

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store

Start Making Sense Talking Heads Tribute. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Monday, May 22 “So, You’re a Poet” Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628. Tuesday, May 23

The Symbols. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

Tony Burfield. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

Events Award-Winning Film — Healing: Miracles, Mysteries, and John of God. 7 p.m. The Caritas Center, 5723 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-3066. Barley Har Har Comedy — Family Anecdotes. 7 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Learn more about state laws with Michael L. Radelet and his new book The History of the Death Penalty in Colorado on May 24 at the Boulder Book Store.

Beginning Flamenco. 6:30 p.m. Kay Carol Gallery & Priscila Working Art Studio, Longmont, 303-9560703. Colorado Aromatics Cultivating Health Series Presents: The Art of Healing. 5:30 p.m. Colorado Aromatics Gift Shop, 340 Lashey St., Longmont, 303-651-2062. Cult Classics & Cocktails: Monty Python & the Holy Grail. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Jordan World Circus 2017. 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 702-456-2642. Navigating the Legal Landscape for Independent Filmmaker. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Oskar Blues & nuun hydration’s BolderBoulder Happy Hour. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

James Kakalios — The Physics of Everyday Things. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. Wednesday, May 24 Michael L. Radelet — The History of the Death Penalty in Colorado. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

401 Main St. Gold Hill, Boulder, 303-443-6461.

0120.

Chris Daniels. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Last Men On Earth. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Danny Barnes with The Sweet Lillies. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-4470095.

Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Lee Hill), 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 20, Boulder, 303-396-1898.

FamilySong Music Class. 11 a.m. Harmony Music House, 2525 Broadway St., Boulder, 303641-8901.

Lo 5. 10 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328.

Jonah Werner. 8 p.m. Shine Restaurant and Gathering Place, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-

theater

Los Cheesies. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

Courtesy of the DCPA/AdamsVisCom

Proxemics: Panel on Digital Bodies and the Spaces Between. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303443-2122. Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Spring Artisan Pop-Up & Fundraiser. 5 p.m. Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder, 720-690-0877. Third Thursday Improv. 7 p.m. Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-588-0550. Trivia & Comedy. 7 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 970-302-7130. Friday, May 19 Music Ben Knighten. 6 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910.

“The David Bowie Tribute”

Bethel Steele. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, Benefit, or wedding at Nissis. Award winning Cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting

Thursday, May 19 Ada Calhoun — Wedding Toasts I’ll Never Give. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

“The Police Tribute”

LOVING THE ALIEN

words

Block 1750 Presents: Street Cyphers. 6 p.m. Block 1750, 1750 30th St., Boulder, 303-6189778.

www.nissis.com/events

Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Boulder, 262-719-8795.

2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE

Bonnie & The Clydes. 9 p.m. The Gold Hill Inn,

Cabaret. Miner’s Alley Theatre, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden, 303-935-3044. Through June 25. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through Aug. 19.

Adventure, imagination and comedy converge in Travelers of the Lost Dimension, now playing in Aurora through May 21.

The Secret Garden. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-8654239. Through May 28. Travelers of the Lost Dimension. Denver Performing Arts Complex, Stanley Marketplace, 2501 Dallas St., Aurora, 720-865-4239. Through May 21.

(SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 36 May 18 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


The Prairie Scholars. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

arts

Ravin’Wolf Acoustic Mountain Blues. 8 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698.

Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-4928300. Through June 24.

Trout Steak Revival. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637.

Colorado Lowriders. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Through May 31.

Events

Colorado Mosaic Artists. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through June 2.

15SDD Block Party. 5 p.m. 15th Street Design District, 15th Street, Courtesy of NCAR Between Grove and Arapahoe, Boulder, 303449-3774.

Dylan Gebbia Richards: Eclipse. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29. Home: American photography at the CU Art Museum. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through July 15.

Dance Nia. 6 p.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800.

I’ll Fly Away — Ashley Hope Carlisle. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through June 11.

Dog Dance. 7 p.m. Floorspace, 1510 Zamia Ave., Boulder, 303-718-2212.

Mathias Kessler: Artifacts & Other Errors of Perception. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29.

Expressive Art Therapies and Mental Health. 5 p.m. Roosevelt Park, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont, 303-6518469.

Mi Tierra. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Oct. 22. Once Removed: Photography by Evan Anderman. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 19.

Stop by NCAR to see the best in mosaics from local ColoLearn to Make Cheese! Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Museum of rado artists, showing through June 2. Feta & Queso Fresco. Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-2987554. Through Aug. 20. 7 p.m. The Art of Cheese, 505 Weaver Park Road, Shade. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. ParkSuite E, Longmont, 303-579-9537. way, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through July 16.

MediaLivePerformances: DuBois, Matteson, Scourti & Ulman. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303443-2122.

Then, Now, Next. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Aug. 31. Tran-‘zi-sh(e)n & ‘Chanj. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through June 18.

Saturday, May 20 Music AscenDance Project Show and Beer. 8 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 South Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. Audio Medz. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Big Band Swing Dance with the Flatirons Jazz Orchestra featuring Deborah Stafford. 7 p.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 303-440-8303. Brett Dennen. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Captain Quirk and The Cosmic Rangers. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303258-7733.

Pat Fiddle’s Electric Hartford Feat. Peter Wernick (Hot Rize). 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637. Performances: Gee, Infinite Palette: Brittelle and Wohl. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Ravin’Wolf Acoustic Mountain Blues. 6 p.m. Casa Alegre, 1006 Pine St., Louisville, 303-6652833. RideRockRally Music Festival. 12 p.m. North Boulder Park, Ninth Street and Dellwood Avenue, Boulder, 303-413-7200.

Deva Premal & Miten. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Gleewood with Ali Rose and Hunter Stone and Friends. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-289-6798.

Wendy Woo Trio. 9 p.m. The Wild Game Entertainment Experience, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Suite A, Longmont, 720-600-4875.

Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339.

Events

Jessica Eppler & Mike Wiebold. 5 p.m. 300 Suns Brewery, 335 First Ave., Longmont. Kirk Margoles and Friends. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-249-8458.

Adobe Photoshop for Photographers. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303800-4647. ArtWalk Longmont: A Downtown Longmont Arts Festival. 4 p.m. Downtown Longmont, Fourth Avenue and Kimbark Street, Longmont, 303-6518484.

Lewis and Church Expeditions. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Celebrate Your Craft — Rooftop Party with Sam Adams. 2 p.m. Samples World Bistro, 370 Main St., Longmont, 303-327-9318.

Longs Peak Chorus presents Memories, Music and You. 7 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-651-0401.

Dance Recital Pictures. 12 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717.

Murmuration. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Auditorium, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Noah Gardenswartz. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Boulder Weekly

THURSDAY MAY 18 8PM

BRAZIL NIGHT

FRIDAY MAY 19 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE SATURDAY MAY 20

ALI ROSE 8PM GLEEWOOD with HUNTER STONE 9PM SUNDAY MAY 21

Tokyo Rodeo with The Federalists and Saddle of Southern Darkness. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Isobar. 8 p.m. KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., Longmont, 540-239-7861.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location

Firefly Handmade Spring Market. 10 a.m. Twenty Ninth Street Mall, 1710 29th St., Boulder. Fish Taco Fiesta! 10 a.m. Platt Middle School, 6096 Baseline Road, Boulder, 720-561-5968. Geology Hike. 9 a.m. Ron Stewart Preserve, Rabbit

Mountain, Boulder, 303-678-6200. Louisville Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m. Downtown Louisville, 916 Main St., Louisville, 303-902-2451. May ArtWalk. 4 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. MediaLive Performances: Gee, Infinite Palette: Brittelle and Wohl. 6:30 p.m. Atlas Black Box, 1125 18th St., 320 UCB, Boulder, 303-443-2122. Saturday Dance Series. 9:30 a.m. Community Dance Collective, 2020b 21st St., Boulder, 401450-2006. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720379-8299. Screenplay Workshop: Your First Scene. 1 p.m. Boulder Writing Studio, 777 Pearl St., Suite 211, Boulder. Sparks & Spirits 2017. 7:30 p.m. The Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-579-9537. Spring Arts Day. 11 a.m. Boulder Shambhala Center, 1345 Spruce St., Boulder. Strawberry Festival: Vintage, Antique, and Collectibles Show. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303776-1870. Walk in the Wild: International Migratory Bird Day. 9 a.m. Walden Ponds Wildlife Habitat, Jay Road and 75th Street, Longmont, 303-499-1950. Sunday, May 21 Music 11th Annual All-Star Tribute to Bob Dylan. 6 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303443-8696. Danny Shafer. 5 p.m. The Gold Hill Inn, 401 Main see EVENTS Page 38

TOM PEVEAR 8PM HONEYWISE 9PM MONDAY MAY 22 8PM “SO YOU’RE A POET” PRESENTS

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events EVENTS from Page 37

St., Gold Hill, Boulder, 303-443-6461. Greatest Hits. 4 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church, 1001 13th St., Boulder. Greatest Hits — Boulder Bach Festival. 4 p.m. Seventh Day Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton Ave., Boulder, 720-507-5052. Harmonia A Capella in Concert. 2:30 p.m. The Academy, 970 Aurora, Boulder, 303-970-1920. Harmony and Brand. 2 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910.

101-Word Fiction Boulder Weekly is now accepting submissions for our third annual 101-word fiction contest. Five entries maximum per person with no more than 101 words each. Winning entries will be published in late June. Please submit entries by June 15 to editorial@boulderweekly. com and include “101 contest” in the subject line.

Woman to Woman 2017. 3 p.m. Congregation Bonai Shalom, 1527 Cherryvale Road, Boulder, 303-766-0324. Events Anime Club. 3 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8470. Dance Nia. 11 a.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800. Drumming for Jared — Silent Auction Fundraiser. 4 p.m. The Riverside, 1724 Broadway, Boulder, 303-402-1500. Firefly Handmade Spring Market. 10 a.m. Twenty Ninth Street Mall, 1710 29th St., Boulder. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. LaBeouf, Ronkko & Turner: #TAKEMEANYWHERE Premiere. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Strawberry Festival: Vintage, Antique, and Collectibles Show. 11 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont, 303776-1870.

Underground, 901 Front St., Louisville, 303-6418901. Gasoline Lollipops. 8:30 p.m. Waterloo, 809 South Main St., Louisville, 303-993-2094. Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. Events Open Mic. 6 p.m. Twisted Pine Brewing Company, 3201 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-771-4940.

Open Mic with the Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Wednesday, May 24 Music

Ballyhoo! With The Holdup & Darenots. 7:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-4470095. Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Oliver Jacobson. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-289-6798. Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-997-4108. SKEYE Hop. 6:30 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Tasting Room Open. 4 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Events Comedy at Tandoori. 8 p.m. Tandoori Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 970-302-7130.

VIva!VIVA — Celebrating 15 years of ageless entertainment. 2 p.m. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-444-7328.

Grill Night in the Clubhouse. 5 p.m. Haystack Mountain Golf Course, 5877 Niwot Road, Longmont, 303-530-1400.

Monday, May 22

Swing Dance Lessons. 6:30 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-7747698.

Music Flatiron Stomp. 7 p.m. Kakes Studio, 2115 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-444-5353. Open Mic Night. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Events Beginning Tap Dance. 6 p.m. Viriditas Dance Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder, 720561-5967. Country Line Dancing. 6:30 p.m. Platt Middle School, 6096 Baseline Road, Boulder, 720-5615967. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Movie Mondays Presents Captain Fantastic. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Richard Dawkins. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Tuesday, May 23 Music

Swing Dancing. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Tips and Tricks for Shooting Pro Video. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303800-4647.

SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@ boulderweekly.com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

FamilySong Music Class. 10 a.m. The Art 38 May 18 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


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Behind the silo, the Mother Rabbit hunches like a giant spider with strange calm: six tiny babies beneath, each clamoring for a sweet syringe of milk. This may sound cute to you, reading from your pulpit of plenty, but one small one was left out of reach, a knife of fur barging between the others. I watched behind a turret of sand. If I could have cautioned the mother rabbit I would. If I could summon the Bunnies to fit him in beneath the belly’s swell I would. But instead, I stood frozen, wishing for some equity. This must be why it’s called Wild Life because of all the crazed emotions tangled up in the underbrush within us. Did I tell you how the smallest one, black and trembling, hopped behind the kudzu still filigreed with wanting?

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Should we talk now of animal heritage, their species, creature development? And what do we say about form and focus— writing this when a stray goes hungry, and away. American Life in Poetry: Column 631: There are few writers who have done more to promote the work of other writers than Grace Cavalieri, who lives in the nation’s capitol. She has a radio show, The Poet and the Poem from the Library of Congress, she writes book reviews and is a tireless advocate for poetry day in and day out. All this while writing her own poems and plays. Her most recent book of poems is With (Somondoco, 2016). — Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate We do not accept unsolicited submissions. American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright ©2016 by Grace Cavalieri, “Wild Life,” from The Broadkill Review, (Vol. 10, issue 2, 2016). Poem reprinted by permission of Grace Cavalieri and the publisher. Introduction copyright © 2017 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction’s author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006.

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May 18 , 2017 39


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‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ has hiccups of awesome by Ryan Syrek

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fter a weird text prologue vaguely describes a magic war, the guy who was the Hulk for one movie (Eric Bana) jumps atop a buildingsized elephant to kill Writer/director Guy Ritchie brings his trademark modern an invading army style to the legend of King Arthur, choosing to only keep elements of the story — a magic sword, Arthur and before Jude Law sacri- basic an evil king. It’s a mixed bag that could have been weirdly fices his wife to a ten- great. tacled sea creature that turns him into a skull-faced Conan-the-Barbarian-looking mothertrucker. This is immediately prior to a funky montage where King Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) grows up a warm-hearted pimp. Writer/director Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword starts off with an acid bath of gleeful insanity and ends with King Arthur as a straight-up superhero. Sadly, everything between feels like wannabe Game of Thrones. And not “OMG! White Walkers, dragon babies and drunken Dinklage!” Game of Thrones, but the other 60 hours of the HBO show nobody talks about. In this retelling of the familiar legend, Ritchie gets some character names right, and there are swords. Other than that, this is like a candid pic of King Arthur compared with his profile pic. There’s a mild resemblance at best. After Vortigern (Law) betrays his brother, Uther (Bana), he rules his kingdom exactly as cruelly as someone with Law’s hairline would. One day, the sword in the stone appears, and Arthur is forced to pull it, revealing he’s Uther’s son and the true heir to the throne. Vortigern tries to execute Arthur, but he’s able to escape, regroup with his squad of disinterested white bros and Djimon Hounsou and attempt to reclaim the kingdom. Ritchie’s trademark style is substituted for any interesting wrinkles in the script, cowritten by Joby Harold and Lionel Wigram from a story by David Dobkin and Harold. You know it was penned by four dudes because the only woman prominently featured doesn’t even get a name. She’s just called “The Mage” (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey), and her backstory is that she has pretty eyes and is going through a Goth phase. She is pivotal to Arthur learning how to wield Excalibur, in that she tells him to use both hands. Seriously. Here’s the thing: Aside from having two of the most blatant token characters in Hounsou’s Bedivere and “The Mage,” King Arthur isn’t as awful as it sounds. It’s like that nursery rhyme about the girl with the curl: When it’s weird, it’s very very good, but when it’s bland, it’s made-for SyFy TV. It doesn’t help that Hunnam’s presence on the big screen across his entire filmography, but especially here, can be described as “legally alive.” Nor does it help that studio suits obviously mandated that Ritchie tone down his nutbar Frank Frazetta-meets-Snatch approach. The film gets caught in the hallway, sneaking out of a room marked “Safe and Mass Appealing” and into one labeled “Giant Snakes and Medieval Superheroes Inside.” It’s undeniably watchable, if unreasonably boring for surprisingly long stretches, and destined to betray the sequel-suggesting hubris of its ending, which tries to treat the Knights of the Round Table like The Avengers. Nobody is falling asleep in Sir Percival Underoos, Warner Bros. Move along. This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

Boulder Weekly


film Life goes on

Finding ways to overcome loss in ‘One Week and a Day’ by Michael J. Casey

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“The ability of the instructors to help these kids find their creativity, create songs, maximize their musical ability, and get up on stage and be stars is always impressive. Participating with his band at Dog House has improved not only his musical ability, but also his confidence, creativity, sense of responsibility, and his ability to work with a group.” - Parent

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here is nothing in this life more tragic, more soul-crushing than the ON THE BILL: One Week untimely loss of a loved one. and a Day. May 31–June 3, The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Thankfully, we have developed Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440faiths, routines and rituals to com7825, thedairy.org. bat this understandable depression. Landmark Esquire, 590 N. Downing St., Denver, 303-733For members of the Jewish faith that ritual 0148, landmarktheatres.com/ is known as “shiva” — Hebrew for “seven” — Denver. and it is the period of mourning following the death of a loved one. The mourners do not bathe, the mirrors are covered and the men refrain from shaving. Friends and family bring food to the home of the deceased and comfort the family. Shiva lasts for one week and once finished, life must return to normal. But for Eyal (Shai Avivi) and Vicky Spivak (Evgenia Dodina) — the father and mother at the heart of the Israeli drama, One Week and a Day from first-time writer/ director Asaph Polonsky — it’s going to take a little bit longer than a week to get over the death of their son. Neither is spiritually or emotionally equipped for what has befallen them and, like most, they disengage from one another and try to engage with the routine of the normal, which simply seems absurd at this point. But Eyal doesn’t want to get on board. He wanders around the house in a dirty T-shirt, workout shorts and Birkenstocks, shoveling globs of food in his mouth and yelling at the neighbors for making A couple struggles with love too loudly. When One Week and a Day played the loss of their son in at last year’s Denver Film Festival, artistic director One Week and a Day. Brit Withey jokingly described Eyal as the “Israeli Larry David.” It’s a fitting description, and not simply because of Eyal’s abrasive personality, but because of the cringing comedy that rises from it. The same is true of Vicky, who returns to her primary school teaching position armed with an unauthorized pop quiz. When she arrives, she finds the substitute teacher still working with the children and rudely dismisses him. Yes, she makes a scene and she doesn’t care. Why should she? Her face is etched with pain, the kind that makes others tread lightly around her. People react in all sorts of odd ways while they are grieving, trying desperately to hold on to something that is ultimately arbitrary. For Vicky, it’s her quiz. For Eyal, it’s his son’s blanket, the one left behind at the hospital. Much like Kenneth Lonergan’s masterful Manchester By The Sea from last year, One Week and a Day shows there is nothing tidy or confined about the grieving process. And not simply because both films deal with the crushing horror of losing a child, but because the survivors push back with the only weapon left to them: humor. Nothing dulls the pain and pushes back the darkness quite like laughter and both movies find those moments, even finding a way to end their stories on an up note. Polonsky and Lonergan seem to agree: If we can’t laugh at all the little absurd moments that make up our lives, what can we laugh at?

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Boulder Weekly


deep dish

Caitlin Rockett

BY CAITLIN ROCKETT

A

2016 article in Restaurant Hospitality explored the rising popularity of the familystyle restaurant model, the kind of places that encourage people to gather up their nearest and dearest and spend some quality time around the dinner table passing bowls of fried chicken and mashed potatoes. But really, how “trendy” is family-style dining? The concept is a long-standing staple of many Chinese, Thai and Korean restaurants, where diners are often given a separate plate on which to serve themselves entrees from larger dishes.

“We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in community with the human race.” (Take note, Donald Trump.) Community offers up a manageable menu of gussied up comfort food, from small plates of tartare, pork belly, sausages and hamachi crudo, to entrees of pork chops with cashew relish, herb citrus

Best get the full rack

The Colorado lamb rack at Community is a crowd pleaser, so prepare to share There are local favorites you might not even consider family-style joints, like Ras Kassa’s two-person platters of wat and tibs, or a big pan of sharable paella from Cafe Aion. Even mega-chains like Olive Garden dish out baskets of bread sticks and bowls of salad for the whole table. It’s all just a variation on how you eat at home, serving yourself from pots, pans and bowls around the dinner table — or even right from the stove. So what Community is doing in Lafayette isn’t trendy, it’s welcoming. It’s sociable. It’s normal. Community is a new player on the Boulder County restaurant scene, but with a prime location on S. Public Road and a patio worthy of precious summer Saturdays, it’ll be a sought after destination in no time. Community tells you what it’s all about right there in its name. Share this food with friends and family — offer up a chicken leg and make a friend of a stranger. Driving the point home is a quote from Cicero, written boldly in red across a brick wall of the interior:

brined chicken (the most sharable of all of the entrees), lamb racks, cassoulet (a French stew of duck confit, white beans and pork), steak and seasonal fish. Side items follow a more traditional path, with mac ‘n’ cheese, orzo pasta salad and seasoned vegetables among the offerings. And while Community is built around the notion of sharing, the chefs have smartly engineered the menu to cater to both sharing and individual entrees. The majority of large plates aren’t so big that ordering one for yourself is ludicrous. A standout among a menu of savory entrees is the Colorado lamb rack, and rightfully so. Colorado lamb is revered in the culinary world, showing up in restaurants around the country. The American Lamb board is located in Denver. We take lamb seriously around here.

Encrusted with Dijon mustard and cooked to a medium rare perfection, the lamb racks at Community are served atop pea puree, chickpeas and a tart salad of sorrel and arugula. The dish is decorated with beer-blistered cherry tomatoes and bittersweet little onions called cippolini. While a half rack is perfect for one person, expect those around you to beg for a chop. Best get the full rack. Community. 206 S. Public Road, Lafayette, 720-890-3793.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday Boulder Weekly

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Boulder Weekly


Susan France

nibbles BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

Or: Gimme a skinny latte

EMBRACINGDUALITY and a side of organic chain grease

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ecent reports about the death rescent illumination. Gone are the days when a storefront could just sell bikes of retail shopping have been and repair services. Now, there must also be nitro cold-brewed greatly exaggerated. Big box Ethiopian Harrar coffee. Why shouldn’t shopping for personal loans and Scandinavian bookshelf kits come with a break for shopping certainly is threat- tasty snacks and tiny meatballs? The latest expression of that duality is the new addition to ened by online ordering and home Boulder’s iconic Full Cycle bicycle shop, 1795 Pearl St., where in-store bar serving beer, wine and espresso is pouring delivery. We still want to shop but the an alongside bike repairs and sales. It follows in the footsteps of Longmont’s CyclHOPS Mexican Bike Cantina and Kettle experience has to be more than just and Spoke, the mini-brewery inside Boulder’s Green Guru, wandering around under harsh fluosee NIBBLES Page 46

Boulder Weekly

May 18 , 2017 45


Susan France

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2500 47th St. The maker of bike gear offers a nice patio where you can talk spokes and sip Raspberry Above: The Capital Saison, Pineapple NEIPA or Whiskey Oaked Porter. One Café is one example of a dualFull Cycle is just down Pearl Street from Capital purpose business. One Café (in the former Boulder Café space, which, Below: Full Cycle ironically, once housed a bank). The location serves Peet’s Coffee drinks, baked goods and informal chats with a “Café Ambassador,” formerly known as a “teller.” Alpine Modern already had a café at 904 College Ave. on the Hill serving quinoa porridge, apple Manchego paninis and Prosciutto waffles along with craft beverages. The company recently added Alpine Modern, 1048 Pearl St., a shop offering home décor, accessories and books reflecting a distinctive minimalist design sensibility that can be pondered while sitting and sipping at a coffee bar. Boulder businesses combining food Susan France and drink with other services is not a new concept. Boulder’s venerable Trident Bookstore has long fused Americanos and literature. Some supermarkets including Whole Foods and Alfalfa’s have coffee and juice bars and dedicated dining areas. Englewood’s Garibaldo Mexican Bistro is inside a Conoco gas station with a window view into the car wash, and Lakewood’s Casa Bonita is really an amusement park that also sells some swell sopaipillas. Are these dual dining destinations really selling a setting where like-minded customers — whether bike, book or board game fans — can gather to socialize and post to social media? Is it another part of the new sharing community economy or simply a reflection of our growing need to be constantly caffeinated? It’s just a matter of time before public consumption of cannabis is legalized and treated the same way as alcohol and cigarettes. One day soon I suspect that Boulder will see the opening of Puff-n-Stuff, a combination cannabis and hemp clothing shop and all-you-can-eat organic buffet with nacho cheese and chocolate fountains.

By the Numbers: 2 Billion

Colorado may be more famous for other crops but the state’s farmers produce more than 2 billion pounds of 70 different varieties of potatoes annually including fingerling varieties such as Austrian Crescent, Banana, French, LaRatte, Red Thumb, Rose Finn Apple and Purple Peruvian. Colorado is the fifth largest spud producing state in the nation. Not that you need an excuse to make mashers but see NIBBLES Page 48

Boulder Weekly


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potatoes are fat-free, gluten-free, sodium-free and high in potassium and vitamin C ... at least before you add the butter, milk and cheese.

Local Food News

Please step away from that well-crafted IPA, and sip with a lot less bitterness for seven days. Opening ceremonies for Cider Week Colorado are 6-8 p.m. Monday at Longmont’s St. Vrain Cidery. (ciderweekco.com) The festive week of events concludes May 27 in Denver with the Pressed Conference, the largest hard cider tasting of the year in the state. (thepressedconference.com) ... Boulder’s venerable Walnut Brewery will close on June 4 and reopen in July as Boulder Beer on Walnut, joining Boulder Beer’s longtime East Boulder brewery and pub. I remember when it was based out of a rural goat shack. It makes sense that Colorado’s oldest craft brewery would have a presence downtown, joining another new arrival, Oskar Blues, which will be opening in the former World of Beer space. ... Noted Denver chef Kevin Taylor (of Palettes at the Denver Art Museum) is set to open Hickory & Ash restaurant in Broomfield’s Arista complex in June. … Bryan Dayton (Oak at Fourteenth, Acorn) and chef Amos Watts, will open Corrida atop a new building at 1023 Walnut St. serving Spanish steakhouse fare and a rooftop rarity in Boulder — unobstructed views of the Flatirons. ... Chocolaterie Stam is open at 103 N. Public Road in Lafayette offering chocolate truffles, a wide selection of licorice (including the salty type), caramel-filled stroopwafels and housemade gelato in cherry cheesecake, chocolate almond, grapefruit and other flavors. ... Coming soon: Endo’s Brewing Co. at 95th and Arapahoe in Lafayette. Its neighbors include the Super Mini Walnut Café, the Brewing Market and the historic Smash Burger location where the successful national chain was born a few years back as Icon Burger.

Taste of the Week

Boulder County has no shortage of new, authentic pizzerias to try out but I found myself recently returning to one of the area’s Neapolitan originals, Proto’s Pizza. I sat down at the pleasant Lafayette location for a super-thin crusted pizza topped with fresh basil, pepperoni and mozzarella. The price per square inch of pizza here is a little steep but the wood-fired, flavor is still great. My crisp slices matched up well with a good pour of Proto’s Sala Upkeep, their house California red wine blend.

Words to Chew On

ou y k rt n o a p h T sup y! e h ll t unt a o r C fo erturn Team d l u Bo -The U HWY 287 in Lafayette

48 May 18 , 2017

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“Skipping breakfast suggests indifference, or a dangerous inability to treat one’s body as the superb, well-cared-for instrument one knows it to be. ... For a corporate hopeful, the only proper breakfast route is the life-preserving, cancer-daunting, palate-numbing route of bran.” — Janet Maslin, The New Republic, December 1986 John Lehndorff is the former Dining Critic of the Rocky Mountain News. He hosts Radio Nibbles 8:25 a.m. Thursday on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, streaming at kgnu. org.) Read his food blog at: johnlehndorff.wordpress.com. Comments: nibbles@boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly


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Grossen Bart Brewery is located directly behind the Safeway on Ken Pratt. We are pet and family friendly. We have a nice outdoor beer garden with mountain views! We offer weekly live music, food trucks, and FREE popcorn! We are pet and family friendly. 720.438.2060 GROSSENBART.COM TEXT GB2014 TO 22828

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Tour de brew: Crystal Springs Brewing Company A little bit of the Midwest comes to Colorado by Michael J. Casey

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here is something magical about the great American Midwest. Sure, driving across it can seem like an endless sea of flatland constantly unfolding before the horizon. Flying over doesn’t make it any more romantic — large geometrical plots of field corn, wheat and soybeans as far as the eye can see. No wonder the inhabitants of Los Angeles and New York call these “the fly-over states.” But consider all who came from this fertile land: T.S. Eliot, Stan Brakhage, Roger Ebert, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln, Warren Buffett and Kurt Vonnegut, to name a few. Poets, filmmakers, writers, storytellers, presidents, economists — hell, the Midwest has them all. Granted, many of them left for fame and forSusan France tune along the more densely populated coasts, but when they went, they carried with them the heart of America and the spark of ingenuity. That heart and spark hit me with my first sip of Old School Pale Ale (5.1 percent ABV) on a recent visit to the Crystal Springs Brewing Company in Louisville. The taste wasn’t as sharp as other pale ales, but the citrus flavor continued to build as I ventured further down the glass. There was something about it I had not experienced in a beer before, but Crystal Springs bartender, Jonathan Dosik once I saw the tasting sheet describe the Old School as “South Dakota style,” I knew exactly what it was. The Midwest had come to Colorado. The man behind Crystal Springs, Tom Horst, hails from Hudson, South Dakota — just 120 miles south, southeast from my family’s hometown of Mitchell — and teaches music at Boulder High. He started brewing beer out of his garage in 1988 at the suggestion of his son. Around about the turn of the century, Horst’s wife, Kristy, started suggesting that he open a brewery, and on May 13, 2010, the Crystal Springs Brewing Company opened its doors. Much like a Midwest home, Crystal Springs’s Louisville pub is an inviting place to go and drink. Thirteen stools surround the bar, but easy chairs and benches caught my associate’s attention and that is where we made our home. While I quaffed the Naughty Marilyn (8.2 percent), a blond Belgian strong with plenty of citrus, fruit and spice, she dove into the delightfully tart Cherry Saison (5.7 percent) and considered moving her monthly book club meetings to Crystal Springs. And there’s a beer for all those avid readers with brews like Blood Orange Kölsch (4.9 percent), a easy drinker that tastes a little like an orange gummy bear; Solano (6 percent), made with roasted hatch green chiles that give the beer its pepper and smoke; and their New England imperial dark Mexican lager, Garage Brew (7 percent), which has a deliciously roasted, malty taste. Heck, I might even have to join them. I might not be of much help in their discussions, but I can certainly keep pace with them beer-wise. We all have our talents and as long as Horst continues to use his to brew that beer, I’ll use mine to drink it. Must be the Midwestern in us. Boulder Weekly


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BOULDER OWNED. BOULDER GROWN

astrology ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19:

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

“A 2-year-old kid is like using a blender, but you don’t have a top for it,” said comedian Jerry Seinfeld. Would you like to avoid a scenario like that, Aries? Would you prefer not to see what happens if your life has resemblances to turning on a topless blender that’s full of ingredients? Yes? Then please find the top and put it on! And if you can’t locate the proper top, use a dinner plate or newspaper or pizza box. OK? It’s not too late. Even if the blender is already spewing almond milk and banana fragments and protein powder all over the ceiling. Better late than never!

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: My pregnant friend Myrna is deter-

mined to avoid giving birth via Caesarean section. She believes that the best way for her son to enter the world is by him doing the hard work of squeezing through the narrow birth canal. That struggle will fortify his willpower and mobilize him to summon equally strenuous efforts in response to future challenges. It’s an interesting theory. I suggest you consider it as you contemplate how you’re going to get yourself reborn.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: I invite you to try the following medi-

tation: Picture yourself filling garbage bags with stuff that reminds you of what you used to be and don’t want to be any more. Add anything that feels like decrepit emotional baggage or that serves as a worn-out psychological crutch. When you’ve gathered up all the props and accessories that demoralize you, imagine yourself going to a beach where you build a big bonfire and hurl your mess into the flames. As you dance around the conflagration, exorcise the voices in your head that tell you boring stories about yourself. Sing songs that have as much power to relieve and release you as a spectacular orgasm.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: In normal times, your guardian

animal ally might be the turtle, crab, seahorse or manta ray. But in the next three weeks, it’s the cockroach. This unfairly maligned creature is legendary for its power to thrive in virtually any environment, and I think you will have a similar resourcefulness. Like the cockroach, you will do more than merely cope with awkward adventures and complicated transitions; you will flourish. One caution: It’s possible that your adaptability may bother people who are less flexible and enterprising than you. To keep that from being a problem, be empathetic as you help them adapt. (P.S. Your temporary animal ally is exceptionally well-groomed. Cockroaches clean themselves as much as cats do.)

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Lady Jane Grey was crowned Queen

of England in July 1553, but she ruled for just nine days before being deposed. I invite you to think back to a time in your own past when victory was short-lived. Maybe you accomplished a gratifying feat after an arduous struggle, only to have it quickly eclipsed by a twist of fate. Perhaps you finally made it into the limelight but then lost your audience to a distracting brouhaha. But here’s the good news: Whatever it was — a temporary triumph? incomplete success? nullified conquest? — you will soon have a chance to find redemption for it.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: While shopping at a funky yard

sale, I found the torn-off cover of a book titled You’re a Genius and I Can Prove It. Sadly, the rest of the book was not available. Later I searched for it in online bookstores, and found it was out of print. That’s unfortunate, because now would be an excellent time for you to peruse a text like this. Why? Because you need specific, detailed evidence of how unique and compelling you are — concrete data that will provide an antidote to your habitual selfdoubts and consecrate your growing sense of self-worth. Here’s what I suggest you do: Write an essay entitled “I’m an Interesting Character and Here’s the Proof.”

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Leonardo da Vinci wrote a besti-

sions from the behavior of animals. One of his descriptions will be useful for you to contemplate in the near future. It was centered on what he called the “wild ass,” which we might refer to as an undomesticated donkey. Leonardo said that this beast, “going to the fountain to drink and finding the water muddy, is never too thirsty to wait until it becomes clear before satisfying himself.” That’s a useful fable to contemplate, Libra. Be patient as you go in search of what’s pure and clean and good for you. (The translation from the Italian is by Oliver Evans.)

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: My friend Allie works as a match-

maker. She has an instinctive skill at reading the potential chemistry between people. One of her key strategies is to urge her clients to write mission statements. “What would your ideal marriage look like?” she asks them. Once they have clarified what they want, the process of finding a mate seems to become easier and more fun. In accordance with the astrological omens, Scorpio, I suggest you try this exercise — even if you are already in a committed relationship. It’s an excellent time to get very specific about the inspired togetherness you’re willing to work hard to create.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: In ancient Greek myth, Tiresias was a prophet who could draw useful revelations by interpreting the singing of birds. Spirits of the dead helped him devise his prognostications, too. He was in constant demand for revelations about the future. But his greatest claim to fame was the fact that a goddess magically transformed him into a woman for seven years. After that, he could speak with authority about how both genders experienced the world. This enhanced his wisdom immeasurably, adding to his oracular power. Are you interested in a less drastic but highly educational lesson, Sagittarius? Would you like to see life from a very different perspective from the one you’re accustomed to? It’s available to you if you want it.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: “You remind me of the parts of

myself that I will never have a chance to meet,” writes poet Mariah Gordon-Dyke, addressing a lover. Have you ever felt like saying that to a beloved ally, Capricorn? If so, I have good news: You now have an opportunity to meet and greet parts of yourself that have previously been hidden from you — aspects of your deep soul that up until now you may only have caught glimpses of. Celebrate this homecoming!

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: I predict that you won’t be bitten

by a dog or embarrassed by a stain or pounced on by a lawyer. Nor will you lose your keys or get yelled at by a friend or oversleep for a big appointment. On the contrary! I think you’ll be wise to expect the best. The following events are quite possible: You may be complimented by a person who’s in a position to help you. You could be invited into a place that had previously been off-limits. While eavesdropping, you might pick up a useful clue, and while daydreaming you could recover an important memory you’d lost. Good luck like this is even more likely to sweep into your life if you work on ripening the most immature part of your personality.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Time out. It’s intermission.

Give yourself permission to be spacious and slow. Then, when you’re sweetly empty — this may take a few days — seek out experiences that appeal primarily to your wild and tender heart as opposed to your wild and jumpy mind. Just forget about the theories you believe in and the ideas you regard as central to your philosophy of life. Instead, work on developing brisk new approaches to your relationship with your feelings. Like what? Become more conscious of them, for example. Express gratitude for what they teach you. Boost your trust for their power to reveal what your mind sometimes hides from you.

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SAVAGE

Love

by Dan Savage

Dear Dan: I’m a 29-year-old man who desires a monogamous relationship. I’m currently in an LTR with a 29-yearold woman. Despite my feelings about monogamy, I’ve sought attention from women and men on dating apps. I’ve gotten caught doing this more than once. I have never met © Rachel Robinson up with anyone in real life, and my girlfriend has yet to find out about the use of gay dating apps. After some soul-searching, I realized that my bisexuality is a huge issue in our relationship. I’ve never discussed it with her, and while I don’t think she would react negatively, I’m scared of how it would affect our relationship. I’m not sure whether to go to therapy, bring it up with my girlfriend, or do some combination of the two. I’d love some advice about having this discussion in a way that won’t end my relationship. I’m not really interested in an open relationship, and I would like to stay with my girlfriend, but I’m confused because I don’t know if a monogamous relationship will still be what I want once I open up about my sexuality. It seems like a no-win situation — stay in the closet and no one knows but I keep wanting outside attention, or tell her the real reason I’ve used dating apps and probably lose the relationship. — Bisexual Reeling About Closeted Ethical Dilemma Dear BRACED: The use of gay dating apps isn’t the issue — it’s your use of them. And while I’m nitpicking: It’s not “outside attention” you want, BRACED, it’s cock. Backing way the hell up: Lots of partnered people — even contentedly monogamous people — dink around on dating apps for the attention, for the ego boost, for the spank bank. Fakes and flakes annoy the people who are looking for actual dates on those apps, of course, but apps are the new pick-up bars, and partnered people were strolling into pick-up bars to harmlessly flirt with strangers before heading home to their mates, all charged up, long before apps came along. The dangers and temptations of app-facilitated flirtations are greater, of course, because unlike the person you briefly flirted with in a bar, the person you flirted with on an app can find you again — hell, they come home with you, in your pocket, and you can easily Boulder Weekly

reconnect with them later. But the real issue here isn’t apps or flirting along the harmless/dangerous spectrum, BRACED, it’s closets — specifically, the one you’re in. The closet is a miserable place to be, as you know, and the only relevant question is whether you can spend the rest of your life in there. If the answer is no — and it sure sounds like it’s no (you sound miserable) — then you’ll have to come out to your girlfriend. If you don’t think monogamy will be right for you once you’re out, then monogamy may not be right for you period. Find yourself a queer-positive therapist, come out to your GF with their help, and allow her to make an informed choice about whether she wants to be with you. Worry less about the right words, BRACED, and more about the truthful ones.

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Dear Dan: A woman recently wrote to you that her husband could not maintain an erection for “more than a few thrusts.” She said that Viagra is of no use to them (the drug gave him headaches) and she was contemplating the pursuit of sexual affairs with other men who could better serve her needs (with her husband’s permission). No need for me to rehash what you told her. I want to call your attention to a better solution to their quandary: Any competent urologist can write a prescription for a preparation known as Trimix (phentolamine, papaverine, and prostaglandin, in various strengths), which must be supplied by a compounding pharmacy. Or failing that prescription, then alternatively one for a brand-name drug called Caverject. Both of these preparations are injected directly into the penis — into the corpora cavernosa, to be specific — and both effectively enable an erection of prodigious size and stiffness that will endure for as much as six hours. — Potential Alternate Solution Sidesteps Infidelities’ Obvious Negatives Dear PASSION: Thanks for sharing, PASSION. And to guys out there with erectile dysfunction: Ask your doctor if Caverject is right for you? Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visitITMFA.org. May 18 , 2017 55


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EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

Dennis McKenna and his beef with religion

D

ennis McKenna yawns. He’s at the end of his consciousness cycle, he says, and his body, nothing more than a system of intakes and outtakes, is making its sleep and oxygen deficiency known. For McKenna, sleep is a drug, just like everything else is a drug. It’s a process that induces physical and chemical changes in the body, changing its function toward a certain end. For him, this is just being honest, both scientifically and phenomenologically — it’s the simplest explanation. But having spent a career trying to explain this to the Wikimedia Commons/Avi kedmi world has been, well, complicated. For some reason, the social tendency has been to apply a moral position to drugs, as if their use is part of an objective judgement of the goodness or badness within us. As if Kant could look inside our soul and see the divinely illuminated truth that abstinence from drugs is a dictate of pure reason. And, as if that weren’t enough, that Jeff Sessions could create a system in perfect actualization of our internal moral code. “We box it up and lock it away because, at the bottom of it, people are sacred,” McKenna says. “People are afraid of anything that is going to change their mind, what they think they know. We’d rather not have our opinions confused by the facts of our own experience.” Over the years, McKenna has found himself in the position of explaining drugs across the chasm, resorting to the words of Salvador Dali over and over again, saying, “I am drugs. I am drugs. I am drugs,” as if he could then put on shiny red shoes, click his heels and

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transport people out of Oz and back into their own reasoning brains. But we seem stuck, our sense of wonder habitually turning to something more authoritarian than our own minds, looking to church and state to help us ask the question, to give us an answer. “This is my beef with religion,” McKenna says. “They don’t facilitate actual, meaningful spiritual experiences. They give you essentially a dogma that you are supposed to believe and not ask questions about. “But, if you take a psychedelic, you are engaging your curiosity and I think it will separate you from religion, or at the very least give you a different perspective on it. You may not abandon your faith, but you will come to understand it differently, on your own terms.” There is actually some iconographic evidence that drugs, like psychedelics and opium, were important sacramental tools in early Christianity. As the religion developed, it’s believed plants maintained an important role, but that their use became restricted to clergymen and priests. It was this, the idea that divine experience was only for the select few, that McKenna points to as the origin of moral and legal prohibitions, not just on drugs, but on independent inquiry into the mysteries of our existence. And then science appeared, asking the big questions once reserved for religion, and seeking objective and reproducible explanations. But science, too, has its biases, and in the 19th and 20th centuries it developed an aversion to the potential of the natural and spiritual as part of biological health.

Lately though, there has been a lot of buzz about an ongoing “psychedelic renaissance,” popularized by headlines like “The Psychedelic Miracle” in Rolling Stone. It appears a new wave of research is beginning to assert the ability of drugs like psilocybin, MDMA and cannabis to treat notoriously difficult to treat conditions, like end of life anxiety and PTSD. How? Because of their ability to “make a regular schmuck, like you or me, have a divine experience.” Here, McKenna offers a gentle reminder that these drugs never went away. “This is a cultural rediscovery,” he says. “These plants have been on the planet, the same way, with the same effects on human beings, for a long, long, long time. What’s changing is our perspective on our relationship with these substances. We are no longer insisting that good science is secular science. “As these drugs make their way back into medicine, medicine is being dragged, kicking and screaming, into this dimension, because for the last 150 years or more, the field has been very concerned to exorcise anything spiritual out of medicine. In other words, to assert that we are just machines and that there is no spiritual aspect to healing, to us, to anything — it is a very reductionist approach. “Of course it is ridiculous, but that aside, the effectiveness of these drugs presents a very inconvenient truth for medicine. It forces it to acknowledge that there is a spiritual dimension to our existence. The whole mechanistic, monkey wrench approach to healing is being challenged and it’s forcing medicine to change, and there is a great deal of entrenched resistance to that.” I ask McKenna what it will take to change people’s minds. He answers the question by undermining it: “Get rid of faith!” he says. “You don’t have to believe anything, you don’t have to accept anything ... If we are in any sort of renaissance, it’s not about drugs. It’s about society finding the courage to open yourself up to your experience. To be moved off your baseline and break with habituated thinking? That takes courage!”

May 18 , 2017 57


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Cheer, cheer the Green Mountaineer! Our vow is recorded — our banner unfurled,
In the name of Vermont we defy all the world! — Revolutionary War song t finally happened. The legislature of a state (as opposed to the people of a state) voted last week to legalize marijuana. The Vermont Legislature became the first state legislature in the country to pass a bill legalizing pot. The eight states and the District of Columbia that currently have legalized marijuana legalized it through a vote of the people. The Vermont legalization leaves something to be desired, but it still does a lot. It legalizes possession of up to an ounce of marijuana by individuals and possession of up to two mature and four immature plants. The measure won’t kick in until July 1, 2018. The biggest omissions are that the measure doesn’t provide for commercial production of pot and sale through dispensaries; nor does it provide for taxing and regulating production and sale. It does, however, establish a nine-member commission to study full legalization, taxation and regulation. Even with those short-comings, passage of the bill is a big deal. That’s because 26 states don’t have the initiative process written into their constitutions. In those states, legalization can take place only by an act of their state legislatures. Since Colorado passed Amendment 64 in 2012, legalization bills have been introduced in a number of state legislatures — 20 are currently pending, according to the National Association of State Legislatures — but none have passed. Until now. It’s widely assumed that if one state legislature passes a legalization measure, others follow.

I

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This is particularly true in the case of Vermont’s bill. That’s because the bill allows timid state representatives to cast a vote for ending the war on pot users by legalizing use and possession, while relying on a study commission to give them cover before voting for full, Coloradostyle legalization. It’s an approach that could have a lot of appeal in other noninitiative states. There is, however, one fly in the ointment: It’s not at all clear Vermont’s firstterm Republican governor Phil Scott will sign the bill. Some of Scott’s post-passage statements make him sound like a man who’s been getting threatening phone calls from drug war dead-enders like Chris Christie and Jeff Sessions and is trying to talk himself into doing the wrong thing. “It’s no secret that I don’t believe this is a priority for Vermont,” Scott told Vermont Public Radio. “I believe that what we should be doing is trying to find ways to protect those on our highways, to deliver a level of impairment that is consistent throughout the Northeast, as well as to address the edibles for our kids before we move forward with legalization,” he said. “Having said that, I’m going to review the bill as it’s passed.” All of which sounds a bit disingenuous. Scott routinely points to his concern about highway and child safety whenever the subject of legalization comes up, but it’s hard to believe that he isn’t aware of the fact that legalization in Colorado, Washington and Oregon has shown that both problems are eminently

manageable. Colorado highways are not covered with stoner road-kill, and it’s a pretty safe bet that Colorado emergency rooms treat a lot more under-age alcohol victims than under-age edible victims. Moreover, the issues of highway safety and edibles regulation are the sort of questions that the commission created by the bill is intended to address. And since the effective date of the bill was set for July 1, 2018, the Vermont Legislature will have a chance to address them during its 2018 session before legalization kicks in. A poll taken in March by Public Policy Polling found Vermont voters support allowing adults 21 and older to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana by a 57-39 percent margin. Scott says he has “a Libertarian streak” in him. It won’t take much political courage for him to prove it.

May 18 , 2017 59


INDUSTRY MAKERS VIE FOR SODA TAX EXEMPTIONS On Tuesday night, the Boulder City Council deliberated for three hours on how to implement the city’s impending tax on sugary drinks. Council members sought to carve exemptions for drinks that have added sugar or exceed the tax’s perserving sugar threshold, but that don’t necessarily fall under the intention of the tax — things like kombucha and bloody mary mix. Council heard testimony from small business

icumi

the health benefits of soda. Dr. Bertrand Pepper, (IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and who said he had a not always accurate view of the world degree in “refreshment” from the Poughkeepsie Education of Physical Sciences owners and fermented food makers Institute (PEPSI), as well as a docwho would be financially harmed if the tax included alcoholic mixers torate in Deliciousness from Harvard, asked Council to consider and kombucha. granting an exception to sodas given Council also heard testimony from a man in a mustache and thick- their numerous health benefits. Pepper said that kids who drink rimmed glasses who spoke elegantly the Institute’s recommended six cans and way over the time limit about

of soda a day do better on standardized tests than kids who drink seven cans of soda a day. In addition, Pepper at one point took off his glasses and said, “Most people think I’m 45 because of my deep facial atrophy, rotted teeth and what doctors call ‘Mello Yello Fever.’ But guess what: I’m only 24.” As Council sat silently figuring out how this was a health benefit, a slow, steady clap emerged, begging for others to join in. No one did. It was Pepper, and his pants were off by then.

Wikimedia Commons/ World Economic Forum

HE MUST HAVE RUN OUT OF FINGERS In his latest attempt to green-wash his image, Governor John Hickenlooper of the Colorado Oil and Gas Party has declared May 15-19 to be Colorado Endangered Species Week. The stated point of this latest Hick exhibition of disingenuous concern for the environment is to educate the public about the 300 or so plant and animal species that are at risk of extinction in Colorado. There are a couple of theories being floated as to why Gov. Frackenlooper only put five days into endangered species week instead of seven. The first theory is that he simply ran out of fingers on the hand he was counting on. We have to admit that one has merit. The other theory is that the other two days represent all the species, endangered and/or heading that way, that Hickenlooper’s love of the oil and gas industry is actually killing off. Sage grouse, mountain lion, black bear, mule deer and several species of hummingbirds come to mind. Or heck, he probably can’t count past five.

60 May 18 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


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