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Boulder Weekly takes home 40 awards at the ‘Top of the Rockies’ contest by Boulder Weekly staff

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Earth Day brings scientists and activists to the streets by Sarah Haas

A conversation with Mr. Harry Belafonte by Angela K. Evans

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departments

33 39 41 43 50 53 55 57 59 60

4 THE HIGHROAD: Hallelujah, Trump rushes to aid the needy! 5 GUEST COLUMN: Xcel went fishing and caught a few fish; I shouldn’t need a permit to protest the existence of Jeff Sessions 6 THE ANDERSON FILES: May Day is still relevant 8 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 29 OVERTONES: Anaïs Mitchell on letting art take the lead 31 ARTS & CULTURE: Boulder Phil concludes a historic season BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go POETRY: by Don Thompson FILM: Kieslowski’s trilogy to play IFS DEEP DISH: A visual experience at the Dushanbe Teahouse DRINK: Tour de Brew: Front Range Brewing Company ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny S  AVAGE LOVE: Proper etiquette for throwing someone out of an orgy WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Finding perspective on the holy day of pot CANNABIS CORNER: General Kelly’s Washington gaffe IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent view of the world

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staff

commentary

Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Entertainment Editor, Amanda Moutinho Special Editions Editor, Caitlin Rockett Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley, Emma Murray Interns, Billy Singleton, Carolyn Davidson, Preston Bryant, Ayako Itoi, Ximena Leyte SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Senior Account Executive, David Hasson Account Executive, Julian Bourke Inside/Outside Account Executive, Andrea Ralston Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo Office Manager Lina Papastergiou CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

April 20, 2017 Volume XXIV, Number 37 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2016 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

4 April 20, 2017

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

the

Highroad Hallelujah, Trump rushes to aid the needy! by Jim Hightower

O

f all the people suffering economic pain today, who should get priority attention from the new president and Congress? Regular folks in our country say that those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder — the poor and downtrodden working class — ought to be the priority. But, then, regular folks don’t run Congress — or Trump’s

White House. The Donald’s working-class voters must be stunned to see that his top economic priority is not them, but a tiny group dwelling in luxury at the very tippy-top of the ladder: Wall Street bankers. Rather than pushing an urgentlyneeded FDR-style jobs program, Trump & Company are rushing to aid the richest Americans at the expense of the working class, actually proposing to unleash the banksters to defraud and gouge workaday people. For example, they want to save the poor financial giants from a consumer protection called the “fiduciary rule.” If you’ve got a 401(K) retirement plan, chances are it’s managed by a firm of financial advisors — so this rule simply requires them to act in your best interest, rather than shifting your money

into risky investments that pay them bigger commissions. Prior to the enactment of this ethics provision in 2015, many advisors were serving themselves, gleefully ripping-off their customers (mostly ordinary working families) to the tune of $17 billion a year! That’s immoral, but it’s real money, so the industry has been lobbying hard — but unsuccessfully — to kill the legal requirement that money advisors deal honestly with clients. Now, however, they’ve got a president who appreciates dishonest business dealings and is going all out to liberate them from the shackles of ethics. “Hallelujah,” shout Wall Street’s Bankers, “Free at last, free at last! Thank Donald Almighty, we are free at last”... to gouge consumers. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


guest column Xcel went fishing and caught a few fish by Leonard May

X

cel went fishing with its “final” offers of two weeks ago. But on Monday night, few on Council took the bait. Council made the right decision to continue with the municipalization of our electricity supply rather than abandoning it at Xcel’s behest. It was gratifying to see the number of young people engaging with the issue. After all, it is they who will bear the brunt of a decision to abandon decarbonizing our electricity supply. Sam Weaver described how the municipalization has critical social justice implications — that the older generations (full disclosure: my generation) “have profited from the emissions of carbon dioxide but the worst harms will be visited upon the following generations.” Mr. Weaver went on to say he did not believe it would be appropriate for him to override the consistent municipalization support from voters that got us this far, by abandoning municipalization. Three council members saw things differently. Checking-in with the voters because of costs and timeline were common themes from council members opposed to continuing with municipalization. Andrew Shoemaker asserted (incorrectly) that “the City is now acknowledging that it’s going to cost an additional $80-$200 million in costs to separate from Xcel.” Xcel’s claims should not be confused with facts. The fact is the City has never accepted Xcel’s separation costs claims. Determining the costs is the purpose of the regulators’ proceedings. Mr. Shoemaker then appeared to attempt a reframing of the discussion away from the fundamental issue — do we move forward with municipalization or not — by getting into the weeds on tree trimming costs and the timeline. Jan Burton, like Mr. Shoemaker, accepted Xcel’s claims as facts, asserting (also incorrectly) that the City will “absolutely blow through the $214 million” cap the voters approved. Ms. Burton viewed the municipalization process like a Trumpian dystopia, where no progress has been made in the courts, on renewables or on decarbonization. This too, is incorrect as noted earlier in the meeting by Mayor Jones. Early in the meeting Ms. Burton asked staff a question that could easily mislead the public — “how much has the City exceeded the amount it was Boulder Weekly

authorized to spend for municipalization through the utility occupation tax (UOT)?” That’s like being asked if you still have a drinking problem. The UOT for funding the municipalization process established a tax cap, not a municipalization spending cap, so there is no exceeding of authorization. The City has collected approximately $10 million over five years ($2M/year) from the UOT. Over the past five years the City has spent approximately $8.9 million from the UOT and another approximately $1.1 million from general fund. The fact is, the City has slightly underspent its budget. Focusing on groundwork costs rather than the long-term benefits of municipalization distracts from the essence of the issue: decarbonizing, decentralizing and democratizing and the huge financial benefits. To put costs into perspective, Xcel takes approximately $35 million out of Boulder in profits each year. Between 2003 and 2012, profits increased at approximately 8 percent annually. If Council had accepted Xcel’s offers, projecting that rate of increase forward for the next 20 years would result in a cumulative total profit paid to Xcel and sucked out of the local economy of $1.6 BILLION. Yet, certain council members are sounding the alarms at spending $2 million, but are willing to forego capturing $1.6 BILLION in profits from Xcel. Their argument certainly benefits Xcel. As for the benefit to Boulder citizens, not so much. As Mary Young commented, fiscal responsibility requires that we continue with the municipalization process. Ms. Young also described how social change takes a long, long time and requires patience. She noted that it took 72 years for women to gain the right to vote. Decarbonizing, decentralizing and democratizing our electricity supply and affecting a paradigm shift from the early 20th century monopoly utility construct is a big social change. And so Boulder proceeds. I wager that there will be future “final” offers from Xcel. After all, $1.6 BILLION in profits is hard to walk away from. We should thank City Council for keeping things in perspective on Monday and enabling Boulder to be the fish that got away. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

guest column I shouldn’t need a permit to protest the existence of Jeff Sessions by Rob Smoke

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hen I was 11 years old, I was cutting school one day with a friend as we discussed the trajectory of our ensuing hookie adventure. We were headed for a brownstone in Brooklyn to meet up with some other young truants. (The parental rulers of the brownstone being absent.) I can clearly recall the dimly lit 14th Street subway platform where I anxiously informed my friend that “I was thinking, I might pass on the hash smoking thing.” My friend, Danny, immediately said, “What if we tie you up and make you smoke it?” My heart began racing. I was pretty much on the fringe of this social group and I knew the possibility of getting tied up probably did exist on some level. In other words, I was a certifiable wuss. “On second thought, maybe I’ll try a little. I don’t have to smoke a lot, right?” Of course, my friend laughed. I did take some healthy hits of Lebanese hash that day. I didn’t want to be seen as... the wussy that I was. And so my life spiraled downward from there as a result of the effects of marijuana on my developing brain. Or... there’s the alternative view... that someone had a natural medicine available to overcome the harshness of life in New York City. After all, when it

comes to marijuana (or cannabis, depending on your cultural milieu or ignorance thereof ) there’s little to worry about. Amendment 64 is a huge hit — barely need a 4/20 event to get a cloud of smoke going over the cities of either Denver or Boulder these days. Everyone is feeling positive. The people who can’t afford $2,000 a month for an apartment are sleeping by the train tracks and saving up to buy a used Dodge Rambler — not for sleeping in, but as a grow-house venue. It’s hard to even recall the days when recreational weed was “winkwink illegal” in Colorado, but in 2006, we were still “en route” to legalization and 4/20 gatherings were still “protest events.” At the 2006 4/20 event on the CU-Boulder campus, students had their pictures taken by campus police. Those pics were then posted online and $50 rewards were offered to students who would rat out the names of their friends for disciplinary action. The City of Boulder’s Human Relations Commission asked the CU administration to attend a meeting to discuss human rights issues related to this action involving covert surveillance and questionable law enforcement procedures. CU did not attend that meeting, but in 2007 and 2008 there were no spesee GUEST COLUMN Page 6

April 20, 2017 5


the anderson files May Day is still relevant by Dave Anderson

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ith total control of the Labor) and the Knights of Labor. federal government, Historian James Green says, “What Trump and the happened on May 1, 1886 was more Republicans have than a general strike; it was a ‘populist encountered remarkmoment’ when working people believed ably massive resistance as they begin to they could destroy plutocracy, redeem roll back decades of hard-won gains for democracy and then create a new ‘cooprace and justice, worker and union, erative commonwealth.’” environment, consumer and LGBTQ A few days later, workers in rights. We are sending out the internaChicago staged a peaceful rally in tional distress message of “Mayday! Haymarket Square to protest the police Mayday! Mayday!” murder of several strikers at the In fact, many resisters are going to McCormick Reaper Works. The event celebrate May Day this year. It is was concluding when cops marched “International Workers Day” in over into the crowd, demanding that every200 countries (and is a national holiday one go home. Someone threw a homein over 80) but not in made bomb at the the United States. police, killing one. In Boulder, In the chaos, at there will be a rally least a dozen peofor labor and ple were killed, ON MAY 1, 1886 WAS MORE immigrant rights including six more THAN A GENERAL STRIKE; IT on May 1 at 5:30 cops, all from gunWAS A ‘POPULIST MOMENT’ p.m. at the downshot-related town bandshell at wounds. WHEN WORKING PEOPLE Broadway and A huge BELIEVED THEY COULD Arapahoe. The national witch DESTROY PLUTOCRACY, event is hosted by hunt against labor REDEEM DEMOCRACY Fairview High and the left School’s Students ensued. Police AND THEN CREATE A for a Democratic raided labor union NEW ‘COOPERATIVE Society, Keep halls without warCOMMONWEALTH.’” Colorado Green rants, seized files — JAMES GREEN, HISTORIAN and Boulder and invaded Democratic homes. Individuals Socialists of were held without America. charges, beaten May 1 will also be “A Day and tortured. Police indiscriminately Without Immigrants,” a strike led by rounded up anarchists and socialists. immigrant rights group Movimiento The color red, the symbol of revoluCosecha. tion, was banished from public adverYou might be surprised to learn that tising. May Day was actually born in this The Chicago Tribune demanded the country. It arose out of the turmoil of deportation of immigrants it labeled an unstable and unregulated small gov“ungrateful hyenas” and “foreign savages ernment along with 19th century capiwho might come to America with their talism which produced many booms dynamite bombs and anarchic purposand busts. In the 1880s, there was a es.” The Chicago Times said the “enemy severe economic depression which forces” were not American but “rag-tag caused sharp wage reductions and high and bob-tail cutthroats of Beelzebub unemployment. from the Rhine, the Danube, the Vistula and the Elbe.” In 1886, there was a nationwide Several anarchists were put on trial general strike by labor unionists — for the crime. Every one of the jurors most of them foreign-born — who demanded an eight-hour workday. This admitted being prejudiced against the defendants. The defense proved that six was considered a wildly dangerous idea of the eight defendants weren’t present by respectable folk because workers when the bomb was thrown, and that typically had to toil for 10, 12 or 14 the remaining two were on the speakhours a day. The strike was called by ers’ stand, in full view of the police. two organizations, the skilled tradesBut the prosecutor claimed that the dominated Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions (the forerun- identity of the bomb-thrower was immaterial. He said the defendants had ner of the American Federation of

“WHAT HAPPENED

6 April 20, 2017

made inflammatory statements about the need to overthrow capitalism by any means necessary, and that was enough. “Convict these men,” he cried. “Make examples of them, hang them, and you save our institutions.” Four of the defendants went to the gallows, three were sentenced to long prison sentences and one committed suicide in his cell. Five of the eight defendants were German-born immigrants and one was born in England. Another was a U.S. citizen of German descent. Then there was Albert Parsons a descendent of Puritan settlers in colonial Massachusetts. During the Civil War, Parsons joined the Confederate Army while a 13-year-old in Texas but became disillusioned and deserted. He married Lucy Gonzalez who may have been born a slave, to parents of African American, Mexican and Native American ancestry. Parsons became a radical

Republican and mobilized freed slaves to vote in Texas. He was targeted for persecution by the KKK and the authorities. Eventually Albert and Lucy moved to Chicago where he became an organizer for the Knights of Labor. The Haymarket defendants would become martyrs for many working people. In 1893, Illinois Governor John Altgeld would pardon the three men still alive. But the bosses would evoke the spectre of the Haymarket bomb to crush the labor movement. Labor’s day was moved to September. In many ways, labor unions in the U.S. would be outlaw institutions until FDR became president. Then finally in 1938, the eight-hour day would become federal law. The fight goes on. This May Day is an opportunity to unite all the movements and communities resisting the Trumpian madness. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

guest column GUEST COLUMN from Page 5

cial restrictions on the 4/20 event which took place on the Norlin quadrangle. They were great events. No one was injured. Everyone cheered (or coughed and cheered) when the clock hit 4:20. At one of the events, someone who had smoked a little too much crashed their car into a garbage receptacle. A few people who were smoking in other spots besides Norlin quad were given tickets. That was about it for the downside. But then came the crackdown. University Chancellor Phil DiStefano was miffed. The campus was turned topsy-turvy by the Froot-Loopers who came out of the woodwork on 4/20, some of them — God save us — from neighboring high schools! The years of the crackdown have included militarysized golf carts full of cops chasing ragtag stoners out of the nooks and crannies on the CU campus. Videos of these incidents suggest there’s no way to tell which group is more significantly “on drugs.” The cops seem to be laughing about as much as the stoners they chase. A group of cannabis advocates including this writer took CU to court in 2012 to enjoin them from stopping the protest. We lost. I got

the small consolation of having my picture next to Phil’s on the front page of the local papers. He looks more dour than I do, which is a good thing, because if he weren’t so dour, I think I would seem dour. Because I am, even today. I shouldn’t need a permit to protest Jeff Sessions. By the way, while I have the microphone — Jeff Sessions is a creep. There, I said it. And the University of Colorado should not align itself with him in any way, shape or form. I will be smoking something on 4/20 — maybe something wrapped in American flag rolling papers. And... I will not be attending the CU Boulder “Cannabis Symposium,” even though I was invited by the vice-chancellor, who I think goes by the title of “El Primo Capo di Tutti-Frutti.” Cannabis symposiums are to 4/20 what ditch weed is to Bubba Diesel, and I didn’t survive the last 50 years of a movement for no ditch weed. Rob Smoke lives on “the Hill” in Boulder, Colorado. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


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letters Would someone please answer this woman’s question?

Hello Crestone Peaks, Since October we have been renting out our farm to a small family, and are currently leasing out a house in Southwest Longmont. Our family was unable to tolerate not knowing when the drilling rigs were going to drive up the road and ruin our way of life. As well, for our family it would be completely impossible to live on a farm, in our home, where there were 12 wells being drilled and a major industrial site being put up in direct line of our view of the mountains. Since November of 2014 I have made it perfectly clear to all parties involved and to the press, that the Rasmussen Site is a completely unacceptable site for a number of reasons including but not limited to: The number of wells makes it a large industrial site, it threatens our health from VOC’s, it’s dangerous due to risks of explosions, leaks, etc., it’s very unsafe due to the use of our driveway and narrow County Road 1 for your operations and would ruin our bucolic country way of life with the immense and continuous truck traffic and the industrialization of our rural neighborhood. Because of your potential violations and to the intensity of the risks involved with putting a fracking site so close to our home, we became fracking refugees. We know that you and the COGCC decided that your statutory rights superseded our constitutional rights, but this is not the reality. You chose to regulate rather than protect us. By law the COGCC was supposed to choose a balanced approach but they did not and therefore you are responsible for our flight from our property. Due to air pollution, the sound pollution, the ruination of our small 1/2 mile driveway and the fact that you did not and do not respect, acknowledge or otherwise believe (even though I sent numerous health study articles to the COGCC and Encana) that our health safety and welfare are threatened by your operations so we were forced to rent our home out until we could further evaluate what to do with our lives. We are currently renting a home in Longmont during this transition. Since the time it will take to go to court for this fundamental problem between the citizens of Colorado and the COGCC will take many years too long to protect our farm, not only will we have had to move away from our farm investment/property, but we are now going to be forced to sell our

property investment. We are being forced out of our property because you did not consider our constitutional rights and truly balance them with our fundamental rights to health, safety and welfare. To be clear, our fundamental constitutional rights will indeed be violated when you begin your operations 1,200 feet from our home, and since you will not retract the permits for the 12 wells thus we are going to have to sell our property. We will be beginning this process soon. If your corporation decides to begin preparing for and drilling the wells anytime before October you will prevent us from getting current full market value for our home which is at approximately $479,000. Currently we are getting $2,300/ month for rent because it is a beautiful rural farm property in the countryside and near Boulder and Longmont. We are very concerned about the disclosure of the 12 wells to any potential buyers and we may have great difficulty selling this property at it’s full market value. If your site begins to be developed while we are trying to sell the property it will immediately be impossible to sell during the nightmare of your operations. We will also not be able to rent for the $2,300 that we are able to get now because of it’s idyllic location. We have already made huge life adjustments because of this violation of our fundamental constitutional rights to true health safety and welfare. You did not answer me in my first request. So, I ask again; how do you plan to compensate us? Amanda Harper/a stones throw from County Line Rd.

Hit pause at PUC: Consider Xcel proposal

As a student at the University of Colorado Boulder, I have been studying this renewable energy debate with interest. It seems that a lot of time and money over the years has been spent fighting Xcel. Energy and not actually putting renewable energy on the grid. Many students agree that we should start real carbon reduction now rather than continually losing every legal and regulatory fight. It doesn’t take much to understand that the City of Boulder’s position at the public utilities commission is abysmal. The PUC has rejected the city of boulder time and time again. Our best hope to start real carbon reduction now is to let citizens vote on the issue in November. Matthew H. Smith Boulder Weekly


letters Bankrolling the president

The right wing propaganda machine that is AM talk radio is currently all over the imminent perils of illegal immigrants and radical Islamist terrorism and the president admittedly wants Obamacare reform because he needs the money saved by denying medical care to those who cannot afford it for his tax cuts, his border wall and increased military spending. Meanwhile his generals have staged an impressive fireworks show of American machismo by firing 59 Tomahawk missiles, not all of which hit their target, at an air force base in Syria and dropped a 21,000 pound mega-bomb on a mountain in Afghanistan, killing, all in all, maybe 100 ISIS fighters at a cost of 79 million dollars. Added to this, American taxpayers are footing the bill for security on his weekend jaunts to his compound in Palm Springs as well as that for his children’s business trips promoting the Trump logo all over the world. Manipulative hyperbole may work in contract negotiation, but how well it translates into governance and foreign relations remains to be seen. There have been bankruptcies, both financial and moral, in his business operations. Robert Porath/Boulder

Flat tax time

As we file our income tax returns, we are all reminded that our income tax system needs to be simple, understandable and fair. The current complex system requires many Americans to hire tax preparers while giving an advantage to those wealthy enough to hire the most skilled and knowledgeable ones. America needs a flat rate income tax, eliminating most current deductions. Such a fair and simple tax would free up the time and money now spent filling out a stack of complicated forms, and would ensure that everyone paid his fair share. These resources could be used by taxpayers for economically sound investments, especially since the tax code would no longer provide incentives for less productive investments. Congress is now about to begin considering tax reform. Their goal should not be modest reform, but a bold change to scrap the current system and replace it with a flat tax. Peter J. Thomas, Americans for Constitutional Liberty

Boulder Weekly

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NEWS BW’s big day at ‘Top of the Rockies’ contest

Boulder Weekly takes home 40 awards

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by Boulder Weekly staff

lease forgive our bragging, but we’re so proud of our reporters and artists that we just couldn’t keep this

to ourselves. On Friday, April 14, Boulder Weekly took home 40 awards at the Society of Professional Journalists’ “Top of the Rockies” contest. The contest is primarily aimed at newspapers and magazines, but also has categories for television, radio and online publications. The contest is open to all news organizations in Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming and Utah. BW competed in the 30,000 to 75,000 print circulation category where it won 12 first-place honors along with 17 second-place and 11 third-place awards, more than any other news organization in the region. First-place awards went to Weekly editor Joel Dyer in the News Column category for his “DyerTimes” columns; the top award in Agricultural: Enterprise went to Caitlin Rockett for her coverage of Boulder’s ongoing GMO controversy in “Decision time... again;” Christi Turner won Agriculture: General Reporting for her examination of Hemp regulations in “Just another plant;” Claire Woodcock won for Education: General Reporting for her expose on PCBs in schools in “PCBs in Colorado Public Schools;” Max Heidt won the Science: General Reporting category for his examination of global warming’s impact on the sport of ice

climbing in “Gimme the cold shoulder;” Travis Metcalfe won Science: Enterprise Reporting for his ongoing series “Lab Notes;” The A&E: Criticism award went to Dave Kirby for his “Music Criticism” (Dave’s been writing music for BW since its first issue 24 years ago); The best A&E single story in the region was penned by Amanda Moutinho for her profile of chalk artist Bryce Widom in “Erasing creation;” The ever-entertaining Tom Winter won the Sports: Columns category for his ski coverage; Not to be outdone in sports, Amanda Moutinho picked up the Sports: Enterprise Reporting top honor for her profile of a nonprofit trying to change biking for women in Afghanistan in “Twowheeled revolution;” the Weekly editorial staff all shared the top honor for Special Section with their BW anniversary issue that profiled everyday people in Boulder County making a difference for good; and art director Sue France (BW’s longest tenured employee) won the Single Page Design category for her “Tourist in Aisle Three” layout in John Lehndorff ’s Nibbles section. And now for our second place awards. Angela K. Evans, Investigative/Enterprise Reporting for her groundbreaking look at immigration abuses in “Opposite of America;” Amanda Moutinho, A&E: Criticism for her “Theater Criticism” (she points out that this gives BW the best Music and Theater criticism in our four-state region); Amanda Moutinho, A&E:

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Enterprise Reporting for “We’re all freaks, together;” Amanda Moutinho (now getting a big head), Science: Enterprise Reporting for “The science of justice;” Angela K. Evans, Health: Enterprise Reporting for “What went wrong with Colorado Health Co-op;” Joel Dyer, News Photography for his work in “Dispatches from Standing Rock;” Susan France, Feature Photography for her photo essay of a roller-skating single mom in “Ain’t too hard for me to jam;” Caitlin Rockett and Amanda Moutinho, Breaking News Story for “Fire blazes through Nederland, neighbors open doors;” Caitlin Rockett, Environment: General Reporting for her look at how coal mining still threatens Colorado wilderness in “Roadless?;” Sarah Hass, Agriculture: Enterprise for “2016 could be the year for industrial hemp;” Matt “the boomerang” Cortina, Environment: Enterprise Reporting for Colorado’s role in California’s Porter Ranch disaster;” Billy Singleton, Agricultural: General reporting for “New exhibit plants viewers in the world of seeds;” Matt “I’m returning to the Weekly soon” Cortina, Education: Enterprise reporting for “The politics of ESSA;” Betsy Welch, Sports: Enterprise Reporting for “Still on the Trail;” Sarah Hass, Legal: Enterprise Reporting for her in-depth examination that took her all the way to the U.N. in search of explaining Colorado’s role in ending the infamous War of Drugs in “Crossing the Threshold,” Emma Murray, Sports: Columns for her coverage of rock climbing; and wrapping up our second-place awards, Christi Turner, Sports: General Reporting for her look at an organization that helps people battle cancer through outdoor adventure in “Outliving it.” And finally, Boulder Weekly won

these third-place honors: Angela K. Evans, Science: General Reporting for “Our last Moment to Act;” Angela K. Evans, News ReportingSingle Story for “Hazardous consequences” a look at a potentially dangerous train crossing; Angela K. Evans, Environment: Enterprise Reporting for “Paying the price” her look at environmental activists who have become targets of violence; Angela K. Evans, Legal: Enterprise Reporting for “Time to revisit Boulder’s controversial camping ban;” Joel Dyer, Politics: General Reporting for “Back to the future,” a look at the 2016 presidential election through the lens of a 20-year-old interview with now-deceased historian Howard Zinn; Joel Dyer, Politics: Enterprise Reporting for “The new harvest of rage,” his examination of the economic roots of the growing antigovernment sentiment in rural America; Caitlin Rockett, Sports: Enterprise Reporting for her profile of a running advocate who is out to teach people that anyone can change their lives for the better in “Born again runner;” Mollie Putzig, Agriculture: Enterprise for “Lightening the load for organic certification;” Christi Turner, Business: Enterprise Reporting for “A compelling reason to ride;” Christi Turner, Agriculture: General Reporting for “Boulder’s sustainable stake in global palm oil;” and last but not least in the third place awards universe is the Boulder Weekly editorial staff, Special Section for our comprehensive coverage of the Conference on World Affairs. Congratulations to all of our winners who continue to provide Boulder Weekly readers with important, informative, award-winning content week after week. Thanks for reading us. Everything we do, we do for you.

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NEWS

O April is for

marches 12 April 20, 2017

Earth Day brings scientists and activists to the streets

n April 22, millions of Americans will celebrate Earth Day, but this year will look a little different than the 46 others that came before. Alongside Earth Day’s traditional offerings like programs to stop deforestation, save endangered species and gatherings where people speak up for a planet that cannot speak for itself, hundreds of thousands of protesters will take to the streets this year — on April 22 for the March for Science and a week later for the People’s Climate Movement on April 29. Not since the first Earth Day have we seen such a public demand for change. As scientist and author of The War on Science, Shawn Otto wrote in Scientific American in October 2016, the “emergence of ‘post-fact’ politics has normalized the denial of scientific evidence that conflicts with the political, religious or economic agendas of authority. Much of this denial centers, now somewhat predictably, around climate change — but not all. If there is a single factor to consider as a barometer that evokes all others in this election, it is the candidate’s attitudes toward science.” As hundreds of thousands of scientists prepare to advocate on behalf of their discipline, they

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Boulder Weekly


Wikimedia Commons/South Bend Voice

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find themselves in an unfamiliar and precarious The People’s Climate position. The scientific method seeks to explain March in September 2014 the events of nature in a testable and reproducible made history as the largest climate march to way, which is to say that scientists are used to letdate. ting the facts speak for themselves. “Many scientists tend to be somewhat introverted, cautious and not particularly interested in political actions of this type,” says Richard Anthes, president emeritus of UCAR and former president of the American Meteorological Society. “That they are speaking up now, and in such number, I think shows the high level of concern about the future of science in the U.S.” Tensions came to a head when, just weeks after Donald Trump took office, his administration began instructing employees in the Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Agricultural and Interior to cease communicating with the general public, issuing a gag order of sorts. Online, people immediately expressed their discontent and, somewhere deep in a thread on reddit, username beaverteeth92 wrote: “There needs to be a Scientists’ March on Washington.” “100 percent,” another user replied. University of Texas Health Science Center postdoctoral fellow Jonathan Berman took the idea seriously, or at least seriously enough to start a Facebook page calling for a March for Science on the mall in Washington D.C. In less than 24 hours, 300,000 people expressed interest. Among those was Denver activist Eric Keitzner, who lay awake in what was one of many sleepless nights following Trump’s inauguration. He saw the March for Science as a call to action he could not ignore. He felt ready to commit to organizing what would become the satellite march in Denver, to mobilize 20,000 people in just two months. The idea settled into reality as he was lying next to his wife in bed. She looked at him and asked if he was sure he wanted to make the commitment. “Positive,” he replied. For Keitzner, it’s not just about the big picture, it’s personal — the funding for his wife’s job in family planning is at risk under the new administration. Right then and there, he started a Facebook page for a Denver satellite march and the next morning 1,500 people had signed up. Richard Anthes didn’t hesitate to join in the action either. Anthes has a legacy of intermingling science with Earth Day activities. In 1995, as president at UCAR in Boulder, he worked to create public events at the city’s many government funded scientific institutions. Back then he told the Daily Camera it was important scientists take an active role in doing what they could to “increase the scientific literacy of the general public” in an effort to instill an environmental consciousness. Since then, he says we have made a lot of progress, not just since 1995, but since Earth Day was instituted in 1970. He cites early victories like removing asbestos from buildings and lead from paint as examples. He describes how we were gaining optimism for how science might help to tackle even bigger, more complex problems like climate change — “were” being the operative word. Now all that he and his peers in the scientific community have worked for is being threatened not only by the Trump administration’s lack of belief in science but also by massive budget cuts of up to 30 percent at institutions like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Renewable Energy lab. “This could have a huge impact, not just on the environment, but on the local economy in Boulder and across Colorado, which depends on the federal government to

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People’s Climate of Colorado

EARTH DAY from Page 13

fund its universities and government labs,” he says. He reminisces about a time when science wasn’t a contentious issue for political debate, but simply a pursuit of enlightenment, a curiosity about the world around us. Humans, he says, are prone to think and wonder about the natural world, about phenomena like “why the moon rises and sets, why the tides pull, why the seasons change and why the winds blow the way they do. We wonder why storms form and die.” “Everything about the environment is associated with a complex set of biological and physical mechanisms,” Anthes says. “For a long time, people didn’t understand those things so they made up stories to explain the unknowns. But gradually, as science became learned and relearned through the generations, we started unraveling many secrets of the world — weather and the climate and the biological cycles and evolution and the list goes on.” Despite our predisposition for scientific pursuits, science hasn’t always been interwoven with government as it has been in the modern era. Since World War I, government has played an increasingly important role in everything from national security to environmental policy to research, development and technology. Anthes says countries that invest in science become great, and the others? “Losers,” he says with a knowing laugh. Today though, science is up for political debate. Hillary Clinton received some of her largest cheers for declaring “I believe in science!” in her speech at the Democratic National Convention. Meanwhile, Donald Trump tweeted that “the concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive,” getting more than 100,000 re-tweets and 67,000 likes. Anthes can’t believe it. “It’s actually crazy,” he says. “None of this should be necessary. Why do we have a march for science? Why do we have a march for truth? It shouldn’t be necessary to waste people’s time and money by marching or protesting the value of science. “Just like,” he pauses, apologizing for the political views he was about to offer up, “Nevermind, because you know what? These views are actually scientifically based, too. You shouldn’t have to have marches for freedom or equality, or against racism or marches for women.” The March for Science is a part of a renaissance of marches proliferating across the country, most notably the Women’s March, which arguably sparked the idea for the March for Science and certainly created the momentum for such actions. The Women’s March brought more than 485,000 protesters to D.C. and 3.2 million to rallies around the world in the weekend following Trump’s inauguration. Speaking about the broader context of protests in the current political climate, Lisa Cutter, organizer of the March on Colorado (formerly the Women’s March on Denver), explains the massive turnout and ongoing movement as the result of finally breaking through what she calls “years of suppression.” She says that on the individual level, women tend to brush incidences of harassment or unequal pay under the rug, “dismissing them as little things, because they don’t seem terribly traumatic.” But as the Women’s March gained momentum, women across the world realized they weren’t alone and that the transgressions they Boulder Weekly


NEWS suffered as individuals added up to an epidemic of international proportions. “This is not so different from climate change,” Cutter adds. “The little things, like decreased annual snowpack in the Rockies or more tornadoes in the south, one-byone they might be easy to ignore, but when you add it all up, it’s dire, too.” To offer the big picture narrative on climate change, the People’s Climate Movement is revving back up for a day of global protest on April 29, including in Denver. It’s the next iteration of the September 2014 People’s Climate March on the eve of the United Nation’s Climate Summit. That effort resulted in the largest march for the climate in history thus far. Since then, the organization has taken a hiatus from massive marches, opting instead for teach-ins, youth education and localized actions. Back then, activist Bill Mckibben issued the call for the march as “an invitation to change everything,” in hopes that the environmental movement could find an identity in the age of climate change. Global warming presented a big and amorphous problem, one that affected everyone, but in many diverse ways. To rally global momentum to address the complex mechanisms at play, McKibben knew the movement needed a face, but he also knew that just one spokesperson wouldn’t do. They needed to find 600,000 faces from all around the world. The potential was there, the problem was how to seed the cloud. By many accounts, the march was a success, catalyzing the creation of the most concrete and significant global climate policies ever put forward by the U.N. In part, this success was attributed to the apolitical nature of the protests that left behind party politics in order to focus on humanity itself. On the contrary, the 2017 People’s Climate Movement march is driven by pointed politicism aimed squarely at the Trump administration and its anti-environmental rhetoric and actions — specifically against such policies as the March 27 executive order that begins to repeal the Clean Power Plan and other environmental protections. The Movement’s messaging is clearly pointed at Trump and the rhetoric is ripe with war-like language, as in this statement on peoplesclimate.org: “Everything we have struggled to move forward in the United States is in peril. Our loved ones feel under siege, and those in power in Washington are advancing a dark and dangerous vision of America that we know is untrue. To change everything, we need everyone.” Jackie Vail, one of five organizers of the Denver Climate March, says she is fighting like her life depends on it, “because it does.” And on April 29, she expects to be joined by up to 20,000 Coloradans who feel the same sense of desperation. Vail offers emotional anecdotes about trying to get through to her conservative family, or about her trips to coastal Haiti already ravaged by rising sea waters. “It might not be a good thing,” she says, “but I tend to think with my heart.” She imagines that many marchers will be driven by similarly personal experiences. Sometimes, emotion is an important part of political action. After all, as Mckibben wrote in his original call to march printed in The New Yorker in 2014, “In a rational world, no one would need to march.” But sometimes, Richard Anthes says, emotion can cloud our judgment. “No matter what your political leanings, belief and prejudice can get so strong that they block your rational thinking and you are just unwilling to accept scientific evidence that goes against your cultural or your religious beliefs. On the right, this could be denial of global warming and on the left, the disposition that GMOs are a bad thing, for example.” But while science may be immune from moral and emotional persuasion, scientists themselves are not. While the March for Science has drawn support from prominent scientists around the country, some are worried that the March for Science is inappropriate and may send the wrong message about the ethics of the profession. Physicist Sylvester James Gates warned that “such a politically charged event might send a message to the public that scientists are driven by ideology more than by evidence.” And, writing in the New York Times, geologist Robert S. Young argues that the march will “reinforce the narrative from skeptical conservatives that scientists are an interest group and politicize their data, research and findings for their own ends.” Denver organizer of the March for Science Eric Keitzner says that while he tends to agree that could happen (and in some sense has already happened), there is simply no time left to delay or waver in taking action. “Make no mistake, this march popped up in direct opposition to the gag orders on the EPA, on the National Park Service and on the silencing of the scientific community at large,” he says. “Our intention is to have direct impacts on policy makers by advocating for evidence-based policy and fact-based decision making.” Boulder Weekly

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For more information and tickets visit Naropa.edu/events 16 April 20, 2017

ON THE BILL: I Am Not Your Negro followed by a Q&A with Harry Belafonte. Friday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. Lory Student Center Theatre, 1101 Center Ave. Mall, Fort Collins, 970-491-6444. Wikimedia Commons

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here’s a specific deeper nuance in the distexture to his cussion of race in voice when he America, a discussion still speaks, a raspy required today. tone to his “It falls into a certain words. At age 90, he social hypocrisy,” he employs a certain cadence explains. “We speak to the reflective of an earlier genglory of this nation, we eration’s charm. A time speak to higher moral when using the titles of Ms. standards. We speak to all and Mr. or inquiring about sorts of things that would the weather didn’t signify a suggest we are the practiformality but was a way of tioners of love on a wholeestablishing human connecsale basis. But the truth of tion, a way to move the the matter is ... we’re conversation not only forbuilding more prisons in ward but deeper. After a America than we’re buildbrief discussion of ing universities, than we’re Colorado’s sunshine, Mr. building schools. These Harry Belafonte launches are the things that coninto his memories of James stantly demonstrate that Baldwin and his thoughts we’ve got to find a way to on the new documentary I stop the hypocrisy and Am Not Your Negro. The become more honest, singer, actor and activist understanding what we’re will be in Fort Collins on doing to one another and Friday at a screening of the flip that coin.” film on the closing night of He says the great the ACT Human Rights dream, the great hope of Film Festival at Colorado the civil rights movement, State University. was that America could Harry Belafonte (center with Sidney Poitier left and Charlton Heston “I knew Mr. Baldwin not only extol the ideals of right at the 1963 March on Washington) was a prominent figure of the pretty well,” Belafonte democratic equality but civil rights movement, and he hasn’t slowed down since. truly embody them. It is a begins, reminding me the dream that extends to this two spent quite a great deal singer and actor. He spoke at the hisday, the belief that “we can achieve a of time together at the American writtoric March on Washington in 1963 er’s home in the South of France. and joined Baldwin in his meetings dis- truly democratic state by the large configuration of mixed races, mixed cul“He left to go to France because the cussing race relations in the U.S. with tures, America the melting pot of the issues of race suffocated him,” he says. then-Attorney General Robert universe,” he says. “We sense this aspect However, “I think the great upheaval in Kennedy. of our historic character, but we don’t this country on the issues of civil rights “I watched [Mr. Baldwin] agonize struck a chord of great guilt in Mr. over his conflict with America,” he says. seem to be comfortable with it.” From the conquering of Native Baldwin himself. That he was in France “I was always aware of it, but [watching Americans when Europeans first while the rest of his clan was struggling the film] I became very once again arrived on the continent to the slave with the issues of segregation and all of touched by the depth of his anguish trade, 100 years of slavery, another centhe things that the civil rights moveand pain. It wasn’t just that he was tury of segregation, and now the mass ment stood for.” upset with the issue of race, he was incarceration of a disproportionate An outspoken champion of human deeply pained by it.” number of African-Americans, true rights for more than 60 years, Mr. Scripted from Baldwin’s unfinished integration still alludes us, Mr. Belafonte himself was intricately work Remember this House about Belafonte says. involved in the civil rights activism of Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King Jr. “There seems to be a redundancy in 1960s America. He was a close friend and Malcom X, Mr. Belafonte calls I social behavior,” he says. “We just don’t and confidant of Martin Luther King Am Not Your Negro a “beautifully conseem to be able to yield, to take the Jr., bankrolling the King family for structed” piece of cinema. But more higher moral view of race in this counyears with the fortune he made as a importantly, he says, it addresses a Boulder Weekly


Wikimedia Commons

try. And I think it is eating away at the American soul.” Not that there hasn’t been progress, he maintains. Slavery was abolished, the Civil Rights Act and other laws passed and have been upheld in the courts. “But the process is excruciatingly slow,” he says. “All that being said, there’s still this strain on our social integration,” he continues. “The great problem we have of the conflict with law enforcement, the shooting down of young black men, the insistence of having laws like stand your ground.” It’s a law he says that directly points to the deep racial division in the U.S., despite what its advocates argue. Still engaged as a humanitarian and activist, Mr. Belafonte is unafraid to point out our shortcomings. And it’s always been that way. Courtesy of Harry Belafonte As the civil rights movement waned, Mr. Belafonte went on to protest South Africa’s apartheid government, help raise awareness of the AIDS epiMr. Belafonte will host a Q&A at the ACT Human demic on the Rights Film Festival on African contiApril 21 at CSU. nent and work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. More recently, he co-chaired the 2017 Women’s March on Washington and works with the ACLU to promote criminal justice reform. “All the integration and harmony that takes place in the practice of arts, culture, theater, sports, it all seems to work,” he says. “But we have not been able to translate that into social conduct. ...” “Dr. King once said, the greatest display of the separation of races can be seen every Sunday because we all go to worship at our different places of choice but it’s never really with each other.” Mr. Belafonte often evokes the memory of his friends now gone, peers in the civil rights struggle who have since passed away. Unprompted, these references aren’t for show. It’s clear he holds their words close, small reminders of what has yet to be achieved. “As Eleanor Roosevelt, who was a very close friend of mine said, we’re putting a terrible burden on the educational system, trying to hold the schools of America responsible for practicing the higher art of integration, when in fact the burden shouldn’t be on schools, it should be on communities,” he says. “As long as we stay a sepBoulder Weekly

arate society, our institutions behave in a separatist way.” There is a point in the conversation where a hint of disappointment creeps in, an acknowledgement of the fact that despite all Mr. Belafonte and his peers accomplished, there still seems so much left to do. “[I] wish it would have happened from the life I have lived in the past, but it seems to be an eternal journey.” He pauses. “I’ve spent so much of my life being touched by issues that have to do with race and I would like to over-

come that. I would like to get that out of my vocabulary, get that off the canvas. I’d like my palette to be of different shades of human expression.” And yet the issue of race persists in the U.S., making films like I Am Not Your Negro more pertinent than ever. “We still have to push aside these obstructions,” he says. “The sooner we do that, the more joyous we will find ourselves as a people. I really believe the rewards are far more delightful than the pain and the anguish we are experiencing trying to understand each other.”

An unfinished work by James Baldwin serves as the framework for I Am Not Your Negro.

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boulderganic Never more important, never so dangerous

Environmental activists around the world face violence and opposition by Angela K. Evans Giles Clarke/Global Witness

“It’s difficult to reconcile yourself to the fact it may be your last day, your last moment, you know? But my spirits are up again. ... We keep on going. Despite everything, we keep on going.” — Tomas Gómez, Honduran environmental activist

T

he March 2016 assassination of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cáceres led to a global outcry against the violence environmental and indigenous activists around the world face everyday. But in the year since her death, hundreds more activists have been killed, and countless others face persecution as largescale development projects threaten the land and natural resources they hold dear. “We hear every couple of months another prominent activist that is murdered, and I’m sure there are many that we never hear about,” says Peter Kostishack, director of programs for Boulderbased Global Greengrants Fund (GGF), which supports grassroots environmental actions throughout the world. “There are obviously certain countries and parts of the world where it’s particularly dangerous to be an environmentalist. But also, the murders are part and parcel of a larger set of constraints.” Global Witness, a nonprofit investigating global human rights and environmental abuses, reports that 2015 was the most dangerous year on record for environmental activists, with 185 documented murders. Ben Leather, campaigner for the organization, says that while Global Witness is still confirming the data, more than 200 activists were killed last year, including Cáceres. And this doesn’t include those already murdered in 2017, such as Mexican environmental activist and former GGF grantee Isidro Baldenegro López, who was gunned down in January. For decades, Baldenegro had fought deforestation around the ancestral lands of his indigenous Tarahumara people in the western Sierra Madre mountains. And only a couple days after Baldenegro’s assassination, Sebastian Alonso, 72, died

Assassinations are just one part of the equation, Kostishack adds. There’s also the increasing criminalization of indigenous and environmental activists who speak out against governments and corporations, which has led to prison sentences and the closing of environmental organizations opposed to corporate development of natural resources. “We look at all of these things together, the violence, the criminalization, the closing civil society space, and they’re all parts of a larger trend,” he says. In response, GGF recently implemented a $40,000 fundraising campaign to address the immediate needs of activists under threat around the world. “We’re trying to make more resources available both on the side of protecting and preventing violence and arrests of activists when it’s needed. And also to strengthen the security protocol and practices of local organizations that we support,” Kostishack says. “And of course to support groups that are dealing with legal needs.” Western countries aren’t immune, either, both Leather and Kostishack say. Kostishack specifically cites the environmental and indigenous protests in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline that took place last year near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, which were met with militarized law enforcement and multiple arrests. Leather points to proposed laws in multiple states that could criminalize the social protest and activism that has been such an important part of the environmental movement for decades. “The killings are the sharp end of a broader wave of repression of environmental activism,” Leather says. “While thee violence is at the worst d Tim imiteAmerica, levels inLLatin this is part of a trend of repression that is truly global, that extends to the To Up live countries that we in.” Tomas Gómez kneels at the grave of an environmentalist killed during a 2013 protest.

of gunshot wounds sustained while protesting a hydroelectric dam in Guatemala. “It’s never been more important to defend our planet and yet it’s never been more dangerous to do so,” Leather says. Cáceres reported 33 death threats to authorities before her assassination, he continues, and yet the Honduran authorities failed to protect her. She was known for her outspoken yet peaceful campaign against a hydroelectric project near her home, and was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize in 2015 for her efforts. She was also a GGF grantee. But since her death, at least three members of her organization have been killed, according to Global Witness, and many others have been threatened, including Tomas Gómez who now runs the nonprofit in Cáceres’s absence. “Honduras is emblematic,” he says. “The factors behind the attacks are corruption around large-scale economic projects on the one hand ... And on the other hand, the complete lack of consultation of the communities that will be affected by the environmental degradation of those projects.”

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ADVENTURE

All photos by Donnie Heden, courtesy of Coley Glasgow

ON THE BILL:

Fishpeople. 7 p.m. Thursday, April 27, Patagonia, 1431 15th St., Denver, 303-446-9500. This is a free event.

TRANSFORMED BY THE SEA

In Patagonia’s new film, the ocean is the star by Emma Murray

T

welve minutes and thirty-eight seconds into Patagonia’s new film Fishpeople, you’re underwater in Tahiti, looking up at one of the world’s most powerful waves crashing upon you. Bubbles churn and sunlight is suddenly obscured as the water fractures all sense of place and time. Without pause, the wave rolls on, leaving us, the fish and ocean bric-a-brac to float about, disturbed, but at peace. Behind the camera, Keith Malloy directs the shot. For him, a 42-year-old lifelong surfer, this scene encapsulates his sentiments about the ocean: powerful, transformative, disruptive, but ultimately positive. “I couldn’t imagine a better way to clear my mind and hit the reset button,” Malloy says. Over the course of the short documentary’s 48 minutes, six stories are told: six lives transformed by the ocean in six ways around the globe. “I wanted to show how the ocean can be such a positive influence

Boulder Weekly

in life — how healthy it is to be in and be around it,” he says. The ocean has been a pervasive source of positivity in Malloy’s life since he was born in Southern California. When he was 4, his father pushed him out on his first surfboard. The giddy weightlessness changed something in him, offset some inner balance that he hadn’t known to pay attention to. Until his late teenage years when he moved to Hawaii, Malloy lived and surfed primarily in California with his two brothers. The trio quickly became wave-riding forces renowned among the bare-chested surfers of Hawaii to the wetsuit-wearing surfers in Baja California. see SEA Page 22

April 20 , 2017 21


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At first, Malloy spent most of his surfing career in front of the camera. While traveling around the globe Whether it’s spearfishing or with the U.S. national surf team, photos of him eventuocean photograally graced the cover of Surfer and Surfing magazines phy, Fishpeople explores the seven times. Malloy and his brothers grew famous for ocean’s positheir quest to perfect “the lost art of being a waterman.” tive influence on people’s lives. The low-key Californian boys could ride big waves, they could dive, paddleboard and body surf. They were inventing new gear and began making movies. They also happened to be known as some of the nicest humans around. For Malloy, his pursuits were as much about riding waves as they were about connecting with the people he met on shore. He personally knows each person in the cast of Fishpeople or was introduced via a close friend. As he started reaching out, seeing if anyone was interested in taking part in the film, he noticed excitement bubble among them all. The ocean’s positive influence seemed to transcend place, age, rhyme or reason. While Malloy was living in Oahu over a decade ago, he met Kimi Werner, a U.S. National Spearfishing Champion and devout marine conservationist. The movie opens with her story. We see her dive, mermaidlike, more than 70 feet in a single breath, navigating the cool blue water’s intricate coral reef maze. She hunts for tropical fish the size of her torso and returns with them back to the surface. A theme of humility runs throughout the film. Six years ago, when Malloy was in Tahiti working on a bodysurfing movie, he met Matahi Drollet, then a pubescent boy who was on the cusp of becoming one of the world’s best big-wave riders. His story taps into a deep respect for the sea that he’s learned from his predecessors and family: “My grandfather and dad always told me to be humble in the water,” he says in the film. “First you have to show respect to nature and the ocean.” Malloy didn’t actually know Lynne Cox, a long-distance open-water swimmer and author from California, until a friend brought her to his attention. “I loved her story,” Malloy says. “She was inspiring and well-spoken, and I wanted to learn more about her.” On camera, we see Cox swim across the Bering Strait and jump wetsuit-less into Antarctica’s churning sea — both of which were unprecedented feats that resulted in raising awareness about social and environmental issues. In questioning the impossible and pushing the limits of human endeavor, Cox’s main mission is to use her accomplishments to help connect communities and fortify humanity’s relationship with the natural world. The same mission statement could be applied to the work of Eddie Donnellan, a long-time friend of Malloy and “super-nice human” who uses his surfing knowledge to offset the selfishness inherent to the one-person-to-one-board-to-onewave sport. Donnellan’s life work is to share the sea’s therapeutic properties with at-risk youth across California’s Bay Area. We see his relationship with his mentee — Anthony, an 11-year-old inner city boy — grow while surfing. “You know, I needed an escape as a kid,” Donnellan says in the film. “[Surfing] Boulder Weekly


ADVENTURE Photo by Donnie Heden, courtesy of Coley Glasgow

gave me this amazing place to experience life. I was raised by my mom and my mom always taught me to Keith Malloy let the characters really, really share any joy that you have in life. ... If I and beauty of can do anything, one thing to help that family, that’s Fishpeople drive a subtle environwhy I do what I do.” mental message. Australian photographer Ray Collins also used the ocean as an escape. After suffering a workplace injury in the coalmines, he decided to pick up swimming for physical and mental rehab. The ocean de-stressed him. He took a camera out with him and started snapping photos of breaking waves. In the film you see him bobbing up and down, capturing water droplets colliding in the air, cerulean curls and white peaks mid-tango, preserving beauty through his lens. “I loved the fact that he just shoots photos of the ocean,” Malloy says. “It’s usually all about surfing, but now it’s about capturing [the ocean’s magic.]” Back in Malloy’s pro-surfing days, he met Dave Rastovich, a lanky, outspoken Aussie heralded as one of the “most gifted waveriders in the world.” Rastovich’s ability to tap into the ocean swell’s energy left a big impression on Malloy. Rastovich’s laid-back, albeit impassioned, commentary about translating surfing’s simplicity into the rest of life echoes Malloy’s conviction about the ocean’s transformative powers. As Rastovich rides, he is stoic, his body relaxed, almost as though he’s riding down an empty escalator, only a wave twice his height towers above him, threatening to crash. In the film, Rastovich says, “[Surfing has] soothed pains that are really real. I remember when my dad died I just kept going back to the ocean and it made a huge difference.” Across the stories, the ocean’s beauty and power is undeniable. The film’s political ambitions are a bit more covert. Malloy doesn’t conjure any direct call for environmental conservation. Rather, he relies upon the ocean’s compelling, vivid beauty to make the case for itself. Between the awe-inspiring shots and first-person experiences, feeling inspired to protect the power and the beauty isn’t hard. “The people may seem like the main characters,” Malloy says, “but the ocean is really the star. Everyone else is just the supporting cast.” Malloy didn’t want the film to be a preachy political statement, although as a company Patagonia has taken firm stances on certain issues. Mostly, he wants viewers to enjoy the experience. “I like the fact that we don’t have an overbearing environmental message, but hopefully that is the effect.” Now, after more than two years of devoting himself to the film, spending time away from home, Malloy can finally fully soak in the fact that it’s done. His message can be shared. Malloy and his wife Lauren have two daughters, aged 5 and 2. They have their own surfboards, and surf their own waves. Malloy hopes the ocean will help set them on their own path to peace and happiness.

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Boulder Weekly


buzz

Photograph by Alexis Adler

THE PROCESS OF BECOMING Two MCA exhibits chronicle artists in formation by Amanda Moutinho “Basquiat in the apartment” (1981) Ryan McGinley/ Courtesy Team Gallery

“Self portrait (crying)” (2001) Photograph by Alexis Adler

“Painted television in apartment” (1979-80) Ryan McGinley/Courtesy Collection of Michael and Michelle Fries

N

o artist steps up to the canvas with a fully formed style. It’s easy to forget that once upon a time, famous artists were in training, finding their voice through trial and error, absorbing the world around them and translating it all through their work. “No artist operates in a vacuum,” says Nora Abrams, curator at Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. “And no artist is alone in the studio in silence. Everyone stands on the shoulders of those before them. Everyone is always looking around at what’s happening in their own context, and some people translate that directly and some people abstract from it.” It’s this process that is now on display in MCA Denver’s two latest shows Basquiat Before Basquiat East 12th Street, 1979-1980 and Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Both shows , curated by Abrams, look at the cultivation of an artist. The exhibits showcase art made in the early stages of their respective careers, when both artists consistently blurred the line between art and life. Prolific painter and neo-expressionist, Jean-Michel Basquiat is noted as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. He started his career in his late teens, running away from home in 1978 to downtown Manhattan where he would become a well-known graffiti artist under the moniker SAMO, which aptly stands for Same Old Shit. He bounced around from friends’ couches to living on the streets, until he settled into his first semi-permanent residence, an apartment on East 12th Street with friend Alexis Adler, who contributed the artifacts in the exhibit. With Before Basquiat, Abrams strived to evoke the 400-square-foot apartment itself, calling attention to the details and intimacy of the objects. The space, barely enough for the two people living there, lacked a formal studio. So, Basquiat began emoting on any surface he could. “He was this tremendously creative and sophisticated mind, filtering and absorbing ideas and refracting them in his art in all these different ways,” Abrams says. “It’s on clothing, it’s on the floor of the apartment, it’s on the refrigerator door, it’s in his notebook that he kept. It’s apparent in all these different forms.” During this one year of his career, he dabbled in drawing, writing, music, fashion and more. In this apartment, it was the first time he was able to experiment in a sustained manner. The viewer can see how Basquiat’s ideas evolved. He drew inspiration from anything and everything that was around him, like his roomate’s biology textbooks. In Basquiat’s notebook, on display in the show, he wrote down scientific notations and chemical symbols, which would later turn up in his mature pieces including some of his best-known works such as “Eroica.” “It’s wonderful to be able to share ... this really special insight into an artist that’s in the process of becoming,” Abrams says. “Nothing is fully formed. It’s not fully baked yet. He’s still working through a lot of different modes of making art and ideas. And therefore it’s this really rare access or window into an artist in formation.” This notion is also apparent in The Kids Were Alright featuring the work of consee BECOMING Page 26

“SACE” (2001)

Boulder Weekly

April 20, 2017 25


Photograph by Alexis Adler

Ryan McGinley/Courtesy Team Gallery

“Refrigerator in the apartment” (1979-80) ; “Red Mirror” (1999)

BECOMING from Page 25

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26 April 20, 2017

temporary photographer Ryan impactful for anyone.” McGinley. The show features Both artists went on to have sucessMcGinley’s work from 1998 to 2003, ful careers, although Basquiat’s was cut when he was in art school in New York, short by his death in 1988, while on the verge of his career. It displays his McGinley continues to produce. Abrams formal photography and 1,700 Polaroids says looking at the early stages of each that chronicle the day-to-day personal artist’s work provides more layers of lives of McGinley and his friends, from meaning by understanding the context moments of self-discovery to adventure that aided to developing their voice. to sorrow. You can see the early semblage of “This is a life in all of its hard living, personal style that shows up later in falling in love, all the antics, all of the their work. For example, Abrams cites adventures, all the joys, all the anxieties, McGinley’s flair for working with light all the fears,” Abrams and capturing the says. body. In many ways, “Also, even when ON THE BILL: McGinley represents the material is gritBasquiat Before Basquiat East 12th Street, 1979-1980. Through the next generation of ty and difficult, it May 14. artists influenced by still has a youthful Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Through Aug. 20. Basquiat’s work and optimism and freeMuseum of Contemporary Art, life. This is explicitly dom and carefree 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303298-7554. apparent in one of the irreverence that will photos taken of continue on McGinley’s room throughout his where a Basquiat book sits on the shelf. work,” she says. “There’s something of a myth of Before Basquiat ends with one of his Basquiat that was so powerful to younger later works called “Untitled Cadmium” artists and artists coming up after him,” (1984), which features some of the developing patterns seen in the rest of she says. “Right or wrong, fact or fiction, the show fully realized, including there’s a sense that Basquiat was almost Basquiat’s use of collage and symbols too creative for this world ... Ryan will like the sacred heart. admit that myth was really inspirational “[The piece] is the punctuation to artists of his generation.” mark of the whole project,” she says. And even though their art is wildly “To basically show that all these different, the two share similar things that you’ve seen percolating approaches. along the way as you journey through “[For McGinley], downtown New York was both a backdrop and a muse, the spaces come together in his mature work.” the way it had been for Basquiat. ... Both exhibits show the artists before [The work is] important because it they officially earned the “artist” title. exemplifies youth culture at a certain They exemplify the young artist’s life moment in time in a certain place — where life and art are one in the same. leaving your family, gaining and find“It’s him in action of being himself,” ing your own independence, before you Abrams says. “We are witnessing a life have a lot of responsibility. What hapbeing lived.” pens in those few years is incredibly Boulder Weekly


Boulder Weekly

April 20, 2017 27


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overtones Take it easy, sweet and slow

response work song performed to a steady beat that both paces and assuages the back-breaking work of brick laying while also indoctrinating the workers to the purpose of their menial labor. “Who do we call the enemy?/The enemy is poverty/And the wall keeps out the enemy/And we build the wall to keep us free/That’s why we build the wall/We build the wall to keep us free.” Now, in between productions, Mitchell is still grappling with the songs in her Brooklyn apartment, “tinkering with lines and little moments,” in preparation for the opera’s sechere is a rhythmic force that lives deep inside of ond opening in November in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Anaïs Mitchell. On stage she can’t help but pop and In the way she talks about her work, it’s clear this isn’t a vain bob, as if punctuating the sing-songy undulations of effort easily satisfied. Mitchell is searching for something her acoustic songs with a drum only she can hear. noble in her art, crafting music strong enough to somehow All the while, she swirls her guitar in little circles as lift the lonely burdens of suffering. the songs pour out, as if the two of them are sculpting the “I guess I believe, and am sort of holding out hope, that air into music, pulling vespers of folk out of the ether. if the words are all put together in the right way that some It isn’t just her stage presence demanding attention, but sort of alchemical thing happens with the song, that it will also her voice — it’s deceptively soft and sweet, resonating sort of give it life, or wings,” she says. “It’s taken awhile, I with a deep inner bellow like thunder dipped in honey. If know, but it’s almost like I hadn’t yet lived through the you follow the sacexperiences I needed Jay Sansone charine trail of her in order to finish it.” voice, her songs won’t It was theater just move you but that first brought bring you with them, Mitchell to the muse into the shadows of that both she and the Vermont woods Hadestown had where Mitchell grew patiently awaited — up. And there she’ll it taught her how to tell you archetypal work and how to let stories of kings, of other people help. lone hunters, of what She relishes in what it’s like to go to hell she describes as the and back. “communion of col“I like the idea laboration” and the that there is nothing mysterious generosity new under the sun, of spirit that she saw AnaÏs Mitchell in rehearsals that we all are expericome to life on stage, for Hadestown. encing these themes but that was familiar like heartbreak and to her as a musician. war,” Mitchell says. “Whether as a “We think it’s our private experience, but these things have songwriter or writer of theater, you aren’t just creating somebeen written about again and again. Working with them feels thing that’s going to come out of your mouth, it’s something like the most intimate and honest thing I can do. In trying to that will live or die by the voice of other people,” she says. figure out what is true for me within them, I am able to figure “It’s all about the space that you leave, to give the song a out what is true for everyone.” chance to catch the light. It’s the same thing Her most recent project is a theatrical I find inspirational about folk music — those embodiment of her lyrical art, transformsongs have lived in so many voices and in ON THE BILL: Anaïs ing her 2010 concept album Hadestown that way they are immortal.” Mitchell. 7 p.m. Friday, into a folk opera adapted for the stage. A At age 36, and now mother to a 3-yearApril 28, 500 W. Main St., Lyons, 303-823-0848 storytelling master of the contemporary old daughter, Mitchell has become viscerally folk tradition, Mitchell is adept at creating aware of her own mortality. Watching her worlds out of her songs, and theater only child grow makes her realize she’s not (quite serves to breathe new life into her imagiso) young anymore, and gives her the feeling nary landscapes. that she’s crossed an invisible threshold into the next generaThis time she tells the story of Orpheus, son of Apollo, a tion. mortal man both graced and cursed with the gift of musical “And so passes a lifetime,” she says. genius. Speaking through his character, she lures audiences “I was raised Quaker and there is this idea in the from the plains where “love and music aren’t enough to surQuaker faith of a calling, that the spirit moves you to do vive the winter,” bringing them down to a hellish undersomething and moving with that is the way to live right. I world, “an industrialized land of mindless labor” ruled by the always knew singing was what I was meant to do, but I’ll devil himself. never know where it will lead.” She pauses to search for a Since writing the songs 10 years ago, the world has come lyric. “My friend wrote this and this pretty much sums it around to give them an uncanny context. One particularly up: ‘Take it all easy and sweet and slow/When you get where you’re going/There will be some place else to go.’” penetrating song, “Why We Build the Wall,” is a call and

AnaÏs Mitchell on letting art take the lead by Sarah Haas

T

Boulder Weekly

April 20, 2017 29


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BOULDER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Season Finale: The Pines of Rome

MICHAEL BUTTERMAN, MUSIC DIRECTOR

SATURDAY, APRIL 22—7:30 PM 7KHVSLULWRIΖWDO\SHUPHDWHVRXUVHDVRQȴQDOH ZLWKLQȵXHQFHVIURPWKH5HQDLVVDQFHWRWRGD\ Concertmaster Charles Wetherbee is joined by his CU colleague, Nicolò Spera, for the last of our season’s pairings—a world premiere for violin and guitar by Stephen Goss based on Italo Calvino’s novel Invisible Cities2UFKHVWUDO favorites from Verdi and Puccini prepare the way for the surround-sound splendor of Respighi’s Pines of Rome Plus, check our website for info on April musical hikes and a Wine & Music Progressive Pairings Event of Note. 30 April 20, 2017

Photo: Glenn Ross Photo

Macky Auditorium, CU Boulder

Tickets start at $13; Students $5 www.BoulderPhil.org ȏ 303.449.1343 Boulder Weekly


arts & culture Ending with a bang

Boulder Phil concludes a historic season by Peter Alexander

T

he Boulder Philharmonic ends a spectacular season Saturday with the spectacular orchestral fireworks of Respighi’s Pines of Rome. The 2016–17 season saw sell-out performances, a trip to Washington D.C.’s Kennedy Center and national recognition at the Shift Festival of American Orchestras. “We’re celebrating a successful season, and one that’s been historic for us,” says Michael Butterman, music director. “I wanted to have an exclamation point at the end of the season.” Respighi’s showpiece is the culmination of an almost allItalian program. Everything on the concert is either by an Italian, based on Italian music or — in the case of the world premiere of a concerto by Welsh composer Stephen Goss — inspired by an Italian novel. Courtesy of Stephen Goss Goss’s piece was written for guitarist Nicolò Spera and the Phil’s concertmaster, violinist Charles Wetherbee, both CU faculty members. His Double Concerto for violin, guitar, strings and percussion is titled Invisible Cities, which is also a short novel by Italo Calvino that is a favorite of Spera. “It is one of the visionary books in the whole landscape of Italian literature,” Spera says. “You can put it right next to Dante’s Divina Commedia (Divine comedy).” A Welshman among The novel imagines conItalians: Stephen versations between Marco Goss’s concerto, based on a novel Polo and the Chinese emperof Italo Calvino, will or Kublai Khan. Polo be premiered by the Boulder Philhardescribes the cities of the monic. Chinese Empire that he has visited, but that the Emperor has never seen. In the course of the novel, it turns out that Polo is actually describing his home city of Venice. Goss says that his score is both inspired by scenes that Polo describes and built on the intricate structure of the novel. The nine chapters of the novel are reflected in nine sections of the concerto. The book’s division into 55 descriptive poems and intervening prose conversations is reflected in an alternation between five titled movements and four dialogues between guitar and violin. “Each movement has its own world, so they’re all quite separate in terms of mood and character and atmosphere,” Goss says. “Between each of the five movements there are dialogues with just the two soloists. The violin part glances toward Italy, because that’s the part that represents Marco Polo. The guitar part is more Kublai Khan and tends to be a little more eastern in flavor.” Spera is looking forward to the premiere. “It’s very exciting because the performers, Charles and I and the orchestra, Boulder Weekly

ON THE BILL: Boulder Philharmonic Season Finale. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 22, Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Tickets: 303-449-1343, boulderphil. org.

will discover the piece at almost the same moment as the audience,” he says. “I think it’s going to be a beautiful experience. There are some moments in my part when I get entranced, deeply moved by how powerful and beautiful this piece can be.” The program opens with Igor Stravinsky’s Monumentum pro Gesualdo, an arrangement of renaissance madrigals by a composer known both for his adventurous harmonies and for murdering his wife and her lover. “Gesualdo is very much forward thinking in terms of his harmonic language,” Butterman says. “I think that struck a chord with Stravinsky, who was interested in viewing work from the past through the prism of his 20th-century ears. There are tart chords that are Stravinskian, but I think people will find it very listenable.” Stravinsky’s re-interpretation of Renaissance madrigals will be followed by Luciano Berio’s re-interpretation of a classical-era piece, Four Original Versions of Boccherini’s Return of the Nightwatch from Madrid. Originally composed for string quintet, Boccherini’s catchy march was used by the composer in four different versions, which are combined and reorchestrated for large orchestra in Berio’s arrangement. After the Goss premiere and intermission the program continues with Verdi’s Overture to Nabucco and an early string work by Puccini, The Chrysanthemums. “It seemed impossible to trace the evolution of Italian music, if that’s what we’re doing, without opera and the contributions of Verdi and Puccini,” Butterman says. “For any orchestra that doesn’t play a lot of opera it’s nice to be able to encounter these wonderful and important composers.” The concert will close with The Pines of Rome, which, Butterman points out, includes extremes of orchestral sound. “It has everything from ear-splitting fortissimos to incredibly delicate and gentle moments,” he says. Among the gentle moments is the section titled “The Pines of the Janiculum,” a quiet nocturne that includes delicate solos from the clarinet and other woodwinds and ends with a recording of a nightingale — probably the first recording of natural sounds incorporated into live performance. That moment of reflection is followed immediately by “The Pines of the Appian Way,” depicting the march of Roman legions along the broad highway leading into Rome. As the legions approach, Respighi calls for Buccine, the circular horns of the Roman military. Sadly, Buccine no longer exist, so those parts have to be played by antiphonal choirs of flugelhorns, bringing the piece, the concert, and the season, to a thunderous ending.

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Courtesy of Boulder Theater

Hashimoto’s Protocol 2 p.m. Saturday, April 22, Barnes & Noble, 2999 Pearl St., 303-444-0349. Dr. Izabella Wentz, author of the no. 1 New York Times best seller Hashimoto’s Protocol: A 90-Day Plan for Reversing Thyroid Symptoms and Getting Your Life Back, stops by Barnes & Noble for a talk, reading and book signing Saturday. A renowned clinical pharmacologist, Wentz was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease at 27 years old. She has since conducted extensive research on the autoimmune disease and written three books advocating practical lifestyle changes for those suffering from it. — Billy Singleton

Courtesy of The Dairy

3rd Law Dance/Theater: The Elision Project Vol. 2 April 21-23, Gordon Gamm Theater at The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-938-8656. The Elision Project will perform for three nights at The Dairy in an innovative collaboration combining live music and dance. The project is a joint effort between 3rd Law Dance/Theater and local composers including Conor Brown, Jesse Manno and Tom Wasinger, who have written original scores for the event. 3rd Law’s name references Newton’s third law of motion (every action has an equal and opposite reaction), a fitting thought for an event based so deeply in teamwork. — Billy Singleton

Courtesy of Public Works/Shawn Cupolo

RAHUL SHARMA AND ZAKIR HUSSAIN. 6 P.M. SUNDAY, APRIL 23, BOULDER THEATER, 2032 14TH ST., BOULDER, 303-786-7030. see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly

Flight of Fancy April 22-23, 29-30, The Hive at East Simpson Coffee Co., 414 E. Simpson St., Lafayette, 720-502-7010. Part puppetry and part theater, Flight of Fancy tells the story of a girl who befriends a lonely puffin for an unforgettable adventure. The Public Works Theater Company production features music, animal puppets, cartoon masks and a vivid soundtrack. Their productions strive to fan the flames of creativity, self-awarness and curiosity. Tickets and showtimes are available at publicworkstheatre.com. Catch a follow-up performance May 6 at the Firehouse Art Center. — Billy Singleton

April 20, 2017 33


EVENTS from Page 33

UPCOMING EVENTS

Thursday, April 20 Music 420 Spectacular featuring Steal Your Peach: Allman Brothers/Grateful Dead Mashup, Rumpke Mountain Boys. 3 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-849-8458. Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW. Celebrate 420 at The Farm. 8 a.m. The Farm Dispensary, 2801 Iris Ave., Boulder, 303-440-1323. The Expendables. 7:30 a.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Fareed/Monica Trio. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Special Radio Show Taping celebrating more than a quarter century of eTown!

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Mavis Staples 28 & Ani DiFranco

Kitchen Dwellers with Part and Parcel & Kind Country. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Outback Saloon Open Mic Night. 9 p.m. Outback Saloon, 3141 28th St., Boulder, 573-569-0370. Reggae Night. 10 p.m. Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922. Todd Adelman and The Country Mile. 8 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown, 303-442-5847. Wind Symphony and USAF Band. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-4928423. Events 30 Years of Desert Towers with Crusher Bartlett. 7 p.m. Neptune Mountaineering, 633 A Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-8866. Adobe Photoshop Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303800-4647.

Apr

29

Full Concert

Wood & Wire

Lauren Stovall & Peter Sharpe of The Railsplitters

Cultural Cul-de-sac: OFF Cinema presents Of Mermaids, Mountains and Machines: Contemporary Psychedelia. 5 p.m. Boulder Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-4432122.

Peter and the Starcatcher. 7:30 p.m. University Theatre, University Theatre Building, Boulder, 303492-8181.

4

Radio Show Taping

Brother Ali

& Chuck Prophet

Apr 20 DAybreAker boulDer eArly morning DAnce movement 6Am -9Am

Apr 21 Zing for ZontA: boulDer’s got tAlent Apr 22 bcAp AnnuAl funDrAiser: big top: A springtime circus extrAvAgAnZA! WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org 34 April 20, 2017

Celebrate the end of tax season at the Boulder Book Store with T.R. Reid, who dissects the U.S. tax system in his new book A Fine Mess.

Thursday, April 20 T.R. Reid — A Fine Mess. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-4472074. Norse Poetry. 2 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Friday, April 21 One Leaf artist and poet. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Monday, April 24 “So, You’re a Poet” Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628. Norse Poetry. 2 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303.

Tuesday, April 25 Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Judith Orloff — The Empath’s Survival Guide. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. Wednesday, April 26 Robert Cooperman and Jared Smith. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Christine Hibbard — The Heart of Healing. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Barley-Har-Har Comedy Open Mic Night. 7 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Front Range Film Festival — Opening Night. 5:30 p.m. Left Hand Brewing, 1265 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-772-0258.

May

words

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store/Jon Groner

Third Thursday Improv. 7 p.m. Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-588-0550. Trivia & Comedy. 7 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 970-302-7130. Up Down Circus — Juggling & Ground Skills Class. 4 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. Friday, April 21 Music Dallas Thornton. 6 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown, 303-442-5847. Danielle Ate The Sandwich with Band of Lovers. 7:30 p.m. Shine Restaurant and Gathering Place, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0120.

theater

Courtesy of Miners Alley/ Sarah Roshan

Playing through April 30, Miners Alley Playhouse’s A Skull in Connemara follows Mike, a workman hired to disinter the bones in a local cemetery every year. Mike struggles when faced with digging up the bones of his late wife and the mysteries surrounding her sudden death.

A Skull in Connemara. Miner’s Alley Theatre, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden, 303-935-3044. Through April 30. Disenchanted. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through May 6.

FamilySong Music Class. 11 a.m. Harmony Music House, 2525 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-641-8901.

Disgraced. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through May 7.

Friday Afternoon Concert Series: Masontown. 2:30 p.m. City of Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

The Secret Garden. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-8654239. Through May 28.

Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Unit 20, Boulder, 303-396-1898. Louis Futon. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. New Family Dog! and Zydecoasters. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 303834-9384.

Silent Sky — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through April 30. She Rode Horses Like the Stock Exchange — presented by Square Product Theatre. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through May 13. Testament of Mary — presented by Goddess Here Productions. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through May 13. Travelers of the Lost Dimension. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through May 21.

see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


EVENTS from Page 34

The Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. Grossen Bart Brewery, 1065 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847.

arts

Purple Squirrel. 9 p.m. License No 1, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-0486. Rene Heredia and the Flamenco Dance company. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

46th Annual Jeffco Schools Foundation High School Art Exhibition. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through May 7.

Sammy Dee Blues Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 720-652-0283.

2017 Boulder Valley School District: The Art of Students and Teachers Exhibition. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through April 30.

September School Presents Corporate Battle of the Bands. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY APRIL 20 8PM

BRAZIL NIGHT

FRIDAY APRIL 21 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE SATURDAY APRIL 22

BRIAN KITTRELL 8PM MATT ROUCH & THE NOISE UPSTAIRS 9PM SUNDAY APRIL 23

SOPHIE NEVILL 8PM BROWN RANDY 9PM SPIRKO 10PM

Zing for Zonta: Boulder’s Got Talent. 5:30 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303818-2268.

Ryan McGinley, courtesy the artist and Team Gallery

Events Bring the Voice: Manifest the Power of Peace. 6 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303651-2787.

Colorado Mosaic Artists. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through June 2. Dylan Gebbia Richards: Eclipse. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29.

Comedy for Cambio en Sevilla. 6 p.m. Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 303-996-0275. The Current: Dance Works by Faculty and Guest Artists. 7:30 p.m. Irey Theatre, 1515 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Home: American photography at the CU Art Museum. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through July 15.

MCA explores the beginnings of artistry in their two latest exhibits featuring the works of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Ryan McGinley. See page 25 for more on both artists.

Dance Nia on Friday Nights at LRC. 6 p.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800.

SPINRAD

WEDNESDAY APRIL 26

ANNA SHOEMAKER 8PM STEREO RV 9PM THURSDAY APRIL 27 8PM

GRUPO CHEGANDO LÁ AND FRANCISCO MARQUES FRIDAY APRIL 28 8PM

KUTANDARA KOMBI

Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 36 April 20, 2017

Naomi Scheck: Hewn, Jeffco Alumni Exhibition. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through May 7. Once Removed: Photography by Evan Anderman. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 19.

Front Range Film Festival. 7 p.m. City of Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

Peter and the Starcatcher. 7:30 p.m. University Theatre, University Theatre Building, Boulder, 303492-8181.

Mathias Kessler: Artifacts & Other Errors of Perception. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29.

Mi Tierra. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Oct. 22.

Front deRanged Improv Comedy — Fourth Anniversary Show! 7:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303-682-9980.

“SO YOU’RE A POET” PRESENTS

Linda Scholes, Carpe Diem, Jeffco Teacher Solo Exhibition. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through May 7.

Meetings in Isolation — Anna Olsson. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303440-7826. Through April 30.

Free Movie Night: Hidden Figures. 6 p.m. Galvanize, 1023 Walnut St., Boulder.

NexStar Dance Competition. 12 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont.

TUESDAY APRIL 25 8PM

Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-4928300. Through June 24. Colorado Lowriders. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Through May 31.

MONDAY APRIL 24 8PM

ED WARD READING STORIES OF COLORADO LITERARY AND ART LEGENDS

Basquiat Before Basquiat East 12th Street, 1979-1980. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through May 14.

Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 20. Shade. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through July 16. Then, Now, Next. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Aug. 31. Wall Writers: Graffiti in its Innocence. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through May 7.

Senior Fish-off. 6:30 a.m. Wally Toevs Pond at Walden Ponds Wildlife Habitat, 75th Street, Between Valmont Road and Jay Road, Boulder, 303-678-6219.

What Unfolds. The Arts Longmont Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont, 303-678-7869. Through April 29.

Unlocking the Cage. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Writer’s Worshop. 7 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Saturday, April 22 Music

Late Night Radio with Maddy O’Neal. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Better You Better Us Better Earth. 8 a.m. KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., Longmont, 720-326-482.

Laudamus Chamber Chorale Concert. 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 1820 15th St., Boulder, 303-402-6400.

Boulder Philharmonic Season Finale: The Pines of Rome. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423.

Resonance Women’s Chorus: Conversations with the World. 5 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-473-8337.

Darol Anger’s Republic of Strings. 8 p.m. Rogers Hall, 400 High St., Lyons.

Salsa Sunday with Chicos Malos. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-0150.

DeadSet Colorado. 9:30 p.m. Dark Horse Bar, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-8162. E.N Young & Tatanka. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637. Felonius Smith & Steve Sheldon. 7 p.m. Longs Peak Pub, 600 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont, 303-6517886. Halden Wofford and the Hi*Beams. 8 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown, 303-442-5847. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. Janine Gastineau. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Silversun Pickups. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Trouble in the Heartland with College Radio. 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-258-5470. Wash Park Live at The Wild Game Longmont. 9 p.m. The Wild Game Longmont, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Suite A, Longmont. The Woody Guthrie Tribute Project Benefit Concert and Canned Food Drive. 3 p.m. East Simpson Coffee, 414 E. Simpson St., Lafayette, 720-502-7010.

105 W. Emma St., Lafayette, 303-593-2066. Backyard Party. 2 p.m. The Post Chicken & Beer, 1258 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 720-588-2883. Big Top: A Springtime Circus Extravaganza! 5:30 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-4446121. Children’s Bee Earth Day. 10 a.m. Growing Gardens, 1630 Hawthorn Ave., Boulder, 303-443-9952. The Dairy Comedy’s 1 Year Birthday Party — Cake and Comedy! 8:30 p.m. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Earth Day & Youth of the Earth Celebration. 12 p.m. City of Longmont Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Earth Day Shamanic Ceremony. 6:30 p.m. Edie Stone’s Office, 2027 Broadway, Boulder, 303-9319806. Front Range Film Festival at the Longmont Theatre. 5:30 p.m. The Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont, 303-772-5200.

Events

Front Range Film Festival Panels & Shorts. 9:30 a.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

Backyard Party. 2 p.m. The Post Brewing Company,

see EVENTS Page 38

Boulder Weekly


FREE

SPRING

COMPOST

WORKSHOPS

Registration is required. Space is limited. Register online at www.BoulderCountyRecycles.org

Cut through the myths and internet rumors and learn how to do it right in our little corner of Colorado. Boulder

Lafayette

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Earth Day! Saturday, April 22 Boulder Public Library, Boulder Creek Room 1001 Arapahoe Ave.

6-8 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 Lafayette Public Library, Lower Level Meeting Room, 775 W Baseline Rd.

Louisville 6-8 p.m. Monday, April 24 Louisville Library, First Floor Meeting Room, 951 Spruce St.

Boulder 6-8 p.m. Thursday, May 4 Boulder County Recycling Center, Education Room, 1901 63rd St.

Lyons 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 27 Red Fox Outdoor Equipment 424 Main St.

720.564.2220 resourceconservation@bouldercounty.org

This free workshop is taught by Melanie Nehls Burow, a Master Composter in Colorado.

Buy Fresh, in Season From Our Local Farmers Directly to You! Boulder Hours Sat. 8am - 2pm Longmont Hours Sat. 8am - 1pm Boulder Wednesday Hours Start in May Lafayette Market Opens in June

www.bcgm.org

Like us on Facebook Boulder Weekly

April 20, 2017 37


events events

EVENTS from Page 36

Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Jill’s Restaurant & Bistro, 900 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-406-7399. NexStar Dance Competition. 12 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717. Pangea Organics Earth Day Tree Planting. 9 a.m. 4-Mile Burn Zone, 5411 Sunshine Canyon Drive, Boulder, 619-795-6030. Peter and the Starcatcher. 7:30 p.m. University Theatre, University Theatre Building, Boulder, 303492-8181. The Phenomenon of Healing Documentary Film. 10 a.m. Brookdale North Boulder Meeting Room, 3350 30th St., Boulder, 720-421-7509. Plant a Tree Event on Earth Day. 11:30 a.m. Sanitas Brewing Company, 3550 Frontier Ave., Unit 1, Boulder, 303-442-4130. Saturday Dance Series. 9:30 a.m. Community Dance Collective, 2020b 21 St., Boulder, 401-4502006. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Seriously Moonlight: A Boulder Spirals Showcase. 7 p.m. Boulder Spirals, 4700 Sterling Drive, Unit C, Boulder, 303-684-3717. Touring by Bicycle. 10 a.m. Community Cycles, 2805 WIlderness Place, Suite 1000, Boulder, 720565-6019. Voice Over Boot Camp with Rachel Alena. 10 a.m. Boulder Writing Studio, 777 Pearl Street, Suite 211, Boulder. Yard Sale Fundraiser. 9 a.m. Centaurus High School, 10300 South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 720561-7182.

Open Mic Night. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Events Beginning Tap Dance. 6 p.m. Viriditas Dance Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder, 720-561-5967. Country Line Dancing. 6:30 p.m. Platt Middle School, 6096 Baseline Road, Boulder, 720-561-5967. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway Suite 65, Boulder, 303-444-7888. Tuesday, April 25 Music FamilySong Music Class. 10 a.m. The Art Underground, 901 Front St., Louisville, 303-641-8901.

Music

Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303396-1898.

BrownRandy. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 2907 55th St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

Open Mic Contest. 6 p.m. Twisted Pine Brewing Company, 3201 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-786-9270.

Country and Bluegrass Easter Service. 9:30 a.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 303776-1128.

Open Mic with The Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303774-7698.

G Herbo. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Events

Sunday, April 23

Honors Student Recital. 5 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599.

Beginning Digital Video Editing. 6:30 p.m. Arapahoe Campus, 6600 E. Arapahoe, Boulder, 720561-5967.

Resonance Women’s Chorus: Conversations with the World. 3 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-473-8337.

Wednesday, April 26

Salsa Sunday with Chicos Malos. 4:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-0150.

Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Steal Your Peach, Allman Brothers & Grateful Dead Mashup. 4 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-849-8458. Events Dance Nia on Sunday Mornings at LRC. 11 a.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800. Front Range Film Festival Closing Night. 12 p.m. The Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont, 303-772-5200.

Music

Na’an Stop Album Release. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Open Mic Night. 7 p.m. Sanitas Brewing Company, 3550 Frontier Ave., Unit 1, Boulder, 303-442-4130. Reggae Night at the Boulder House. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-997-4108. School of Rock: The Musical. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Middle School, 1341 Main St., Louisville, 303-6730744. Events

Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007.

Business Essentials for Freelancers & Small Business Owners. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

NexStar Dance Competition. 12 a.m. Airborne Dance, 1816 Boston Ave., Longmont, 303-684-3717.

Comedy at Tandoori. 8 p.m. Tandoori Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 970-302-7130.

Peter and the Starcatcher. 2 p.m. University Theatre, University Theatre Building, Boulder, 303492-8181.

Educating Kids About Cannabis. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Riverside, 1724 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-4432322.

Truth Be Told: Boulder’s Story Slam. 6:30 p.m. Shine Restaurant and Gathering Place, 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0120.

Home Buyer Seminar. 6:30 p.m. Elevations Credit Union, 2nd Floor Conference Room, 2960 Diagonal Highway, Boulder, 303-775-6085.

Monday, April 24

The Mystery of Bird Migration Slide Program. 7 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-8470.

Music Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW.

38 April 20, 2017

SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@ boulderweekly.com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

Boulder Weekly


Wikimedia Commons/Ansh Mishra

Oak Grove Cemetery by Don Thompson

www.philfoodtrade.com

Distributed by: Philippine Foodtrade Corp., Commerce, CA 90040 Just enough rain an hour ago to give the wispy dry grass some hope, turning it green instantly.

TEL: (323) 727-5107 FAX: (323) 727-1045

This place has been abandoned, the old faith overgrown, confused by brambles, and in these hard times, its upkeep cut from the budget. But we walk, soaked to the knees, making our slow pilgrimage among gravestones, speaking blurred names back into the world. American Life in Poetry: Column 627: How many Oak Grove Cemeteries can there be in America? There’s one just a mile from my home. Here’s another, with a poet, Don Thompson, to show us around. Poetry thrives on sounds as well as sense, and the vowel sounds in line eight are especially artfully collected. Thompson lives in California and his most recent book is A Journal of the Drought Year (Encircle Publications, 2016). — Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate We do not accept unsolicited submissions. American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright ©2016 by Don Thompson, “Oak Grove Cemetery,” from The Cortland Review, (Issue 66,2016). Poem reprinted by permission of Don Thompson and the publisher. Introduction copyright © 2017 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction’s author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006.

NOW HIRING for our new Lafayette Dispensary Coming Soon

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Contact:

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April 20, 2017 39


Wednesday april 19 @ red rOCKs

Mighty tree presents

420 eve On the rOCKs Feat MethOd Man & redMan, Flatbush ZOMbies W/ Curren$y, FuturistiC & rdgldgrn

thursday april 20 (early shOW)

Kyle W/ COusin stiZZ

thursday april 20

Mighty tree presents

MethOd Man & redMan W/ aFrOMan

Friday april 21

the underaChievers

every thursday @ the Other side

grass FOr that ass

Free beFOre 8pM & Free beFOre 9pM FOr all text Message subsCribers

text Cervantes tO 91944 tO sign up 5/4: daniella KatZir band 5/11: piCKin’ On the piZZa tapes Feat pat Fiddle (patriCK hOeper), tyler grant (grant FarM), FranK risChe & dOn Julin W/ WOOd belly (late set) & the tyler grant triO (patiO set) thursday april 20

Mighty tree presents

diZZy Wright

W/itsevi, talent aMOng us & Otis Feat dJ COs & riMes

Friday april 21

green is beautiFul

saturday april 22

(tribute tO blue nOte guitarist grant green) Feat eddie rOberts (the neW MastersOunds), alan evans (sOulive, Kdtu), Chris spies, alex sCOtt, niCK gerlaCh (turbO suit) W/ dJ MarCOs bOriCua

dan the autOMatOr & Qbert

ruMpKe MOuntain bOys

W/ Jubee Feat brisCO JOnes, reasOn the CitiZen, planes!, Write Minded & david FrederiCK

W/ / the party peOple – re: CreatiOn

thursday april 27

tOMOrrOWs bad seeds W/ Mindstate & OFFsteady

Friday & saturday april 28-29 dual venue

sOniC blOOM pre party 4/28: the huMan experienCe Feat shane bOrth, MiKe lOve, ben silver (OrChard lOunge), saQi, JanOver, tierrO band Feat bridget laW OF elephant revival, saM Klass & unFOld MusiC 4/29: Ott, sOdOWn, OrgOne, MOnOphOniCs, MiKey thunder, FunKstatiK & truFeelZ

Friday May 5

brOther ali W/ sa-rOC, last WOrd & sOl Messiah

saturday May 6

lil bibby

W/ yOung nerO – hOsted by lana J & nOOK ex

saturday May 13

WOOKieFOOt W/ rOOts OF CreatiOn

tuesday May 16

Wale

sunday May 18

Zebbler enCanti experienCe W/ sixis

saturday May 20

start MaKing sense (ultiMate talKing heads tribute) W/ OrKa Odyssey

Friday May 26

digable planets

saturday april 22

W/ CasCade CresCendO & CanyOn COlleCted

MOnday april 24

MOnday night Menagerie Feat laiKa beats, sCOtty dOes KnOW, bOssillatOr & tWOMOOd

tuesday april 25

seeds?

W/ MidiCinal, the OrCastratOr & pharMaCOn

Wednesday april 26

re: searCh Wednesday

Feat the geeK x vrv W/ luCid visiOn, MiKey thunder, staxx & Jubee

thursday april 27

brOthers gOW

W/ taylOr FrederiCK’s phisCuits Feat MeMbers OF eMinenCe enseMble, yaMn, dynOhunter & the hOller! (patiO set)

sunday april 30

sadistiK

W/ naChO piCassO & raFael vigilantiCs

Wednesday May 3

re: searCh

Feat MuZZy bear W/ FraMeWOrKs, ryan viser, MiKey thunder & Jubee

Friday May 5

bare

W/ Flyrant, rettChit, Future gOOn, bOnKerZ & gOOn

saturday May 6

spread the WOrd CO MusiC Festival

Feat sKydyed, luCid visiOn, speCtaCle, the OrCastratOr & Midnight pressure

MOnday May 8

spread the WOrd Festival Menagerie

Feat JOey pOrter’s vital Organ, dOran JOseph & COllidOsCOpe

Wednesday May 10

re: searCh

Feat eprOM W/ prOJeCt aspeCt, the OrCastratOr, MiKey thunder & Jubee

Friday May 12

FOrtunate yOuth

W/ the reMinders

W/ JOsh heinriChs & iya terra

sunday May 28

We dreaM daWn

saturday June 24 Widespread paniC aFtershOW

raise the rOOF FOr at risK yOuth

Zebbler enCanti experienCe neW Orleans suspeCts

saturday May 13

W/ intuit (late set) & taarKa

sunday May 14

Feat nOtOriOus COnduCt, bad Chad & siCKniCK FlOseph Wayne (patiO set)

saturday July 8

Wednesday May 17

W/ CrOWell b2b COdd dubbZ, JOOF b2b

Feat teebs W/ Free the rObOts, leFtO, MiKey thunder & Jubee

OMegaMOde MOrF, uvs gang & art – the hive

saturday July 15 OFFiCial lOhi aFter party

tauK

Feat MeMbers OF the Main sQueeZe & niCK gerlaCh W/ tiger party

saturday July 29

re: searCh tuesday May 23

vOOdOO visiOnary Friday May 26

WhisKeyFOlK

Feat JOnathan MeadOWs, Chris speasMaKer, sCOtt lane & raphael KatChinOFF & alpha King Knight Feat tOri pater & JOnathan MeadOWs (late set) W/ the drunKen FrenChMen (patiO set

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Boulder Weekly


film Three colors, three ideas, three masterpieces Kieślowski’s trilogy to play IFS by Michael J. Casey

T

he colors belong to the French flag, ON THE BILL: Blue. Friday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. the corresponding ideas to the White. Saturday, April 22, Republic: blue, white and red — liber7:30 p.m. Red. Sunday, ty, equality and fraternity. For France, April 23, 7:30 p.m. International Film Series, these colors, these ideas, are political. Muenzinger Auditorium, They guide the nation the way Jefferson’s decree, 1905 Colorado Ave., “We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all Boulder, internationalfilmseries.com. men are created equal,” has guided America. But though they are born of politics, they are human at their core, and when artists set their minds to exploring these ideas, masterpieces are born. Blue, White, and Red are those masterpieces. Known collectively as the Three Colors trilogy, they explore the three governing ideas behind the French Republic, celebrating the country’s 1989 bicentennial. But considering they were made by the Polish filmmaker Krzysztof Kieslowski and the team behind Dekalog, they also address the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of Eastern European Communism. Set in France, Poland and Switzerland, Three Colors mark a major change for Europe, particularly the formation of the European Union. While each film can stand on its own, they are best experienced in close succession. Blue opens the trilogy with a series of abstract images: a car tire speeding along the road, a candy wrapper blowing in the wind and a fatal car crash that sets the events in motion. Red resolves these abstractions by closing the trilogy with a miraculous curtain call. In between these images are loss, love, lust, bungee jumpers, bird shit, comedy, deportation, confusion, frustration, impotence, missed connections, puppies and a recycling bin. Connecting them all are simple and daily epiphanies, the stuff that makes life worth living. In Blue, Julie ( Juliette Binoche) survives the fatal car crash, but her husband and child do not. A morbid twist on the notion of liberty, Julie decides to live her life free of attachments. But the world comes creeping back in and Julie must finish her husband’s musical composition, a song to celebrate the unification of Europe. While Blue’s Julie is soaked in sorrow, White’s Karol (Zbigniew Zamachowski) seeks revenge against his wife ( Julie Delpy), whom he still loves, in an attempt to restore equality. His task is no easier than Julie’s as Karol must navigate an everchanging Poland full of odd connections and crossed paths. These connections multiply even more in Red where a young model, Valentine (Irène Jacob) crosses paths with a reclusive and cankerous retired judge ( Jean-Louis Trintignant) who is spying on his neighbors. How does this installment express fraternity? That is worth discovering on your own. Disparate as they may seem, all three films work masterfully together. They are united by Kieslowski and collaborator Krzysztof Piesiewicz’s notion that if you look past the veneer of politics, the human will shine. And these Three Colors don’t just shine, they radiate. Thanks to the International Film Series, here is your chance to see these monumental works as they were intended, beautiful and bold and projected from 35mm prints. As an added bonus, University of Colorado film professor, Dr. Suranjan Ganguly, will introduce all three films. Boulder Weekly

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deep dish BY CAITLIN ROCKETT

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Caitlin Rockett

hen people visit Boulder, there are a few places they should experience without question — a hike through one of Chautauqua’s many trails, the view from Flagstaff Mountain, a stroll down Pearl Street. The Boulder Dushanbe Teahouse is on that list. Its story is well known around town, each piece of the building carefully hand-crafted by artisans in Tajikistan — one of Boulder’s sister cities — then reassembled in Boulder in the early ’90s. Like any traditional teahouse in Central Asia, Dushanbe is decorated with Persian art. Nature is the central theme, namely the sun, stars and flowers, all depicted through intricate repeated patterns carved into pillars and painted on the ceilings in subdued greens, yellows, blues and reds. A pool in the center of the teahouse features seven copper sculptures based on a 12th century poem called “The Seven Beauties.” In the tale, seven princesses from different nations narrate their own parable that ultimately communicates important cultural values, much like the teahouse itself serves as a link between the cultures of Boulder and Tajikistan. Ferns and indoor trees around the pool and outer edges round out the gardenlike atmosphere, while a skylight lets sunshine spill over the lavish decorations and earth tones of the interior. The effect is enchanting, romantic and soothing. Outside, the “tree of life” grows across a series of eight ceramic panels on the building’s exterior, while

A flower in my teacup

Lily Pearls, a “display” tea made from green tea leaves handsewn with a red lily blossom and a string of Jasmine flowers. To admit my ignorance, I had no idea what I was getting. I was surrounded by beauty and in the company of a dear friend, so the tea sounded as special as the moment felt. And that’s exactly what I got. Display teas can be crafted from green, black or white tea (there are a few to choose from on the Dushanbe tea menu) along with flowers like chrysanthemum, jasmine, lily and rose. When placed in hot water, the little bulb unfolds into a flowerlike display. Different handsewn teas can resemble a shell or a fruit. These types of teas were created as a tribute to the mountains where tea gardens are found. Like the tea, the flowers add their own health benefits and subtle flavor. The Lily Pearls is served in a clear wine glass. A little bulb of sorts is placed in the glass and then hot water is poured over it. Then be patient. After three to four minutes, the bulb will start to unfurl and settle in the glass, eventually blooming into a flower, with the red lily blossom crowning the white Jasmine leaves, all anchored and surrounded by the green tea. It was earthy and light, a classic green tea. It was a perfectly special treat for a perfectly special moment. Dushanbe Teahouse. 1770 13th St., Boulder, 303-442-4993.

A visual experience at the Dushanbe teahouse Boulder Creek babbles happily by. In the warmer months, vines grow thick around a trellis, making a natural canopy for visitors to enjoy their tea in the shade. It was here I found myself recently, enjoying the company of an old friend, nibbling on hummus and samosas in the warm spring sunshine. There was still just enough chill in the air to justify drinking a hot tea. For the special occasion, I wanted to try something different, so I ordered the

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Boulder Weekly


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Tim Brod does routine maintenance on his bee hives to make sure that they’re well cared for.

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Beekeeper Tim Brod gets raw about real honey and the alarming decline of bees

Buzz and the Bees the

T

im Brod has spent a lifetime having close encounters of the stinging kind with the bees he lives and works with. But he’s not one to blame the fuzzy critters. “Usually when you walk into their flight path, the bees will just bounce off you and you can get out of the way. Last week, I got stung in the face near my eye,” Brod says with a shrug. “The bee must have been flying backwards when it ran into me. Bees are benign until they’re not,“ Brod says, as he pulls jars of honey from various cabinets at the home office of his Highland Honey in Longmont. Brod’s honey is strictly local. The vast majority of his hives are within Boulder County — that’s 741 square miles. Highland Honey is always “polyfloral” because his bees have a smorgasbord of very different flowers, grasses and herbs blooming at varying elevations including dandelion, crab apple, dogwood, basswood, sage, mint and clover. Highland Honey is sold mainly in Colorado, but Brod see NIBBLES Page 46

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April 20, 2017 45


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NIBBLES from Page 45

ships a lot to Saudi Arabia, which has a long and celebrated honey history. “I worked for years for The U.S. Agency for International Development on honey projects in the Middle East so I speak Arabic. Students I meet at the Farmers Market send the honey home by the Susan France case,” he says. Brod has bees in his family tree. “We had beekeepers on both sides of the family — Ukrainian and Canadian. I remember being a 3- or 4-year-old and going to see the hives on the farm and the smell of the bees and the pollen.” Brod went on to earn a B.A. in cultural anthropology and a masters in social work, degrees useful in managing bee resources in a colony of up to 30,000 individuals with a very complex social system. “Bees love to make more bees and they love to work,” Brod says. “They are very blue collar and move through all these jobs in the five to six weeks that each one lives. When the colony gets too big they will split into two with new queens. Queens are made, not born. Every female bee can be a queen if she is fed royal jelly at the right time.”

Tim Brod checks in on one of many hives located in Longmont.

However, there is one huge downside to queendom. “When the colony is suffering from disease they figure it must be the queen’s fault so they kill her and make a new one,” Brod says. Think of it as Game of Thrones with stings and a loud buzzing noise. Brod is a lively presence offering honey samples at the Boulder County Farmers Market on Saturdays and prominent in speaking out about beerelated issues including colony collapse. He has created a buzz by saying that many amateur beekeepers are actually making the bee crisis worse. He is pissed off about the way honey is marketed, and he is loudly pessimistic about the future of raw honey and his own business. “Every single one of us in the business is scared about the future sustainability of pollinators in the U.S.,” Brod says. see NIBBLES Page 48

Boulder Weekly


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nibbles NIBBLES from Page 46

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“Right now the prognosis is very poor. Honeybees are failing everywhere and they are failing in bigger numbers. It’s the result of many factors including pesticides, the reduction of nutritional forage and widespread disease including mites. It won’t be long before it severely impacts food prices.” According to Brod, the problems beekeepers are having now are indicative of a “fouled-up agricultural system.” “It started after World War II when fertilizers and pesticides started being used on a big scale to grow monoculture — one crop — to feed the masses,” he says. Well-meaning amateur beekeepers who start hives without training are contributing to colony collapse. There’s a reason Brod named his classes “Beekeeping is NOT for Dummies. “Because of all the publicity about colony collapse there has been a big boom in home beekeeping,” he says. “Unless people educate themselves, it’s not just that they experience hive failure — they are spreading disease to other hives.” The bottom line right now is counter-intuitive: More bees are not necessarily better for the survival of the species. “That’s like saying that unprotected sex is better,” he says. “I’m not optimistic. I figure I will only be able to keep making honey commercially for another five years. The forage is dwindling yearly in Boulder County.” Honey regulations also do not insure that “local” honey is really local. “It allows a local packager in Colorado to repack honey from elsewhere,” he says. “You don’t know about the sourcing, the quality of forage, whether there were pesticides. You don’t know whether the honey is raw.” Brod’s honey is pricier than store brands at natural foods stores. “This is honey that hasn’t been manipulated — heated and filtered. No water or fructose has been added to it. It is worth it for the health benefits,” he says. “What pisses me off is that the words ‘raw,’ ‘unheated’ and ‘unfiltered’ don’t mean anything legally in the honey industry.” Tasting honeys shifts your honey paradigm from bland syrup to a symphony of flavors, aromas and textures. “You can smell notes of flowers with mint and even a hint of cinnamon from all the catnip. Raw honey is always floral but 98 percent of honey is not raw. It’s heated and filtered to keep it from crystallizing,” he says. However, Highland Honey is smooth and spreadable despite being raw because Brod builds the crystalline structure to be smooth using temperature, time and observation. He can talk about it for hours. His line of high-potency, herb-infused honeys are not shy in the flavor department. They contain medicinal levels of powdered herbs and strongly taste and smell like the herbs. “This is a serious product not some fou fou flavored bullshit,” he says. His deep yellow fermented turmeric honey is intense, aromatic and tastes a bit like chutney. His Male Tonic boasts ashwagandha, American ginseng, sarsaparilla, cardamom and, like all his honeys “pollen, wax and bee particles.” A small teaspoon is an intense and, uh, stimulating experience. Bees are “kept,” not ranched or harvested. Essentially, they work for you. “Bees get to know you and understand your sound and smell,” Brod says. “That’s why you never want to smell like soap or perfume around them. But, basically, bees don’t care about you and I.” At least, until one of them runs into you while flying backwards.

Local Food News

The Cellar West Artisan Ales opened stealthily recently at 1001 Lee Hill Drive with a tiny, weekend-only tasting room pouring naturally carbonated beers fermented in oak barrels, Belgian farmhouse-style. ... Boulder Pho has opened at 2855 28th St. in the former site of Thai Kitchen and Jimmy and Drews 28th Street Deli. ... Apeizza E Vino has closed at 300 S. Public Road in Lafayette. ... The Gold Hill Inn opens for its 55th season on May 5. Coming soon: A second Gondolier Restaurant in Longmont.

Words to Chew On

“The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” — Henry David Thoreau

John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org).

Boulder Weekly


All DAy TuesDAy • WeD - sAT 4pm - 6pm

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April 20, 2017 49


drink

Tour de brew: Front Range Brewing Company

Expand your range with Lafayette’s first brewery by Michael J. Casey

A

ON TAP: Front Range Brewing Company. 400 W. South Boulder Road, Suite 1650, Lafayette, 303-339-0767, frontrangerbrewingcompany.com.

t 400 W. South Boulder Road, in the unassuming and currently under-renovation strip mall, stands Lafayette’s first brewery, the Front Range Brewing Company. Outside, in the large and treelined parking lot, cars snake their way through the Taco Bell drive-through waiting for their turn to yell an order into the speaker. On the other side of the lot, a small stand specializing in cakes waits for the Easter rush. The two employees don’t seem to mind; They are pleasantly chatting away in the Saturday afternoon sun while men in Day-Glo orange vests direct street traffic to the mega church; just another weekend in the suburbs. Lafayette certainly has the flavor of late ’80s-mid ’90s Colorado suburb. Wide boulevards cut through big blocky strip malls on their way from the historic core to Boulder and back. Though these stores and malls are no longer in fashion, many places have Susan France found ways to revitalize dormant storefronts, updating them with a shared-space mentality. That’s where you’ll find the Front Range Brewing Company, nestled in the back of what used to be a run-ofFront Range Brewing Company, Bartender Jay Shelley the-mill strip mall. Now the space is home to a few coffee roasters, a homebrew supply store and, yes, a bike shop to come. What more could “sipsters” ask for? Sipsters — the word came to my associate like a bolt of lighting — are suburban hipsters obsessed with craft beer, and Front Range is their kind of place. Opened in 2013 by the Boggs and the Hoglund families, Front Range specializes in a wide array of styles designed to appease just about every drinker. My associate has recently developed a taste for sours and Front Range’s Sonnebahn Berliner Weisse (5% ABV) was a hit. The beer is clear with little head and is kettle soured for 10 days to give it a tart lemony and apricot taste. While she busied herself with the Berliner Weisse, I sought sanctuary in the TrHOPical Illusion (6.5%), a dry-hopped IPA with a lingering finish of strawberry and citrus. The TrHOPical boasts an attractive color with a head that clings to the glass while the brew slips down your gullet. When you’re done, it looks like you accomplished something. Front Range’s award winner, Piney Ridge Dunkel (5%), took home the silver at 2016’s GABF in the Munich-style dark lager category for its aroma of caramel and toffee, and a mouthful of coffee and sweet chocolate. For those looking for a lager, but not ready to give up darker flavors and roast, Piney Ridge hits the sweet spot. Keeping with their motto, “Expand your range,” Front Range currently offers the Rocky Mountain Sherpa Robust Porter (7%), which is served on nitro and offers plenty of coffee and dark fruit in the profile; the Bourbon Barrel-Aged Chasm Lake Russian Imperial Stout (10%), dark as night with a big boozy nose and loads of vanilla, cherry and syrupy alcohol in the mouth; and the delicious Prairie Fire Helles (5.7%), beautifully golden with mountains of malt in the mouth and a touch of Saaz hops for balance. With more rotating seasonal taps to come, my associate and I are already plotting our return. We may get our sipster cards yet. 50 April 20, 2017

Boulder Weekly


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ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19:

astrology

magic beans that actually work, you can.

After George Washington LIBRA was elected as the first Go to RealAstrology.com to check out SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: A President of the United Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO friend told me about a States, he had to move HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE trick used by his grandfrom his home in Virginia HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes mother, a farmer. When to New York City, which at are also available by phone at her brooding hens stopped the time was the center of laying eggs, she would 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. the American government. put them in pillowcases But there was a problem: that she then hung from He didn’t have enough cash a clothesline in a stiff breeze. After the hens got blown on hand to pay for his long-distance relocation, so he was around for a while, she returned them to their cozy digs. forced to scrape up a loan. Fortunately, he was resourceful The experience didn’t hurt them, and she swore it put them and persistent in doing so. The money arrived in time for back on track with their egg-laying. I’m not comfortable him to attend his own inauguration. I urge you to be like with this strategy. It’s too extreme for an animal-lover like Washington in the coming weeks, Aries. Do whatever’s myself. (And I’m glad I don’t have to deal with recalcitrant necessary to get the funds you need to finance your life’s hens.) But maybe it’s an apt metaphor or poetic prod for next chapter. your use right now. What could you do to stimulate your own creative production? TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Fantasize about sipping pear nectar

and listening to cello music and inhaling the aroma of musky amber and caressing velvet, cashmere and silk. Imagine how it would feel to be healed by inspiring memories and sweet awakenings and shimmering delights and delicious epiphanies. I expect experiences like these to be extra available in the coming weeks. But they won’t necessarily come to you freely and easily. You will have to expend effort to ensure they actually occur. So be alert for them. Seek them out. Track them down.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Contagion may work in your favor,

but it could also undermine you. On the one hand, your enthusiasm is likely to ripple out and inspire people whose help you could use. On the other hand, you might be more sensitive than usual to the obnoxious vibes of manipulators. But now that I’ve revealed this useful tip, let’s hope you will be able to maximize the positive kind of contagion and neutralize the negative. Here’s one suggestion that may help: Visualize yourself to be surrounded by a golden force field that projects your good ideas far and wide even as it prevents the disagreeable stuff from leaking in.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: A reader named Kris X sent me a

rebuke. “You’re not a guru or a shaman,” he sneered. “Your horoscopes are too filled with the slippery stench of poetry to be useful for spiritual seekers.” Here’s my response: “Thank you, sir! I don’t consider myself a guru or shaman, either. It’s not my mission to be an all-knowing authority who hands down foolproof advice. Rather, I’m an apprentice to the Muse of Curiosity. I like to wrestle with useful, beautiful paradoxes. My goal is to be a joyful rebel stirring up benevolent trouble, to be a cheerleader for the creative imagination.” So now I ask you, my fellow Cancerian: How do you avoid getting trapped in molds that people pressure you to fit inside? Are you skilled at being yourself even if that’s different from what’s expected of you? What are the soulful roles you choose to embody despite the fact that almost no one understands them? Now is a good time to meditate on these matters.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: In the coming weeks, there will

be helpers whose actions will nudge you — sometimes inadvertently — toward a higher level of professionalism. You will find it natural to wield more power and you will be more effective in offering your unique gifts. Now maybe you imagine you have already been performing at the peak of your ability, but I bet you will discover — with a mix of alarm and excitement — that you can become even more excellent. Be greater, Leo! Do better! Live stronger! (P.S.: As you ascend to this new level of competence, I advise you to be humbly aware of your weaknesses and immaturities. As your clout rises, you can’t afford to indulge in self-delusions.)

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: I love to see you Virgos flirt with

the uncharted and the uncanny and the indescribable. I get thrills and chills whenever I watch your fine mind trying to make sense of the fabulous and the foreign and the unfathomable. What other sign can cozy up to exotic wonders and explore forbidden zones with as much no-nonsense pragmatism as you? If anyone can capture greased lightning in a bottle or get a hold of

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OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Now would be an excellent time to add deft new nuances to the ways you kiss, lick, hug, snuggle, caress and fondle. Is there a worthy adventurer who will help you experiment with these activities? If not, use your pillow, your own body, a realistic life-size robot, or your imagination. This exercise will be a good warm-up for your other assignment, which is to upgrade your intimacy skills. How might you do that? Hone and refine your abilities to get close to people. Listen deeper, collaborate stronger, compromise smarter, and give more. Do you have any other ideas?

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CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Zoologists say that cannibalizing

offspring is common in the animal kingdom, even among species that care tenderly for their young. So when critters eat their kids, it’s definitely “natural.” But I trust that in the coming weeks, you won’t devour your own children. Nor, I hope, will you engage in any behavior that metaphorically resembles such an act. I suspect that you may be at a low ebb in your relationship with some creation or handiwork or influence that you generated out of love. But please don’t abolish it, dissolve it, or abandon it. Just the opposite, in fact: Intensify your efforts to nurture it.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Your astrological house of com-

munication will be the scene of substantial clamor and ruckus in the coming weeks. A bit of the hubbub will be flashy but empty. But much of it should be pretty interesting, and some of it will even be useful. To get the best possible results, be patient and objective rather than jumpy and reactive. Try to find the deep codes buried inside the mixed messages. Discern the hidden meanings lurking within the tall tales and reckless gossip. If you can deal calmly with the turbulent flow, you will give your social circle a valuable gift.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: The best oracular advice you’ll get in the coming days probably won’t arise from your dreams or an astrological reading or a session with a psychic, but rather by way of seemingly random signals, like an overheard conversation or a sign on the side of a bus or a scrap of paper you find lying on the ground. And I bet the most useful relationship guidance you receive won’t be from an expert, but maybe from a blog you stumble upon or a barista at a café or one of your old journal entries. Be alert for other ways this theme is operating, as well. The usual sources may not have useful info about their specialties. Your assignment is to gather up accidental inspiration and unlikely teachings.

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SAVAGE

Love

by Dan Savage

Dear Dan: I’m a queer girl living with a male partner. This weekend, we found ourselves in an after-hours club, made some new friends, and ended up at a house with two other guys and a girl. Things were pretty playful with everyone except for one of the guys. We all wanted him gone, but he wouldn’t take the hint. He bought the booze for the after-party, so we were a little unsure of the etiquette of asking him to leave. Neither I nor the other girl was interested. I made it clear that penetration was off the menu for me, and everyone respected this — except the one guy. He asked if I would do anal, and I refused. He shoved his fingers in my ass, and I stopped him. I positioned myself away from him, but he somehow got behind me again and put his bare dick in my ass © Rachel Robinson — though barely. The host pulled him off me. We were admittedly all a bit fucked up from partying. I had a stern talk with him about respecting consent — but when I felt his dick enter me from behind a second time, I got upset. My boyfriend threatened him, and the guy punched my boyfriend and broke my sweetheart’s nose. The host threw the guy out with no pants, so he had a well-deserved walk of shame. We don’t know the guy’s last name, so we can’t charge him. My question is this: As a couple, we enjoy threesomes/ moresomes/swingers clubs, etc., and this wasn’t the first time a fun night was ruined by a persistent dick monster. Do you have any suggestions for dealing with pricks like these? Sober and not horny me has all the answers, but when I’m feeling violated and vulnerable, and distracted by whatever dick/pussy is in my face, I’m not the loudmouthed feminist bitch I usually am. We all agree he should have been kicked out before the offenses added up. Maybe he should have been kicked out when we all agreed we weren’t comfortable with him playing with us. What’s the etiquette of telling someone they can’t join in? I’m done dancing around assholes’ feelings. — Queer Unicorn Exhausted Entertaining Numbskulls Dear QUEEN: “Persistent dick monster” (PDM) is putting it mildly, QUEEN. This guy sexually assaulted you and physically assaulted your boyfriend — that guy is a VSP (violent sexual predator), not a PDM. And even if you don’t know his last name, report the night’s events to the police. It’s possible this asshole is already known to the cops — hell, Boulder Weekly

it’s possible he assaulted someone else on his pantsless way home and they’re already holding him and they’d be happy to add more charges to the ones this asshole is already facing. I’m not saying you have to report him, of course. It’s estimated that only 15 to 35 percent of all sexual assaults are reported to the police, and only 9 percent of all accused rapists are prosecuted. While recognizing some folks have legitimate reasons for not going to the cops, we need to get those numbers up — because unreported rapes and sexual assaults can’t be prosecuted. As for preventing a PDM/VSP from ruining your future threesomes/moresomes, etc., advance planning — and familiarity among participants — is the best way to ensure a good experience. Spontaneous can be fun, but it’s difficult to pull off safely with groups — spontaneous fun can be difficult to pull off safely in pairs. Another lesson to be learned from this encounter: Getting shitfaced/shtoned/shwasted may not be the best plan. It’s often the worst plan — getting fucked up rarely results in good sex, even between people who fuck on the regular. Plus, it’s easier to ignore red flags/gut feelings when you can barely shee shtraight. Having to remind someone about consent is a major red flag, QUEEN, and one we’re likelier to overlook when we’re shwasted. In a situation where you’re receiving unwanted touches, your polite dismissal of them should be enough. If this reminder has to be repeated twice, that participant should have their pass to moresome mountain revoked immediately. Two final takeaways: Even kind and decent people can be terrible about taking hints — especially when doing so means getting cut out of a drunken fuckfest. So don’t hint, tell. There’s no rule of etiquette that can paper over the discomfort and awkwardness of that moment, so your group’s designated speaker-upper will just have to power through it. And if you’re going to drink and group in the future, QUEEN, hew to a strict BYOB policy. You don’t ever want to be in a position where you hesitate to show someone the door because they brought the booze. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

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EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

Finding perspective on the holy day of pot

T

he day this column hits the stands will be widely celebrated as the high holy day “4/20,” a holiday replete with fabled origin stories, traditions and, now that we’ve got a cannabis industry, commercialization, too. In Boulder and Denver, the day is infamous for massive congregations of people coming together for the public consumption of pot and, although the context of the gatherings have changed, the larger symbolic gesture remains the same. Public consumption of marijuana has long been a sort of “screw you” to the proverbial “man,” proof you’re not a suit, a nod toward the freedom to consume whatever you damn well please. It is the right to assemble mixed with a dose of civil disobedience — it’s about as American as it gets. “You’re an American,” Dr. Carl Hart says to me over the phone on his train ride home in New York. “This is a deeply American problem.” It’s your problem and mine, even if we don’t see our connection to it. “For example, many white mothers didn’t see Mike Brown as their kid, but he was,” Hart says. “I mean, this is our country, this is your country and you should [care].” Renowned scientist, activist, educator and chair of the Department of Psychology at Columbia University, Hart will be speaking at the Institute of Cannabis Research Conference at CSU Pueblo on April 27. A quarter century ago, Hart began studying neuroscience as a way to end the drug problem. Hart first came to this approach via the persuasive rhetoric of the war on drugs, as he explains in a March article for Nature: “I believed that the poverty and crime in the resource-poor community from which I came was a direct result of drug addiction; so, I reasoned that if I could cure addiction, especially through neural manipulations, I could fix the poverty and crime in my community.” The notion of addiction as a disease of the

Boulder Weekly

brain has long served as a cornerstone of the idea that drugs lead to the degradation of the individual and of society at large. But, in 25 years of scientific practice and research, Hart has not found an empirical basis to link addiction and brain disease. What he did find was indisputable evidence to substantiate that drug criminalization ravages poor, minority neighborhoods. Marijuana possession accounts for about half of the 1.5 million annual drug arrests, and blacks are four times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession than whites, despite similar rates of usage. But, according to Hart, “drug abuse science does not support our current drug policy.” As the legal landscape for marijuana shifts around us, many of us are experiencing our own awakening, privy for the first time to evidence provided by personal experience, and unlearning pervasive prejudices in the process. Despite what we were taught, there is no inherent evil in drugs. There is no moral damnation awaiting the user. The utopia we seek isn’t free of drugs, au contraire, it’s where they are accepted and used safely. Our prejudice may have been deeply ingrained, but it turns out it is not inextricable from the fabric of our lives. We can choose a different path. In November 2016, Hart wrote in an article for Vice.com that “we as society should recognize that drug use is an activity in which humans have engaged since they first inhabited the Earth. We will always use drugs. My acknowledging this fact does not function as an endorsement but rather a realistic appraisal of the best available evidence to educate people and keep them safe.” I ask him to imagine a world beyond criminalization. Clearly, this isn’t the first time he’s thought about this, readily rattling off a list of what needs to be done to create a society that safely coexists with drugs — decriminalize all substances; shift drug education away from prevention and toward safe

use; establish free drug testing centers to make sure drugs are what they appear to be (it’s the adulterants that are dangerous, he says, not the parent drugs); and institute schemes for the regulation of drug manufacturing and trade. In the meantime he offers a warning: to be slow in our thinking and to learn from the mistakes in our hasty adoption of the drug war. Don’t fall for it when government officials try to appease marijuana users by saying that “marijuana is not a factor in the war on drugs,” as head of the Department of Homeland Security John Kelly recently did in an appearance on Meet the Press. “750,000 people are still arrested for marijuana possession every year,” Hart reminds me. “People are still being put in the system, still being labeled habitual offenders.” What about gains in research of psychedelics in their ability to affect notoriously difficult to treat psychiatric diseases? “Be careful with that, too,” he says. “These are the same people that think of psychedelics as being different from crack cocaine or heroin, people who are using them to transcend this place and go to a higher plane. It’s just a way to separate their drug use from that of a person who is smoking crack, but it’s all the same. We are all seeking the same thing: to be psychoactively altered, no matter how you color it or dress it up.” Hart left me with the feeling that when it comes to drugs, we cannot single out our drug of choice and be satisfied when it is freed from the chains of criminalization. “You have to see how your cause is connected to the cause of the cocaine or heroin user — to pretend that one drug is uniquely therapeutic is simply not true.” If you decide to light up on 4/20, take a moment to recognize how drugs connect us all. Light up in honor of your personal freedom, sure, but remember the cost others pay each day for the exact same act.

April 20, 2017 57


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

General Kelly’s Washington gaffe

I

Wikimedia Commons/DonkeyHotey

n 1985, the late marijuana legalization activist Jack Herer wrote a book — or perhaps more accurately compiled a book; it was in the style of the Whole Earth Catalog and arguably was the single most influential work on marijuana legalization in the 20th Century. Its title was The Emperor Wears No Clothes. And last Sunday, for a brief, shining moment, it appeared that a member of Trump’s cabinet stood up and, in so many words, said just that about the war on marijuana. During an interview on NBC’s Meet the Press, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, a retired Marine Corps four-star General, was asked by host Chuck Todd if legalizing marijuana would help or hurt his work. Kelly responded: “Yeah, marijuana is not a factor in the drug war.” “It’s three things,” he added later. “Methamphetamine. Almost all produced in Mexico. Heroin. Virtually all produced in Mexico. And cocaine that comes up from further south.” Those three drugs, plus opiates, were responsible for the deaths of 52,000 people and cost the country $250 billion, he said. “The trafficker’s biggest problem is not getting drugs, till now, into the United States — the biggest problem they had was laundering the money. So when you have that much profit coming out of the United States, and that profit is managed by cartels that are beyond violent... The kind of money they can offer an attorney general in Guatemala or a police chief in Mexico City, the kind of money they can offer — and if you don’t take the money they’re happy to send your youngest child’s head to your home in a

Boulder Weekly

plastic bag. “The solution is not arresting a lot of users,” he continued. “The solution is a comprehensive drug demand reduction program in the United States that involves every man and woman of goodwill. And then rehabilitation. And then law enforcement. And then getting at the poppy fields and the coca fields in the south.” So does this signal some sort of sea-change in the Trump administration regarding marijuana? Nope. Kelly made his remarks on Sunday. By Tuesday he was walking them back: “And let me be clear about marijuana,” he said in a speech at Georgetown University in Washington. “It is a potentially dangerous gateway drug that frequently leads to the use of harder drugs. Additionally, science tells us that it is not only psy-

chologically addictive but can also have profound negative impact on the still developing brains of teens and up through the early 20s. Beyond that, however, its use and possession is against federal law, and until the law is changed by the U.S. Congress we in DHS are sworn to uphold all the laws on the books.” He also referred to “vast tonnages” of pot that “TCOs” — or transnational criminal organizations — move across the border from Mexico. Wow, from marijuana “not a factor” in the drug war to “vast tonnages” of marijuana being moved across the Mexican border by “transnational criminal organizations” – in the space of 48 hours. In other words, Kelly’s Sunday comments were what former New Republic Editor Michael Kinsley once famously called a Washington Gaffe, which is when someone inside the Beltway accidentally tells the truth, “some obvious truth he isn’t supposed to say.” Sad. It would have been a great 4/20 if he had stuck to his guns. The truth is that the war on marijuana has been the heart and soul of the drug war since 1937. That’s a big part of the reason that the drug war has been such a breath-taking failure. By conflating marijuana, which is hands down the safest of all recreational drugs, legal and illegal (and safer than most prescription drugs for that matter), the feds destroyed the integrity and legitimacy of the drug war in the eyes of tens of millions of Americans. And misdirected hundreds of billions of dollars into fighting marijuana. If the Trump administration wants to have any realistic chance of winning its forthcoming war on drugs, opiod edition, it needs to start by decoupling it from marijuana.

April 20, 2017 59


RUTGERS SCORES A TOUCHDOWN Honestly, we never thought that much about Rutgers University. Everybody knows it’s a good school, academically speaking, but aside from that, who ever gave the place a second thought? But then came the New England Patriots visit to the White House. You know the drill; whichever team wins the Super Bowl gets to visit the sitting president at the White House. It’s safe to say that most of America hates the Patriots so the thought of them having to spend time with Trump was about the only joy we got out

icumi

(IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world of Super Bowl 51. But then we read the fine print on the visit. Not every member of the Patriot’s team was willing to set foot in the house of Trump. In fact four players in particular were conspicuously absent: Devin McCourty, Logan Ryan, Duron

Harmon and Jonathan Freeny. So what’s so strange about that, you ask? All four of these members of the team went to the same university, Rutgers. It’s strange enough that the Patriots have four members of their team from Rutgers. It’s not exactly a football powerhouse. But the fact that none of the guys from Rutgers were willing to put on a fake smile and pose for photos with the Trumpster says something about their education. We don’t profess to understand exactly what this presidential diss says about the school, but we’re pretty sure we like it. Go Rutgers. You’re doing something right. Wikimedia Commons/Justin Hoch

KILL BILL: VOL 3 Barring any apocalyptic event, it looks like Christmas will come twice this year. Liberals around the country prepared feasts, drank deeply of mead and sang carols as news came that Fox gave Bill O’Reilly the boot. In what came as a surprise to no one but O’Reilly, the angriest man on Earth was felled by a series of harassment complaints from women he’d worked with at Fox over the years. In a prepared statement, O’Reilly lamented that he couldn’t help that women find him so attractive (please refer to ICUMI subhead). As is tradition, Rupert Murdoch and his sons, James and Lachlan, donned robes sewn from the hair of the most sensitive liberals and performed the ancient sacrament needed to expel O’Reilly from The Eternal Sacred Order of Beelzebul. Building a fire lit from the eternal flame from John F. Kennedy’s grave and stoked by copies of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, they then burned O’Reilly’s contract, and asked St. Reagen to forgive them for forsaking a great warrior in order to protect their profit margins. This certainly won’t be the end of O’Reilly’s career as a conservative sycophant. Our money is on O’Reilly joining Tomi Lahren to create the angriest show on television, The Blazing No Spin Zone. 60 April 20, 2017

Boulder Weekly


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last word

Divine Resonance Massage & Skin Care

Please see ad on page 51. Now offering acne treatments. www.divineresonance.com www.bouldermassageandskincare.com 720-432-1108

LOWEST MARIJUANA TAX IN THE STATE

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop • 3070 28th St., Boulder

Voted by You Boulder’s #1

EARLY BIRD NEW HAPPY HOUR 7PM-10PM SPECIAL 9AM-10AM • PAY NO TAX

303-402-0122

Recreational Marijuana Dispensary & Best Customer Service in Boulder County!

Call Elizabeth Today!

303-772-2900

20% OFF

• BUY ANY EIGHTH, GET A FREE GRAM OF SAME STRAIN.

Limit 2 per order. Valid 4/20/17 - 5/3/17

Limit 2 per order. Valid 4/20/17 - 5/3/17

ENTIRE ORDER

ATM ONSITE! *some restrictions apply

www.karingkind.com • www.karingkindlabs.com 5854 Rawhide Ct., Boulder CO 80302 (1 Mile North of Boulder on HWY 36)

303-449-WEED (9333)

2801 Iris Ave., Boulder, CO

See our full-page ad across from Cannabis Corner. Voted Boulder’s Best Recreational Dispensary 2015-2016!

Colorado’s #1 Source for

& Oregon’s Only #4 Soil.

Guaranteed lowest price! Wholesale Pricing & Free Delivery for Qualifying Commercial Accounts!

Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

303.66.HYDRO (664.9376) victoryhydro.com

$99 for 3 hours

See our ad below

www.terrapincarestation.com

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 57. THE

Holos

TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

Health

CO medicalDenver marijuana patients only. 3rd! WeOur areForOpening O˞ ce on April Denvera Office is Now Open!

720-314-4989 THEMAGICFAIRYCLEANING.COM

See Ad on PG 53

FOR SPECIAL 4/20 ONLY DEALS! THIS WEEK’S COUPONS:

$20 FLOWER 1-8 (REC)* 25% OFF FORMULA 1 DISPOSABLE VAPE PENS (REC)* OPEN 8AM-9PM MON-SAT, 11AM-5PM SUNDAY 1750 30th Street, Suite 7, Boulder

720.379.6046

*See ad on PG 53 for restrictions.

Save Time, Skip the Line! Order Ahead Online! Same day pickup. Now available everyday from open to 9pm. Early Bird Special* Shop Between 8-10 am Monday - Friday, 9-10 am Saturday, Receive 15% off your entire purchase!

1387 E South Boulder Rd., Louisville, CO

Home or Office Cleaning

Now open daily until 9:45pm

Our New Location is at 1127 Pennsylvania St. Denver, CO 80203 Call Our O˞ce to Book an Appointment

We Provide 100% Compliant, Comprehensive MMJ Evaluations Which Include: -30 Minute O˞ce Visits -A Body Composition Analysis -Computer Stations to Complete the Online Application in Our O˞ce -Follow-up Services for Further Questions About Treatment Plans 3000 Center Green Drive, Suite 210, Boulder, CO 80301 | By Appointment Only M-F Online Appointments Available at www.holoshealth.org or Call 720-273-3568 We have 1000 reviews with a 5 STAR rating! Check out our expanded selection of edibles. 21+

1534 55th St., Boulder 303-444-0861

8a- 6:45p Sun-Tues • 8a- 9:45p Weds-Sat

www.elementsboulder.com

Strain of the Week* Race Fuel OG 20% off all quantities. $100 HALF OZ Strains* Durban Poison, Green Crack, Louie XIII OG, Tangerine Haze, Blue Dream, Dubbya Diesel, Chuckles OG * Not to be combined with other discounts. While supplies last. Some exclusions may apply. Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Olio, Spherex, Bolder Extracts, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar

Craft Cannabis

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com

303.440.1323

WHERE NATURE & MEDICINE MEET

RECREATIONAL: 25% OFF All Mahatma Clear Products STARTING AT 20% OFF Craft Shatter & Viola Concentrates

OUNCES

$150.00

20% OFF Seasonable Incredible Bars

Open Everyday MEDICAL: 20% OFF303.442.2565 All Craft Wax & Sap

20% OFF Seasonable Incredible Bars 5420 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder www.boulderwc.com Open Everyday

MUST MENTION THIS AD FOR SPECIALS LISTED ABOVE • Valid through 4.12.17

5420 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder www.boulderwc.com • 303.442.2565


A Boulder Boutique locally owned & operated

2043 Broadway 303-442-2059

See our ad on page 10. Belle La Dame

Waxing & LashExtensions

Melissa Scheppmann, Esthetician

www.belleladame.com

303.249.3483

Boulder Sensations

Sensual Body Rubs by Boulder’s Sexiest Young Co-Eds Centrally located in Boulder. Monday - Sunday • 10am - 6pm See ad on pg. 59 720-296-2799 www.perfectsensations.com

Your Eclectic Wonderland 1815 Pearl St. 303.442.0669

Piano and Drum Lessons

All ages / levels are now being accepted. HIGHLY QUALIFIED INSTRUCTOR. Dr. Michael Barnett 303-818-2113

The Hill Cannabis Club

 MMD Medical Doctors 720-440-2023 Boulder Clinic NOW OPEN IN BOULDER! See our ad on page 40.

www.themedicalmarijuanadoctors.com

Come Celebrate our 2 Year Birthday Specials All Month Long • Joint with Ad Ear Wax, Strongest Edibles, Tinctures, THC Drinks 1121 Broadway G-1, On ‘The Hill’ 303-245-9728

CLONES - 2 FOR $25 Beautiful new plants for sale at The Bud Depot - 138 Main St., Lyons FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE!

REAL MASSAGE • REAL PRICES

Michelaii Massage NORTH BOULDER / LONGMONT 720.438.5642

WHERE NATURE & MEDICINE MEET

THE BEST WAX DEAL IN TOWN! $15 1/2 grams all the time REDISCOVER THE

COLORADO GIFTMAS This Saturday & Sunday December 22nd & 23rd 10am to 5pm Boulder County Fairgrounds (main exhibit hall) 9595 Nelson Rd., Longmont

Over 150 vendors selling the finest selection of Holiday Art, Crafts, and Gifts. (See ad on page 28.)

www.coloradoevents.net

BOULDER WELLNESS CENTER Open Daily 11am-7pm

303.442.2565

5420 Arapahoe Ave. (Unit F) Boulder Between Connestoga & 55th. Going east, make right after Conestoga w w w. b o u l d e r w c . c o m

See our ad below

“Weed Between the Lines” on page 61.

See our ad

below “Weed Between the Lines” on page 69.

HUGE PREMIUM BUDS SPECIAL SELECTION NOT TO BE MISSED!

AlterMeds.com • 720-389-6313

LABOR DAY SALE

$25 OFF EVERY OUNCE NOW THROUGH LABOR DAY! Can not combine with any other offer. Expires 9/3/12

Dog House Music

525 Courtney Way, Lafayette 303.664.1600 doghousemusic.com

Look for Flower of Life Infused Products at your favorite dispensary. 

www.floweroflifeinfused.com

HOLOS HEALTH

is back!

A holistic medical practice, specializing in MEDICAL MARIJUANA EVALUATIONS 720-273-3568 • www.journey2life.org 5377 Manhattan Circle #204, Boulder

303.442.0006 www.parlando.org

Happy Hour Monday-Saturday with $3 Anchor Steam Drafts!

We’ve Lowered Our Prices

Over 50 Strains • Open 7 Days A Week! Mon-Fri 11am-7pm Sat - Sun noon-5pm 3370 Arapahoe, Boulder – 303-449-1905 www.HighGradeAlternatives.com

Many Strains Available!

THAT’S THE WAY WE DO IT!

*For medical marijuana patients only. 5420 Arapahoe Ave. Unit D Boulder, CO Open 11-7 Monday-Sunday www.rootorganicmmc.com

303.443.0240

See our ad below

“Weed Between the Lines” on page 61.

Alpine Auto Detailing Full Mobile Service

Ask for Great Holiday Specials!

See our www.terrapincarestation.com ads on pages 71, 76 & 77.

Winner of Best of Boulder 2011!

www.alpinedetailing.com call 303.579.9398

NY STYLE

Accepting preferred clientele. In/Out Photos Upon Request 720.422.6633

Good Humor Wellness

DOWNLOAD THE TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

For CO medical marijuana patients only. www.terrapincarestation.com

See our ad below

“Weed Between the Lines”

DOWNLOAD THE TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

WISHING YOU A HEALTHY NEW YEAR!

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

Original location re-opening mid-January Call 970-232-8010 or 970-729-0138

www.terrapincarestation.com

goodhumorwellness.com

See our ad below

“Weed Between the Lines” on page 61.

$150 OZ. SPECIALS

PREMIUM STRAINS - ALL ORGANIC! NEW LOCATION - WEST END 1021 Pearl St. Boulder Now also in Lyons - 138 Main St.

on page 69.

See our ads on pages 60 and 61!

DOWNLOAD DOWNLOAD THE TERRAPIN APP, THE ORDER AHEAD, SKIPTERRAPIN THE WAIT! APP, ORDER AHEAD,

www.terrapincarestation.com

See our ad below

“Weed BetweenDOWNLOAD the Lines” THE on page TERRAPIN 77! APP,

ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

4 20 17 boulder weekly  
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