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STAY CONNECTED The curious case of temporarily halted CSU West Nile virus research, infected birds, PETA protests and the costs of preventing the spread of disease by Matt Cortina

news:

As the climate situation grows more dire, climate lawsuit expected back in court by Angela K. Evans

Check us out on Facebook and Twitter for events, local news, and ticket giveaways.

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news:

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Front Range artist captures ‘The Colors of Ice’ at ice core facility in Lakewood by Jenna Sampson

Steve House, Scott Johnston and Kilian Jornet’s new endurance training book changes the game by Emma Murray

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Boulder-bred Lao Tizer shares some thoughts on jazz radio, adding a vocalist and surviving a big project by Dave Kirby

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Shipping meat around the world to save it by Matt Cortina

departments 5 The Highroad: What’s the cost of high living? 6 The Anderson Files: Is the U.S. marching toward a war with Iran? 23 Overtones: Cris Williamson, Barbara Higbie and Teresa Trull bring decades of friendship and music to the Dairy 25 Arts & Culture: MahlerFest XXXII offers two orchestral concerts in expanded schedule 27 Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go 34 Words: ‘walking through’ by Greg Alston 35 Film: Political documentaries in a partisan world 37 Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 45 Drink: Know your brew: German-style heller bock and maibock 47 Astrology: by Rob Brezsny 49 Savage Love: Disclosed 51 Weed Between the Lines: Attorneys general to Congress: Let banks work with marijuana businesses 53 Cannabis Corner: All hat and no cattle in New York and New Jersey BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Editorial interns, Giselle Cesin, Lenah Reda Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Coordinator, Lara Henry Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar Bookkeeper, Veronica Turner PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama COVER Photo by Federico Modica of Christian Varesco, Dolomites, Italy May 16, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 40 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

FOR MORE INFORMATION on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

What’s the cost of high living? by Jim Hightower

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he rich aren’t merely different from you and me... they’re ridiculous! The über-rich, I mean, the billionaire barons of Wall Street, who literally live above the real world and are clueless about the gross inequality their financial schemes are creating. Take Kenneth Griffin, a hedge fund tycoon who’s the latest gold medal champion of conspicuous consumption. He just paid an obscene $238 million for a sprawling, 24,000-square-foot New York City penthouse located 79 stories above street level at Central Park South — a strip nicknamed “Billionaire’s Row.” His I

three-floor mansion-in-the-sky is the most expensive residential purchase in U.S. history, exceeding the excesses of robber barons in the Gilded Age. Adding to the overindulgence, he’ll live there only occasionally for he also has a $60-million penthouse in Miami, a $122-million mansion in London and posh crash pads elsewhere. Griffin is the poster child for that disgraceful TrumpGOP tax cut for the super-rich, which they passed by claiming that beneficiaries like Ken would put their windfall into jobs and wage increases for the working class. Interestingly, his exclusive skyscraper MAY 16, 2019

residence replaces a modest, 20-story building of affordable, rent-controlled apartments, where dozens of middle-class tenants lived. They were evicted by the corporate developers to provide opulent digs for a few billionaires. That ought to be illegal, but instead, a state law specifically empowers landlords to toss out middle-class and low-income tenants, demolish their apartments, and put up a swank new building. If you wonder where inequality and America’s affordable-housing crisis comes from... there it is. Yet, Griffin has complained that rich elites like him have “insufficient influence” in politics. Really, Ken? Who had the political clout to eject those families from their homes? This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. I

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Is the U.S. marching toward a war with Iran? by Dave Anderson

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year ago, Trump withdrew from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and restored harsh sanctions. As a result, Iran’s economy has been severely damaged. The deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action ( JCPOA), was not just between Iran and the United States but also with France, Germany, the U.K., Russia, China and the European Union. It was reached after years of negotiations. Iran has been complying with the deal. This has been confirmed by more than a dozen reports by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog agency. IAEA inspectors must monitor Iran’s stockpile of enriched uranium on a daily basis and send four reports a year to its board of governors and the memberstates of the U.N. Security Council. The Trump administration is carrying out a campaign of “maximum pressure” against Iran. The Financial Times says “the ratcheting up of pressure looks deliberately designed to destabilize Iran, rather than bring it back to the negotiating table.” Is the United States marching toward a war against Iran? The belli-

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cose and reckless rhetoric of Trump, his National Security Adviser John Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo makes you wonder. In a recent op-ed in The Washington Post, Senators Tom Udall (D-New Mexico) and Dick Durbin (D-Illinois) warned, “16 years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, we are again barreling toward another unnecessary conflict in the Middle East based on faulty and misleading logic.” In April, the Trump administration announced that it would end waivers that had allowed India, China, Turkey, Japan and South Korea to continue importing about 1 million barrels of Iranian oil per day. The White House explicitly stated that this action was intended to bring Iran’s oil exports to zero. Iran responded with threats to close the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow waterway off Iran’s coast through which nearly one-third of all the crude oil transported by sea currently passes. Under the JCPOA, Iran can have only enough enriched uranium and heavy water needed for its commercial nuclear power plant. The country could produce nuclear weapons if there was a bigger stockpile of both. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


On May 3, the Trump administration revoked sanctions waivers, which have allowed Iran to export its surplus low-enriched uranium (LEU) and heavy water. Iran would have to stop its production of both if it reached the JCPOA-mandated stockpile limits and couldn’t export the LEU and heavy water. The Trump administration said it wants to force Iran to end its production of LEU. The Iranian government rejects that demand since it uses the uranium to help produce electricity. Jon Wolfsthal, Obama’s nuclear expert for the National Security Council, told Business Insider there’s “a very real risk that the cycle of political and diplomatic escalation can get out of hand, and turn into a military confrontation.” He said, “In the past, accidents and inadvertent contact between Iran and U.S. military capabilities did not escalate into war, but it is not clear that President Trump understands the risk, or that NSA John Bolton wants to avoid those risks.” That doesn’t mean that the Iranian theocracy is trustworthy. The regime is repressive, supports terrorism and has committed horrific war crimes in Syria defending the bloodthirsty dictatorship of Bashar alAssad. But Trump is making life worse for the Iranian people. His actions and talk are empowering the hardliners in Tehran. Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and the right wing in Israel are encouraging Trump. Former Secretary of Defense Bob Gates said in 2010, “the Saudis want to fight the Iranians to the last American.” Former Obama Defense Department official Colin Kahl writes in Foreign Policy: “If Iran resumes its nuclear activities, we can expect a return to the type of Israeli threats of military action that were common from 2009 to 2012. Only this time, the U.S. administration is much more likely to encourage Israeli strikes rather than seek to constrain them. Trump’s support for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government — which seems deeply rooted in the president’s domestic political calculations — has been unwavering and unconditional. And Trump’s closest advisors seem BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

primed to encourage him to give Israel the green light to launch an attack. After all, in 2015 Bolton opined that the best way to address the Iranian nuclear threat was an Israeli strike backed by U.S. efforts to overthrow the Iranian regime.” A bipartisan group of senators and representatives are trying to prevent an unauthorized war. Led by Udall and Durbin, they recently introduced the “Prevention of

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Unconstitutional War with Iran Act of 2019” (S.B. 1039/H.R. 2354). These bills would prohibit funding for a U.S. military attack against Iran without specific, prior authorization from Congress. Stop the war before it gets started. It would be a gigantic disaster for the Middle East but it would also make things much worse here at home. As Iranian-American scholar and activist Trita Parsi told Democracy Now!:

MAY 16, 2019

“Almost none of the progressive domestic programs and reforms that the Democratic candidates are discussing right now, and will be debating as soon as the debate starts for the presidential nomination, can actually take place if by then John Bolton has started a war with Iran. Because war with Iran will be much, much more devastating than war with Iraq was.” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/ ANDY REAGO & CHRISSY MCCLARREN

Thirty-seven crows left of the murder

munications. But of course intentionally infecting a living being, and ending its life after the study, raised ethical red flags for those who disagree with animal testing, no matter the potential benefit to society. Those against such animal testing, like People for the Ethical Treatment for Animals (PETA), say the research being done at the Ebel Lab has negligible public benefit despite CSU’s claims otherwise. “[The research] has failed to develop a cure, vaccine, or any clinical treatments for the disease, either for birds or humans. Crows are highly intelligent, sensitive animals who value their freedom, their families, and their lives,” PETA wrote in a statement demanding that Ebel be stripped indefinitely of his permits to collect birds. In humans, West Nile can cause serious brain issues, and there’s no

The curious case of temporarily halted CSU West Nile virus research, infected birds, PETA protests and the costs of preventing the spread of disease

by Matt Cortina

S

ince 2013, Dr. Greg Ebel and a team of researchers at the Colorado State University Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases laboratory, or the Ebel Lab, have been collecting crows, robins and other birds, sometimes infecting them with West Nile virus, sometimes releasing them, and sometimes killing them at the end of the study. “This research is essential for understanding how viruses such as West Nile survive in and spread among bird, animal and human populations, and what happens when these viruses enter new ecosystems,” says Mike Hooker, CSU director of public affairs and comBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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treatment — just supportive care. Colorado has had cases of West Nile every year since 2002. (In Boulder County, peak risk for West Nile occurs in late July and August, and the County uses breeding prevention and targeted chemical applications to reduce populations.) So PETA filed a complaint and a request for investigation into the Ebel Lab’s work. Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) responded and issued Ebel a citation on April 22 for five crows the lab had in its possession that were captured in 2018, warned the lab about the 32 other crows it was using for a study, fined Ebel $208 and stripped him of his scientific collection permit. What CPW found was an “administrative oversight, not an intentional violation” Area Wildlife Manager Ty Petersburg said in the ruling — two permits are required to collect wildlife, a state and federal one. Though the Ebel lab had obtained the proper federal permits and had historically received state permits every year, the lab didn’t apply for one in 2018, a year in which Ebel had collected crows.

COLLECTING CROWS without a permit, an “oversight,” according to the state, resulted in one prominent researcher losing his permit to collect birds to study West Nile.

see CROWS Page 10

MAY 16, 2019

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“Given the violations that did take place, a citation was issued for the wrongdoing. Rules and regulations must be followed, but we will continue to work with CSU faculty to obtain the proper permit to allow this important research to continue,” Petersburg said. “We are supportive of the academic research Colorado State is conducting with this human health and safety project.” Ebel says he’s unable to speak about the process publicly, but called it “pretty frustrating.” Hooker agrees the issue was clerical: “The annual federal permit was current during this time, but due to a clerical error, there was an inadvertent lapse in the annual state permit during the time birds were collected in 2018. ... CSU communicated this error to the sponsor of the work ­­­— the National Institutes of Health. We also are reviewing our protocol tracking processes to add additional checks to ensure licensing is in place. All state and federal permits are currently up to date for 2019, and have been since Jan. 9.” PETA asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to intercede from a federal level as well, but Hooker says CSU has confirmed that the “USDA is not investigating.” Still, it was the foothold PETA and other critics of the research needed to press for the cancellation of the Ebel Lab’s animal collection, citing the organ failure and central nervous issues that are inflicted upon wild birds when West Nile is injected. On May 6, PETA hosted a rally outside the CSU Transitional Medicine Institute to call for the end of the “school’s cruel West Nile virus experiments on wild birds.” “Hundreds of wild birds have suffered and died in horrible ways in experiments that don’t even claim to seek to develop a vaccine or cure for West Nile virus in birds or humans,” says PETA Vice President Dr. Alka Chandna. “PETA is calling on CSU to pull the plug on these pointless and cruel experiments immediately.” But the Ebel Lab’s work isn’t scoped, necessarily, to find a vaccine or I

cure for West Nile virus, the school maintains. The lab has, however, produced dozens of research articles in the years since the animal collection began, in addition to providing data on the Culex mosquitoes that carry West Nile, and the aedes aegypti mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus. The lab makes their routine monitoring information of these mosquitoes and vector-borne diseases available through the City of Fort Collins website. Even if people disagree with the ethical concerns around trapping and killing birds, Hooker says the research is in line with state and federal guidelines. “Understanding these interactions will help provide important information about how to save human and animal lives from West Nile and other viruses, which have devastated many avian populations, including crows and raptors in Colorado, in years when the virus is spreading rapidly,” Hooker says. “This West Nile research was externally reviewed by the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and Colorado Parks and Wildlife agencies. CSU experts also review all research projects to ensure our practices meet or exceed the guidelines for animal care and use.” Despite the momentum PETA and critics of the research have gained due to the protest, the increased attention to the cause, and the stripping of Ebel’s permit this year, Hooker says research will continue. “This important research will continue uninterrupted with the state permit now issued under another name, and our understanding is that Prof. Ebel will be able to reapply for the permit next year,” Hooker says, noting that CPW will have final say over whether to approve Ebel’s permit, should he apply, next year. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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t’s been a little over a year since the City of Boulder and Boulder and San Miguel counties teamed up and filed a lawsuit against energy companies to fight climate change. Since then it seems like things may just be getting worse. For the first time in human history, the level of atmospheric carbon dioxide surpassed 415 parts per million over the weekend of May 11. Carbon emissions are once again on the rise, growing 2.7 percent in 2018 despite global commitments to curb them. The U.N. has given a decade or so to change course if we’re to avert climate catastrophe. Climate change is already affecting coastal communities, biodiversity and economies around the world. All the while, the climate case in Colorado makes its way slowly through the courts. The suit seeks damages, and in some sense, accountability, from Exxon Mobil and Suncor Industries, two of the largest carbon producers, both of which acknowledge their products contribute to climate change. Damages include paying for large expenses like flood and wildfire recovery efforts, but it also covers daily, weekly, seasonal and annual expenses a local government could incur due to climate change. According to the lawsuit, local governments have already spent tens of thousands of dollars studying the impacts of climate change, looking at everything from the economic impacts to adapting to extreme heat to changes to the water and forest systems. They expect to spend millions more based on projected precipitation levels, increased wildfire risk and rising average temperatures, all attributable to climate change. “It goes across every aspect of local government, whether it’s mosquito control, removing trees that the bark beetles have killed, being concerned about water supplies; truly basic government services are getting more expensive,” says David Bookbinder, an attorney with the libertarian think tank the Niskanen Center, which is representing the local governments along with EarthRights International and Denver attorney Kevin Hoonan. Bookbinder was in town in late BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Fighting for today

As the climate situation grows more dire, climate lawsuit expected back in court

By Angela K. Evans April, along with representatives from the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), to discuss the lawsuit and the growing body of scientific research, which they say back up the lawsuit’s claims. Currently, the common narrative about combating climate change revolves around how much individual countries are emitting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and creating policies and reduction goals in response. But that’s just one half of the equation according to Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, director of climate science with UCS and a leading climate attribution scientist, a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field which connects severe weather events and conditions directly to climate change. “Emissions reductions save you money, buy you more time for adaptation decisions,” Ekwurzel says. “But there’s a limit to what global emissions reductions get you. You have to adapt.” The damage of past greenhouse gas emissions is “already baked in” until at least 2030, she says, which makes the discussion not just about what could happen in the future, but I

what people are grappling with today. Adaptation is paying for air conditioning in schools and other government buildings as temperatures are historically higher during spring and fall. It’s repaving the roads with more heat-sensitive chemical binders as it gets hotter, a feat which could increase Boulder’s asphalt costs by 40 percent, Bookbinder says. It’s combating air quality as ground level ozone worsens, which has direct impacts on the economy, Ekwurzel says. As scientists are able to project increasing temperatures, along with emissions based on stated reduction goals, they can then predict how many more people are going to be exposed to greater ozone concentrations and then “we can siphon off those extra costs to the economy,” Ekwurzel says. Say heightened ozone levels cause a child to have an asthma attack. That generally means at least one of their parents won’t go to work, resulting in lost labor hours. Additionally, the attack may result in an emergency room visit, which has further ripples in the economy. “This type of information helps highlight the damages of today. Many MAY 16, 2019

times people talk about the future and fighting for the future,” Ekwurzel says. “I find that that is missing a lot of the point.” Ekwurzel’s work also changes the emissions narrative, shifting the responsibility from countries to specific industries, mainly carbon-producing entities. Her latest study reveals that approximately 43 percent of the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide since 1980 can be attributed to the top 90 carbon producers. “There’s an actor involved with making a product that’s harmful,” Ekwurzel says, admitting that the percentages from her latest work don’t necessarily equal responsibility. “That’s out of the realm of science. That’s in the realm of philosophy, courts and juries to think about what level of maybe extra responsibility might be in the mix.” Which is where lawsuits like Boulder and San Miguel counties’ comes into play. The lawsuit can be boiled down to a simple question, according to Bookbinder: “Who’s going to pay? Is it going to be the taxpayers? Or the guys who made huge amounts of money because they concealed their knowledge and when they admit what their products do say, ‘Now we’re going to make your problem worse,’” he says. “We’re not seeking to stop the production of any fossil fuels. There is no request for injunctive relief, no saying, ‘Don’t produce,’ no saying, ‘Reduce emissions,’” he continues. “Make as much as you want, sell as much as you want, but you’ve got to pay for the damage those products cause.” There’s little legal precedent for such a case, and similar cases are making their way through courts on both coasts, with appeals pending in New York and California. But Bookbinder says all of the current climate lawsuits will hopefully “start clarifying the landscape.” “It’s going to take some time,” he admits. “The wheels of justice grind very slowly.” The next hearing for the case in Colorado was scheduled for May 30, but has been be postponed. It was to be heard by Federal Judge Wiley Daniel, who passed away on Friday, May 10. I

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Front Range artist captures ‘The Colors of Ice’ at ice core facility in Lakewood

by Jenna Sampson

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irk Hobman wants to take a tree ring but going back much furpeople on a journey through ther, possibly millions of years. time, drilling down through Most ice cores that are drilled frigid layers of history, past around the world get shipped to the the era of the first Homo sapi- facility in Lakewood for processing, ens, to 200,000 years ago. That’s making the Front Range somewhat of where his work begins. a hub for climate research. Merging his backgrounds in ecolA tour of the facility is offered to ogy and photography, Hobman tells the public, with the main attraction stories of the natural world. His most being a massive freezer held at negative recent project, “The Color of Ice,” 32 degrees Fahrenheit in order to keep takes viewers into the frozen annals of the samples from melting and releasing DIRK HOBMAN ice cores, turning them into colorful masterpieces of paleoclimatology. The project hinged on his ability to sell the idea to the archive at the National Science Foundation Ice Core Facility in Lakewood. Hobman is one of just a handful of artists who have been granted access to the archive to capture images of the priceless specimens held there. The facility houses an incredible 19,000 meters — nearly 12 AN IMAGE TAKEN by Dirk miles — of ice core the ancient air trapped Hobman of an ice sample samples from within them. Geoffrey roughly 200,000 years old is the first in his series “The Greenland, Antarctica Hargreaves, curator of the Color of Ice,” which is now on and North America. collection for nearly 30 view at the National Science Foundation Ice Core Facility in “It’s like the coldyears, is cut out for the Lakewood. est place on the planjob as tour guide, walking et, and it’s right here,” leisurely into the freezer, says Hobman, smirkpast a cardboard cutout ing at the irony of of Mr. Freeze, through the pursuing such a project, all while aisles of the main archive. admitting to skiing only in the spring Outside the freezer is a rack of to avoid the unpleasant conditions of extreme weather gear, untouched by winter. Hargreaves and noticeably unoffered Ice cores are cylinders of ice 2-6 to those in the tour who are mostly inches wide and up to 2 miles long. dressed for school or work. Alas, the They are typically drilled out of gear is meant only for the researchers Arctic and Antarctic glaciers formed who handle the samples in the adjaover time as each year’s snowfall turns cent exam room, which is held at a into a layer of ice that then gets covrelatively balmy negative 11 degrees. ered and compressed by the next Hargreaves says researchers have year’s snowfall, on and on for millencaptured ice believed to be up to nia. The ice, therefore, contains a 800,000 years old, though the facility yearly graph of data, similar to that of holds samples only going back BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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400,000 years, which were taken from a site in Antarctica where the coldest temperature on Earth — negative 129 degrees — was recorded. Core samples must travel precariously from their home in a remote ice sheet, via a cargo carrier and tagalong refrigerator mechanic, to Colorado. Once at the facility, the cores are left untouched to stabilize in their new climate, then eventually unpacked and cut with a saw to specific dimensions before being shipped off to climate research labs around the world. In his presentation to the tour group, Hargreaves shows a graph comparing historic levels of carbon dioxide and temperature change from 400,000 years ago to the present. The image spikes dramatically at the end after fluctuating in an upward trend from the start, as the Earth has warmed and cooled, with the decades since 1950 beginning an ongoing ascension beyond any other past measurements. Hargreaves calls himself a science absolutist, but is happy to see artists like Hobman get creative with the ice. Hobman uses a macro lens to zoom in on the ice samples and show their crystalline structure and microscopic bubbles of ancient air. He ends his series, though, with an image of the dark rippling water of the Arctic Ocean, reminding viewers about the current reality of rapidly melting glaciers and thinning pack ice in the far North. After a stint in the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art at CSU Fort Collins, Hobman’s alma mater, “The Color of Ice” found its permanent home in the place where it all began: the ice core facility. “Pretty cool,” Hobman says, unable to resist the pun. MAY 16, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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own the tunnel of his headlamp light, Luke Nelson saw a frog. It sat in the middle of the trail, somewhere around 9,000 feet above sea level in the Italian Alps. He didn’t believe it. For the last few hours, outside the scope of his headlamp, in the corner of his eyes, he’d been catching glimpses of squids wrapping themselves around trees. Octopi were slithering between roots. Once, a moose appeared behind a rock. Italy definitely doesn’t have moose, let alone alpine sea creatures.

KIMBERLY STROM RUNS A STEEP RIDGELINE ABOVE SAASALMAGELL, SWITZERLAND. PHOTO: DAN PATITUCCI

already completed several 100-mile trail-running races (winning many), finishing the notoriously challenging “Nolan’s 14” (a 100-ish-mile traverse of 14 Colorado fourteeners), and also setting a speed record for linking all of Utah’s 13,000-foot peaks, all the while working as a physician’s assistant during the day and parenting three kids alongside his wife. “I wanted to keep exploring the impossible.” Scott Johnston, then, was the perfect coach. About a decade earlier, Johnston had started training Steve House, a

Legends in the fields

Steve House, Scott Johnston and Kilian Jornet’s new endurance training book changes the game

By Emma Murray But Nelson, a seasoned ultra-running athlete now living in Idaho, wasn’t necessarily surprised. He was deep into a 219-mile race called the Tor des Geants — an iconic network of trails that leads runners up and over 25 mountain passes (89,000 feet of elevation gain total, or the equivalent of climbing Mt. Everest three times). Elite racers typically finish it between 70 and 80 hours. At a certain point, hallucinations are part of the ultra-endurance racing job. The frog, though, sitting in Nelson’s headlamp spotlight — that seemed eerily real. Nelson paused long enough to take out his phone and snap a picture. He squinted, holding the screen up close to his eyes. The frog was there alright, real in the flesh. He stepped over it and continued onwards, pushing ahead on the midnight trails, outside his element just as much as the frog seemed to be in this high-altitude, low-temperature, mountainous setting. But that’s exactly the point for Nelson — getting outside his comfort zone. Less than a year earlier, he’d approached his running coach, Scott Johnston, with a desire to expand his athletic repertoire. “I wanted to start exploring objectives bigger than what I know I already can do,” Nelson says, having BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

mountain athlete the legendary Reinhold Messner once called “the best high-altitude climber in the world.” Johnston has spent his whole life developing a keen, in-depth understanding of training and exercise science, first as a Boulder teenager learning to climb, then as a competitive collegiate swimmer, and eventually as a world-class crosscountry ski competitor and coach. Under his watchful eye, House’s climbing career bloomed. When House published his first book, Beyond the Mountain, a collection of climbing stories that reflect the trials and tribulations of being a world-class alpinist, he embarked on a nationwide tour and everyone wanted to know the how underlying his athletic accomplishments. “People wanted to hear a simple answer: I ran, hiked uphill, etcetera,” House recalls. “But, you know, there’s a lot of things involved. My answer had become: ‘Well I’d tell you, but I’d have to write another book.’” So, that’s exactly what House and Johnston did. They teamed up to coauthor Training for the New Alpinism: A Manual for the Climber as Athlete (March 2014) and together the duo transformed the entire mountainendurance community. “The culture of training for I

climbing or mountaineering didn’t really exist before we wrote this,” Johnston says. Until Training for the New Alpinism hit bookshelves, there was no central training resource for alpinists working towards big mountain objectives. You simply got better at being an alpinist (that is, climbing in environments too harsh or too high in altitude for trees to grow) by doing a lot of it. Nothing was very efficient or necessarily reliable. What they thought might sell a few thousand copies snowballed into tens of thousands of copies. Training for the New Alpinism details the how and why behind training methods primed for athletes spending long, intensive days in the mountains. It quietly became a staple on mountaineering shelves, the bible of serious alpinists. Before long, though, it was clear alpinists weren’t the only ones interested in the science and wisdom embedded within its relatMAY 16, 2019

able, easily understood pages. Other “uphill athletes” like skimountaineers, skimo racers and mountain runners were trying to adapt the book to meet their needs, too — as it was the closest thing the endurance community had ever seen to a canon acknowledging their needs. Kilian Jornet, arguably the most accomplished and well-rounded uphill athlete of current times, read Training for the New Alpinism and posted on social media shortly after. He lauded praise, but yearned for more: a book geared specifically toward fast uphill movement, not just for slower-moving alpinism (where one often carries a much heavier pack and navigates more technical terrain). So, Jornet, House and Johnston got to talking. Jornet has a strong background in physiology, as he studied it in college, see LEGENDS Page 18

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KÍLIAN JORNET RUNS DOWN THE TÄSCHHORN, SWITZERLAND. PHOTO: STEVE HOUSE

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MAY 9, 2019

and has been training since his youth in Spain. His list of athletic accolades would run off this page, but includes summiting Everest twice in one week and setting speed records on worldwide iconic peaks. As a self-coached athlete prioritizing his mind-body connection, Jornet was able to offer Johnston and House valuable uphill training insight that meshed perfectly with the ethos that guides Training for the New Alpinism: “If you understand everything [about your body] well and remain objective, you could possibility become the most precise coach for yourself,” as Johnston describes it. Their goal has always been to empower athletes with their own knowledge and motivation. The need for another training book had only grown clearer with time, House says. “People kept emailing us the same questions,” asking about adaptations for different skiing and running objectives. Not long after, House, Johnston and Jornet began collaborating on a new book, Training for the Uphill Athlete: A Manual for Mountain Runners and Ski Mountaineers (March 2019), which spends 368 pages integrating Jornet’s expertise, House’s experiences and Johnston’s intellect into one cohesive guide. Like House and Johnston’s first book, it’s an interdisciplinary approach to success in a nontraditional sport. “We didn’t invent anything new here. All we did was apply conventional sports training methodologies to this unusual activity,” Johnston says. “This is our attempt to bring the conversation back to reality, to say: ‘[We] want to make this accessible to any interested amateur who wants to know what professional athletes do for training, and how and why it I

ON THE BILL:

Training for the works,’” Johnston Uphill Athlete says. Book Tour. As with 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May Training for the 22, Patagonia New Alpinism, Boulder. 1212 Training for the Pearl St. uphillathlete.com Uphill Athlete doesn’t provide any singular, one-size-fits-all training plan. The authors intend for readers to absorb the science and use it to build their own plans. “Training has to be individualized to the athlete,” Johnston says. The books are “what we wish we’d had when we were young and starting out.” Equipping today’s athletes with expert training advice will set the stage for new athletic achievements. “It’s happened in every other sport, like swimming, climbing,” Johnston says. “I don’t see why not in this sport. We’re very likely to see better performance [in the mountains].” If anything, Luke Nelson’s experience (plus that of National Geographic photographer Cory Richards and climber Anna Pfaff, among many more world-class athletes) makes a strong case using the trio’s methods. “The secret sauce is all there. And the secret is that there’s no secret. It’s hard work and it’s all these very sound, proven training techniques, but laid out in a way that you can understand them and then apply it to your own training,” Nelson says. Nelson placed eighth in the Tor des Geants, finishing in over 85 hours. He says House and Johnston “are absolute legends within their fields. That the larger community gets to now tap into who they are and this resource is just going to change the sport.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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A

fter a failed attempt, or three, we finally caught up to Lao Tizer on a Friday afternoon after he had wrapped up a band rehearsal session in Los Angeles. Tizer is a cat constantly in motion; writing, playing, managing his band and schedules, chasing gigs... so our chat wasn’t exactly chill time for the keyboardist/bandleader. Calling us from his car on one of those SoCal freeways, we felt a little weird about chatting him up while he was navigating LA traffic. Is that really such a great idea? Tizer laughs. “Well, it’s rush hour, and during rush hour it’s always bumper-tobumper, so it’s a little hard to get into too much trouble,” he says. “But hey… Denver’s no cakewalk for traffic either.” Fair enough. Tizer plays at Dazzle next Friday, May 24, for a return engagement with his quartet after having played there last summer.

COURTESY OF LAO TIZER

Beyond the swinghouse

Boulder-bred Lao Tizer shares some thoughts on jazz radio, adding a vocalist and surviving a big project by Dave Kirby

It’s a kind of homecoming for the artist; raised in Boulder, Tizer played his first gigs as a high school kid on the Pearl Street Mall for loose change and moved to LA pretty much right after graduating from Boulder High. His band’s latest project, Songs from the Swinghouse, came out last year. The ninth release for Tizer, the album is a full-bore, multimedia project (album and DVD), with as many as 15 players and a professional eight-camera video crew (directed by Andy LaViolette) capturing the tracks in real time at Conway Studios in Hollywood. On paper that may sound a bit dry, but the results are fairly astonishing — Tizer’s deep and mature arrangements, combining guitars, a variety of keys, strings and a four-piece brass section, highlight his deft compositional discipline and the band’s innate connection to the material. Ranging from the Latin-garnished “16th Heaven,” the lithe and melodic “A Prayer for Unity,” and the hard swing of “The Source,” Tizer summons the full package from funk and bop to nuance and introspection. This was one of those watershed, everything-else-led-to-this moments. A year later, with a couple of videos still to be released online, the glow of exhausted satisfaction hasn’t yet dissolved. “I’ve never worked harder on anything in my life,” Tizer says. “I ate, drank and slept it, and everybody in the band and all the additional musicians really just brought their 100 percent A-game. The whole thing was such a family vibe and a lot of joy when we finally got to the sessions... but the leading up to that, man, especially six months before, three months before, it was working every night until three or four in the morning, sleeping a few hours, hardly eating. You’re really in it.

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PAUL JANNUZZI

ON THE BILL:

The Lao Tizer Quartet featuring Eric Marienthal. 6:30-10:15 p.m. Friday, May 24, Dazzle @ Baur’s 1512 Curtis St., Denver. Tickets range from$15 to $30.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


“Super gratifying to pull it off, and of course, some of the best musicians anywhere. I’m lucky to keep such amazing company.” We wonder if the cameras — panning across the studio, drawing in tight for close-ups — were a distraction. “Y’know, they actually weren’t,” Tizer says. “At first you thought it might be, but you know what? Everybody in the band are such pros with so much experience, they’ve all done TV, a lot of them have been on the late night shows. And I of course was band leading, wrote the tunes, did most of the horn and string arrangements, trying to stay focused on playing well, and was liaising with the director who was always right next to me with a boom. So, yeah, it was everything.” The project also marked another first for Tizer, the addition of a vocalist on three cover tunes, including a zesty and utterly unpretentious read of “Ramble On,” with vocalist Tita Hutchison teasing the lyrics for every gram of whimsy and rage the original served up. Alternately bluesy and buoyant, hypnotic and fierce, the addition of a genre-defiant cover like this only serves to underscore Tizer’s confidence in his band and arranging skills. No, a Led Zeppelin cover shouldn’t work on a jazz record. Yes, it soars beautifully here. “[Tita] and I have have co-written a whole bunch of cool original vocal stuff since then, and two of them have been in the live show for over a year, and we have two or three more that we’re almost done arranging for the band. So the next project will probably have original vocal stuff — I don’t know that we’ll do any more cover stuff; I mean, it’s just never really been in my DNA — and the rest will be instrumental.” There used to be a time when a solid cover was a play for some radio time, but radio airplay is a diminishing target for a commercial jazz band these days. We chatted a bit back in 2007 about the slow atrophy of so-called “smooth jazz” radio, and things haven’t gotten much better. Any better, for that matter. “Well, I was never really a ‘smooth jazz’ artist,” Tizer says. “My music has sensibilities and appeals to that audience, but we also appeal to a lot of other audiences as well. So I never really fit into that box. “In 2009, over the course of six to nine months, the bottom just kind of fell out, the format lost 15 of the major market stations. All the key markets: Chicago, New York, San Diego, Miami. These days, there just isn’t much radio to speak of. Songs from the Swinghouse is actually a pretty eclectic record to begin with, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

and we did have a single that we went to radio with, and we did have another campaign to straight-ahead radio, college and jamband, and that’s actually where we had more success. “But the one big reason we did all the video ... was social media. Did you know, there’s 20,000 new tracks added to Spotify every day? Every day. The logjam of content out there can be really daunting.” Tizer says he always welcomes the chance to come back to Colorado — he played with longtime Denver sax icon

Nelson Rangell last summer, and they’ve remained in touch — but raises a question that’s been dancing around the music community here for years. “How does Denver/Boulder not have a jazz festival? How can we not have an annual jazz festival at Red Rocks? The Playboy Jazz Festival (which is still a thing, kids) should be at Red Rocks. The Denver area has a great music scene, including some really great jazz musicians.” Maybe Tizer, who’s been planted in

Second chance to win a trip to

the palm-lined pastures of SoCal for more than two decades now, should consider a move back? Leavin’ LA... isn’t that a song? He laughs. “It took a long time to get tied in, a network, friends that’re your people. But now ... I really have a great situation and a great network of people. Part of me would love to move back to Colorado. My girlfriend is a Pasadena native and loves Colorado... but she’s afraid of winter.”

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the sound of roManticisM May 23, 2019 at 7:30PM 345 Mapleton Avenue Festival Orchestra, period instruments Mina Gajić, Érard grand piano, 1845 Haydn Symphony “La Passione,” Chopin Concerto #2 in F Minor, Brahms Motet Op. 29 No. 1

Tickets: BoulderBachFestival.org

announcinG our 2019-2020 season VanishinG Point

PhilosoPher’s stone October 9 at eTown Hall - Boulder Distinct, poetic, and rarely-heard works by Buxtehude, Piani, Pandolfi, Stradella, Couperin, and J.S. Bach. Ian Watson, harpsichord | Guy Fishman, cello | Zachary Carrettín, violin

secret Garden Thursday, November 14 at eTown Hall

J.s. Bach’s GoldBerG Variations

Angela Hewitt Tuesday, March 3 at eTown Hall Of all the piano soloists in the history of the instrument, one has garnered the undisputed reputation for her mastery of J.S. Bach’s oeuvre: Ms. Hewitt performs in Boulder for the first time, on a Fazioli concert grand piano.

COmpass Resonance Ensemble, our CoRE of resident musical artists performs works of extreme beauty composed by Schmelzer, Rosenmüller, Marini, Salomone Rossi, Francesca Caccini, and J.S. Bach.

art of duo Thursday, February 6 at eTown Hall Works by Saint-Saens, Liszt, Franck, and J.S. Bach. Top Prize winners of Boulder International Chamber Music Competition 2018 travel from Warsaw to Boulder for this splendid program featuring accordionist Iwo Jedynecki and pianist Aleksander Krzyżanowski. COmpass Resonance Ensemble—CoRE joins the duo for a double concerto by J.S. Bach in a special transcription for this event.

Photo credit: K Saunders

“I know of no musician whose Bach playing on any instrument is of greater subtlety, beauty of tone, persuasiveness of judgment or instrumental command than Hewitt’s is here.”

Thursday, May 21 at eTown Hall COmpass Resonance Ensemble returns in a performance that begins with the Colorado premiere of a minuet by Giuseppe Antonio Capuzzi (1755-1818), then, Mina Gajić performs Mozart’s brilliant, charming, and poignant Piano Concerto in A Major K.414. The Festival Chorus performs the finale of our 39th season, with the deeply profound and ecstatic motet, Jesu meine freude, by Johann Sebastian Bach. Additionally, for subscribers only, we present an intimate concert in April, featuring virtuoso 10-string guitarist Nicolò Spera performing the Bach Chaconne, extraordinary mezzo-soprano Abigail Nims singing Erbarme dich from the St. Matthew Passion, and CoRE performing Zachary Carrettín’s Caprice, original music commissioned by Project Bandaloop and Bachiana Chamber Orchestra. Other musical surprises as well—and FREE raffle tickets with fun gifts for you!

—BBC Music Magazine

We expect the entire season to sell out soon as 25% of the seats were sold on the first day we announced the season, May 1. If you wish to participate in the experience of this programming and these artists—don’t hesitate—order today! BoulderBachFestival.org/2019-20-subscriptions/

coMPass resonance enseMBle


S

ome of the greatest pop music to emerge from the Western World has been a result of great friendships: Lennon and McCartney, Richards and Jagger, Elton John and Bernie Taupin. Great friendships give us wings, they make us feel confident and loved — they can even save us from ourselves (see: John and Taupin). Cris Williamson, Teresa Trull and Barbara Higbie have been making music together in some capacity for 40 years. Each a multi-talented artist in her own right, together they create something beyond beguiling. With powerful voices and endless charm, they effortlessly blend their love for gospel, folk, country, rock and even New Age sounds at “reunion” tours that bring these longtime friends together every couple of years. “It’s an amazing chemistry, definitely something bigger than the three of us,” Higbie — a violinist, pianist, mandolinist, drummer and singer — explains. “For some reason, the sound of our three voices singing together makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up — every single time... and I’m not the only one. There is a resonance among our three voices that is simply a gift. The fact that Cris and Teresa are two of the best singers on the planet is a big part of that. But still, it is greater than the sum of the parts and is something we all feel. Years of close friendship, creating, performing and backing each other up through thick and thin certainly help, too. Then there’s the wonderful fact that at this point we’ve all forgotten about ego or careerism and just want to serve the music and the community.” It’s hard to imagine these three ever battled with overactive egos. They met in the mid-’70s soon after Williamson cofounded Olivia Records, a women-run label focused on developing women musicians. But Olivia was even more radical than that: The seven women who founded the label were lesbian feminists, and they were determined to create a space in the world for their voices. “I cannot abide competition in art,” Williamson says. “Oh no, you’ve got to let go of one or the other, and for me, I hold the hand of art, right to the heart. I don’t compete with it. I never have had to, you

JILL CRUSE

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DUELING PIANOS “Arena Rock” Friday & Saturday May 17/18

THAT EIGHTIES BAND

No competition in art

Cris Williamson, Barbara Higbie and Teresa Trull bring decades of friendship and music to the Dairy

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

A gathering place for... live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks

by Caitlin Rockett

“80s”

ON THE BILL: Cris Williamson, Barbara Higbie and Teresa Trull. 7:30 p.m. Saturday May 31, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Tickets are $40/$55 VIP (includes meet-and-greet at 6:30pm), thedairy.org

Sunday May 19

DAKOTA BLONDE “Americana – Folk”

Wednesday May 22

NELSON RANGELL

just step up to it, you know? And [Higbie and Trull are] that way too.” Williamson was born in North Dakota and raised between Colorado and Wyoming as her father moved between assignments as a forest ranger. The fourperson family lived mostly without electricity, but not without culture. “We lived way out in eastern Colorado, out in a place called Briggsdale, a town of a hundred people,” Williamson says. “I was 5 or 6 when I took my first piano lesson, and my mom would drive me once a week out to Ms. West’s ranch for an hour after school because she had a piano in her house and that was a big expense. As my father said: We were poor but poverty stricken. We had no money for [piano lessons], but Mother said, ‘Oh no, no matter how far out in the mountains or the wilderness we are, my kids are going to have culture.’” Trull likewise grew up financially poor but culturally rich in eastern North Carolina, where she was steeped in the sounds of blues, gospel and rhythm and blues from an early age. She left home at 16 after her mother died, and cut her teeth playing guitar and singing in rock bands before being accepted to Duke University on a full scholarship to study chemistry. Dismayed by what she saw as unethical I

practices in the labs, she left Duke after about a month to tour with Ed’s Bush Band. Today, Trull lives in New Zealand where she trains horses. “She’s a survivor, never about money,” Williamson says of Trull. “It’s not why she’s on this earth. She’s here to help us all move forward of our own volition. You know, she was my producer on a couple of albums when I needed exactly a horse trainer. She says the job of the horse trainer is to get the horse to move forward of its own volition.” Higbie’s life was a bit different. The child of two Peace Corps members, Higbie and her family moved to Ghana, West Africa when she was 13. She studied drumming with ethnomusicologist Mustapha Tetty Addy while there, and later studied music at Mills College and the Sorbonne. Raised in different ways in different circumstances, these three women are bound by their devotion to peace, love and equality, just as they have been for the past 40 years. “Each of us, Barb and Teresa and I, are all teachers in that way,” Williamson says. “We stay put and we do our very best to talk about the things that matter in the world so that when you leave, you’re fuller than when you came in.” MAY 16, 2019

“Contemporary Jazz” Thursday May 23

TERESA STORCH “Americana”

FREE ADMISSION Friday May 24

HAZEL MILLER “R&B / Dance” Saturday May 25 BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

SONS OF GENESIS “The Genesis Tribute”

& PARADISE THEATER “The Styx Tribute”

Sunday May 26

YOUTUBE SENSATION MIKE MASSE “Classic Acoustic Rock”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 I

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Colorado Shakespeare Festival JUNE 7 – AUGUST 11

Twelfth Night As You Like It Romeo and Juliet King Charles III

by Mike Bartlett

King John 303-492-8008 • coloradoshakes.org

Nick Forster’s

@ Boulder Theater

Sunday, May 19 • 10am - 12pm

Peace • Love • Joy Join us for a morning full of good community vibes, live music, and poetry. Sing along to Nick Forster’s “Guilt Free Gospel” service. All welcome! Tickets $10 at www.BoulderTheater.com

For More Information Visit www.HippyBluegrassChurch.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


MahlerFest XXXII offers two orchestral concerts in expanded schedule Arrangements, by Mahler and of Mahler, are part of the program

by Peter Alexander

C

ZOË BEYERS – CONCERTMASTER, COURTESY OF MAHLERFEST

olorado MahlerFest is growing. This year, the 32nd edition of the festival will feature more repertoire than ever, including two separate orchestra programs in Macky Auditorium on Saturday and Sunday of the festival weekend (May 18–19), and a chamber music concert Friday evening (May 17). The Festival started in Boulder in 1988 as an opportunity to hear Mahler’s ON THE BILL: much that one can do around MAHLERFEST XXXII. symphonies, which were then every Mahler symphony that havMay 15-19, venues not often performed. For ing a different program on around Boulder. many years the orchestra pro- Tickets and full schedule: Saturday night gives us a chance mahlerfest.org gram, featuring one of the to create more context around symphonies, was performed the big work on the orchestral Saturday and Sunday. That program.” has now changed, with a As part of that broader conchamber orchestra concert on Saturday and text, the programming for MahlerFest XXXII the large orchestra concert, this year featuring reflects some specific themes. One is perforSymphony No. 1, on Sunday. mances of arrangements, particularly on the MahlerFest has gone through nearly chamber orchestra concert on Saturday. the entire symphonic cycle three times. The “The first half is two Schoenberg arrangefourth cycle that starts this year will be the ments for the forces that he used (for confirst full cycle under conductor Kenneth certs in Vienna around 1920) — solo strings Woods, who succeeded festival founder and solo winds, piano and sometimes harmoRobert Olsen as director in 2016. nium,” Woods explains. “The second half of In Woods’ vision of the festival, Mahler’s the concert is string-quartet arrangements, symphonies remain the central focus of a [including] Mahler’s string orchestra version of larger event. “The festival needs to grow and Beethoven’s ‘Serioso’ Quartet (op. 95).” re-invent itself for the future,” Woods says. One of the Schoenberg arrangements He aims “to create a sense that every is Mahler’s “Songs of a Wayfarer,” a work event is a special occasion. There is so

that preceded the Symphony No. 1 and provided many of the musical ideas for it. Having that work sharing the festival with the First Symphony provides context for both pieces. Schoenberg’s arrangement does not reflect the challenging style of his own works but is “very reverent,” Woods says. And it carries a benefit: “It is ultimately more natural for the singer to sing through a small group of solo instruments than a huge string section.” The Sunday concert for the full Festival Orchestra opens with another arrangement, Mahler’s version of Beethoven’s Leonore Overture No. 3. Here, Mahler’s arranging affects mostly the instrumentation, such as adding extra winds to compensate for the much larger string sections than were normal in Beethoven’s time. Sunday’s major work, Mahler’s Symphony No. 1, will be heard in a new version, derived from a brand new edition that has aroused controversy among some scholars. The details may be arcane, but one aspect of the edition is important to Woods: “The care taken to look at the [string] bowings that Mahler used in his performances. “Some of them are very eccentric, but they’re always there for a reason. Hopefully they bring out some interesting characters and moods and nuances that you wouldn’t otherwise hear.” In addition to the symphony, the concert

includes the short movement known as “Blumine” (Bouquet) that was originally part of the symphony, then removed by the composer. “Mahler could, when he wanted to, be a minimalist,” Woods says. “This is a wonderful, concise, understated work. It’s very direct, it’s very touching and moving, full of color and moods.” The other work on Sunday’s program, Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Violin Concerto, represents another major theme of the festival: music by composers influenced by Mahler. Korngold was part of a generation of Jewish composers who were inspired by Mahler’s international success. Many of those composers died in the Holocaust, including Hans Krása, whose music will be played at the Friday chamber music concert, and Viktor Ullman, whose String Quartet No. 3 will be played in Woods’ arrangement on Saturday. Korngold escaped their fate by coming to the United States, where he was one of the first great film composers in Hollywood. Korngold took his film composing seriously, and later included themes from some of his films in the Violin Concerto. “Korngold was an astonishingly gifted composer,” Woods says, “He only agreed to work in Hollywood on the proviso that he could write his music without compromise.” Looking to the future, Woods says his aim for MahlerFest is “a progressive journey of not just doing each piece, but developing our approach to Mahler’s music over the next [symphonic cycle of] 11 years. “I’m really keen that we signal loud and clear that MahlerFest is not just for hardcore Mahler fanatics, but should be something that anyone can come and enjoy.”

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MAY 16, 2019

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EDDIE CLARK MEDIA

Leftapalooza — Mile High Tribute Band Battle. Noon. Saturday, May 18, Roosevelt Park, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont.

The Left Hand Brewing Foundation presents its ninth Leftapalooza and the Mile High Tribute Band Competition on Saturday, May 18 at Roosevelt Park in Longmont. This homegrown music and local craft beer festival showcases some of Colorado’s best tribute bands battling for top honors while raising funds for nonprofits Love Hope Strength (LHS) and the Left Hand Brewing Foundation. This year will also feature the Longmont Artisan Market for the first time, featuring more than 25 local artists. Music kicks off at noon.

see EVENTS Page 28

events WINE, CHEESE & CHOCOLATE TASTING.

5 p.m. Saturday, May 18, Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-587-6951.

BOULDER COUNTY AIDS PROJECT ANNUAL CANDLELIGHT VIGIL.

6:45 p.m. Sunday, May 19, BCAP House, 2118 14th St., Boulder.

A hallmark spring event in Longmont, the The Rotary Club of Niwot’s Wine, Cheese & Chocolate Tasting event has raised nearly $70,000 over nine years — all of which has been donated to local, state and international charities. 2019’s charities include Colorado Friendship, which delivers food and clothing to low-income and poverty-stricken families and the homeless; and Pearl, which provides single-parent families with skills necessary to building a stable home environment. Tickets are $40-$50, bit.ly/30isOs3

Each year on the third Sunday in May, the Boulder County AIDS Project and the Interfaith AIDS Coalition of Boulder co-host a local commemoration for the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial. This annual event of remembrance is an opportunity for activists, family members and community supporters to gather to honor those lost, and to raise consciousness about the continuing challenges faced by those living with or impacted by HIV. The Candlelight Memorial program includes a reception at BCAP, followed by a silent walk through downtown Boulder and the reading of names of individuals lost to AIDS-related illnesses.

CONGERDESIGN VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

NICK FORSTER’S HIPPY BLUEGRASS CHURCH.

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MAY 16, 2019

10 a.m. Sunday, May 19, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Nick Forster, host of eTown and bass player/singer for the award-winning bluegrass band Hot Rize, is sharing his brand of “guilt-free gospel” through the Hippy Bluegrass Church on Sunday, May 19 at Boulder Theater. The monthly event is a community sing-along with a live bluegrass band featuring local luminaries, paired with poetry readings, storytelling and good vibes, all led by one of the most congenial hosts around. Lyrics are projected so there’s no need to fret if you don’t know the words — just show up and sing along. Your soul will thank you. I

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words THURSDAY, MAY 16

LAUREN SANDERSON is the author of ‘Some of the Children Were Listening,’ a debut collection of poems that move easily between the personal and the universal. Born in Oakville and raised in London, Ontario, she’s currently based in Chicago. Her work has appeared in ‘The Adroit Journal,’ ‘Beecher’s Magazine,’ ‘Storm Cellar,’ ‘Point of Contact,’ and elsewhere. Sanderson will speak about her book at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 21 at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore.

Open Improv: Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. Peter Hessler — The Buried. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, MAY 17 Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SATURDAY, MAY 18 Minor Disturbance Weekly Workshop + Open Mic. 1 p.m. Prodigy Coffeehouse, 3801 E. 40th Ave., Denver. Jeffrey B. Miller — WWI Crusaders. 7 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot.

SUNDAY, MAY 19 Laura Resau and Melanie Crowder in Conversation. 2 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, MAY 21 Lauren Sanderson. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Dr. Joseph Parent — A Walk in the Wood. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

MONDAY, MAY 20

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

Mesa de Português. 4 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Marc & Julie Bennett — Living the RV Life. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Road to Sonic Bloom featuring Of The Trees. 8:30 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

David Phipps of STS9. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

Sal & Swing Shift Band. 5:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Erik Boa Duo. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

EVENTS from Page 27

THURSDAY, MAY 16 Music ‘Bella Gaia’/’Beautiful Earth.’ 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Carol Pacey & the Honey Shakers, Izzy Heltai, Matt Cox. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Dueling Pianos. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Elle King: Shake The Spirit Tour. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Exploring Billy Budd: Ethics, Morality And Social Justice Panel. 4 p.m. JCC Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S Dahlia St., Denver, 303-331-7027. Jenny Lewis. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Laurie and Lorrie Duo. 6 p.m. Boulder Country Club, 7350 Clubhouse Road, Boulder, 303-530-4600. Liquid Sky Journey. 9 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Magnolia North featuring Steve Foltz of Trout Steak Revival — with Liver Down The River (Late Set), Thunder and Rain. 7:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Max Mackey Band. 7 p.m. Wibby Brewing, 209 Emery St., Longmont, 303-776-4594. Metrik + Rene LaVice. 8:30 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. The Radio Latina Music Awards. 6 p.m. Aztlan Theatre, 976 Santa Fe Drive, Denver.

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Events Adultology: Cooking with Spring Vegetables. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Comedians’ Power Hour. 8 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 970-445-7480. Corinne Fisher & Krystyna Hutchinson. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. More show times through May 18, comedyworks.com. Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452. Old School Film School New School Film School. 9 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; 9 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Third Thursday Improv Show. 7:30 p.m. Wesley Foundation at CU Boulder, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, MAY 17 Music The Beeves (Album Release). 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Danny Elfman Violin Concerto featuring Sandy Cameron. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Through May 19.

I

The Flatirons Guitar Trio: Guitar Conversations. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Mennonite Church, 3910 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-886-9887. Laser Beastie Boys. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Lionel Young Duo. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Little Twist. 6 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 720-266-8300. MahlerFest Chamber Music Concert. 2 p.m. The Academy, 970 Aurora Ave., Boulder, 720-310-8946. Nice Work Jazz Combo. 5:30 p.m. Hotel Boulderado, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-442-4344. Paul Taylor, Michael Lington, Vincent Ingala. 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303830-9214. R&R Acoustic. 7 p.m. Por Wine House, 836 1/2 Main St., Louisville, 720-666-1386. Rebecca Folsom Presents: Vocal Freedom Singer-Songwriter Showcase. 6 p.m. East Simpson Coffee, 414 E. Simpson St., Lafayette, 720-502-7010. Rogue 2. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Slothrust. 8 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Spread The Word Music Festival 2019. 6 p.m. 4600 Humboldt St., Denver. Through May 20.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Spring Music Series. 7 p.m. Georgia Boys BBQ, 250 Collyer St., Longmont, 720-999-4099.

FILMS

Sylar. 6 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Tech N9ne. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. That Eighties Band. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Trish Applegate-Loetz — with the Phast & Wreckless and Special Guests. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. The Wildlings. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Wookiefoot and Mike Love — with Yak Attack, Analog Son, A-Mac & The Height and Special Guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ and The Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Xerephine. 7 p.m. VisionQuest Brewery, 2510 47th St., Suite A2, Boulder.

LIVE MUSIC!

All films showing at the Dairy Arts Center’s Bodecker Theater at 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Thursday, May 16 ‘Ask Dr. Ruth.’ 2 and 7 p.m. ‘Transit.’ 4:40 p.m. Friday, May 17 ‘Ask Dr. Ruth.’ 1:30 and 6 p.m. ‘Transit.’ 4 p.m. FN Weird: ‘Relaxer.’ 8:45 p.m. Saturday, May 18

‘Ask Dr. Ruth.’ 3:30 p.m. ‘Transit.’ 1 and 6 p.m.

‘MEETING GORBACHEV’

Sunday, May 19 ‘Klimt and Schiele: Eros and Psyche.’ 1 p.m.

Mike Chiasson The Tune Up at Full Cycle

Wednesday, May 22 ‘Klimt and Schiele: Eros and Psyche.’ 1 p.m. ‘The Heiress.’ 2 and 4:30 p.m. ‘Meeting Gorbachev.‘ 7 p.m.

Friday, May 17 7:30-10 PM

1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

Events Boulder Ballet Presents ‘Cinderella.’ 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-443-0027. Through May 19. Comedian Gabriel Rutledge. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver, 303-307-1777. Through May 19. Free Spirit Nia Jam Dance Party. 6 p.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. The Little Mermaid — Dance Theater Production. 6 p.m. Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-229-1127. Through May 19. Pancho Barraza. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

SATURDAY, MAY 18 Music Beethoven and Mahler with the MahlerFest Chamber Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423. Cottonwood Band, Dahlby & Nadine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Dan Harris. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Defunkt Railroad. 10 p.m. Dark Horse Bar and Grill, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder. Founder Fights 4. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Jack Cloonan Band. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Janestown. 8 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown, 303-442-5847. Kevin Morby — with Sam Cohen. 9 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Kirin J Callinan. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Kurt Allen Band. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Lionel Young Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. May Playin. 1 p.m. George Reynolds Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Music for Piano and Strings. 5 p.m. UCC Longmont, 1500 Ninth Ave., Longmont, 303-776-4940.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Neetesh Jung Kunwar & Bartika Eam Rai — with Jaanvi Gurung. 8 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303297-1772. Old’s Cool Rock. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Peak2Peak. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Porter Neville Quartet featuring George Porter Jr (The Meters), Ivan Neville (Dumpstaphunk), Ian Neville. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Ravin’Wolf Acoustic Mountain Sagebrush Blues Duo. 8 p.m. The POR Wine House, 836 Main St., Louisville, 720-606-1734. Simone Dinnerstein, piano. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-388-9839. Spread the Word Music Festival. 12:30 p.m. Denver Coliseum, 4600 Humboldt St., Denver. Steve Manshel. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720-600-4875. Tango Portraits of Love. 6:30 p.m. Colorado Ballet Black Box Theater, 1075 Santa Fe Drive, Denver.

Tantra Speed Date: Where Playful Meets Mindful. 6 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-449-4410. Tech N9ne. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. U.S. Air Guitar 2019 Championships. 8 p.m. 3 Kings Tavern, 60 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-7352. Wallows. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Wink Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. World Whisky Day Celebration. 11 a.m. Spirit Hound Distillers, 4196 Ute Hwy, Lyons, 303-823-5696. Events Accessing Digital Library Books, Movies and Magazines. 1 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Dairy Comedy in the Boe, Featuring Zoe Rogers. 8:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. see EVENTS Page 30

BELLA GAIA - BEAUTIFUL EARTH 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY JOURNEY FRIDAY MAY 17 9:00 PM

LASER FLOYD: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON 10:30 PM

LIQUID SKY DAVID BOWIE 11:59 PM

SATURDAY MAY 18 NINO BARBIERI VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

9:30 a.m. Saturday, May 18, Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Through May 19.

9:00 PM

BLACK HOLES: THE OTHER SIDE OF INFINITY 10:30 PM

Find your next treasure at this long-standing community event. The Strawberry Festival Vintage and Antique Market features many dealers in vintage and antique items including: furniture, fine jewelry, costume jewelry, clothing, accessories, toys, collectibles, primitives, decor, glass, art and more. After a morning or afternoon of shopping, stop by the café to grab a bite to eat — including a slice of strawberry shortcake. Admissions and café sales supports The St. Vrain Historical Society’s mission of historic preservation and education in the community. Tickets are $5, children under 12 enter for free, visitlongmont.org.

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7:00 PM

LASER BEASTIE BOYS

staff PICK STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL VINTAGE AND ANTIQUE MARKET.

THURSDAY MAY 16

MAY 16, 2019

LIQUID SKY THE WALL 11:59 PM

LASER QUEEN Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 I

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theater

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY MAY 16

IZZY HELTAI 8PM MATT COX 9PM CAROL PACEY & THE HONEY SHAKERS 10PM FRIDAY MAY 17

THE WILDLINGS 8PM SATURDAY MAY 18

COTTONWOOD BAND 8PM DAHLBY & NADINE 9:30PM

Beauty and the Beast. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Sept. 21.

The Memory of Water. Theater Company of Lafayette, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. Through May 18.

Between Us. Denver Center for Performing Arts Off Center, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through May 26.

The Moors. Arvada Center, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 18.

The Boys in the Band. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through May 26.

Oliver. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through May 26.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theater Company. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through May 19.

Outside Mullingar — presented by Coal Creek Theater of Louisville. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville. Through May 18.

Hay Fever — presented by Germinal Stage. John Hand Theater, 7653 East First Place, Denver. Through June 8. The Language Archive. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through June 16. Magnets on the Fridge. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Shows the first Wednesday of the month from February-June. The Marvelous Method: An Improvised Tribute to Stan Lee. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. Thursday evenings through May 23.

Queen of Conspiracy. Miners Alley, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Opens May 17. Through June 23. Sanctions. Curious Theater Company, 1018 Acoma St., Denver. Through June 15.

MINERS ALLEY PLAYHOUSE commissioned awardwinning playwright Josh Hartwell to write the true story of Mae Brussell, considered to be America’s first mainstream conspiracy theorist during the 1960s and 1970s. Her radio shows analyzed public government records to link the JFK and RFK assassinations with the Watergate scandal. With humor and wit, Josh Hartwell’s new drama, set in present-day Denver, imagines the family who inherits Brussell’s legacy. ‘Queen of Conspiracy’ plays May 17-June 23 at Miner’s Alley Playhouse.

Sin Street Social Club. Arvada Center, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 19. Wicked. DCPA Broadway, Buell Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through June 9. The Wizard of Oz. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through July 7.

SUNDAY MAY 19

WOMEN IN SONG HOSTED

BY SHANNNA IN A DRESS

8PM

MONDAY MAY 20

HADLEY KENNARY 8PM THERESA PETERSON 9PM TUESDAY MAY 21

DAVID BOOKER 8PM ORACLE BLUE 9PM WEDNESDAY MAY 22

ELEPHANT COLLECTIVE 8PM THURSDAY MAY 23

GRUPO CHEGANDO LÁ AND FRANCISCO MARQUES 8PM FRIDAY MAY 24

DOMINICK ANTONELLI 8PM THE MOONLIT WILD 9PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 30

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EVENTS from Page 29

Denver Nourished Festival (May 18-19). 10 a.m. National Western Complex, Hall Level 2, 4655 Humbolt St., Denver. Fem Fest 2019. 10 a.m. Museum Of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Free Dance & Theater Workshop. 11 a.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder, 303-440-4510. Last Podcast On The Left. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. StandUp Comedy Showcase At Endo Brewing. 8 p.m. Endo Brewing Company, 2755 Dagny Way Suite 101, Lafayette, 720-442-8052. Women Breaking Plates — Boulder Empowerment Party. 6 p.m. 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 720-309-4708.

SUNDAY, MAY 19 Music 101st Army Band Armed Forces Day Concert. 2 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-651-0401. 13th Annual All-Star Tribute to Bob Dylan. 6 p.m. eTown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

MAY 16, 2019

Alicia Svigals, Archive Transformed: Klezmer Music from the Beregoski Archives. 7 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Boulder Bach Festival. 2 p.m. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Events Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. Yarn-fiti 2019. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Calpurnia. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

MONDAY, MAY 20

Dakota Blonde. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

Circle Singing with Mmmwhah! Led by Roy Willey. 6 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110.

The Delta Sonics Duo. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Felonius Smith Trio. 5 p.m. Oskar Blues Grill and Brew, 303 Main St., Lyons, 303-823-6685. GIANT ROCK the Boat Benefit Concert. 3 p.m. Union Reservoir, 461 CO Road 26, Longmont, 720-233-8969. Longmont Youth Symphony Finale Concert. 2 p.m. Longmont High School, 1040 Sunset St., Longmont, 303-776-6014. Mahler’s First Symphony, Korngold Violin Concerto. 3:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423. Orchestra Concert: Mozart Violin Concerto, Pictures at an Exhibition, Mendelssohn. 4 p.m. Westview Presbyterian Church, 1500 Hover St., Longmont, 303-776-3242. Pentatonix: The World Tour. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

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Music

Hadley Kennary, Theresa Peterson. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Klaus Johann Grobe + Vinyl Williams. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Events Creating Serial — An Evening with Sarah Koenig & Julie Snyder. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106,. VIVA Theater at the Library. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Women of the West. 11:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. see EVENTS Page 32

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


JOIN US IN CELEBRATING OUR 25TH ANNIVERSARY! SUNDAY · JUNE 2, 2019 11 AM - 5 PM

THE COURTHOUSE LAWN ON PEARL STREET MALL

A special celebration of Jewish culture through food, music, and art Free and open to the public

Activities for the whole family

Visit our website for more information at www.boulderjewishfestival.org BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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arts All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Aftereffect: Georgia O’Keeffe and Contemporary Painting. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26.

‘VIBRANT FEMMES: Suspended Devotions’ considers the work of eight contemporary female artists working in ceramics and paper. Each artist has created their own constellation of objects centered on the theme of reverential representation. Now showing at Firehouse Art Center through June 8.

Amanda Wachob: Tattoo This. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26. Andrew Jensdotter: Flak. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26. Ansel Adams: Early works exhibit. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26. The Art Of Resilience: Nicaraguan Perspectives. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through June 3. Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit. Don Coen: The Migrant Series. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St.,Boulder. Through May 27. Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2019. Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Evan Cantor, New Work (oil paintings). Seeds Cafe (Boulder Public Library), 1001 Arapaho Ave., Boulder. Through June 26 Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit.

Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 23.

LISA DOANE PHOTOGRAPHY

Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change. The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9. EYES ON: Jonathan Saiz. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18. Living with Wolves. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 20. Mothers, Fathers, Sons & Daughters. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Nicole Banowtz: Concerning Plants. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Norman Rockwell: Imagining Freedom. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave.

Our Planet — Art Exhibition on the Environment in a Changing Climate. National Center for Atmospheric Research, UCAR Gallery I & Gallery ll, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through May. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1.

Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8. Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Denver Art Museum, Anschutz Gallery, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 25. Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through January 2020. The Unknown Polly Addison. Dairy Arts Center, Polly AddisonGallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through June 16. Vance Brand: Ambassador of Exploration. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Vibrant Femmes: Suspended Devotions. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through June 8. Water Flow: Under the Colorado River. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26. World War II Diary Transcribed at the Museum. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit.

EVENTS from Page 30

TUESDAY, MAY 21 Music Altius Quartet featuring Hsing-ay Hsu, Piano. Noon. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100. David Booker, Oracle Blue. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Elovaters. 7:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Kevin Heffernan & Steve Lemme. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Kutandara Concert. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Ron LeGault Jazz. 6:30 p.m. Hotel St Julien, 900 Walnut St., Boulder, 281-960-3501. The Twilight Sad. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. West Coast Swing Dance Lessons. 5:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 310-614-6853. Events Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder,

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MAY 16, 2019

303-441-4250; 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Comedy Open Mic. 7 p.m. Vapor Distillery, 5311 Western Ave, Suite 180, Boulder, 303-997-6134. Dancing, Movement, Music, Community and Chocolate. 7:30 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 608-332-4355. Historic Downtown Walking Tour. 10 a.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Third Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents: Central City Opera. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Elephant Collective. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. MoJazz Duo. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Nelson Rangell. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Events Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Derek Hough. 7:30 p.m. Bellco Theatre, 700 14th St., Denver, 303-228-8000. Hannah Gadsby. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106,.

Video Production Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

High Crimes Book Group. 5:30 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

MediaLive: Subterranean Closing Performance and Reception. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

Nick Forster's

May Hippy Bluegrass Church

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Community Sing-A-Long at Boulder Theater!

Jun

Boulder In The Round

Jun

Anders Osborne

5

10 AM – 12 PM

Community Event

Featuring Kyle Donovan, Pamela Machala and Jackson Emmer

Radio Show Taping

23

Jul

7

& Chatham County Line

Radio Show Taping

Over The Rhine & more TBA

5/19 All-Star Tribute to Bob Dylan 6/26 Souvenir de Florence

Flatirons Chamber Music Festival

6/29 UndocuMonologues -

with Jazz Great Robert Johnson

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact jenny@etown.org BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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MAY 16, 2019

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Mr.Bowie invites you to visit the coolest store in Boulder H Fabulous antique and retro furniture H Specializing in estate items H One-of-a Kind gifts H Unique shopping experience

4919 Broadway, Boulder 303.447.0417 www.TheAmazingGarageSale.com

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

walking through by Greg Alston

i’ll walk into your forests and in the shadows of your mind i’ll walk along these winding paths to see what i might find

and i’ll walk beyond your boundaries and the paintings in your halls and i’ll walk beyond your borders and i’ll walk beyond your walls

i’ll walk when i am tired and when my feet are light and i walk beyond these city streets and out into the night

and i’ll walk with your lies then i’ll walk out of my skin and i’ll walk with a different color on to look in your eyes again

i’ll walk when i am high and when i’m feeling low and i’ll walk out on your prairies to feel the winds of change blow

and i’ll walk behind these signs and i’ll walk across your land and i’ll walk with you whether you’re a woman or a man

and i’ll walk to feel the music i see dancing in your eyes and i’ll walk along these open roads underneath uncertain skies

and i’ll walk with joy and i’ll walk with death and i’ll walk into the darkness to feel your breath

and i’ll walk into the garden where the seeds of love are sown and i’ll walk when you’re holding my hand and i’ll walk when i’m alone

and i’ll walk with pain and i’ll walk out in the cold and i’ll walk to hear these children laugh and i’ll walk until i’m old

and i’ll walk when i am hungry and when my shoes are worn and i’ll walk into the quiet and i’ll walk into the storm

and i’ll walk with trouble when the hour’s getting late but i will not walk with fear and i will not walk with hate

and i’ll walk with the rich and i’ll walk with the poor and i’ll walk into your house and i’ll walk across your floor

and i’ll walk with hope until my soles are thin then i’ll walk out of this world and i’ll crawl back in

Greg Alston is a gardener, cook, father and some other things, too. 34

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Our Longmont location is celebrating it’s 10th anniversary May 21st by giving every customer ... ON THE BILL: ‘Running with Beto.’ 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 17, Alamo Drafthouse Sloans Lake, 4255 W. Colfax Ave., Denver.

A FREE BAGEL

WITH PLAIN CREAM CHEESE! No purchase necessary and no substitutions. Longmont location only.

WE THANK YOU for making us a success!

Integrative Facials, Personal Fitness Training and Wellness Coaching for the Evolving Woman

Pearls of Wellness

TM

• $20 off first service •

We’re just getting started

LONGMONT

Political documentaries in a partisan world

Prospect Village • 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237 Also serving you in Boulder, Golden, & Lafayette

970.412.5571 www.jpspearls.com

by Michael J. Casey

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odern politics and media are so intertwined it’s hard to view one without the other. But hasn’t it always been this way? Where would the Framers be without the printing press? Franklin Roosevelt without radio? Trump without Twitter? And though movies capture past events in the present tense, they too have created signature portraits of politicians on the rise. The most recent example, Running with Beto, documents the Texas congressman, Beto O’Rourke, and his grassroots campaign for incumbent Ted Cruz’s Senate seat in the 2018 election. We’ve been here before. In 1960, filmmakers Robert Drew, Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, Terence Macartney-Filgate and D.A. Pennebaker, armed with new, lightweight cameras and portable audio recorders, captured a Wisconsin presidential primary between Hubert Humphrey and John F. Kennedy. And though their film, Primary, was as of-the-moment as you could get, it wasn’t released until after Kennedy beat Richard Nixon in the general election. Captured in a sea of grainy monotone grays and flat lighting, Primary set the stage for a new form of documentary, one that watched rather than intervened; captured rather than constructed; presented rather than manipulated. The French called it cinéma-vérité (film truth). Jump ahead to 1992, and you can see Pennebaker — this time working with filmmaker Chris Hegedus — employing cinéma-vérité to capture the Bill Clinton campaign. Again, the work (War Room) wasn’t released until after the general election, and again audiences wanted to know just how a relatively unknown upstart could make his way to the top office in the nation. We’re still asking those questions. And not just in Running with Beto — which will have a one-night screening at the Alamo Drafthouse Sloans Lake — but also in Knock Down the House, which follows Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Amy Vilela, Cori Bush and Paula Jean Swearengin as they ran primary campaigns against four established members of the Democratic Party in 2018. It’s no secret that of those four women and O’Rourke, only Ocasio-Cortez came out the victor. However, the story is far from finished: O’Rourke has announced his presidential campaign for 2020, and America has probably not heard the last from Vilela, Bush and Swearengin. Like Pennebaker before them, both Rachel Lears (director of Knock Down the House) and David Modigliani (director of Running with Beto) remain as hands-off as possible. But there is a noticeable difference between their approaches. Our concept of politicians has significantly shifted since the days of Primary, as has our depiction of them. What hasn’t changed is our fascination. Like Primary and War Room, the outcome of Knock Down the House (currently streaming on Netflix) and Running with Beto (debuting May 28 on HBO) is known to anyone watching, and the story lacks suspense. But as documents of a specific time and place, they are invaluable. And if Primary and War Room are any indication, Running With Beto and Knock Down the House are far from the conclusion of the story; they are just the beginning.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Tantric Sacred Sexuality Exploration & Education • Private Coaching • Workshops • Individuals / Couples For more information: 720-333-7978

www.tantricsacredjourneys.com MAY 16, 2019

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF Fire Lamb Special

Spice China 269 McCaslin Blvd., Louisville, 720-890-0999, spicechinalouisville.com

PHOTOS BY STAFF

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his house special is every bit as fiery as promised. The lamb is thinly sliced and fried in a savory blend of spices that doesn’t overwhelm the dish, but adds noticeable texture and depth. The snap peas and bell peppers lend a distinct pop of freshness and a satisfying crunch; beware the abundance of fresh jalapeños — unless you’re in for the real fire. $12.95.

Smoked Georgia Pork Bowl Big Dawg Barbecue Mobile, Boulder County, bigdawgbarbecue.com

Pearl Street Sandwich

Lolita’s Market and Deli 800 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-443-8329

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mbedded within Pearl Street’s quirky West End is Lolita’s, perhaps the most underrated sandwich shop in Boulder. We stopped by to pay homage to the City’s main artery with the Pearl Street sandwich, a delightful combination of turkey, avocado, Monterey jack cheese, onions, tomato, lettuce and sprouts held between two slices of bread. We opted for the toasted sourdough, and it did not disappoint. $8.99.

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his is barbecue to write home about. Home, in the case of Big Dawg Barbecue, is Georgia, and the folks behind the mobile operation have been making smoked meats for three decades. Assembled in less than 30 seconds, we chose to have our sampling of slowsmoked, pulled pork (brisket and chicken were the other choices) in one of Big Dawg’s “barbecue bowls.” It’s heaven. Luxurious macaroni and cheese, fruity roasted corn, a heaping serving of pork, crunchy onion strings, punchy scallions and crispy bacon. Add on any of a halfdozen sauces from sweet to spicy — we liked the Carolina gold. $11.

Vegetable Sherpa’s Stew

Sherpa’s Adventurers Restaurant & Bar 825 Walnut St., Boulder, sherpasrestaurant.com

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ne recent day when spring had momentarily fled Colorado, leaving winter to once again fill the space, we decided to go in search of comfort food. We looked no further than Sherpa’s, where we opted for a bowl of the vegetable Sherpa’s Stew. A savory, bone-warming broth is loaded with tender carrots, cauliflower, sweet peas, bell peppers and chewy house-made dumplings, then topped with fresh spinach. Just a dash or two of the house hot sauce and we forgot how chilly it was outside. You can pack a bit more protein into the stew with chicken, lamb or yak meat. $8.50.

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The butterfly sausage effect

On a summer grill, nothing’s better than a wurst-case scenario

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

C

onventional wisdom says there are two things you never want to watch being made: sausages and laws. If you knew what went into creating them, you wouldn’t like them so much. A great deal depends on the integrity of the legislator and the sausage-maker. As the grandson of a Sicilian-born sausage-maker, I know great sausage artisans use top ingredients, not weird parts or leftovers. For fans, sausage is the main dish, not the sidekick to the main meat. Sausage should rule the summer grill or smoker because of its variety: there are pork, beef, lamb, chicken, vegan and other sausages, and nearly every national cuisine has a grill-able sausage, from Chinese lap cheong to Moroccan merguez. Then, there are the wieners. Most sausage, like most politics, is local, including links from Boulder

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Sausage, Longmont’s Mulay’s Sausage, Louisville’s Old Style Sausage, Denver’s Polidori and Canino’s, and many others made by supermarkets and butchers. Many of you love eating sausages but, frankly, you don’t know how to cook them. Grilling sausages that thrill guests isn’t simple, and you can’t cheap-out on low-rent links and expect stunning results. Jim Pittenger has cooked an awful lot of sausages in the past 13 years. He launched his Biker Jim’s Gourmet Dogs food stand on the streets of downtown Denver. Now, Biker Jim’s has a brickand-mortar location on Larimer Street, a stand at Coors Field, and carts at various locations. His fans have included the late Anthony Bourdain. TO GRILL FRESH SAUSAGE Pittenger says that the first thing to know is that there are two distinct types

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of sausages for the grill: fresh and pre-cooked. There is a third type, cured. While sizzling pieces of salami are tasty, you are unlikely to grill a whole one. Fresh sausages include Italian sausage, bratwurst and linked chorizo in natural casings. “Fresh sausage can be really good on the grill but you have to cook them right first. You can heat them through on the cooler side of the grill or they need to be simmered, steamed or pre-cooked,” Pittenger says. Simmer them in three-quarters of an inch of water in a pan, or use broth or bouillon to add flavor. One secret: Add some butter to the simmering water and it adds a tasty sheen. Pittenger is not a fan of cooking brats in beer. “Besides the fact that I don’t drink, I don’t care for beer in cooking brats because it see NIBBLES Page 40

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NIBBLES from Page 39 KIM LONG

can taste sour or bitter. A lot of people cook the sausage in their pans of sauerkraut or a mixture of peppers and onions before grilling them,” he says. Simmered fresh sausage JIM PITTENGER should be grilled knows a thing or two whole. Slicing about sausage preparation. See for yourthem lengthwise self at one of Biker makes them fall Jim’s Denver locaapart and lose tions. essential moisture and fat. “It’s low and slow until you put them over a flame. I like a little char for flavor but there’s a fine line between caramelizing and carbonizing,” Pittenger says. “I want to serve something that’s juicy with the right amount of sear — not cold, raw or burnt.” TO GRILL A COOKED SAUSAGE In his business, Pittenger uses cooked sausages, including lots of game sausages — boar, reindeer and elk — from local purveyors like Denver’s CharcutNovo. Even precooked sausages need to be fully warmed before grilling, either on the grill’s cooler side or in a liquid. Cooked sausages, including summer sausage, have a firmer texture. Pittenger butterflies them — cut in half lengthwise, leaving a hinge. Butterflying is huge. “They cook faster. It also exposes more sausage surface area to the flame. It’s the Maillard reaction with the char,” he says. ‘DRESS THE MEAT, NOT THE BUN’ Butterflying also creates a perfect trough in the sausage ready for assorted toppings. Pittenger’s stated mantra is: “Dress the meat, not the bun.” It’s better on top. For him, dressing means cream cheese applied with a caulking gun and onions cooked in cola and more exotic substances. Biker Jim’s toppings include The Desert, a blend of harissa cactus, Malaysian curry jam, scallions, cilantro and onions Besides good quality wieners and toppings, invest in better buns and warm them before serving, Pittenger says. Heat them foil-wrapped in an oven, toast briefly on the grill, or moisten in a steamer. The ultimate are New England-style buns, spread with butter and griddled. 40

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LOCAL FOOD NEWS Boulder constantly brags about being the best this or that. Now, Boulder can claim to be home to the best restaurant service in the country. Frasca Food & Wine won the 2019 James Beard Award for Outstanding Service. ... Moxie Bread Co.’s first Heirloom Grain Day celebration May 18 at Altan Alma Farm features an heirloom pie contest. I’ll be one of the judges. Fresh rhubarb pie, perhaps? It’s free to enter with neat local prizes. Competitors can pick up a free bag of heirloom wheat flour at Moxie to use in their contest pie crust. ... Salvadoran native Milton Guevara is offering mission-style burritos at Nopalito’s in Boulder’s Diagonal Plaza across from the state DMV office. ... Chef Jim Cohen has sold the Empire Lounge & Restaurant in Louisville to Jeff Osaka, the acclaimed Denver chef and restaurateur behind Sushi-Rama, Osaka Ramen and 12@ Madison. The name and the menu at Empire will remain largely the same. Cohen continues his remarkable recovery from a serious stroke. TASTE OF THE WEEK Since 1898, Chautauqua Dining Hall’s wraparound wooden porch has been one of Colorado’s quintessential al fresco dining locations. Since 1976, when I arrived, it’s been a personal favorite. Lately its popularity means summer weekends are ridiculously crowded. So I tend to stop by early on weekday mornings, as I did recently. Settling on the east-facing porch in the sun, I contemplated coffee, a peaceful green view and a well-made breakfast burrito topped with Cheddar, sautéed peppers and onions and a decent green chile sauce dotted with large chunks of soft pork. Chautauqua’s house-made green and red hot sauces added some extra oomph. WORDS TO CHEW ON “Nothing beats the taste sensation when maple syrup collides with ham.” — From Twin Peaks (R.I.P. Peggy Lipton) John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, streaming at kgnu.org). Read John’s blog at johnlehndorff.wordpress.com. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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impact,” Pirog told the sustainable food group Worldwatch Institute. The vast majority of U.S. beef is raised on factory farms that use a ton of water and don’t help sequester carbon, and fed crops that are grown on pesticide-laden land “The way we raise beef here, there’s a lot of methane, pesticides, water, the amount of tractor and petrochemicals you have to use to harvest that grain and move it around, these are all inputs. The inputs in New Zealand are, you have some land, it’s lush green, and that’s the input... it’s a God-given commodity. From my perspective if it’s not used, it would die and create carbon,” Heap says, adding, “but I’m not an authority on this,” and later in our conversation, “I couldn’t figure out how to get the facts on how much energy is used on a big cargo ship, there’s another input.” There’s a bunch of anecdotal evidence to calculate the emissions involved in shipping beef from New Zealand, but for reference, a 2015 study found that the transportation of frozen Australian beef around the world contributed to less than 5 percent of the total emissions involved in raising that beef. Another study that tracked emissions involved in selling New Zealand lamb to the United Kingdom found that, similarly, only 5 percent of the total emissions came from the actual transportation. New Zealand thinks they’re onto something, at least. In March, the trade group Beef

REVOLUTIONARY DINNER

BEEF AND LAMB flown in from New Zealand may be the most sustainable way to source it, says Wild Standard and SALT chef/owner Bradford Heap. Try New Zealand’s First Light wagyu steak (above) at Wild Standard.

Shipping meat around the world to save it

S

by Matt Cortina

ustainable does not always equal local. That’s the next-level thinking going on at eateries across the country which are shipping in food, mostly meat, from far-away areas where that meat can be raised without contributing excess greenhouse gases to our already burning planet. Now, some Boulder County restaurants are getting into the action. Bradford Heap, of SALT and Wild Standard, is serving First Light Wagyu on his menu, beef raised in New Zealand, shipped overseas to Colorado, defrosted (sometimes), cooked and served. The latest trend in sustainability is “food miles” — the distance it takes to get a piece of food from the producer to the plate. Rich Pirog, a researcher at Iowa State University, found that the average piece of food travels 1,500 miles (Boulder County to Pittsburgh), and that processed foods, like strawberry I

yogurt, for instance, travel even farther. So how can increasing food miles make our food system more sustainable? It’s hard to believe, even for the early adopters. “At first glance I thought I’m not going to buy beef from New Zealand, that’s not sustainability,” Heap says. “And that’s a simplistic way of looking at a global problem. Now with global warming, you start looking a little closer and food miles is absolutely an oversimplification.” There’s data to back it up. Fruits and vegetables may still be best sourced locally, but energy- and resource-intensive food like beef and lamb may be more Earth-friendly if they’re raised in areas where the animals can feed on grass in pasture, regardless of the energy needed to ship them around the globe. “Food miles are a good measure of how far food has traveled. But they’re not a very good measure of the food’s environmental

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Heap agrees: “I don’t think beef itself is a sustainable product necessarily compared to pork and chicken and their inputs; they’re omnivores, they’ll eat scraps.” Heap adds that his restaurants serve local lamb and pork, but that making it affordable while still making money to keep the restaurants in business is a “challenge.” “It’s going to be appetites that drive the conversation,” Heap says. “If people vote with their credit cards for big steaks, I think [First Light Wagyu] is an option that’s far more sustainable than corn-finished Wagyu or Choice beef. I personally would never consume that, it’s not meat to me. Even if it’s treated well, if it’s fed glyphosate-soaked corn, I’m not supporting Monsanto. I’ll go to my grave being proud of that.” To his credit, Heap has made about half his menu at SALT plant-based, but, he adds, everyone has to make this decision on their own. He’s sharing the news of New Zealand beef and hosting tastings with restaurateurs around Boulder County, but that’s as far as he’ll go. “I think shaming people is not a good place to start with it,” he says. “I do my best to keep my piehole shut.” Maybe we all ought to keep our pieholes shut for beef and lamb. But when we do eat it — twice a month for the latter, according to the U.S. government’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans — maybe we only do it for well-raised products, from New Zealand or Boulder County. I

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+ Lamb New Zealand launched an international campaign to get food-sellers to use their meat, the aforementioned First Light Wagyu and the New Zealand Spring Lamb. (Warning: ad speak ahead): “New Zealand farms provide a stressfree place for the animals to live; a calm existence where they can roam and graze freely over lush green hills and pastures in vast, wide open spaces. The result is a lean, flavorful meat that tastes just as nature intended,” the group recently claimed. No doubt, New Zealand beef and lamb is heralded for its quality and cost, and it makes sense: natural pastures lead to healthier animals, which leads to a better yield, better meat and lower costs. Heap says the breed of cattle, in particular, matters too: Wagyu raised in New Zealand’s rolling pastures is a fit, while Angus and Hereford breeds raised in the U.S., even if they’re grass-fed, pack on a lot of fat, multiplying the amount of grass that needs to be used for the animals, which is problematic in water-restricted areas like the West. Ultimately, though, the best way to ensure the beef and lamb you’re eating isn’t contributing to the demise of the Earth is to just eat less of it. Everyone, seemingly, agrees on that point. Christopher Weber and H. Scott Matthews of Carnegie-Mellon University culled data and concluded that, “No matter how it is measured, on average red meat is more GHG-intensive than all other forms of food.”

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Know your brew: German-style heller bock and maibock Hands off maibock

by Michael J. Casey

M

uch like with the seminal Oktoberfest brew, märzen, there is a bit of ceremony that goes along with ushering in maibock drinking season. The first kegs are tapped at Munich’s Hofbräuhaus during the last week of April as they bid auf wiedersehen to winter and welcome the warming days of spring with a lager strong enough to withstand cooler nights but aromatic enough to match the flowering trees and budding plants outside. Maibocks (mai-, pronounced “my,” is German for May), like other bocks (stout lagers) are malt-forward, full-bodied beers with a stronger alcohol content (6.3 to 8.1 percent alcohol by volume than your typical helles or dunkel. The origins of the style date back to 1614, MICHAEL J. CASEY with Hofbräuhaus laying claim to brewing the first. But maibock didn’t truly take off until the pale beer craze of the 19th century. While most bocks are dark in color, maibock came at a time when the availability of pale malts changed how brewers approached beer, which is why you will occasionally find the term “maibock” interchangeable with heller bock or helles bock Endo Brewing (helle is German for bright). Do note there is some dispute as Company’s Mister Bock is one of sever- to the direct relationship between maibock, often darker and al well-executed local maltier, and heller bock, paler and softer, but brewers — takes on the maiespecially in America — like to play fast and loose with bock. styles, often making the style suit them and not the other way around. Back to the bock: Like those Lent-inspired doppelbocks, maibocks are strong and rich and can stand up to a sudden cold snap in the weather. But, unlike their darker brothers, maibocks highlight floral hop characteristics that keep the sweet, malty experience light and bouncy. Take Endo Brewing Company’s Mister Bock: a crystal clear golden brew underneath a loose collar of foam. Like most lagers, the nose is muted — maybe a hint of honey — but the mouth explodes with flavors of chewy bread, sweet caramel and flowery hops. It’s soft and full, and as a good lager should, has a delightfully clean finish to keep you coming back for more. At Prost Brewing, a German-inspired brewery through and through, the maibock has a bready nose and a mouth that is a true expression of malt — slightly grainer, richer and fuller. There is a ghostly echo of potpourri on the back, like a naked tree just starting to bud. Pair it with a hot pretzel crusted with kosher salt if you’re looking for the perfect snack, roasted ham or spicy Pad Thai during dinner, and cheesecake or apple streusel if it’s time for dessert. Maibock also pairs nicely with an afternoon of yard work. Bierstadt Lagerhaus’ Maibock is so bouncy and herbaceous you might as well drink it while trimming the hedges. Trader Joe’s Spring Prost — brewed by Josephsbrau Brewing Co in San Jose, California — aptly sports a lawnmower graphic on its six-pack. Maibocks are wonderfully versatile. And thankfully so considering May in Colorado can contain three of the four seasons in a single week. Enjoy them while the days still sport a slight chill. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

LIBRA

method of learning Japanese recommended by experts is to be born as a Japanese baby and raised by a Japanese family, in Japan.” As you enter an intensely educational phase of your astrological cycle, I suggest you adopt a similar strategy toward learning new skills and mastering unfamiliar knowledge and absorbing fresh information. Immerse yourself in environments that will efficiently and effectively fill you with the teachings you need. A more casual, slapdash approach just won’t enable you to take thorough advantage of your current opportunities to expand your repertoire.

because grace changes us and the change is painful,” wrote author Flannery O’Connor. I think that’s an observation worth considering. But I’ve also seen numerous exceptions to her rule. I know people who have eagerly welcomed grace into their lives even though they know that its arrival will change them forever. And amazingly, many of those people have experienced the resulting change as tonic and interesting, not primarily painful. In fact, I’ve come to believe that the act of eagerly welcoming change-inducing grace makes it more likely that the changes will be tonic and interesting. Everything I’ve just said will especially apply to you in the coming weeks.

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: According to humorist Dave Barry, “The

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I think it’s time for a sacred celebration: a

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: “All human nature vigorously resists grace

SCORPIO

blow-out extravaganza filled with reverence and revelry, singing and dancing, sensual delights and spiritual blessings. What is the occasion? After all these eons, your lost love has finally returned. And who exactly is your lost love? You! You are your own lost love! Having weaved and wobbled through countless adventures full of rich lessons, the missing part of you has finally wandered back. So give yourself a flurry of hugs and kisses. Start planning the jubilant hoopla. And exchange ardent vows, swearing that you’ll never be parted again.

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: There’s a certain problem that has in my opinion occupied too much of your attention. It’s really rather trivial in the big picture of your life, and doesn’t deserve to suck up so much of your attention. I suspect you will soon see things my way, and take measures to move on from this energy sink. Then you’ll be free to focus on a more interesting and potentially productive dilemma — a twisty riddle that truly warrants your loving attention. As you work to solve it, you will reap rewards that will be useful and enduring.

GEMINI

SAGITTARIUS

art museum. Over 35,000 works are on display, packed into 15 acres. If you wanted to see every piece, devoting just a minute to each, you would have to spend eight hours a day there for many weeks. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that now would be a good time for you to treat yourself to a marathon gaze-fest of art in the Louvre — or any other museum. For that matter, it’s a favorable phase to gorge yourself on any beauty anywhere that will make your soul freer and smarter and happier. You will thrive to the degree that you absorb a profusion of grace, elegance and loveliness.

cally rigorous approach to love. I’ll tell you about it, since in my astrological opinion you’re entering a phase when you’ll be wise to upgrade and refine your definitions of love, even as you upgrade and refine your practice of love. Here’s Cixous: “I want to love a person freely, including all her secrets. I want to love in this person someone she doesn’t know. I want to love outside the law: without judgment. Without imposed preference. Does that mean outside morality? No. Only this: without fault. Without false, without true. I want to meet her between the words, beneath language.”

MAY 21-JUNE 20: The Louvre in Paris is the world’s biggest

CANCER

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Author Hélène Cixous articulated a poeti-

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Capricorn author Henry Miller wrote

a mandate to exercise your rights to free speech with acute vigor. It’s time to articulate all the important insights you’ve been waiting for the right moment to call to everyone’s attention. It’s time to unearth the buried truths and veiled agendas and ripening mysteries. It’s time to be the catalyst that helps your allies to realize what’s real and important, what’s fake and irrelevant. I’m not saying you should be rude, but I do encourage you to be as candid as is necessary to nudge people in the direction of authenticity.

that his master plan was “to remain what I am and to become more and more only what I am — that is, to become more miraculous.” This is an excellent strategy for your use. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to renounce any tendency you might have to compare yourself to anyone else. You’ll attract blessings as you wean yourself from imagining that you should live up to the expectations of others or follow a path that resembles theirs. So here’s my challenge: I dare you to become more and more only what you are — that is, to become more miraculous.

LEO

AQUARIUS

land of Alaska, many days have 20 hours of sunlight. Farmers take advantage of the extra photosynthesis by growing vegetables and fruits that are bigger and sweeter than crops grown farther south. During the Alaska State Fair every August, you can find prodigies like 130-pound cabbages and 65-pound cantaloupes. I suspect you’ll express a comparable fertility and productiveness during the coming weeks, Leo. You’re primed to grow and create with extra verve. So let me ask you a key question: to which part of your life do you want to dedicate that bonus power?

pendium of artifacts from the civilizations of many different eras and locations. Author Jonathan Stroud writes that it’s “home to a million antiquities, several dozen of which were legitimately come by.” Why does he say that? Because so many of the museum’s antiquities were pilfered from other cultures. In accordance with current astrological omens, I invite you to fantasize about a scenario in which the British Museum’s administrators return these treasures to their original owners. When you’re done with that imaginative exercise, move on to the next one, which is to envision scenarios in which you recover the personal treasures and goodies and powers that you have been separated from over the years.

JUNE 21-JULY 22: In my astrological opinion, you now have

JULY 23-AUG. 22: During summers in the far northern

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: It’s time for you to reach higher and dig

deeper. So don’t be a mere tinkerer nursing a lukewarm interest in mediocre stories and trivial games. Be a strategic adventurer in the service of exalted stories and meaningful games. In fact, I feel strongly that if you’re not prepared to go all the way, you shouldn’t go at all. Either give everything you’ve got or else keep it contained for now. Can you handle one further piece of strenuous advice, my dear? I think you will thrive as long as you don’t settle for business as usual or pleasure as usual. To claim the maximum vitality that’s available, you’ll need to make exceptions to at least some of your rules.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: London’s British Museum holds a com-

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: “I hate it when people tell me that I should ‘get out of my comfort zone,’” writes Piscean blogger Rosespell. “I don’t even have a comfort zone. My discomfort zone is pretty much everywhere.” I have good news for Rosespell and all of you Pisceans who might be inclined to utter similar testimony. The coming weeks will feature conditions that make it far more likely than usual that you will locate or create a real comfort zone you can rely on. For best results, cultivate a vivid expectation that such a sweet development is indeed possible.

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PASSION PLAY Parker Walton is crazy about cannabis. And soccer. Back in the day, he was recruited to play central defense for a D-1 program. Good as he was, Parker soon discovered that his greater talent was squeezing gems from the soil. He set aside his cleats, moved to Colorado and co-founded Cannacraft with his brother. That boutique on the prairie is now an oasis for cannabis connoisseurs across the state and Drift in Boulder. Parker takes a competitor’s passion and discipline, amps it up a notch, and applies it to every phase of growing. From sourcing magic beans to curing epic colas. The result is aromatic, pageant-worthy flower with terpene profiles out of a botanist’s dream. Enjoy.

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BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: Garbage human here. I’ve had herpes for about 15 years. The first five years, I was in a relationship with a guy who also had it. The last 10 years, I haven’t been in a serious relationship. I’ve been a (rare, drunk) one-night-stand type of gal, and I don’t usually tell the guy because, like, everyone has herpes. (I get that one in five isn’t everyone, but if you count HSV-1? I’ve seen numbers as high as 80 percent.) Frankly, it seems about as significant medically as minimally contagious mild acne. (Some risks to pregnancies and immunosuppressed people exist, and I know logically it’s not my call to determine what may be serious for someone else.) I justify nondisclosure to myself these ways, even though I know it’s not ethical. On the occasions where I have disclosed, I’ve been made to feel like a leper by dudes who 10 minutes before were begging me not to have to use a condom. I obviously have a lot of resentment over having this stupid thing and over the guilt I have around nondisclosure, and I suspect my history of casual sex is influenced by not wanting to deal

with this conversation. Which brings us to now. What I thought was a onenight stand has turned into a months-long affair, and I’m amazed to report I find myself liking and respecting this guy. (I know, I know: If I really respected him, I’d have told him before I ever knew I respected him). What do I do? I have to tell him. But how? Is there any justification for what I’ve done? Can I just say, “Oh man, I noticed a thing and went and got tested and guess what?” That just adds to the lie. There’s no way I can have a relationship with this guy based on trust going forward, is there? I’ve fucked this up and I have to bail, don’t I? Am I going to be alone for the rest of my life? —Deserves To Be Alone Dear DTBA: You’re not a garbage human, DTBA. You didn’t share something you should’ve — the fact that you, like upwards of 50 percent of everyone, have herpes — but weren’t obligated to. The problem with not disclosing, as you now know, is that casual sex partners have a way of becoming potential longterm partners. And by the time you recognize someone’s long-term potential, the stakes are so high that bailing looks like

an easier option. “We don’t think DTBA needs to bail,” Momo and Felix wrote in a joint e-mail after reading your letter. “And we don’t think she’s destined to be alone for the rest of her life.” Momo and Felix are the cocreators of My Boyfriend Has Herpes (instagram. com/my_boyfriend_has_herpes), an Instagram account that has amassed more than 15,000 followers in just a few months. Using simple, direct prose and Momo’s charming illustrations, Momo and Felix educate others about herpes while sharing the story of their relationship — from how they met, to Felix’s disclosure, to Momo’s initial hesitation to get involved with someone who has herpes. “Our stance is pro-disclosure, always, but we know this isn’t possible for everyone living with HSV,” said Momo and Felix. “Unfortunately, one of the significant pitfalls of [not disclosing early on] is the difficulty it adds to the potential of a longterm relationship. And while we don’t agree with DTBA’s choice to not disclose to her partners, we understand why she might have made those choices. The stigma against herpes is terrible.” Momo and Felix both feel — and I’m with them — that you need to be completely honest with this guy, even if it means the relationship could end. But it

might not end, DTBA. He might have a disclosure of his own to make — he could have herpes, too — or the relationship could end for other reasons. You’ve been dating this guy for only a few months, and he could decide to end things for reasons that have nothing to do with the disclosure you’re about to make and/or your failure to make it sooner. Or you might learn something about him down the road that’s a deal breaker. (Have you searched his place for MAGA hats?) So how do you broach this topic? “She obviously cares about this person,” wrote Momo and Felix. “She made a mistake and she wants to make it right. DTBA needs to acknowledge her actions (opting for nondisclosure) and their impact (putting her partner at risk without his informed consent). DTBA’s partner may very likely feel betrayed or deceived. He might want to end the relationship, and his feelings would be valid. Unfortunately, all that DTBA can do is acknowledge her mistake, make herself vulnerable, and accept his reaction.” “But whatever happens, she doesn’t deserve to be alone,” they said. “We all make mistakes, and we all have the opportunity to do better.” On the Lovecast, listen and learn about vasectomies!: savagelovecast.com.

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Attorneys general to Congress: Let banks work with marijuana businesses by Seymour

A

coalition of 38 state and U.S. territorial attorneys general, led by Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser, sent a letter to Congress on May 8 urging them to pass legislation that would allow marijuana businesses to access the mainstream banking system. The attorneys general COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE summarized the issue thusly: “Thirty-three states and several U.S. territories have legalized the medical use of marijuana. However, because the federal government classifies marijuana as an illegal substance, banks providing services to statelicensed cannabis businesses and even to other companies which sell services and products to those businesses could find themselves subject to criminal and civil liability under the federal Controlled Substances Act and certain federal banking statutes.” The attorneys general (yes, you’re reading that right, that is the plural form of attorney general. Don’t believe us? Just watch John Oliver’s Last Week Tonight episode on the subject.) write that the risk of liability has prohibited financial institutions from providing services to state-approved marijuana businesses.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

I

And, although sales in 2017 were estimated at $8.3 billion (and expected to jump to $25 billion by 2025), all that money has been handled outside the regulated banking system. “Businesses are forced to operate on a cash basis,” the attorneys general wrote. “The resulting grey market makes it more difficult to track revenues for taxation and regulatory compliance purposes, contributes to a public safety threat as cash-intensive businesses are often targets for criminal activity, and prevents proper tracking of billions in finances across the nation.” The letter clarifies that passage of such legislation wouldn’t be an endorsement of any state or territory’s specific handling of marijuana and legalization, just an acknowledgement that “the reality of the situation requires federal rules that permit a sensible banking regime for legal businesses.” The attorneys general are requesting Congress advances the SAFE Banking Act, sponsored by Colorado Rep. Ed Perlmutter, or similar legislation that would protect banks that work with legally (according to the states) operating marijuana businesses. “An effective safe harbor would bring billions of dollars into the banking sector, enabling law enforcement; federal, state and local tax agencies; and cannabis regulators in 33 states and several territories to more effectively monitor cannabis businesses and their transactions. Compliance with tax laws and requirements would be simpler and easier to enforce with the regulated tracking of funds in the banking system, resulting in higher tax revenues,” the letter read.

MAY 16, 2019

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All hat and no cattle in New York and New Jersey by Paul Danish

A JOISEYSHOW VIA FLICKR

s we say out West, all hat and no cattle. At the start of the year, legalization of recreational marijuana in New Jersey and New York appeared all but inevitable. The Democratic governors of both states supported legalization and the legislatures in both states were controlled by Democrats (in New Jersey 56-26 Ds in the Assembly and 25-15 in the Senate; in New York 106-43 in the Assembly and 39-23 in the Senate). National and statewide polling in both states showed overwhelming support for legalization, especially among Democrats. But over the space of a few weeks both legalization efforts were on life support. So what happened? In New Jersey (which holds its state elections in odd-numbered years), Governor Phil Murphy had made legalization part of his 2017 campaign. But then he spent all of 2018 and the first weeks of 2019 dickering with the leadership of the New Jersey Legislature over the details of a legalization bill. Especially over the tax rates in it. When they finally reached an agreement last February and introduced a bill, Murphy and the Democratic leadership evidently assumed that the bill they had drafted would swiftly pass. Bad guess. Murphy and Senate President Stephen Sweeney discovered that they didn’t have the votes to get their bill through the State Senate and on March 25, pulled it from the Senate agenda hours before it was scheduled for consideration. Chances are Murphy and Sweeney hadn’t bothered to involve most other members of the legislature in the negotiations. So when the bill was finally introduced not many legislators felt they had any ownership of the measure. And it’s likely some resented being left out of the MurphySweeney negotiations. Although it’s technically not dead, multiple sources say the New Jersey bill isn’t going to get further consideration this year. Failure in New Jersey had a knock-on effect on the legalization effort in New York. That’s because New York legalization supporters had argued

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it was urgent for New York to act because once New Jersey legalized, New Yorkers would have easy access to legal marijuana on the other side of the Hudson. “New Jersey took the wind out of the sails in New York,” Jeremy Unruh, director of public and regulatory affairs for medical marijuana company PharmaCann, told the New York Times. “I do think it that was an inflection point.” In New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo had declared legalization was one of his legislative priorities for the first 100 days of the legislative session. But as the deadline approached, Cuomo declared that negotiations were too complicated to allow legalization to be included in the state’s budget bill, so he decided consideration of legalization be deferred until after the budget bill was passed. There are about six weeks remaining in the New York legislature’s 2019 session, so it is still possible a marijuana bill will pass, but the path is much steeper. Cuomo’s support for legalization always seemed a bit disingenuous. Until last year he had been a prohibitionist dead-ender on marijuana and a standard issue nanny-statist generally. His marijuana views “evolved” after Sex and the City actress Cynthia Nixon mounted a vigorous primary challenge to his 2018 re-election bid, making legalization a centerpiece of her campaign. It’ll be interesting to see what, if anything, Cuomo does during the final weeks of the legislative session — and revealing. Back to New Jersey. The state constitution allows the legislature to refer issues to a vote of the people, and there is talk of the legislature doing this with the marijuana bill. But putting legalization on the ballot would require two-thirds majorities in both houses. There’s no guarantee the votes are there for that either. Legalization opponents in both states were much more focused than supporters. They organized opposition from law enforcement groups and PTAs and even got some city councils to announce in advance they would opt out if a legalization bill became law in their states. Legalization supporters are going to have to learn how to play legislative politics as well as initiative politics. A good place to start would be to target vulnerable legislators who oppose legalization with primaries. This sort of political trench warfare is tough — for openers you have to find electable candidates — but you generally don’t have to defeat very many smug incumbents before the views of the survivors start to evolve.

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