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....................................................................... NEWS:

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departments 7 THE HIGHROAD: Trump’s tax-cut scam worked perfectly 8 THE ANDERSON FILES: The war on unions rages on 11 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 17 NEWS: Right to Rest Act, take four 27 OVERTONES: Boulder Bach Festival returns to its central mission with four choral works 29 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 37 WORDS: ‘Waiting for Spring’ by Burt Rashbaum 38 SCREEN: ‘Annihilation’ is blissfully bonkers 39 FILM: Past and present collide at the 2018 Brakhage Center Symposium 41 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 49 DRINK: Tour de Brew: Romero’s K9 Club & Tap House 55 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Female stoners, unite! 59 CANNABIS CORNER: Marijuana and nullification 6O ICUMI: An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world 61 SAVAGE LOVE: We all like different porn, and that’s OK Boulder Weekly

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, John Lehndorff, Amanda Moutinho, Carolyn Oxley, Brian Palmer, Noël Phillips, Mollie Putzig, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner Interns, Tiffany Bergeron, Veronika Shemigon SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Olivia Rolf Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 18-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

March 8, 2018 Volume XXV, Number 31 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2018 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

Boulder Weekly

the

Highroad Trump’s tax-cut scam worked perfectly

by Jim Hightower

R

emember last year when Donald Trump and his congressional Trumpeteers bragged that their yuuuuuge tax cut for corporations would spark a yuuuuuge corporate spending spree to create new jobs and higher wages? Well, just as they promised, we’re now seeing corporate chieftains spending wildly! Only... they’re spending their tax-cut windfall on themselves, not on boosting America’s economy. Mainly, they’re pouring billions into a self-serving scheme called “buybacks” — literally buying-up shares of

their own corporation’s stock. Why? Because reducing the total number of shares on the market increases the value of each remaining share, giving those lucky shareholders a bigger piece of the company’s profit pie. Yes, less magically means more! But it’s not magic, it’s manipulation. And the top executives doing the manipulating are primary beneficiaries, since most of their pay comes in the form of millions of dollars worth of their corporation’s stock. Google executives, for example, are spending $8.6 billion from their taxpayer bonanza on buybacks, PepsiCo is in for $15 billion and Apple for $30 billion. If Trump and the GOP Congress

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

had really intended that their trillion-dollar giveaway of the people’s tax revenue be spent for the benefit of all, they would’ve required the corporate recipients to plow the bulk of the money into our nation’s grassroots economy. Instead, once again, our corrupt political officials duped taxpayers into giving away public funds in the name of workers, but they actually stiffed workers, enriched CEOs, increased inequality, diverted tax dollars from urgent national needs — and enabled corporate powers to donate even more corrupting campaign cash to the politicians and party doing this to us. In other words, the Trump tax scam worked just as the GOP intended. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. March 8 , 2018 7


the anderson files The war on unions rages on by Dave Anderson

O

n Feb. 26, the U.S. costs. The First Amendment protects Supreme Court heard the right to speech, but not the right arguments in Janus v. to get something for nothing.” American Federation of Shanor told Democracy Now that State, County and the lawsuit is part of a larger libertariMunicipal Employees (AFSCME). The an effort “to use the First Amendment Washington Post calls it “the most to challenge what we might otherwise important labor case of the 21st centu- understand as regular economic regury to date.” The lawsuit is funded by an lation, in areas not just for unions, but alliance of big corporations, right-wing the government’s ability to act on clifoundations and billionaire activists mate change or public health or a like the Koch brothers who are hoping range of different activities.” to deal a “mortal blow” to progressive The Center for Media and politics. Democracy acquired a fund-raising The lead plaintiff, Mark Janus, is a letter from the State Policy Network child support specialist who argues that (SPN), an alliance of 66 state-based a state law in Illinois allowing the think tanks, describing a campaign union to charge a fee for collective bar- with an $80 million annual budget to gaining activities violates his First “defund and defang” unions representAmendment rights. A majority of his ing government employees as the first battle in a war fellow workers voted against progressive to unionize and politics. AFSCME negotiThe author of ated better pay and the letter, SPN’s benefits. Janus REFORMS ENACTED president and didn’t have to join CEO Tracie the union but was IN WISCONSIN Sharp, says they compelled to pay a AND NEIGHBORING have a “once-in-a“fair share fee” MICHIGAN HELP (lower than union lifetime chance to dues) for the costs reverse the failed DONALD TRUMP WIN of the functions policies of the THOSE STATES? NO that the union American left ... QUESTION IN MY performs on his We are primed, behalf and on right now, to MIND.’ — ANTI-TAX behalf of all the deliver the mortal ADVOCATE MAX other workers. If a blow to permaPATTERSON non-union nently break its employee such as stranglehold on Janus has a grievour society.” ance with his This comes at a employer, the union is legally time when the labor movement is required to represent him in grievance more popular than it has been in procedures. decades. Over the past year, approxiJanus v. AFSCME follows a similar mately 60 percent of Americans case the Supreme Court heard in expressed support for unions, accord2016, Friedrichs v. the California ing to Pew and Gallup polls. Even a Teachers Association. The court deadlarge minority of Republicans are locked 4 to 4 in the case, after conserfavorable. According to Gallup, 39 vative Justice Antonin Scalia died sudpercent of Americans would like denly. Trump appointee Justice Neil unions to have more influence — the Gorsuch is expected to break the tie. highest figure recorded in the 18 years The American Civil Liberties the polling organization has asked this Union (ACLU) filed an amicus brief question. Pew says that 76 percent of on behalf of AFSCME. David Cole Americans under 30 approve of and Amanda Shanor of the ACLU unions. argued in an article in The Nation that: Today, only about 7 percent of pri“It is not a violation of the First vate sector workers belong to a union. Amendment to disallow free riders see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 10 who would have others pick up their

‘DID THE LABOR

8 March 8 , 2018

guest column Marches and vigils are not going to bring about the change we need by Dennis Duckett

Y

et another school shooting. A call for vigils and marches, and letter-writing campaigns. While I agree kids have skin in the game, (always have and always will), this seems reactionary because of an incident. I encourage their political awakening, yet I wonder if it’s right to suggest they can accomplish something that we in generations before them have lacked the political ability to do. I watched the video of Parkland High School shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez’s powerful speech demanding gun control. I could feel her empowered grief and anger, and feel the passion of the very large assembly she addressed. This incident has sparked yet another flurry of outrage by “us.” We will hold marches and vigils all around the world. And then, we once again become too busy in our lives, too busy trying to make a living, too focused on myriad other political issues, too disillusioned with the political system to be involved, too locked into the dogma of our personal beliefs; so we go home. This is the way things have been arranged by the economic and political forces in this country. This reflects the political box our activism must work within. This is what we have bought into. No one has a “right” to own a gun. Where the hell did that come from?

Even free-thinking gun owners ought to get this. Illegitimate wealthy land and slave owners who stole land from the indigenous people living on it, who murdered them, who subjugated women as property wrote a document that essentially kept them from being taxed by the imperialist European governments, while opening the capitalist exploitation of resources of this land which they stole. The purpose of this document, (nothing more than words on paper) called the Constitution was to limit democracy and yet protect them (Second Amendment) from reprisals of those European governments. This is some illegitimate BS, and yet for generations we have bought it. There is no “right” to own a gun. And, this is the dead-end path we offer to our children in our encouragement to awaken them. There is no path, and we are blind to that. We blindly lap dog to propaganda pretending we have a political voice. The political system is fixed. The majority of Americans want gun control, so why don’t we have it. Vigils will not deliver, marches will only deliver if we face off with those forces. I mean in their face. Our voices are more and more restrained as we go forward. Online petitions are only leads for donation requests. The non-profits asksee GUEST COLUMN Page 10

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the anderson files THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 8

Most of them would like to join, according to numerous polls. However, if they try to organize, they are faced with a campaign of psychological warfare. Chris Tilly, director of the UCLA Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, notes that U.S. employers “have perfected the art of the anti-union campaign, in which they ratchet up the tension, one-sided arguments and flat-out intimidation to the point where most workers will vote ‘no union’ just to end the discord. Unfortunately decades-old U.S. labor laws do little to curb such tactics.” By contrast, public employee unions have remained rather stable with membership at about 35 percent. But they have been under relentless attack for several years. In 2010, Scott Walker, the newly elected Republican governor of Wisconsin, passed Act 10, which stripped public sector unions of the power to bargain collectively and forced them to re-certify themselves every year with electoral backing from more than 50 percent of all workers, not just those voting. Iowa and Indiana passed similar laws. A total of 28 states have also passed so-called “right to work” laws that

allow private sector workers to refuse to join unions while enjoying the benefits of collective bargaining. It is too early to understand the full impact of these anti-union measures but public sector union membership in Wisconsin has dropped by 40 percent since Act 10 passed. That’s 136,000 union members. Trump won Wisconsin by 23,000 votes. “Did the labor reforms enacted in Wisconsin and neighboring Michigan help Donald Trump win those states?” asked anti-tax activist Matt Patterson. “No question in my mind. Hard to fight when your bazooka’s been replaced by a squirt gun.” SPN president Tracie Sharp told The Wall Street Journal that Wisconsin and Michigan were only “thinly blue” and that the GOP’s destruction of the states’ unions was crucial. She notes cheerfully, “When you chip away at one of the power sources, that also does a lot of get-out-the-vote. I think that helps — for sure.” Our country’s future is at stake. A strong and prosperous union movement is essential if we are going to have economic and social justice. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

guest column GUEST COLUMN from Page 8

ing for donations are required to maintain corporate charters limiting their political power, legally covering their asses, and to get a tax break. Ah, capitalist America! We are society, and this is our society. If we’re not responsible, who is? If we own it, the only conclusion we can arrive at is that the U.S. Constitution does not serve the people, and has created a political and economic system which gives corporations more power than the people who labor in the myth we keep repeating to ourselves, that we have a voice. We don’t. We never really have. The Constitution, the basis for our political system, was not devised to give people power, nor was it meant to be reformed; it was meant to hold us in bondage. With the proper amount of propaganda applied, it has worked. It is fixed! The Center for Responsive Politics reported in 2012, the median net worth for members of the House and Senate was $1,008,767. This is how the capitalist system serves the public. If we 10 March 8 , 2018

don’t move beyond our indoctrination about a representative government, we will remain the “governed.” We have moved beyond a time when our marches and civil disobedience frightened these people. They don’t care, because they are fully aware that we don’t hold power in this system. So, we have to stop being the reactionaries when they stick it to us. If you want it to change, if you want to offer a future to our children, then offer them a new way, a new paradigm, a new political and economic system, a new vision of what a society in which citizens with a true voice can look like. Do we know? With vision, if we are willing to give up our attachment to an obviously brutal and dysfunctional system and its culture, I think in our hearts we do. We embrace our children and invite them to join us in the creation of a new era. Dennis Duckett writes from Nederland, Colorado. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


Bringing self-sufficiency and sustainability home

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letters ‘Gun Safety’ is an oxymoron

The only safe gun is an empty gun. I encourage an immediate ban on ammunition in the contiguous states of North America. “United” no longer applies. I have held that opinion since 1969 when I returned from Vietnam, where I witnessed the ravages of big boy games with guns for nearly two years. I concluded the killing machines have no place in civil society. As a civilian employee of the U.S. State Department, I was not obliged to carry a gun while serving in the Far East, but most civilian men with whom I worked did carry. It terrified me then, and it terrifies me today. On Tuesday, Feb. 27, I participated in the Fort Collins High School student rally honoring the murdered students in Parkland, Florida. I experienced the first real glimmer of hope that I have felt in decades. Perhaps there will be rational leadership in the future. My generation has failed miserably. I was inspired by the authenticity of the young people with whom I spoke at the rally. They get it! They acknowledge the gun issue is simple: If there are no guns and no bullets, students will not die at the hands of disturbed killers. Why is that concept so difficult for alleged adults to grasp? My first choice is to ban the manufacture and distribution of all weapons and ammunition in North America. Clearly that is not feasible. The low-tono-value leaders of the country are too dependent on the financial contributions of weapons manufacturers. So I support restricting the manufacture and distribution of ammunition. Legislators of the future need to be thinking about creating laws that make it so difficult to obtain ammunition that gun violence among non-military personnel will be eliminated. That’s how civilized countries function. Lynda Blake/Fort Collins

To Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

Dear Mr. Bezos, Speaking as a former Fort Collins City Council person, current member of the Nederland Board of Trustees and a longtime Colorado resident, I understand your interest in potentially opening a facility in beautiful, sunny, milehigh Colorado, home to many outstanding communities. For various good reasons, 90,000 good people relocate to Colorado every year. Nevertheless, fiscal and social prudence would have you also consider: • Many new-to-Colorado residents Boulder Weekly

will locate and send their children to school in very close proximity to toxic industrial sites as fracking escalates. The traditional zoning laws that separate toxic industrial sites from homes and schools have been set aside in Colorado by legislative and executive branches of government heavily influenced by oil and gas money. • Out-of-control growth has created gridlock on our highways. Our state wants to create more lanes rather than focus on mass transit and innovative solutions. • Colorado is mediocre in its support of el/hi public education. We rank near the bottom in per capita spending on students, in spite of voters’ attempts to correct this under investment. Class sizes continue to increase. • Our state is choking on growth. • There is no affordable housing along the Front Range as housing prices and rents have soared. Water, already a scarce resource, is becoming even scarcer as our population increases and the essential snowpack, our only water source, is decreasing as a result of global warming. Massive dams that will choke our rivers are being planned. Too many vehicles and methane emissions from fracking make it risky to exercise outside most summer afternoons because of ozone pollution. Inadequate environmental regulations are not protecting public health and safety. You have a reputation as a caring and responsible person. I urge you to turn down all tax incentives and seek a location where your business would be a boon, rather than a burden, to the people of the state. Alan Apt/Nederland

Marching to his own parade

There was a time when Conservatives disparaged all things “French,” even to the point of embracing the term “freedom fries.” Now, after watching a military parade celebrating Bastille Day in Paris last year, our adolescent male president wants one for himself. This chest-thumping, militant nationalism echoes that of Hitler, the Soviet Union and Kim Jong Il. In today’s state of existential anxiety, stirring the ever-present tendency to violence and war in the human psyche is near insanity. Peace, be it individual, societal or international, is elusive enough without pandering to our baser instincts. France’s military glory ended with Napoleon who, after all his pomp and self-aggrandizing, did not fare so very well in the end. Robert Porath/Boulder

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news

Out of the Fryingpan and into the Forest: Debate heats up over clear-cutting in White River National Forest

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by Josh Schlossberg

onservationists are challenging a logging proposal that would clearcut 1,300 acres in the White River National Forest northeast of Aspen, including endangered Canada lynx habitat and units adjacent to the protected Woods Lake Roadless Area. The Upper Fryingpan Vegetation Management Project covers 1,848 acres in the Aspen/Sopris Ranger District in Eagle and Pitkin Counties, Colorado, with the goal of providing lumber and biomass energy, increasing the diversity of tree age and size, and creating snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) habitat, the primary food source of the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). However, a formal objection filed by Denver-based forest management analyst and consultant Rocky Smith, along with representatives from Rocky Mountain Wild, Rocky Mountain Recreation Initiative and a chapter of Great Old Broads for Wilderness, alleges the project would instead degrade habitat for lynx and other wildlife, disturb soils and watersheds, and impact scenery. Objectors say the U.S. Forest Service must draft an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to detail the project’s potential harm to ecosystems and offer alternatives that would shrink its footprint. “We think that the impacts are of a nature that are significant [and therefore require] an EIS,” says Smith, who has 35 years of experience related to national forest regulations, in an interview with Boulder Weekly. He also says the project violates the Land Resource Management Plan for the White River National Forest, which emphasizes keeping “dense, undisturbed, closed-canopy conifer stands that provide security habitats for landscape-scale forest carnivore movement, migration, and dispersal between forested landscapes.” The Fryingpan landscape consists of mostly lodgepole pine, aspen and spruce/fir stands with much of the forest dating back to a large wildfire in 1860, according to the Aspen/Sopris 12 March 8, 2018

Ranger District’s Notice of Proposed Action for the project. The lion’s share of operations involves 1,061 acres of clear-cuts where all merchantable lodgepole over five inches in diameter would be logged — roughly 350,000 to 400,000 trees, according to a March 2017 Upper Fryingpan Vegetation Specialist Report — while leaving behind some spruce, fir and aspen under five inches. The project calls for another 327 acres of aspen clear-cuts — coppice cutting — which removes all trees in a unit, with an additional 458 acres of “group selection,” where stands would be cleared up to an acre in size, with total openings not to exceed 25 to 30 percent of a unit. The Forest Service would also punch in 10 miles of temporary roads for logging trucks, which they would obliterate afterwards. Kate Jerman, public affairs officer for the White River National Forest, explained in an email that much of the thrust behind the logging is to “alter the structure of the stand in a way that will increase the overall resiliency of the area to future disturbance such as insects, disease and wildfire.” While enhancing variety of tree age is one of the project’s objectives, not everyone agrees with the agency’s methods. “Long before humans were clearcutting, the forest maintained natural age class diversity all on its own,” says Delia Malone, wildlife chair of the Colorado Chapter of the Sierra Club. Malone says the Forest Service’s practice of clear-cutting to increase age class diversity — instead of allowing the forest to do so on its own over time — degrades wildlife habitat. “If you let that lodgepole forest get

to maturity without the cutting, it would be replaced ... by older growth forest, which would provide long-term habitat for snowshoe hare,” Malone says. “So they kind of create this selffulfilling prophecy of the need to cut by their very activities.” Smith points out that some of the units of the project already include aspen stands with a diverse age class, maintaining that the agency’s mandate to cut “doesn’t make sense.” Another Forest Service project goal is to create habitat for the snowshoe hare, the endangered Canada lynx’s favorite food. While the elusive wildcat is currently protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), in January the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released a scientific review of the Canada lynx in the contiguous U.S., concluding the species “may no longer warrant protection” under the ESA. Despite admitting the possibility of the creatures being “functionally extirpated” from some of their main popula-

tion centers during this century, USFWS will nevertheless “begin development of a proposed rule to delist the species.” Scoping comments on the project filed in December 2016 by Smith, conservation groups and 40 area residents noted that some of the units are good lynx habitat with “overhead cover and sufficient horizontal cover near the ground.” Clear-cutting, however, would remove trees that might otherwise fall and provide denning habitat. Further, Smith explains that large openings — the largest unit is 113 acres and some adjacent units add up to 180 acres — make the forest “unsuitable” for lynx. Reducing canopy cover between areas of high-quality habitat, such as the adjacent 12,200-acre Woods Lake Roadless area, makes the cats vulnerable to predation from eagles and hawks. “They need connectivity, and this will disrupt that,” says Smith. Lynx aren’t the only creatures that would suffer from the logging, accordBoulder Weekly


ing to conservationists. The large cuts would also impact elk, deer, marten, goshawk, boreal owl, olive-sided flycatcher, purple martin, fringed myotis bat, pygmy shrew, boreal toad and northern leopard frog. Malone says the project will “absolutely increase fragmentation of the landscape and ... in the face of a changing climate, critters need to move, and this will inhibit that ability to move from secure habitat to other secure habitat.” “You don’t have native wildlife without healthy forests, and you don’t have healthy forests without native wildlife,” says Malone. “So when you alter one, you alter the other.” As a multi-use project, the Forest Service is also looking to generate revenue from the project through the sale of wood to local businesses for the production of lumber and biomass electricity. The project is expected to generate between 18 and 22 million board feet of lumber, according to the Specialist Report. Mike Kusar, general manager for Montrose Forest Products — a local mill likely to bid on the wood — says national forest timber sales like Upper Fryingpan help keep the region’s timber industry afloat. He added that Montrose provides almost 100 direct jobs at the mill while contracting with another 200 truckers and other workers. “That one sale obviously isn’t going to make or break us,” Kusar says. “But they’re all important to us.” Due to the small size of the trees, Smith questions how many logs could actually be turned into dimensional lumber. Indeed, Montrose forester Norm Birtcher says the mill can use lodgepole pine larger than seven inches in diameter and spruce eight inches in diameter. Since the project mainly calls for cutting trees larger than five inches, presumably any lodgepole between five and seven inches and spruce between five and eight would go to post and pole plants. Trees that are too small, crooked, knotty, or rotten for lumber or poles, as well as any by-products of logging not scattered or burned on-site, can be chipped and trucked to the Eagle Valley Clean Energy facility, an 11.5-megawatt biomass power facility in Gypsum in Eagle County. “They can use just about anything that grows in the ground and make biomass,” says Smith. “We can comfortably assume, based on current markets, that most of the aspen and small-diameter lodgepole would go [to the] Gypsum biomass facility,” says Jerman, the White River public affairs officer. Woody biomass energy is a controBoulder Weekly

versy in and of itself, with supporters calling it clean, renewable, “carbon neutral” energy and critics countering that cutting and burning trees degrades forests while emitting carbon dioxide and harmful air pollutants. For years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has delayed the decision for how to account for carbon emissions from biomass energy. Last month, EPA administrator Scott Pruitt sent a letter to New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu suggesting that biomass energy may be carbon neutral, which some environmentalists

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say ignores climate science and forest ecology. “When we remove material from the forest, we are removing the very nutrients that sustain that forest,” says Malone. “Forest nutrients are recycled within that forest into new trees and new life, so basically by removing those products, we’re diminishing the health of the forest.” “There’s this concept that humans need to manage the landscape, [which] is why we’re in the predicament that we’re in in the first place,” says Malone. “When we start mucking

around with natural processes, we generally create more disturbance and more loss of biological diversity than we intend.” The Forest Service had until March to review and analyze the eleven objections the Upper Fryingpan Vegetation Management Project received. At some point following the review, the team will make recommendations to Scott Fitzwilliams, forest supervisor for the White River National Forest, who will decide whether to move the project along as is, amend it, or cancel it altogether.

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Rosa Sabido (left) has been in sanctuary in Mancos since June 2017. Ingrid Encalada Latorre (with sons Bryant and Anibal) is currently in sanctuary in Boulder.

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n the face of increasingly hostile immigration policies, a record number of undocumented immigrants have claimed sanctuary in churches and communities of faith around the country in the last year. But they are not hiding. Resolved to stay with their families and in their communities, many of these immigrants have become outspoken advocates for change. There are currently four women living in sanctuary in Colorado, one each in Mancos, Denver, Carbondale and Boulder. On March 8, International Women’s Day, they are launching a “people’s campaign,” asking individuals, as well as businesses, community groups, law enforcement agencies, faith communities and elected officials, to endorse a resolution that they hope will provide a blueprint for legislators to make policy changes. “We realized that uniting would give more strength to the movement,” says Ingrid Encalada Latorre, who has been in sanctuary in three different churches in Colorado since November

news

THURSDAY MARCH 8 7:00 PM

2016. She’s been at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Boulder since mid-December. “And the reason unifying the four of us is more powerful is it unifies the state from north to south, unifying the churches that support us as well as the communities.” Each woman’s case is unique, but there is little, if any legal recourse for any of them. The new campaign sets out what the women and immigration advocates say are simple solutions to their legal issues. “You hear so much about how the system doesn’t work or is broken or is complex, so there’s this feeling that this is a really difficult problem to solve,” says Jennifer Piper, interfaith coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee, which is helping to organize the campaign. “It has become a political football, but the solutions are actually not that hard. Even in just looking at these four cases there are some really simple changes that could be made that would create a path to status for them and for thousands of other Coloradans.” For example, Araceli Velasquez’s husband has Temporary Protected Status, but that doesn’t include a pathway to citizenship for him or a way for her to obtain any sort of legal status. Latorre is not eligible to apply for status either, despite the fact she has U.S.-born children and a citizen aunt. Same for Sandra Lopez, who has U.S.citizen children and has lived in Boulder Weekly


Colorado for almost two decades. She’s been at the Two Rivers Unitarian Universalist Church in Carbondale since November 2017. And Rosa Sabido has been waiting more than 17 years for a family reunification visa to be approved, but given the immense backlog of the system, as well as the limited number of visas allowed, she could be waiting several more years. She’s been living in the Mancos United Methodist Church since June 2017. “We are working together and we’re going to be working with the community and our elected officials to change these unjust laws ... putting pressure on Congress to make changes that would allow us to be free, to be liberated,” Lopez says via an interpreter from Carbondale, “to help thousands avoid sanctuary in the future.” In the past, other immigrants in sanctuary have appealed to politicians for relief from deportation, but that has become increasingly tricky given the current political climate. Latorre, for example, appealed to lawmakers and government officials for help in her case to no avail. Most notably she petitioned Gov. Hickenlooper for a pardon, which he denied last year. The people’s campaign, on the other hand, hopes to galvanize a movement from the bottom up, with the goal of collecting 20,000 signatures to present to state and federal lawmakers before summer recess. The hope is that local and state officials can use their influence to motivate Colorado’s Congressional delegation to take action. “A state can’t necessarily set federal policy but they can decide to what level they’re going to participate and use the resources of the state to carry out these federal goals,” Piper says. One such example is a Colorado law, first passed in 2013, that allows undocumented residents to obtain driver’s licenses and decrease the risk of being sent to ICE for minor infractions. Ultimately, the four women hope the results of the new campaign will allow them to leave sanctuary without the threat of deportation. But they also recognize it isn’t just about them. “In general, immigrants are facing more racism than ever and we’re seeing doors closed on us,” Lopez says. “My human dignity is not about having a piece of paper. I am a human being and that is the basis on which I have dignity. And every one of the 11 million undocumented immigrants has that same dignity. We have dreams, feelings, goals just like everyone else.” Boulder Weekly

MORE INFO: People’s campaign launch with Ingrid Encalada Latorre and Araceli Valesquez, Sandra Lopez and Rosa Sabido via Skype. 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 8, Unitarian Universalist Church of Boulder, 5001 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Araceli Valesquez (with her family) has lived in a Denver church since August 2017, Sandra Lopez (with daughter Areli) has been in sanctuary in Carbondale for four months.

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news Right to Rest Act, take four

MORE INFO: Come to the rally March 14 at 12:30 p.m. in front of the Capitol, hearing at 1:30 p.m. in room 271.

by Angela K. Evans

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Joel Dyer

or the fourth year in a row, Colorado lawmakers are considering the Right to Rest Act, a piece of legislation aimed at local policies around the state that prohibit people experiencing homelessness to sit, camp, eat and have their property in public spaces. After an initial postponement to accommodate possible amendments, the bill will be presented at a House Local Government Committee hearing on March 14 that is expected to take considerable time. (Last year it lasted more than 10 hours.) As in past attempts, getting the bill through the legislature is an uphill battle for the homeless advocates and legislative sponsors behind it. Each year, the proposed bill has failed to make it out of committee and to a vote in the House. That’s to say nothing of getting it passed in the more conservative Senate. But that isn’t stopping the bill’s supporters. “Homelessness is a systemic problem that is caused by our housing market and our economy and that the answer to addressing the widespread crisis of homelessness in our nation is not to try to criminalize folks and move folks around, but is to give people basic rights and dignity and bring back actual attainable housing for poor people in our country,” says Terese Howard, organizer with Denver Homeless Out Loud and Western Regional Advocacy Project, which helped draft the bill. Sponsored by Democratic Representatives Joe Salazar (Thornton) and Jovan Melton (Aurora), the Right to Rest Act is commonly known as the Homeless Bill of Rights. Similar campaigns are currently making their way through Oregon and California. The goal is to shift the focus and resources away from criminalizing homelessness and toward adequate solutions like affordBoulder Weekly

able housing. “It would mean that folks who are living outside in Boulder would no longer be going through this ineffective and harmful and expensive cycle of streets to jail, streets to jail, streets to jail, as is currently the case,” Howard says. “It would mean that the resources that are currently being spent on that could be redirected towards actual solutions like housing. And it would mean that statewide folks would not be being pushed from city to city to city, but that folks would be able to settle down in a city of their liking and do the best that they can to further themselves — wherever is best for them, not wherever they are trying to get away from police enforcement.” Critics claim cities like Boulder, which have policies such as the camping and smoking bans in public areas, specifically target and criminalize the homeless population. While the City maintains its position that these policies are necessary for public safety, they aren’t without “collateral consequences,” says Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle, who isn’t taking an official position on the Right to Rest Act. When people are ticketed for things like camping or smoking in public, they often end up in jail, unable and/or failing to pay the

fine or show up in court. “The jail is crowded. It’s expensive. It doesn’t change their behavior. It doesn’t do anything to enhance public safety,” Pelle says. “So it (criminalizing homelessness with policies like the camping ban) doesn’t accomplish anything other than cost the taxpayers a bunch of money. “That’s the issue I have,” Pelle continues. “The answer, I don’t know. It’s really complicated.” The City of Boulder has opposed the Right to Rest Act from the beginning, “from a very fundamental, home rule, local control perspective,” says Carl Castillo, policy advisor for the City of Boulder. “When we talk about regulating our parks and open space and how we deal with public safety issues, we strongly feel those are decisions that should be made by the local governments or elected officials.” Although in years past staff has lobbied at the capital against the bill, more recently the City has taken a more “passive” approach, Castillo says, while also revamping homeless services in collaboration with the rest of Boulder County. “We think it’s ironic that some of the cities that are being most targeted by this bill are the ones that are doing the most to help the homeless, at least ones attempting to through a variety

of services,” Castillo says. Sandra Seader, assistant city manager for the City of Longmont, says her City Council has yet to take an official position on the bill and probably won’t unless it passes committee and goes to a House vote. In the meantime, the community services department is working “to try and educate the bills’ sponsors on the work that is being done and why this is sort of contrary to that,” she says. Longmont wants to be involved in the process, not seen as adversarial to the bill from the get-go. The most recent round of amendments have yet to be made public and neither legislative sponsor responded to questions prior to press time. Seader says that if the final draft does go against the principle of home rule and “restrict and go against the things that the council is doing in order to aid people who are struggling with homelessness,” then Longmont would most likely oppose the bill as well. Regardless of the efforts of cities, Howard says the point of the bill isn’t to increase “quote-unquote services,” nor will the presence of such services exempt jurisdictions from an “appropriate and adequate housing” provision that could allow certain places to maintain their public safety ordinances. “Not shelter beds, not mats on a floor, not warehouses where people can be stuffed as if that is some sort of a housing option,” she says. Despite opposition from local governments and lawmakers, Howard remains hopeful the legislation will pass, if not this year, then sometime soon. “It’s a humanity and a moral and a justice issue,” she says. “And until they (lawmakers) can realize that we are going to fight. This is the strongest legislation protecting the rights of people surviving outside and we’re going to continue with the long-haul struggle.” March 8, 2018 17


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Urban and Community Forestry, Forest Legacy, Community Forests and Open Space, and Landscape Scale Restoration. The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) swiftly responded with a statement expressing disappointment in the proposal, calling it a “detriment to the American people.” However, Colorado State Forest Service Director Mike Lester says he’s not worried just yet. “The president’s budget is just recommendation,” Lester says. “Even this year (2018), the House [Committee on] Appropriations, what they are coming back with is different than the president’s proposed budget. We don’t worry because it’s just a suggestion. We worry about appropriations.”

Colorado foresters aren’t worried about proposed cuts to National Forest system... at least not yet by Caitlin Rockett

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n Feb. 12, as Congress was still finalizing a budget deal for 2018, the Trump Administration released recommendations for 2019’s federal budget, including significant cuts to state and private forestry programs. As proposed, the budget would reduce overall funding for the National Forest System by more than $170 million, eliminating key programs from the State and Private Cooperative Forestry division including

Don Becker via Wikimedia Commons

Lester does admit the president’s recommendations “can represent a trend,” guiding the way political appointees view public lands and how the government will manage those lands. Still, he says, the decision is left up to Congress, which has, according to Lester, typically pushed negotiations toward sensible funding for forestry programs. For example, the president’s 2018 budget recommendations zeroed out funding for Urban and Community Forestry (a federal program that helps communities around the nation manage and restore forests), just as it does in the 2019 proposal, but the House and Senate never considered ending the program and negotiated a relatively small cut in its funding. So while the president has suggested eliminating some key forestry programs, Lester doesn’t see it happening. See BUDGET CUTS Page 20

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March 8 , 2018 19


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“The [president’s] administration might not be sure of the value of those programs, but the House and Senate are,” he says. Of most concern to Lester is proposed wildfire funding. Nonprofit conservation organization American Forests echos Lester’s sentiments. “While the administration’s budget proposed a slight increase in funds to reduce wildfire risk on America’s national forests, it does not propose a comprehensive fix to the wildfire suppression budgeting issue, especially regarding the erosion of the U.S. Forest Service’s budget to the rising costs of suppression.” “It’s kind of stunning,” Lester says. “The U.S. Forest Service budget stays pretty flat from year to year. Part of budgeting for wildfire suppression is based on a 10-year average. That’s no big deal if the cost goes up and down every year, but that’s not the way it works now. It goes straight up. Each year a larger and larger portion [of the U.S. Forest Service budget] is being taken up by wildfire suppression. So the money available to states, money for private landowners, is less and less. Forest supervisors have less and less. The equivalent is running a factory by never maintaining your equipment; it just gets worse and worse.” But some cuts to wildfire funding are proposed. According to the NASF, the federal Volunteer Fire Assistance program would be cut by nearly a fifth if the president’s recommendations are adopted. Writing for Wildfire Today, career wildland firefighter Bill Gabbert takes aim at the president’s proposed cuts to wildfire-fighting aviation resources, cuts made “in spite of the fact that the number of acres burned annually in the United States continues to increase.” Wes Rutt, a retired tree farmer and volunteer firefighter in Stove Prairie — about 20 miles west of Fort Collins — agrees that wildfire is the most impor-

tant piece of the budgeting puzzle. “There’s all sort of evidence that says working in forests before fire to mitigate damage is more cost effective than trying to suppress the fire,” Rutt says. “We live right in the middle of what was the High Park Fire. I was on the volunteer fire department when fire came through here. All sorts of people had done some work to their property; some had done extensive work, others none at all. There’s no guarantee that work you do and money that these funds may give you are definitely going to reduce the damage if the fire comes through at 50 miles per hour uphill. But they certainly can improve your chances to reduce your risks of losing your home and forest.” Rutt says he lost about 70 percent of his private forestland. While the threat of wildfire may seem more existential to urban dwellers, Rutt says it’s just as real. “If you’re an urbanite living in Fort Collins or Boulder and a fire happens up in the mountains, you’d say, ‘Oh, gee, look at how pretty that is, all those beautiful flames,’ but you’re not OK because when a big fire comes through it denudes the forest and denudes the water shed. Everybody gets affected when there’s a big fire.” Like Lester, Rutt says this is just the beginning of negotiations and he believes Congress will ultimately approve a budget that’s more balanced than the president’s proposals. “I’ve been around long enough to see budget negotiations go on,” he says. “It always starts with extremes. After months of negotiation you come up with a compromise you can live with. “There’s a lot of calls for public money,” he adds. “We need it for all sorts of things. If a fire isn’t on your doorstep, the Forest Service isn’t necessarily the top priory for most people. I can understand that, but you have to think ahead and I hope with negotiations for the budget, cooler heads will prevail.” Boulder Weekly


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March 8 , 2018 21


BUZZ

Gaelle Beri

Friends first, bandmates second Darlingside’s ‘Extralife’ explores the present, the future and the healthy space in between by Angela K. Evans

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22 March 8 , 2018

atching Darlingside perform is reminiscent of seeing four college buddies — intellectual and talented as they are — hanging out, cracking jokes and making each other laugh, sometimes even more than the audience. Then they begin to play, and the four voices meld together in rich harmony as all of them cluster around a single microphone. What comes out is mesmerizing: a combination of guitar, bass, mandolin, sometimes banjo and sometimes cello — but never drums — with vocals taking center stage. There really is no front man leading the show; no personality takes precedence over the others. From the stage to the recording studio, the guys in Darlingside are friends first, bandmates second. Named after writing advice they heard from a college professor, “kill your darlings,” Darlingside is made up of members Auyon Mukharji on mandolin, bassist Dave Senft, “effervescent cellist” (as Mukharji puts it) Harris Paseltiner, and guitarist and banjo player Don Mitchell. The quartet recently released their latest album, Extralife, a compilation of songs written over the past decade of making music together. It started at Williams College in Western Massachusetts when Mukharji and Senft were

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assigned freshman year roommates — a “complete happenstance,” Mukharji The members of Darlingside met says. They then met in college more Paseltiner and Mitchell than a decade ago and have while singing in an a capella been creating group, and somewhere along music together ever since. the way picked up a drummer to accompany them as they started performing as a more traditional indie rock band with musicians sprinkled throughout the stage, listening to each other through monitors. When the drummer, who is still a good friend, left the group in 2013, the group decided to embrace the change, quickly becoming a four-piece folksy Americana band overnight. “At the same time [the drummer] was deciding that the touring life was just not for him, we were all talking about exploring more acoustic and folkier textures,” Mukharji says. “It now feels inevitable but at the time it was just like, ‘Well, maybe we’ll try this.’” The experiment proved successful as the release of 2015’s Birds Say drew attention for its unique sound — what NPR called “exquisitely-arranged, literaryminded, baroque folk-pop.” Now, it’s hard to imagine the four members doing anything but performing shoulder to shoulder, sans Boulder Weekly


Cameron Gee

drums, sharing the mic with the a capella influences readily apparent. “We like singing close together,” Mukharji says. “It’s nice to be able to hear a person’s voice as opposed to their voice through a speaker. Singing in a room together is just the way that we’ve practiced from the start as a band.” Working democratically is also something Darlingside has done from the start, considering all ideas and opinions before settling on the final outcome. When the idea for a song comes along, one member becomes its “steward,” messing with lyrics, melodies and arrangements before bringing it back to the group for review. Sometimes that one person will oversee the process the entire way through, others times a song will cycle through a few different stewards before it’s complete. “It’s an incredibly slow-moving process but one that we all have faith in, and I think that stems from a lot of mutual trust and respect,” Mukharji says. “There’s a faith that what all of us like and love together is going to be stronger than what any one of us would like and produce on our own.” It can take years to finish a song, Mukharji admits, although that’s “less a reflection of how long it takes us to write a song and more one of the fact that we have a lot of stuff brewing.” Ideas can sit in nascent forms in notebooks and voice memos for a while before they ever make it to an album. Take the lead single of Extralife, for example. “Eschaton” was one of the first melodies the band came up with way back in 2008. “That is one of the greatest departures from the music we were making at that point,” Mukharji says. “Its form a decade ago was just a happy folk tune, but as we pulled it back out and reworked it, it became what it is now.” Energetic and poppy, the song explores the end of the world, with the upbeat chorus, “No matter what we’ve been/We are the upshot now.” Although the band didn’t set out with a specific theme or overarching goal in mind, Extralife is an exploration of a potentially dystopian future, as the band wrote the album throughout their tour of the country during much of 2016. “The fact that we ended up writing a lot about the present and the future more so than the past is very much a reflection of what we were thinking about and talking about,” Mukharji says. Still, the album is void of any overarching political sentiment or specific demands. “Our role is asking questions and Boulder Weekly

putting ideas out there,” Mukharji continues. That’s “where our heads were at, more so than this is wrong, this is bad, this needs to change.” The result leaves room in the music for the listener to engage with the band, much like the friends leave space for each other in the songwriting process. But that doesn’t mean uniformity or consensus is the result. “Disagreement is the space that we live in,” Mukharji says. “But that is a healthy thing, or at least we view it as that.”

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arts & culture

T

DCPA/Joan Marcus

heater lovers anywhere outside of New York City must cultivate one similar trait: patience. When a new show opens on Broadway, unless you buy a ticket to the Great White Way, fans of the stage know they will have to patiently wait until the show makes its way out to them. Luckily, Denver is blessed with a thriving theater scene, meaning shows make tour stops in the city not long after they debut. The latest show to come to Denver is the smash hit Hamilton, playing at the Buell Theatre through April 1. Tickets sold out for its five-week run within hours of going on sale. As the 9,978th member in line, I was lucky enough to secure tickets, an opportunity for which I had been waiting for three years. I heard about Hamilton as many millennials hear about things these days, in a listicle on Buzzfeed with a number of “reasons why the show will be your new obsession.” After one listen to the soundtrack, then a few dozen more, I was hooked. But my love for Hamilton transcended myself; it was news I had to share with everyone. So friends, family, coworkers and strangers endured endless hours of me explaining just why this show was so great. A cornucopia of stories have been published on the history and brilliance of Hamilton. But for those uninitiated, the musical tells the story of Alexander Hamilton and the other founding fathers during the American Revolution. The story follows Hamilton from his humble beginnings in the Caribbean, to immigrating to America and eventually becoming the nation’s first treasury secretary, all the way to his death at the hand of thenVice President Aaron Burr. The story is told using hip-hop and rap and provides a fresh approach to retelling history. Moreover, show creator Lin-Manuel Miranda cast a multi-ethnic group of actors to tell the story — as he told The Atlantic, “This is a story about America then, told by America now.” The list of reasons that Hamilton garnered so much success is long and

BIG SHOES TO FILL

Even on an off night, ‘Hamilton’ is an inspired show by Amanda Moutinho

Boulder Weekly

substantial, but it boils down to a stunning soundtrack, wonderful actors, provocative staging and boundless creativity. So after so much waiting and anticipation, I attended the March 1 show in Denver and was left disappointed. Miranda and crew provided an impeccable blueprint for following productions, so while all of the show’s fixed elements — music, lyrics, costumes, stage design, choreography — were wonderful, the biggest frustration of the night was the cast. The original Broadway production boasted an especially talented company, receiving seven Tony nominations for acting and wins in three major categories. While I acknowledge that the show left some big shoes for subsequent casts to fill, it was disheartening to see such a drop in quality. Perhaps the biggest let-down was the performance of the titular role. Understudy Ryan Alvarado seemed disconnected from the show. The character of Hamilton is multi-faceted and passionate — many songs tell of his intensity, his non-stop nature and unsatisfiable zeal. But Alvarado didn’t deliver an interpretation that demonstrated these vital character traits. Whether singing the spirited “My Shot,” the angry “Meet Me Inside,” the lullaby “Dear Theodosia” or the determined “Hurricane,” Alvarado stayed in a limited emotional range, undercutting the power of the songs. Other lead roles left something to be desired as well. Nicholas Christopher (Aaron Burr) and Sabrina

Sloan (Angelica Schuyler) delivered performances that were inconsistent and lacking that extra sparkle. This was sad to watch, especially with such incredible source material like Burr’s “Wait for It” and Angelica’s “Satisfied.” Watching the cast, I felt like a director watching a rehearsal, wanting to stop the production and tell the actors, “OK, now do it one more time with feeling.” What saved the show were the secondary characters. Chris Lee, playing Marquis de Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson, gave excellent presentations. Lee made the characters his own — the goal of any new portrayal. By his side, Mathenee Treco (Hercules Mulligan/James Madison) and Desmond Newson ( John Laurens/Philip Hamilton) also delivered entertaining appearances full of humor, emotion and gusto. The brilliance of Hamilton transcends the lows of its individual performances. By the time Hamilton delivers his final monologue, it’s almost impossible not to be moved, evidenced by my own sobs and the ones heard around me. The show is packed with such splendor that its overall majesty wins every time. I’m disappointed that I can’t unabashedly gush when asked about the show, but overall, I’m grateful to have seen a show that has moved me for so long. Just as an off night for one of your favorite bands can’t spoil your love for them, I will continue to love Hamilton. In the meantime, I’ll wait patiently for my next opportunity to see the show. March 8 , 2018 25


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overtones

Amy Mundinger

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Boulder Bach Festival returns to its central mission with four choral works by Peter Alexander

I

t will be back to basics for the [appeared] as soloist with the Boulder Boulder Bach Festival. Philharmonic and the Colorado Its next concert will return to the Symphony last year, and he’s on the facoriginal focus of the festival by preulty of UNC in Greeley. And Sewailam, senting choral works by J.S. Bach who has sung as soloist with the Boulder with soloists and orchestra. After several Philharmonic many times, is an extraorconcerts featuring music by composers dinary musical presence.” before and after Bach, and introducing Stoppelenburg likes to come all the various performance styles, the program way to Boulder to perform at the BBF will comprise four of Bach’s church canfor several reasons. “It’s a very special tatas: No. 4, Christ lag in Todesbanden; festival, and for me it’s a great treat to No. 50, Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft; go there and sniff some good mountain No. 61, Nun komm, der air,” she says. Beyond Heiden Heiland; and No. that, she enjoys singing 63, Christen, ätzet diesen the festival’s Baroque Tag. repertoire, because it ON THE BILL: “Eternal Spirit.” Boulder Bach “All of these works “fits my soul and my Festival, Zachary Carrettin, have great arias, beautiful voice the best. And artistic director. Bach duets, riveting choruses you can tell that the Festival Orchestra and Chorus with guest artists. and gorgeous orchestral audience in Boulder is Four Bach Cantatas. 7:30 writing,” Zachary very culturally aware.” p.m. Thursday, March 15. Carrettin, the festival’s Carrettin chose Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton cantatas for this proartistic director, says. “I Ave., Boulder. Tickets: 720gram because of the love these four works, 507-5052 or www.bouldercentral place they have and I thought they bachfestival.org/tickets/ in J.S. Bach’s life. would be fabulous on Providing cantatas for one program.” Sunday services in Carrettin will conLeipzig was for many years one of his duct the Boulder Bach Festival Chorus and Orchestra, with soloists Josefien main duties. “With over 200 cantatas, Stoppelenburg, soprano; Abigail Nims, this is what Bach did,” Carrettin mezzo-soprano; Derek Chester, tenor; explains. “If you want to find the majoriand Ashraf Sewailam, bass. “These are ty of Bach’s masterpieces, you look to the four of the greatest soloists we’ve procantatas. It’s the genre that’s got everygrammed,” he says. “I couldn’t think of a thing. better quartet of individuals to collabo“It’s got the drama that one may find rate with our chorus and orchestra.” in an opera. It has the sacred quality one Although she lives in the might find in the liturgical settings. Netherlands, Stoppelenburg has perSometimes it has the instrumental writformed several times at the BBF and has ing you find in a concerto. The cantatas “already become a Bach Festival favorhave everything!” ite,” Carrettin notes. “Nims has an The two halves of the program, extraordinary career as a mezzo and is before and after intermission, represent on the faculty at CU Boulder. Chester different styles and different periods in Boulder Weekly

Bach’s creative life. The first two cantatas, nos. 4 and 50, are scored for voices and strings only, and date from the early years of Bach’s career. They are both “chorale cantatas,” meaning that they are based on a Lutheran chorale tune that appears throughout the cantata, often in longer notes surrounded by musical decoration. “There’s almost a medieval quality, and these archaic moments have a profound quality for the listener,” Carrettin says. “That’s why I’ve chosen to do one per part in the string section, with a chamber choir of 20 singers.” There will be a significant contrast in sound with the two later cantatas, nos. 61 and 63. “We contrast (the earlier works) with two works in the second half that have four trumpets, three oboes, timpani and full orchestra,” Carrettin says. “We bring out the full chorus of 44 and the larger string section for these two works. It’s a different style of writing, and very jubilant.” The difference in sound reflects the different ways these works would have been perceived in Bach’s lifetime. The earlier cantatas would have seemed old fashioned in the 18th century. “These cantatas look backwards stylistically, and there’s something very profound in doing that,” Carrettin says. In contrast, “when he’s writing for trumpets and oboes and timpani, it’s a very contemporary voice for him. So the first half is Bach looking backward, and the second half is Bach in the moment.” These kinds of stylistic and historical distinctions are fascinating and can add a great deal to the enjoyment of the concert. But Carrettin hopes the audience will listen primarily to enjoy the music, as they would for the chamber concerts or any other programs at the BBF. “Listening to a cantatas program is a lot like listening to a concertos program,” he says. “It’s uplifting and intriguing, and there’s diversity in the writing. “But it’s important to say that some of the greatest moments in Bach’s aria writing and choral writing are in this concert.”

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With the support of The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism FredericLenzFoundation.org NAROPA UNIVERSITY’S NEW BA ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM PRESENTS…

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28 March 8 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


Wikimedia Commons/Snowfalcon CU

ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14

there will be a walkout at Fairview High School in Boulder at 10 a.m. Students and other supporters will gather on the ultimate frisbee field for 17 minutes of silence to honor the 17 victims of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting. Afterwards, students, faculty, parents and other supporters from the community will gather on the football field to hear from a number of speakers including students and guests. There will also be a chance to make signs for the upcoming national action that includes “March for Our Lives” in Denver on March 24. see EVENTS Page 30

LUCKY ME — ALBUM RELEASE PARTY.

TRANSFORMING GENDER CONFERENCE.

JAZZ AT THE DAIRY: FLOWERS OF EVIL.

7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette.

March 8-10, CU Boulder, Wolf Law Building, 2450 Kittredge Loop Road, Boulder.

Lucky you, because you Courtesy of Tom Wasinger get a chance to see Lucky Me. The band is made up of local music heroes Rob Galloway (who’s recorded and toured with Carole King, Ian Matthews and Leftover Salmon) on bass and vocals, Craig Skinner (of Boulder New Wave band Pearl) on guitar and vocals, threetime Grammy-winner Tom Wasinger on guitar and vocals, and Michael Wooten of the legendary Colorado band Zephyr on drums. The band’s music reflects their eclectic tastes in music, from straight up Americana to world music. It’s been said that the second best part of a live Lucky Me show is listening to Tom and Harry tell wild stories about the old Boulder music scene between songs.

Monica Helms, via Wikimedia Commons The 12th annual TRANSforming Gender Conference will host national and local transgender, genderqueer, intersex, trans people of color, activists and scholars to raise awareness of transgender issues. Free and open to the public, the conference offers more than 35 workshops and panels addressing wide-ranging issues including genderinclusive teaching and educational materials, employment, mental healthcare, practicalities of transitioning, allyship and legislation. This year’s keynote speakers are Kat Blaque (animator, activist), Sam Bullington (first trans professor at the University of Missouri) and Chase Strangio (staff attorney with the ACLU’s LGBT & AIDS Project). Register at colorado.edu/ gsc/transforming-gender-conference.

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 14, Dairy Arts Center, Gordon Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boulder Weekly

Courtesy of Annie Booth

Award-winning jazz pianist and composer Annie Booth’s compelling, genre-bending work Flowers of Evil is based on the beautifully dark poetry of one of the greatest 19th century French poets, Charles Baudelaire. This program will feature mixed media and a fusion of jazz and classical instrumentation, taking you on a musical journey filled with sonic landscapes that match the complexity of Baudelaire’s work. Performers joining Annie for this modern jazz world premiere are Kathryn Radakovich, Anisha Rush, John Gunther, Brad Goode, Adam Bartczak, Adrienne Short, Kari Clifton, Patrick McDevitt and Alejandro Castaño. Tickets are $10-$24.

March 8 , 2018 29


events

EVENTS from Page 29

Thursday, March 8 Music

CU BOULDER EVENTS THURSDAY, MARCH 8

SATURDAY, MARCH 10

Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon.

Rights, Wrongs and Responsibilities: Covering Race in Today’s America.

2 p.m. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder.

8:30 a.m. Eaton Humanities, 1610 Pleasant St., Boulder.

This event takes place simultaneously at sites around the world and brings together diverse communities to create and improve Wikipedia articles on women in the arts and humanities.

A Century of Views of Colorado, 18201920. 5:30 p.m. Benson Earth Sciences, 2200 Colorado Ave., Boulder,

While rarely seen today, these maps offer a window into the development of our state from its origins through the early 20th century.

CU Eco-Social Justice Team presents: Echoes of Eco in Hip-Hop: Performance and Panel. 6 p.m. Old Main, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder.

Courtesy of CU Boulder

Famed local Hip hop artivists DJ Cavem, Mike Wird and Bianca Mikahn weave health, food justice, and ecological thinking into their work.

H.G.S.A. Spring Speaker Series: “The Tattooed Professor:” Dr. Kevin Gannon “Teaching History Critically.” 6 p.m. Eaton Humanities, 250, 1610 Pleasant St., Boulder.

Please join us for Dr. Gannon’s lecture and workshop addressing the challenges of effectively teaching history in classrooms characterized by political and socioeconomic divisiveness.

Climate Change in our Backyard: Bugs and Burns — Mountain Pine Beetles in Colorado. 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium and Science Center, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder. Join us to learn more about how human actions and natural cycles intersect, and the impacts this has on our forests and our lives.

FRIDAY, MARCH 9 Experience Virtual Reality. Noon. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder.

Explore Seeing Through, an experimental film with those who have never used virtual reality before. See calendar.colorado.edu for more dates.

“Canyon Cinema” screening with David Dinnell. 7 p.m. Roser ATLAS Center, 102, 1125 18th St., Boulder. The CMCI Payden Teaching Grant is funding the visiting programmer, artist and scholar David Dinnell for a special “Canyon Cinema, a fifty-year filmmakers’ co-operative” screening.

The College of Media, Communication and Information at the University of Colorado Boulder will unite journalists, media makers and scholars for the one-day conference titled Rights, Wrongs and Responsibilities: Covering Race in Today’s America.

SUNDAY, MARCH 11 Takács Quartet. 4 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder. The Grammy Award-winning string quartet has been moving audiences and selling out concerts for three decades at CU Boulder. See calendar. colorado.edu for more dates.

MONDAY, MARCH 12 Responsibilities to Refugees. 5:30 p.m. Hale Science, 270, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder.

Over 11 million Syrians have fled their homes since the outbreak of the civil war in 2011. The question of what Western states such as the U.S. owe to refugees is thus a pressing one. This panel will bring together political theorists and philosophers to discuss a range of interconnected issues that arise in this context.

Sutherland Seminar Series — Diagnosis Part II: Bipolar Disorders. 6 p.m. Atonement Lutheran Church, 685 Inca Parkway, Boulder.

This seminar will discuss what disorders commonly co-occur or are confused with bipolar. How does this impact treatment? How are alcohol and recreational drug use related?

TUESDAY, MARCH 13 Nordic Club Movie Night: Änglagård (House of Angels). 6 p.m. Eaton Humanities, 145, 1610 Pleasant St., Boulder.

A Cannes Award-winning drama about a distant city relative inheriting a reclusive uncle’s mansion in remote Sweden.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 Josephine Jones Lecture: Amal Kassir — I Swear by Humanity. 5:15 p.m. Fleming Building, Fleming Courtroom, 2445 Kittredge Loop Road, Boulder. This talk is a testimony narration infused with poetry about the resilience of humanity and the impetus of mankind.

Dean Himes. 6 p.m. Lunada Eatery and Cantina, 2770 Arapahoe Road, Suite 124, Lafayette. Deejay Theory. 10 p.m. The Pop-Up, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder. The Elders. 8 p.m. The Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver. Framing the Red. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver. Jam Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland. KGNU’s Spring Membership Drive. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder. Monophonics. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Open Bluegrass Jam. 6:30 p.m. Open Door Brewing Co., 2030 Ionoshere St., Suite 6, Longmont. Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder. Open Mic Night. 7 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. The Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Events 6th Annual Boulder Jewish Film Festival Opening Night. 7 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder. Big Jay Oakerson. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. Comedy Night at Vision Quest. 8:30 p.m. Vision Quest Brewing, 2510 47th St., Boulder. Drop-In Improv Class. 6 p.m. Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver. Fake Network News: A Fully Improvised Show. 7:30 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. Guy Torry. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver. No Man’s Land Film Festival. 6 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver. Open Stage: Ladies Night. 7 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver. Oscar Shorts: Live Action. 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Trivia at Tandoori’s Bar. 6 p.m. Tandoori’s Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder. WWI Film Series: Wonder Woman. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Friday, March 9 Music Boulder Suzuki Strings Concert. 6 p.m. Mountain View United Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Place, Boulder. The CBDs (50th Gig Celebration!). 7 p.m. Kathmandu Indian Restaurant, 110 N. Jefferson St., Nederland. Cellar West Friday Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 10, Boulder. Citizen Dan. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette. Classical Evening with Colorado Children’s Chorale. 7:30 p.m. Saint John’s Cathedral, 1350 Washington St., Denver. Cross Pollinations: Music Intersects with Art. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver. see EVENTS Page 32

30 March 8 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Chorale & Chamber Singers March 10, 7:30 PM & March 11, 4 PM Boulder Seventh-day Adventist Church 345 Mapleton Avenue Explore a fusion of two cultures as the Boulder Chorale and Jam Key Jam present newly commissioned works and arrangements merging the Hindustani classical music and American choral traditions. Connect with the music, with the divine, and with community as you experience transcendent choral beauty from J.S. Bach to the theme from “Game of Thrones”!

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303.554.7692 March 8 , 2018 31


events UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

words

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store

No one escapes life without experiencing grief in one form or another. But the journey of grieving parents, specifically that of the grieving mother, is something no one can imagine unless they have lived it. Is there a way through? Is it possible to live vibrantly again, to find joy and purpose in life after your young adult child has passed on? Grief Interrupted is a letter of love, hope and healing from one mother in grief to another. Corey Stiles will speak about her book at the Boulder Book Store at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 14.

Thursday, March 8 Darla Sue Dollman — Colorado’s Deadliest Floods. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Friday, March 9 Saturday, March 10 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Radio Show Taping

Mar

Williams 12 Marlon & Esmé Patterson

Square One. 4:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Sunday, March 11 Jessie Hilb — The Calculus of Change. 2 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Movie Night:

Muscle Shoals

Mar

13

A documentary that celebrates Rick Hall, the founder of FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL, and the signature sound he developed in songs such as I’ll Take You There, Brown Sugar, & When a Man Loves a Woman.

Mar

16, 17, 18

The Blind Cafe

An award winning positive social change discussion, dinner & music experience held in 100% darkness, no blindfolds!

Danny Sahfer. 6 p.m. Chuburger, 3490 Larimer St., Denver. Gravity Check. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont.

3/19 3/22 3/23 3/29

Full ConCert: Mirabai Ceiba MerryVille u.S.a - liVe FilMing & launCh Party le Voile du bonheur: FrenCh ChaMber MuSiC truthteller tour: an eVening For CourageouS WoMen to Share, ConneCt, & inSPire

KGNU’s Spring Membership Drive. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder. Lauren Stovall Duo. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. Lionel Young and the IBC Band. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder.

New Orleans Suspects. 9:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. Pegboard Nerds. 9 p.m. Beta Nightclub, 1909 Blake St., Denver. People Corrupting People. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland.

Wednesday, March 14 Adam Agee and Jon Sousa. 11:30 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Corey Stiles — Grief Interrupted. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

The Great Leap. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Ricketson Theatre, 950 13th St., Denver. Through March 11. Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde — presented by Firehouse Theater Company. John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through March 17. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St. Longmont. Through April 8. Jotunheim: A Legend of Thor and His Hammer. The BiTSY Stage, 1137 South Huron St., Denver. Through April 8. Kiss Me, Kate. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through April 15. Oscar Dove: Letters to Sherlock. Theater Company of Lafayette, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. Through March 24. Peter Pan. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through March 24. Sense and Sensibility. Arvada Center for Performing Arts, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 6.

Shovels & Rope. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Siren Song: A Pirate’s Odyssey. Buntport Theatre, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through May 14.

Sonic Arcade ’80s band. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Suite A, Longmont.

Sleeping Beauty — presented by Denver Children’s

TICKETS: eTOWN.org

Young Dubliners. 8 p.m. The Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver.

Video Games Live in Denver. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver.

Events Becky Shaw. 7:30 p.m. Coal Creek Theater, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville.

RDG Photography

The Electric Baby. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 4.

Phillip Phillips. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Tom Pakele. 7 p.m. Boulder Beer on Walnut, 1123 Walnut St., Boulder.

32 March 8 , 2018

Micah Springer — Keepers of the Story. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

theater The Book Handlers. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through March 17.

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org

Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Intrepid Travelers — with Metafonics, Chompers. 9 p.m. Your Mom’s House, 608 E. 13th Ave., Denver.

New Breed Dance Company: Oh No She Didn’t! 6 p.m. The Dickens Tavern, 300 Main St., Longmont.

Featuring comedians Janae Burris, Harris Alterman, Patrick Scott & Katie Bowman.

Aaron Brown. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Always Patsy Cline. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through April 1.

Music & Movement. 10:30 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville.

21

Tuesday, March 13

The Hustle Kings. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont.

Meadow Mountain. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons.

eTown Mar Comedy Live!

So, You’re a Poet. 9 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 30

Jive Tribe. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Music and Dinner in the Dark Experience

Monday, March 12

In an adaptation of Sleeping Beauty, Denver Children’s Theatre tells the story of Briar Rose (aka Sleeping Beauty), an independent, headstrong, inyour-face kind of princess and her best friend and companion Gryff, a smart-aleck half-dragon. When Briar Rose pricks her finger and goes to sleep, Prince Owain and Briar Rose’s friend Gryff join forces on a funny and adventurous quest to save her, battling troublesome fairy-folk and a riddling Spider King along the way. Showing at Mizel Arts and Culture Center through May 4. Theatre. Mizel Arts and Culture Center, Elaine Wolf Theatre, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Through May 4. Wisdom from Everything — presented by Local Theater Company. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through March 25. The Wizard of Oz — presented by Peanut Butter Players. Harlequin Center for the Performing Arts, 1376 Miners Drive, Suite 106, Lafayette. Saturdays through March 17.

Big Jay Oakerson. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver.

Boulder Jewish Film Festival: In Between. Noon. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boulder Ballet: Storybook Ballet: Snow White. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

The Cured, with Ellen Page. 8:45 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boulder Jewish Film Festival: Act of Defiance. 2:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Exhibition Reception for Objects in Perspective, Embracing Mistakes, and Through Their Eyes. 5 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. see EVENTS Page 34

Boulder Weekly


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March 8 , 2018 33


events

arts

Kimberlee Sullivan, Elliptical Orbit, 2017

The question that arises in response to Kimberlee Sullivan’s ambiguously abstract works is whether they are based on an observation of nature or observation of art. Her current exhibition, Weather Pattern, is on display in the foyer of Macky Auditorium through May 6.

Arthur Jafa: Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May. 13. Cleon Peterson: Shadow Of Men. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 27. Degas: A Passion for Perfection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through May 20.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location

Diego Rodriguez-Warner: Honestly Lying. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 13. Draw Me In: The Art of Drawing at the CU Art Museum. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through March 24.

THURSDAY MARCH 8 8PM

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!

Elemental Forms. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May.

PAPER MOONSHINE

Embracing Mistakes. Dairy Arts Center, MacMillan Family Lobby and Hand-Rudy Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Opens March 9. Through April 15.

FRIDAY MARCH 9 8PM

DANGO ROSE & ROSH & THE BLIND CAFE ORCHESTRA

Eyes On: Xiaoze Xie. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through July 8. From Her Perspective. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through March 31.

SATURDAY MARCH 10 8PM

THE MOONLIT WILD, THE HEARTSTRING HUNTERS and THERESA PETERSON SUNDAY MARCH 11

ALLEN THOMPSON 8PM BOB BARRICK 9PM MIKE HEUER 10PM MONDAY MARCH 12 8PM

THE STEAMBOAT BANDITS TUESDAY MARCH 13 8PM

ESPRESSO!

WEDNESDAY MARCH 14 8PM

RABBLEFISH

THURSDAY MARCH 15

JEREMY DION 8PM ELIZABETH SWAN 9PM LAUREN JOY 10PM FRIDAY MARCH 16 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE

Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 34 March 8 , 2018

Ganesha: The Playful Protector. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through October.

Objects in Perspective. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Opens March 9. Through April 15.

Kimberlee Sullivan: Weather Pattern. Macky Auditorium (foyer). 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through May 6.

Past the Tangled Present. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Oct. 28.

Linking Asia: Art, Trade, and Devotion. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through April 1.

Pink Progression. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through March 24.

Member’s Show. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through April 22.

Power Of Process, Jefferson County Schools Exhibition. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden. Through April 1.

Millie Chen: Four Recollections. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through July 21.

Through Their Eyes. Dairy Arts Center, Polly Addison Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Opens March 9. Through April 15.

Nathan Abels: History of the Future. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St. Through May 28.

Wopo Holup: Endless Places, Present. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St. Through May 28.

EVENTS from Page 32

FN Weird: The Warriors. 8:45 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Frozen Dead Guy Days: Royal Blue Ball. 4 p.m. ReAnimate Yourself Tent, Nederland. Integral Steps Presents Music & Movement. 1 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. The Jester’s Court Improv Comedy Show. 10 p.m. Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver. Kids’ Night Out. 6 p.m. CENTRALongmont Presbyterian Church, 402 Kimbark St., Longmont. Local Theater Company: Wisdom from Everything. 7:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Movies @ Meadows: Alice In Wonderland. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder. Oscar Shorts: Live Action. 6:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Pioneers: Women Artists of Colorado (18701970). 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder. Saturday, March 10 Music Bootstrap Brewery Tour. 4 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Boulder Chorale: Between Heaven & Earth. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Seventh-day Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton Ave., Boulder. Boulder Concert Band: American Masters Past & Present. 7 p.m. First Congregational Church UCC, 1128 Pine St., Boulder. Cat Jerky. 8:30 p.m. Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont. CharlestheFirst. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

Colorado Women’s & Colorado Men’s Chorales Jazz it Up! 7:30 p.m. Augustana Lutheran Church, 5000 E. Alameda Ave., Denver. The Contortionist: Clairvoyant North America. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Cordle’, Hager and Williams: Blues, Rock, Folk Music Collaboration. 6 p.m. Front Range Brewing Company, 400 W. South Boulder Road, Suite 1650, Lafayette. Cosmic Mesa. 7 p.m. Boulder Beer on Walnut, 1123 Walnut St., Boulder. Cuentos y Cantos con Josh (bilingual). 10:30 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette. The Delta Sonics. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Flatirons Community Orchestra. 7 p.m. United Church of Christ, Ninth and Francis, Longmont, 1500 Ninth Ave., Longmont. Full of Mirros. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder. Jazz for Instruments. 2 p.m. Silver Creek High School, 4901 Nelson Road, Longmont. The Jerseys. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette. Knocked Loose — with Terror, Jesus Piece, Year of the Knife. 6:30 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver.

Lucius: An Intimate Acoustic Show. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Marmozets. 8:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. New Breed Dance Company: Oh No She Didn’t! 7 p.m. The Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Official Frozen Dead Guys After Party. 9:30 p.m. Rocky Mountain Oyster Bar, 25 E. First St., Nederland. Onda. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland. Opera Colorado Masquerade Ball. 6 p.m. McNichols Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. Planina & Marrakech Express. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver. The Red Petals, J.W. Schuller. 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver. Ryan Montbleau House Concert (Adults Only). 7 p.m. Sounds of Simon House Concerts, 1086 E. Roggen Way, Superior. Tom Weiser Jazz Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder. Video Games Live in Denver. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver. Wendy Woo. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont. Events Becky Shaw. 7:30 p.m. Coal Creek Theater, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville.

Krewe of Olympus Carnival Ball. 7:30 p.m. Historic Grant Avenue, 216 S. Grant St., Denver.

Big Jay Oakerson. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver.

Lee Clark Allen and Friends. 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver.

Boulder Ballet: Storybook Ballet — Snow White. 2 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Live Music: Maynard Mills Blues Band. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder.

Boulder Jewish Film Festival: Dreaming of Jewish Christmas. 7:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boulder Weekly


events Denver’s Next Improv Star — Season 9. 8 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. FreeDance Workshop. 3 p.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont. Frozen Dead Guy Days: FDGD Pancake Breakfast. 8 a.m. Nederland. Events continue throughout the day. Guy Torry. 9:45 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver. KGNU’s Spring Membership Drive - Tune in March 7-18. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder. L.A. Dance Project. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Off the Clock Burlesque & Comedy. 11 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver. Oscar Shorts: Live Action. 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder. Stories on Stage: Storybooks on Stage. 10:30 a.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Sunday, March 11

Chris D’Elia Live. 7 p.m. Glenn Miller Ballroom; CU, 1667 Euclid Ave., Boulder. Guy Torry. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Suite 64, Boulder. Netflix and Chill (For Reel. With Strangers!): If A Tree Falls. 11 a.m. McNichols Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. Screening of Fatittude. 5 p.m. Sie FilmCenter, 2510 E. Colfax, Denver. Sensory Friendly Playtime. 8 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. Monday, March 12

Music Ceschi — with Dark Time Sunshine, Moodie Black, Dopeknife, Sole. 8 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Griefshare Support Group. 6:30 p.m. Longs Peak United Methodist Church, 1421 Elmhurst Drive, Longmont.

The Steamboat Bandits. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder. Tour With Us! Free Information Session. 8:30 p.m. Faith Community Lutheran Church, 9775 Ute Highway, Longmont. Events

Joanne Shaw Taylor. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver. Live eTown Radio Show Taping — with Marlon Williams & Special Guests. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Open Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

6th Annual Boulder Jewish Film Festival. 1 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Broadway Experience: Hamilton Dance Intensive. 6 p.m. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Children’s Creative Movement and Story Time. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Creative Collective, 2500 47th St., Suite 10, Boulder. see EVENTS Page 36

Join Us In Celebrating our 14th Year in Boulder!

Music Bluegrass Pick. 12 p.m. Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont. Bootstrap LOCO Ukulele Band. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Boulder Chorale: Between Heaven & Earth. 4 p.m. Boulder Seventh-day Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton Ave., Boulder. The Dear Landlords. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. George Clinton. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. KGNU’s Spring Membership Drive — Tune in March 7-18. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder. The Longing of the Spirit, A Celebration of Women Composers. 4 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver. Music in the Galleries: Ensemble Faucheux. 2 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver. Music Together® Class. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder. Outlaw Yoga. 10:30 a.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. The Prairie Scholars. 4 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont. Requiem: Mozart’s Last Words. 3 p.m. LifeBridge Christian Church, 10345 Ute Highway, Longmont. They Might Be Giants. 7 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Tinsley Ellis. 7 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver. Unity of the Heart: Sacred World Music at Columbine Unity Spiritual Center. 7 p.m. Unity Columbine Spiritual Center, 8900 Arapahoe Road, Boulder. You Are My Sunshine. 11 a.m. Dabble Paint and Sip Studio, 2330 Main St., Suite E, Longmont.

When: Saturday, March 17th 9AM Where: Celestial Seasonings Cafe 4600 Sleepytime Dr - Boulder Come out and help make a difference! All ages and hair length welcome! Register today to go bald for this great cause! Go to: www.stbaldricks.org

Events Boulder Ballet: Storybook Ballet: Snow White. 2 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Boulder Jewish Film Festival: Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story. 10:45 a.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Boulder Jewish Film Festival: Hitler’s Hollywood. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boulder Weekly

Together we can put an end to Childhood Cancer March 8 , 2018 35


events EVENTS from Page 35

Getting Started Shooting 360 Video. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder. Monday Open Mic. 8 p.m. Sko Lounge, 1325 Broadway St., Suite 205, Boulder.

Music Conan. 8:30 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver.

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder.

Espresso! Swing & Gypsy Jazz. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder.

Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder.

Euchre in Longmont — Win Free Beer! 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Tuesday, March 13

Introducing the Band with Mark Diamond. 7 p.m. The Post Brewing Company, 2027 13th St., Boulder.

KGNU’s Spring Membership Drive — Tune in March 7-18. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder.

Open Mic — with The Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont.

Movie Night at eTown Hall: Muscle Shoals. 7 p.m. eTown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder.

Open Stage: Hosted by Danny Shafer. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder.

Open Jam/Mic Night. 10 p.m. Your Mom’s House, 608 E. 13th Ave., Denver. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland.

Sarah Chang. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Events 6th Annual Boulder Jewish Film Festival. 1 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Achieving the Cinematic Look. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder. Drop-In Improv Class. 6 p.m. The Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver. Wednesday, March 14 Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland. Bon Jovi This House Is Not for Sale Tour. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Burn It Blue. 7 p.m. Boulder Beer on Walnut, 1123 Walnut St., Boulder. CD Release Party: Alive Inside The Tank. 7 p.m. Nevei Kodesh, 1925 Glenwood Drive, Boulder. Dairy Presents: Flowers of Evil. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Suite C, Longmont. Glen Hansard. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Harmony Youth Choir. 4 p.m. Harmony Music House, 2525 Broadway St., Boulder. KGNU’s Spring Membership Drive — Tune in March 7-18. KGNU Community Radio, 4700 Walnut St., Boulder. Marc-André Hamelin, piano. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Midday Music Meditation. 12 p.m. Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Open Mic. 6:30 p.m. Shoes and Brews, 63 S. Pratt Parkway, Suite B, Longmont. Our Last Night. 6:30 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Rabblefish. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder. Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder. Taylor Bennett. 7 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

UPCOMING SHOWS Saturday, March 24 – 8 pm to midnight • Wild Game - Longmont Friday, April 6 – 6:30 pm • Full Cycle Tap Room - Boulder Hindsight Acoustic Duo

CALL NOW to book the band for your Party! 303-819-8182 • www.hindsightclassicrock.com 36 March 8 , 2018

Wednesday Acoustic Open Mic Hosted by Captain Flashback. 4 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 W. 38th Ave., Denver. Events Refocusing My Family — LGBTQ Faith. 7 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder. Wyclef Jean: The Carnival Tour. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Yoga for Kids. 4 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette.

Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Weekly

March 8 , 2018 37


screen Thursday March 8

hIrIE

w/ IndubIous & For PEacE band

FrIday March 9

charlEsThEFIrsT, PoTIons, suPErTask w/ GooPsTEPPa & sorrow

saTurday March 10

ThE ExPEndablEs w/ ThrouGh ThE rooTs, PacIFIc dub & aMPlIFIEd

sunday March 11

FuTurIsTIc: whaT MorE could you ask For? w/ Ishdarr, scrIbEcash, avEry shyra, PdF & klassIk

FrIday March 16

ThE JaunTEE

w/ ThE acousTIc MInInG coMPany & woodshEd rEd

FrIday & saTurday March 9-10

JoEy PorTEr’s shady busInEss

FEaT JoEy PorTEr (ThE MoTET), alvIn Ford Jr (PrETTy lIGhTs lIvE band/ duMPsTaPhunk), GarrETT sayErs (ThE MoTET), craIG brodhEad (Turkuaz) & shIra ElIas (Turkuaz) 3/9: yaMn 3/10: lylE dIvInsky’s soul survIvors

TuEsday March 13

ryan caravEo

w/ ryan oakEs, rookE5, FlIP bonE & colorblInd

wEdnEsday March 14

rE: sEarch

w/ analoG son & wabakInosET

FEaT arTIFakTs w/ bIrocraTIc, wax FuTurE, MIkEy ThundEr & Jordan PolovIna

saTurday March 17

Thursday March 15

MaGIc bEans Mark FarIna & sacha roboTTI w/ dErEk russo

FrIday March 23

ThE russ lIquId TEsT w/ TnErTlE, lyFTEd & krushEndo

saTurday March 24

ThE dancE ParTy TIME MachInE FEaT Marc brownsTEIn, aron MaGnEr & allEn aucoIn oF ThE dIsco bIscuITs, MIkE GrEEnFIEld oF loTus, cory wonG oF vulFPEck & JEFF Franca oF ThIEvEry corPoraTIon

Thursday March 29

MIchaEl schEnkEr FEsT FEaT MIchaEl schEnkEr, Gary bardEn, GrahaM bonnET & robIn McaulEy & dooGIE whITE (MIchaEl schEnkEr’s TEMPlE oF rock), chrIs GlEn, TEd MckEnna & sTEvE Mann

FrIday March 30

anTIbalas w/ PInk hawks

FrIday aPrIl 6

Muzzy bEar w/ Todd & shooka

saTurday aPrIl 7

cuT chEMIsT w/ El dusTy

FrIday aPrIl 13

Grass For ThaT ass PrEsEnTs

andy Thorn & FrIEnds

w/ banshEE TrEE, davId burchFIEld & ThE FIrE GuIld

FrIday March 16

rocky MounTaIn GraTEFul dEad rEvuE

FEaT rob EaTon (dark sTar orchEsTra) Plays ThE bEsT oF EuroPE ’72 w/ bonFIrE dub’s ThE doors & wIsh you wErE PInk

saTurday March 17

40oz To FrEEdoM w/ ProJEcT 432 & ElEPhanT wrEckInG ball

sunday March 18

caMPrado

rob $TonE w/ anT bEalE

wEdnEsday March 21

rE: sEarch

FEaT GovInda, MIkEy ThundEr & Jordan PolovIna

Thursday March 22

whITEwaTEr raMblE PIckIn’ on lEd zEPPElIn

w/ JEssIca JonEs w/ ThIn aIr (TrIbuTE To wIdEsPrEad PanIc) & arMchaIr booGIE

FrIday March 23

MaTador! soul sounds & cory wonG w/ anTwaun sTanlEy

saTurday March 24

sold ThE dEad souTh

ouT

w/ ThE hooTEn hallErs

sunday March 25

b.h. 2doTs

FEaT Jay TrIIPlE, ThE MIsFITs & 2unE

Thursday aPrIl 19

MEnaGErIE G.o.a.T. FashIon show sPrInG EdITIon

GranTFul dEad (FEaT MEMbErs oF hoT buTTErEd ruM, GranT FarM & coral crEEk)

FrIday aPrIl 20 lIvwEll PrEsEnTs

METhod Man & rEdMan collIE budz

Monday March 26

FEaT Goldyloxx, bankaJI & sassFacTory

TuEsday March 27

FaT TuEsday’s TrIbuTE To nola Funk, soul, r & b

saTurday aPrIl 21

FEaT casEy russEll (MaGIc bEans), wIll Trask (GrEaT aMErIcan TaxI), clark sMITh (dynohunTEr), sEan dandurand w/ JoEy MarcInEk band FEaT JEFF PETErson & TIM PhIlPoTT

wEdnEsday aPrIl 25

MEadow MounTaIn

w/ chalI 2na & ProJEcT 432

JoynEr lucas bIG k.r.I.T.

w/ cyhI ThE PryncE

FrIday aPrIl 27 dual vEnuE!

ForTunaTE youTh w/ ballyhoo!, TaTanka & MIkE lovE

FrIday May 11

EvEryonE orchEsTra FEaT sTEvE kIMock, John kadlEcIk, Jason hann, JEnnIFEr harTswIck,

Thursday March 29

FEaT chrIs PandolFI (ThE InFaMous sTrInGdusTErs) w/ Grass FEd MulE & ThE lonEsoME days

FrIday March 30

ToTEM, alasI clay, FIErcE lE FEy, ThE dIrTy GEMsTonEs, FrEEdoM MovEMEnT, MIkE word & Tr9nsFEr saTurday March 31

J.waIl lIvE band

Jans InGbEr, Todd sTooPs,

FEaT chuck MorrIs (loTus) & ThE wIlkolak broThErs horns (laTE nIGhT radIo/MIchal MEnErT)

Josh schwarTz & shIra ElIas

Monday aPrIl 2

chuck JonEs, brIdGET law,

T

he Bible describes angels as so mind-meltingly unfathomable to humans, the first thing they always say is “You gotta chill out, I’m cool. I promise and stuff.” Scientists conclude that the actual appearance of any potential alien or interdimensional life would neither resemble Alf nor any of the primary-hued sexy space ladies Captain Kirk sleezily tries to Kobayashi in the Maru. And yet, most mainstream cinematic speculative fiction refuses to traffic in the absurd and impossible. Delightfully, writer/director Alex Garland’s Annihilation ain’t scurred of the surreal. Terrifyingly beautiful and gorgeously horrific, this lightly plotted sci-fi gem is the kind of brilliant nonsense that gives studio executive ulcers and fans of limitless imagination the tingly-tummy opposite of ulcers. Based on the novel by Jeff VanderMeer, which is apparently even more enthusiastically abstract, Annihilation begins with the sky barfing a circular rainbow around a lighthouse. Nicknamed “the Shimmer,” its surface area is constantly expanding, and anyone who goes into the affected space doesn’t come out. Until someone does... Lena (Natalie Portman) is a smartypants Harvard biologist mourning the disappear-

Shimmer shimmer ya

TuEsday March 20

bassTracks w/ raPIdGrass, ruM crEEk

When the sky bars a shimmering rainbow at a lighthouse, the government starts sending in troops who never come out. Until Natalie Portman’s hubbie does. So she goes in after him with an expedition that is like Hearts of Darkness via Ursula Le Guin.

Thursday March 8

yunG PInch TExT cErvanTEs To 91944 For TIckET GIvEaways, drInk sPEcIals, dIscounTEd TIckET ProMoTIons & MorE

w/ a-Mac & ThE hEIGhT & ThE runnIkInE

‘Annihilation’ is blissfully bonkers by Ryan Syrek

ance of her husband, Kane (Oscar Isaac), a soldier she presumed died on a secret mission. Then he just kind of shows up in their bedroom and starts emitting blood from all sorts of places. The evil double-secret shadow government shows up and takes Kane. Lena is determined to figure out what happened and save her husband. So she convinces Dr. Ventress ( Jennifer Jason Leigh), who is in charge of the Shimmer missions and an firm 11 on a 1-10 scale of creepy-intense, to let her go on the next expedition. In the film’s clunkiest bit of unneeded overexplaining, we’re told only women are being sent in this time by choice, as though simply having a squad of qualified women enter would have broken brains more than the shimmery rainbow fart they’re investigating. Anya (Gina Rodriguez), Cass (Tuva Novotny) and Josie (Tessa Thompson) join Lena and Ventress on their sure-to-go-really-awesome mission, which does not go really awesome. Annihilation is as much about what it means to be human as it is about decidedly non-human shenanigans. Although Lena’s infidelity makes her motivation a bit onenote, the film attempts a meditation on the flawed-but-worthwhile cycle of love and sorrow, not unlike Arrival. Portman and Isaac somewhat undersell their relationship, with a bit too much “flashbacks of tickling whilst wearing underpants in bed” and too little “do they actually love each other?” That said, the entire cast does a helluva job negotiating the believability of reacting to the unbelievable. The unbelievable is actually the star of the show. Although some sights inside the Shimmer are designed only to encourage diaper deposits, most are a lyrical blend of alarm and beauty. The film’s final third takes full advantage of the quiet previous acts, ending in a crescendo of sight, sound and vanishing sanity. Annihilation is strange in the most complimentary form of that descriptor. It is borderline profound, a singular experience and the kind of escapist fiction that truly liberates audiences from the oppressive weight of mundane reality. This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

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2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

38 March 8, 2018

Boulder Weekly


film The reality of experience

Past and present collide at the 2018 Brakhage Center Symposium by Michael J. Casey

“Say it, no ideas but in things” —William Carlos Williams, Paterson

A

ON THE BILL:

Brackage Center Symposium. 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 10 through 4 p.m. Sunday, March 11. CU Boulder, ATLAS 100. Free.

s the legend goes, when poet William Carlos Williams sat down to pen what would become his five-book opus, Paterson, he sought to do for his New Jersey city what James Joyce had done for Dublin in Ulysses: to look deeply into the everyday and find the eternal. And, like Joyce’s desire to transport the ancient Greek tale of Odysseus to 20thcentury Ireland, Williams’s poem transports Joyce’s quotidian approach to the Garden State with great success — infamous, even. Because nestled on page six of Paterson, comes the signature line, “no ideas but in things,” a dictum that would spur poets to explore the concrete and the here and now, rather than abstract thoughts and theories. One such poet, armed with a 16-mm camera, was famed filmmaker and CU-Boulder professor, Stan Brakhage; a man who spent his life trying to bring Williams’s charge to the moving image. Now, 15 years after Brakhage’s passing, the 14th annual Brakhage Center Symposium (March 10-11) explores filmmakers who Animator and drawer Karen have picked up the baton and seek to encounter the realYasinsky turned ity of experience: Karen Yasinsky, Christopher Harris to filmmaking as a way to expand and Jean-Paul Kelly. her art. Specializing in animation and drawing, Karen Yasinsky turned to filmmaking when painting proved to be too limiting. Like Williams pulling from Joyce and Brakhage pulling from Williams, several of Yasinsky’s films draw inspiration from the films and teachings of Robert Bresson — himself a filmmaker who sought to express the extraordinary through rigorous photography of the ordinary. Eleven of her films, including one work-in-progress, will be presented March 10 at 2 p.m. History is fodder for every artist, but for Christopher Harris, the history expressed is a history repressed. Take Reckless Eyeballing, which uses images of Pam Grier and Angela Davis to explore the deep chasm separating fantasy and reality. Of the seven works featured (4 p.m.), three have been edited in-camera, a technique that gives viewers the impression that what they are watching is not so much composed as it is snatched from the river of time. The work of Jean-Paul Kelly (7:30 p.m.) also deals heavily with representation and perception, but Kelly looks to rework the notion of authorship with re-creations and reenactments morphing previous works into something wholly new. Be it a Truman Capote interview turned into a stream of images in The Innocent or characters wearing Charlie Brown ghost sheets and restaging scenes from Fredrick Wiseman documentaries in Service of the Goods, Kelly’s films playfully transform the past into something new. The Brakhage Center Symposium continues March 11 at 2 p.m. with a collection of Brazilian documentary and experimental works curated by Chris Stults of the Wexner Center for the Arts. The back half of the program, starting at 4 p.m., features the work of Cao Guimarães, Brazil’s renowned documentarian whose work celebrates the poetry of the everyday, just like Brakhage, Williams and Joyce before him. Boulder Weekly

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303-776-8089 CALL FOR DELIVERY! visit our website: www. jaithaimenu.com

March 8 , 2018 39


SI M P L E

|

L O C A L

|

FA R M

T O

TA B L E

BEST NEW RESTAURANT THANK YOU for voting for us!

578 Briggs Street Erie, CO 80516 303.828.1392 www.24carrotbistro.com

40 March 8 , 2018

BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 3 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

DINNER

SUN-THR 5PM-9PM

F R I & S AT 5PM-10PM

Boulder Weekly


Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Smoked Pork Cali Burrito

Photos by staff

Verde 640 Main St., Louisville; 3070 28th St., Boulder, verdeboulder.com

O

Boulder Bowl

Japango 1136 Pearl St., Boulder, boulderjapango.com

I

f it’s true you eat with your eyes, then Japango’s Boulder bowl will have your peepers categorically stuffed. A bowl of tuna, yellowtail and salmon over sushi rice bursts with color and gets the gastric juices flowing before you dip your chopsticks in. Like everything at Japango, there is substance to back up the good looks; the fish is fresh, expertly sliced and well-apportioned. Crisp cucumber and sinus-cleansing wasabi provide footholds as you make your way through the bowl. There are few better ways to ride out the last days of winter than in Japango’s modern, yet cozy dining space, next to a tall flask of hot sake and a bowl or plate of delicious fresh fish. $22.

K, so the hottest place to be in Boulder County right now is Verde. Whether you stop in at the new digs on Main Street in Louisville (the old Blue Parrot building), or at the strip mall location on 28th Street in Boulder, you’re going to be met with a lot of energy, people, drinks and food. The Verde operation has exploded from its food truck beginnings, thanks mostly to its stable of bold Mexican foods. The standard Cali burrito includes guacamole, potatoes, cheese and salsa, with a choice of protein; we chose smoked pork. The meat is tender and robust, like biting into a pig on a spit. Special shout-out to the crispy-skinned and light potato hash on the inside. That’s next level burrito-ing. $12.50.

Risotto con Gamberi

Via Toscana 356 McCaslin Blvd., Louisville, viatoscana.com

O

nce you step inside the thick, wooden doors of Via Toscana, it’s easy to forget the outside world. Thick shades keep the real world out, while the service, decoration and classic Italian menu transports you to what feels like some old New York City haunt. Its take on shrimp risotto is tastefully understated and well-prepared. Crisp, fresh shrimp is nestled atop creamy risotto cooked perfectly al dente. Garlic, herb and olive oil bring the right amount of flavor. $7.

My Mom Listens to Slayer

Bramble & Hare 1970 13th St., Boulder, brambleandhare.com

I

f you’re not making Bramble & Hare a regular stop on your nights out in downtown Boulder, well, you should. The selection of inventive craft cocktails is virtually unparalleled. Take the tequilabased, My Mom Listens to Slayer. It’s reposado tequila, strawberry, and a gastrique of mushroom and Flemish sour ale. It starts sweet and floral, then moves to earthy and spicy, then to a hint of tartness. If the Old Fashioned is your drink, give this a try. If not, try it anyway, or any of the other bold creations on the cocktail list. $10.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday Boulder Weekly

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

2016

March 8 , 2018 41


nibbles

Susan France

BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

T Using your noodles Skip the spaghetti and sauce up bucatini, ziti and orzo instead

42 March 8 , 2018

he bucatini guanciale carbonara served at Boulder’s Emmerson restaurant only includes the essentials. The long, tubular, house-made noodles are cooked al dente and tossed with cubes of guanciale — cured, unsmoked pork cheek. The noodles are barely coated with egg yolks and finely grated pecorino Romano. It wasn’t a gigantic portion but the amazingly rich, classy, bacon-and-eggs taste lingers in memory. If the chef had used linguine, farfalle or vermicelli instead, it would not have been the same experience. Whenever I visit the Boulder County Farmers Market (opening April 7), it’s easy to get caught up in the fresh greens, dumplings and mushrooms, but I’m always mesmerized by the Pappardelle Pasta booth. The Denver-based company makes dozens of shapes, sizes and flavors ranging from basil tangerine fettuccine and dark chocolate linguine to green chile pappardelle, habanero radiatore and sweet potato orzo. I imagine the pastas mingling with various sauces, market veggies and meats. The Italians (not to mention the Chinese) did not invent hundreds of macaroni variations because they were bored. Well, maybe some of them, but different shapes hold and show-off some sauces better than others. They elevate

pasta from a bland canvas into an essential flavor component. Traditionally, round pasta strands like spaghetti work best with clingy tomato sauce. More delicate, thin, long noodles like angel hair need a lighter sauce like garlic and olive oil without a ton of additions. Linguine seems to love lobster. These are “rules” I ignore all the time, including with my recent Asian fusion fusilli tossed with toasted sesame oil, vegetables, pickled ginger, siracha and toasted coconut. Pasta is cheap. Try experimenting with some of the following: Shaped pastas: Farfalle (bow ties) to radiatore (radiators) These “structural” pasta shapes (including fusilli, orecchiette and rotelle) are made for catching thicker, heavier sauces with lots of veggies, seafood or meats.

Boulder Weekly


Front Range Food for Front Range Families Tubes: Rigatoni to cavatappi (corkscrew) Tubular pastas including penne and ziti function well as chewy conveyors of flavors. Use these in baked pasta dishes (including mac-and-cheese), tomato meat sauces and pasta salads. Noodles designated “rigate” have ridges, which catch more pesto or puttanesca than smooth noodles. Long, flat pasta: Pappardelle The wide surface area of flat ribbon pastas like pappardelle hold their own with big meaty or mushroom sauces. They are also perfect for Thai “drunken noodles” and with peanut- and coconut-based curries. Cooking pasta at altitude When newcomers make pasta they confront the reality of our more-thanmile-high altitude. The water just doesn’t get as hot. Water boils in Boulder at about 201 degrees versus 212 degrees at sea level. The spaghetti that cooks in seven minutes in Florida can take 10 or more minutes here. In Rollinsville, it can take forever. A watched pot: Use your largest pot with lots of water. Wait until the water is at a rolling boil on “high” before adding pasta. Be patient. Putting a lid on it speeds up the process, but stir the pasta often so it doesn’t stick or boil over. No oil, no rinse: Don’t add oil to the boiling water or rinse cooked pasta. Both make it harder for sauces to grab onto pasta. Add the pasta to the sauce after draining versus pouring sauce over the noodles. Salt right: It’s fake news that adding salt makes water boil faster. It does the opposite. However, do salt the water to make pasta taste better. Al dente or not?: Don’t go by timing. Taste the pasta as it finishes cooking. Al dente means firm to the bite (not crunchy) and soft (not squishy). Undercook any pasta you will cook again on the stove or in the oven. Save the pasta water: Don’t drain all of the water. A little not-too-salty pasta water is a good addition to tomato and other sauces.

And called it macaroni

Be the first one in your Facebook group to adopt the Aldentica typeface composed of penne rigate, stelline, ruote, macaroni and other pasta shapes. Download: saveur.com/pastafont-aldentica. (“Macaroni” or “maccheroni” is actually a pasta shape. The small bent Boulder Weekly

tubes are mostly found in blue boxes of Kraft Dinner.)

Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

Jarring local sauce

If you miss Louisville’s Blue Parrot Restaurant (or ate its red sauce in Boulder schools), Blue Parrot spaghetti sauce is available at local supermarkets. So are bottles of Pasta Jay’s familiar, garlic-infused marinara. Aiello’s sauces (from the late Patsy’s Inn) are an affordable option. My favorite is the pricier roasted garlic fra diavolo, a lively, red chile-infused sauce from Denver’s Spinelli’s Market. For a good time, poach eggs in simmering sauce and ladle over spinach fettucine.

Local food news

Tangerine Restaurant has opened a new location at 300 S. Public Road, Lafayette. ... Pho Kitchen is open at 2900 Baseline Road, Boulder. ... Stem Ciders’ 12-acre facility in Lafayette is open, including Acreage restaurant. Menu items catching my attention: cider-glazed donuts and cast-iron cornbread with pimiento cheese ... Congratulations to Colorado’s winners of the 2018 Good Food Awards honoring food producers nationally. Boulder’s Ozo Coffee Roasters won for its Ethiopia Hambela Kirite beans. Stem Ciders was honored for its Coloradoheritage blend cider. Other local honorees are Elevation Charcuterie (Calabrese); Big B’s Hard Cider (Grand Cru Ciaison); DRAM (Pine Syrup); and Deerhammer Distillery (American Single Malt). ... Gardeners will spring forward early March 10 at the main Boulder Public Library, where they will trade saved vegetable and flower seeds and local gardening wisdom.

Plan Your Dinner Party at Morning Glory Cafe for 2 to 200 People! Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Brinner!

BOTTOMLESS WINE WEDNESDAYS 4-8pm MORNINGGLORYCAFE | 1377 FOREST PARK CIRCLE, LAFAYETTE | 303.604.6351

FINE INDIAN DINING IN THE HEART OF BOULDER!

Taste of the week

I boiled some spaghetti and sautéed it in a pan with olive oil, garlic, mushrooms, dry basil, salt and black pepper. I finished it with whipped whole eggs, shredded extra sharp cheddar and toasted sliced almonds. That was brunch.

Words to chew on

“I always have ParmigianoReggiano, olive oil and pasta at home. When people get sick, they want chicken soup; I want spaghetti with Parmesan cheese, olive oil and lemon zest. It makes me feel better every time.” — Isabella Rossellini John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org).

JAIPUR VEGETARIAN THALI $

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1214 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO 303-442-0999 www.JaipurIndianRestaurant.com March 8 , 2018 43


Thank You for Voting for Us!

Best Pizza Slice Best Food Delivery

People tell us it’s Real New York Pizza!

Family Owned and Operated, Making Every Pizza with Love! 3060 Pearl Pkwy #112, Boulder • (303) 442-4949 Louisville’s Newest BBQ & Bar

Open 12noon until..? 2am Happy Hour 4-7pm Tues - Fri 2 for 1 house wine & well liquor $2.50 domestic pints $3 mimosas $5 martinis $2 hotdogs $5 wings $5 nachos $1 sliders (beef chicken pork) Open Mic every Wednesday Karaoke every Thursday 328 S. MCcaslin Blvd. • Louisville, CO • 720-535-7895

44 March 8 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


Susan France

community

TABLE

DEATH OF A SALESMAN

But eventually, enough was enough. He derailed his sales career, “milking it for all it was worth,” before quitting. He then called up some friends who were starting a taqueria in downtown Boulder and asked if they needed help. They stuck him behind the bar and siphoned some of his marketing knowledge to boot. “The plan was to do it for only a few months and for me to get back on track with my corporate career,” Waters says. “I was asked in [to T/aco] and in a couple hours just felt this is what I should be doing, which is unique. At the time, I was 36 years old, and not a lot of people arrive in the restaurant world at that age.” That’s true. Folks who work in the restaurant industry tend to be young because of its relatively low barrier to entry. Lots of people hop in and out until they “get on track,” so to speak, but for the few who have hospitality in their nature, stepping behind a bar or behind a host stand can feel like an epiphany. Hospitality had long been a part of Waters’ personality — it’s probably what made him an effective salesman of, what was it, data plans? He says he was “social chair in a fraternity and it never really stopped.” He spent Sunday mornings at brunch at Brasserie Ten Ten and would be so apt at socializing that he’d invite whomever he met back to his house a few blocks away for Champagne on the patio. But it wasn’t just that Waters found his calling

T/aco’s Peter Waters trades in sales for the wonderful world of tacos

by Matt Cortina

T

here came a time when Peter Waters had to intervene in his own life. He’d been working a job selling data plans for a decade, and was reaching a dead-end that would make Arthur Miller blush. “I tell people it was a great job for keeping the lights on,” Waters says. “I kind of woke up one day and decided I’d rather live in the dark than go to work another day doing that kind of work on a daily basis.” Sales was lucrative, but brainless. He worked on commission gained via signing long-term contracts with clients; when a three-year deal ended, he made one phone call, maybe two, and thus guaranteed some income for another three years. “It was greater money for less work over time,” he says. He could work remotely, taking vacations whenever and wherever he pleased so long as he had internet access. From the outside it looked more like a cushy cul-de-sac than a dead-end. “[The perks] kept me around longer than they should’ve, but the insanity of working a job to earn enough money to go on vacation so you don’t have to work is pretty stupid,” Waters says. He laughs, then adds, “I didn’t think it was stupid when I was doing it.” Boulder Weekly

when he walked through the doors at T/aco, it was However you want that he realized what he’d to pronounce it, T/aco has become missed over his 10 years a go-to for taco in corporate America. lovers in Boulder. “My greatest issue with my previous life was that I wasn’t learning anything new,” Waters says. “It was this kind of Groundhog Day of corporate life and that was not the case when we opened up here. Six years later, I’m kind of starting to feel like I just have a grasp on what we’re doing.” You can imagine how steep the learning curve was for the restaurant newbie when the partners at T/aco made him part owner within his first year and essentially gave him the reigns to the restaurant. There was the business side — replacing equipment, marketing and setting prices — and then there was the craft of making tacos. The kitchen at T/aco is run by an all-female, allfirst-generation-Mexican crew. Though local chef and taco aficionado Matt Collier initially developed many of the recipes, the kitchen staff now makes everything from tortillas to meat dishes to salsa from scratch. Waters says watching the women work has been like an internship at his own business, and that it’s their intention while cooking, more than their technique, that has the biggest impact in the restaurant. “People follow these exact recipes and it’s the attitude people bring to the preparation that changes the flavor. That carries over into the front of house, which I wasn’t expecting,” Waters says. see T/ACO Page 46

March 8 , 2018 45


Susan France

T/ACO from Page 45

One Thousand Nights at Sole

637R South Broadway, Boulder, Co. 80305 www.caffesole.com

Happiness in the kitchen is passed onto the waitstaff, which is passed on to the customer, Waters says. And if you’ve eaten at T/aco, you know that’s not a sales pitch; it’s cozy and the staff is almost overwhelmingly friendly. And, of course, the tacos — from pork belly to duck to al pastor varieties — are delicious. The goal is to create a community through tacos, Waters says. T/aco regularly holds fundraisers, and 100 percent of the money spent on gift cards in December is given to the kitchen staff. That sense of community extends to the Boulder County restaurant scene, too. For instance, T/aco acquired a wet mill so they could make their own masa out of dehydrated corn kernels. When the mill came in, Esmerelda, a senior cook in the kitchen, said her mom had the same model in her village in Mexico, and that she’d make masa for the whole community, which she traded for fruit, vegetables and wares with neighbors. When Esmerelda shared this story

with Waters, he says, “a light bulb went off and I said, ‘Hey, what if we did what Esmerelda’s family does in Mexico in Boulder?’” Now, they do. Dishes at Arcana and River and Woods now feature T/aco masa, and Waters says he’s gotten unique food products in return that show up on T/aco’s menu. Like the time OAK at fourteenth closed for renovations and Chef Steve Redzikowski came over with a cooler of prepared goods to sell at T/aco. Given T/aco’s success, Waters hopes his 2,000 or so patrons that walk through its doors every week would follow him in a new venture, featuring, say, pizza or burgers. Whatever it is (or, if it ever is), Waters is uniquely suited to take on the great unknown. “When we first started, everyone was so intrigued by who I was and what I was doing,” he says. “I used to tell them when it feels like work I’m going to quit. ... The reality is the day it felt like work, I realized there’s no other work I wanted to do.”

What’s in a name? “Lionel is bringing a six piece blues band ... a fat blues sound which is hard to come by these days.” Dinner Service:

6-8:30

All Showtimes:

7-10

46 March 8 , 2018

“a torch bearer for the golden a ge of jazz...”

P

eople come over with this look in their eyes and say, ‘I’ve got one question.’ and I’m like, ‘T/aco,’” Waters says. “They have this very peculiar look, and they look at you like, ‘I’ve got $10 riding on this with my friend.’” Normally when a word has a unique pronunciation, we’ll provide you with a brief phonetic key. T/aco, however, requires etymology. The group that started T/aco also started H-burger in Boulder and Denver. Those restaurants sold, wait for it... hamburgers. “We kind of ran out of our creative juices when we were getting ready to open the place,” Waters says. “Honestly we were talking about how we could shorten taco like we did hamburger, [and then] somebody asked us to fill out a very important piece of paper, so we just kind of went with it.” Waters says they’ve heard it pronounced “taco,” “t-aco,” “t-slash-aco” and more. It all works, he says. “We don’t care how you pronounce it or mispronounce it as long as you pronounce it or it mispronounce it in the restaurant,” he says. Boulder Weekly


Fresh Authentic New York Pizza

2 Slices of Cheese & Soda........................$6.99 plus tax 2 Slices of Pepperoni or Sausage & Soda ..........................................$7.99 plus tax Extra Toppings $1.50/12” • $2.50/16”

Ask About Pizza of the Day!

We Deliver in Boulder

1647 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO • 720-328-2324 www.BrooklynPizzaBoulder.com Boulder Weekly

March 8 , 2018 47


COLORADO’S FIRST CRAFT BREWERY → boulderbeer.com

Denver Restaurant Week Continued!

March 5 - 31 $25 per person, for a three-course lunch $35 per person, for a four-course dinner $45 per person, for a premium four-course dinner Ten days is not enough! We have extended our Denver Restaurant Week Special the rest of March. Three ways to enjoy our Denver Restaurant Week Special $25, $35 and $45. Enjoy a three-course lunch Saturdays and Sundays 12 - 3 for $25 per person. Any day of the week enjoy our four-course meal for $35 per person or upgrade to our premium entree including a lobster tail for $45 per person. Mention “Denver Restaurant Week Special” when making your reservation. Restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer. Valid February 23 - March 31.

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BOULDER BEER ON WALNUT

1123 WALNUT ST → DOWNTOWN BOULDER → @boulderbeerwalnut Boulder Weekly


drink Tour de brew: Romero’s K9 Club & Tap House In dog beers, I’ve only had one by Michael J. Casey

D

Whiskey Lounge Pearl Street & Back Bar Patios Sake Bar SPECIALS

id you know Colorado’s state animal is ON TAP: Romero’s K9 the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep? Club & Tap House. Those majestic and rugged rams of the 985 South Public Road, Rockies were bestowed the honor back Lafayette, 720-485-5968 romerosk9club.com in 1961. But, if they held the vote today, there’s little doubt the Centennial State’s honorary animal would be canine. Yes, Coloradans love their dogs, almost as much as they love their beer. And as dog parks and breweries become ubiquitous throughout the Front Range, it was only a matter of time before someone brought the two together for the purposes of commerce. Granted, most breweries allow you to bring the pooch along with you — as long as the brewery in question doesn’t prepare food on-site — but at Romero’s K9 Club & Tap House, a typical outdoor biergarten becomes an off-leash dog park for well-behaved and pre-registered four-legged friends while you knock back a few choice brews. Located at 985 South Public Road in Old Town Lafayette, Romero’s has transformed the former Sonic Drive-In/Snarfburger into an indoor/outdoor playroom for dogs and owners alike. The individual carports still stand, just without the intercom ordering devices, and should you wish to sit at the Courtesy of Denver Film Company/Romero’s drive-thru cashier’s window, a long table awaits you and your companions. The window no longer overlooks grease-stained asphalt; now the view belongs to Romero’s biergarten, where an English bulldog plays King of the Castle on the picnic tables. It’s good real estate for those who come to drink without a dog but still enjoy the chaotic sounds of canines at play. Inside is divided into two sections: an indoor bar complete with stools, a half-dozen tables and a few TVs tuned to sports, and an indoor/outdoor, corrugated-steel, heated enclave for those willing to brave a stiff Chinook wind. Stools are lined along the horseshoe bar defining the enclave, allowing two-legged patrons a chance to sit while enjoying one of the best-curated tap lists around. Yes, most come for the dogs, but everyone comes for the beer. With room for 33 different brews, including two nitro taps, and two kombuchas from Upstart, Romero’s is the place to dabble in a wide variety of craft brews. And not just Colorado craft, but brews from Wyoming’s Melvin, Oregon’s The Commons, Missouri’s Boulevard, even Sweden’s Omnipollo. For those who steer clear of gluten, Romero’s also has cider for all your quaffing needs. But the tap list isn’t the only thing Romero’s has going, its extensive can and bottle list feature plenty of rarities and impossible-to-find beers, including sours from Denver’s Amalgam Brewing and Texas’s Jester King. That’s just the tip of what you’ll find at Romero’s K9 Club & Tap House. The only thing you won’t find is a quiet corner to disappear into; Romero’s is an extrovert’s haven, filled with yapping dogs, a knowledgeable staff eager to talk beer and plenty of people ready to drink it.

Boulder Weekly

NEW

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March 8 , 2018 49


happy saint patrick’ s day Stop by and welcome Verde Natural to the neighborhood!

SATURDAY, MARCH 17TH

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astrology

on a spilled drink as she carries a tray full of food through a cafeteria. The men who work on Spiderman, disguised as offshore oil rigs perform his alter ego Peter Parker, demanding, dangerous makes a miraculous save. tasks on a regular basis. If He jumps up from his Go to RealAstrology.com to check out they make mistakes, they chair and catches Mary may get injured or befoul Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO Jane before she falls. the sea with petroleum. HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE Meanwhile, he grabs her As you might guess, the HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes tray and uses it to graceculture on these rigs has are also available by phone at fully capture her apple, traditionally been macho, 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. sandwich, carton of milk stoic and hard-driving. and bowl of jello before But in recent years, that they hit the floor. The has changed at one company. Shell Oil’s workers in the filmmakers say they didn’t use CGI to render this scene. U.S. were trained by Holocaust survivor Claire Nuer to The lead actor, Tobey Maguire, allegedly accomplished talk about their feelings, be willing to admit errors and it in real life — although it took 156 takes before he soften their attitudes. As a result, the company’s safety finally mastered it. I hope you have that level of patient record has improved dramatically. If macho dudes toiling determination in the coming weeks, Libra. You, too, can on oil rigs can become more vulnerable and open and perform a small miracle if you do. tenderly expressive, so can you, Aries. And now would be a propitious time to do it.

ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19:

SCORPIO

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: How will you celebrate your upcoming climax and culmination, Taurus? With a howl of triumph, a fist pump and three cartwheels? With a humble speech thanking everyone who helped you along the way? With a bottle of champagne, a gourmet feast and spectacular sex? However you choose to mark this transition from one chapter of your life story to the next chapter, I suggest that you include an action that will help the next chapter get off to a rousing start. In your ritual of completion, plant seeds for the future.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: On April 23, 1516, the Germanic

duchy of Bavaria issued a decree. From that day forward, all beer produced had to use just three ingredients: water, barley and hops. Ever since then, for the last 500-plus years, this edict has had an enduring influence on how German beer is manufactured. In accordance with astrological factors, I suggest that you proclaim three equally potent and systemic directives of your own. It’s an opportune time to be clear and forceful about how you want your story to unfold in the coming years.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: What’s your most frustrating flaw?

During the next seven weeks, you will have enhanced power to diminish its grip on you. It’s even possible you will partially correct it or outgrow it. To take maximum advantage of this opportunity, rise above any covert tendency you might have to cling to your familiar pain. Rebel against the attitude described by novelist Stephen King: “It’s hard to let go. Even when what you’re holding onto is full of thorns, it’s hard to let go. Maybe especially then.”

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: In his book Whistling in the

Dark, author Frederick Buechner writes that the ancient Druids took “a special interest in in-between things like mistletoe, which is neither quite a plant nor quite a tree, and mist, which is neither quite rain nor quite air, and dreams, which are neither quite waking nor quite sleep.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, inbetween phenomena will be your specialty in the coming weeks. You will also thrive in relationship to anything that lives in two worlds or that has paradoxical qualities. I hope you’ll exult in the educational delights that come from your willingness to be teased and mystified.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: The English word “velleity” refers

to an empty wish that has no power behind it. If you feel a longing to make a pilgrimage to a holy site, but can’t summon the motivation to actually do so, you are under the spell of velleity. Your fantasy of communicating with more flair and candor is a velleity if you never initiate the practical steps to accomplish that goal. Most of us suffer from this weakness at one time or another. But the good news, Virgo, is that you are primed to overcome your version of it during the next six weeks. Life will conspire to assist you if you resolve to turn your wishy-washy wishes into potent action plans — and then actually carry out those plans.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: In the 2002 film Spiderman, there’s a scene where the character Mary Jane slips

Boulder Weekly

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Scorpio mathematician Benoît

Mandelbrot was a connoisseur of “the art of roughness” and “the uncontrolled element in life.” He liked to locate and study the hidden order in seemingly chaotic and messy things. “My life seemed to be a series of events and accidents,” he said. “Yet when I look back I see a pattern.” I bring his perspective to your attention, Scorpio, because you are entering a phase when the hidden order and secret meanings of your life will emerge into view. Be alert for surprising hints of coherence.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: I suspect that in July and August

you will be invited to commune with rousing opportunities and exciting escapades. But right now I’m advising you to channel your intelligence into well-contained opportunities and sensible adventures. In fact, my projections suggest that your ability to capitalize fully on the future’s rousing opportunities and exciting escapades will depend on how well you master the current crop of wellcontained opportunities and sensible adventures. Making the most of today’s small pleasures will qualify you to harvest bigger pleasures later.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: If you saw the animated film The Lion King, you may have been impressed with the authenticity of the lions’ roars and snarls. Did the producers place microphones in the vicinity of actual lions? No. Voice actor Frank Welker produced the sounds by growling and yelling into a metal garbage can. I propose this as a useful metaphor for you in the coming days. First, I hope it inspires you to generate a compelling and creative illusion of your own — an illusion that serves a good purpose. Second, I hope it alerts you to the possibility that other people will be offering you compelling and creative illusions — illusions that you should engage with only if they serve a good purpose.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: I do a lot of self-editing before I publish what I write. My horoscopes go through at least three drafts before I unleash them on the world. While polishing the manuscript of my first novel, I threw away over a thousand pages of stuff that I had worked on very hard. In contrast to my approach, science fiction writer Harlan Ellison dashed off one of his award-winning stories in a single night, and published it without making any changes to the first draft. As you work in your own chosen field, Aquarius, I suspect that for the next three weeks you will produce the best results by being more like me than Ellison. Beginning about three weeks from now, an Ellison-style strategy might be more warranted.

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PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: According to my assessment of the astrological omens, you’re in a favorable phase to gain more power over your fears. You can reduce your susceptibility to chronic anxieties. You can draw on the help and insight necessary to dissipate insidious doubts that are rooted in habit but not based on objective evidence. I don’t want to sound too melodramatic, my dear Pisces, but THIS IS AN AMAZING OPPORTUNITY! YOU ARE POTENTIALLY ON THE VERGE OF AN UNPRECEDENTED BREAKTHROUGH! In my opinion, nothing is more important for you to accomplish in the coming weeks than this inner conquest.

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EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sidni West

Female stoners, unite!

H

appy International Women’s Day! We can all agree that lady stoners are having a moment. And rightfully so — we deserve it. Throughout pop culture history, men have dominated the conversation (not just about marijuana but basically everything, which is super annoying in the first place) and there has been a Wikimedia Commons/Christopher Dombre major shortage of women in the stoner comedy genre. Just look at all the classic pothead films: Cheech & Chong, Dazed and Confused, Half Baked, Dude Where’s My Car, Pineapple Express, etc. It was only recently that we’ve been blessed with shows that feature female protagonists, like Broad City and Weeds. I can’t even open Facebook now without seeing a GIF of Rihanna smoking weed, which is pretty amazing considering that the representation of lady stoners is more important than ever as many look at the cannabis industry as a rare opportunity to establish a more equitable systemic framework. According to a survey by Marijuana Business Daily, women make up roughly 36 percent of the leaders in the cannabis industry, including 63

Boulder Weekly

percent of high-level positions at testing labs and nearly 50 percent of such roles at infused products and processing companies. These numbers are progressive when compared to other fields where women hold roughly 5 percent of the CEO positions and only 25 percent of the leadership roles. However, there’s room for improvement: women still hold less than half of senior roles at two-thirds of cannabis businesses, and one in four companies have no women at the executive level at all. One of the reasons marijuana offers more opportunity is the relative newness of it as an industry. The market is young, and we’re making up the rules as we go along, meaning that traditional barriers for women haven’t been established. So instead of fighting for a seat at the table, women are in a position to decide what that table looks like in the first place. One of the ways in which women are rebranding cannabis culture is the focus on health and wellness. This is a compassionate business, especially if you’re dealing with the medicinal side. Medical patients need time and consideration, and women are usually the better gender for that. Since it’s still federally illegal and laws vary from state to state, the industry is rooted in advocacy and community. In Colorado, the key demographic in the legalization movements were 30to 50-year-old women, according to a study by the Wales-based Global Drug Policy Observatory. Women were important players in the crafting and implementation of Amendment 64. Since the industry is still growing and the laws around it are constantly changing, there’s no one blueprint for success. This allows women the opportunity to mold the corporate culture that they want, which is exactly what they’ve been doing. When women and people of color are in leadership positions, they hire more diverse employees, they work with more diverse

colleagues and that leads to more successful companies because it makes room for multiple perspectives and creative innovation. As a product, cannabis transcends all genders, ethnicities, economic backgrounds and political views, so businesses that actively foster an environment where the contributions of both genders are equally valued will without a doubt have more success attracting and retaining the talent that will both set the company apart from competitors and position it to become an industry leader. We’re still in the midst of an almost nationwide green rush, so now is the time for women to make entrepreneurial moves because we are at the precipice of a massive change. The future of cannabis is female, and this is our opportunity to revolutionize and create the industry we wish to see in the world, especially when it comes to moving away from the traditional patriarchal business practices in place and improving the social justice system. According to Emily Paxhia, managing director of Poseidon Asset Management, a hedge fund that invests in cannabis businesses, women should act now: “Once something is set into motion, it is much more difficult to influence it than to get it going ‘right’ in the first place. For example, the tech industry was born out of a mainly male group of ‘Founding Fathers’ — and some courageous women have had to fight to make a space in that industry,” Paxhia says. “What if cannabis can be formed by ‘Founding Mothers’ or ‘Founding Sisters’ and this industry can be more balanced in its leaders?” After all, marijuana and femininity have always gone together: the plant we smoke is female. (There is a male plant, but it’s never used to get you high.) Marijuana growers do everything they can to keep their whole crop female, and all the flowering plants are cloned from one plant called the Mother.

March 8 , 2018 57


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Marijuana and nullification

A

couple weeks ago the Berkeley, California city council unanimously voted to declare Berkeley a sanctuary city for licensed marijuana businesses and users. Now other cities and some states that have legalized pot are considering doing the same thing. Sanctuary cities up until now have been cities that have declared they will not cooperate with the federal government in enforcing federal immigration laws. What Berkeley did was extend the concept to federal anti-marijuana laws. According to an Associated Press story, bills are pending in the Alaska, California and Massachusetts legislatures to declare them marijuana sanctuary states. (California is already a sanctuary state for illegal immigration.) Whether or not they will pass remains to be seen, but the fact that they have been introduced at all is radical. Really radical. That’s because the sanctuary city concept, whether applied to federal immigration or marijuana laws, is both an assertion of states’ rights and arguably a form of nullification. And the federal government thinks “nullification” is a very bad word. Almost as bad as “treason.” It’s been that way since 1832. That was the year that the State of South Carolina amended its constitution to declare a federal tariff, affectionately known as the “tariff of abominations” in the South, as null and void in the state. The tariff, which had been adopted in 1828, imposed duties as high as 45 percent on some imports and duties averaging 38 percent on most others. It was intended to protect American manufacturers, most of whom were in the North, from dumping by foreign producers, but it screwed the southern states, which had little indigenous manufac-

Boulder Weekly

Sanfranman 59 via Wikimedia Commons

turing and relied heavily on imports. (The 1828 tariff also imposed a stunningly high duty on hemp, which was intended to protect Kentucky hemp producers. The tariff on “unmanufactured” imported hemp was $60 a ton, which (depending on which inflation calculator you use) works out to $1,360 or $2,725 in 2017 dollars.) The states of the Deep South — and South Carolina in particular — were beside themselves, and in November 1832, South Carolina “nullified” the tariff. It also threatened to secede if the federal government didn’t accept the nullification, and started raising military forces — 1,000 mounted minutemen and 24,000 militiamen — in case the feds decided to make something of it. The president at the time was Andrew Jackson. He decided to make something of it.

He started mobilizing troops and ordered the navy to prepare to sail into Charleston Harbor and hang the nullifiers. South Carolina caved. The Civil War was delayed for 28 years. So are cities and states engaging in latterday nullification when they declare themselves sanctuaries for illegal aliens and marijuana businesses and users? No, but they’re pushing the envelope. The big difference between what South Carolina did in 1832 and what Berkeley has done in 2018 is that South Carolina unilaterally attempted to void a federal law it didn’t like. Berkeley isn’t trying to nullify federal laws; it’s just refusing to help the feds enforce them. The ordinances declaring Berkeley a sanctuary city also bar city staffers and cops from cooperating with the feds. That’s the part that’s pushing the envelope. Since the Civil War, most states have added a clause to their state constitutions acknowledging that the U.S. Constitution and federal law trumps state law. Moreover, everyone in the criminal justice system swears an oath to support the U.S. Constitution and the laws of the United States as well as their state constitutions and laws. Strictly speaking, a cop could arrest you for lighting up in Boulder, because it’s a federal crime and he has sworn to uphold federal law. If he did, you would be tried and sentenced in a federal court and would be sent to a federal prison. The reason it isn’t done is because the federal criminal justice system doesn’t have the resources, not because it doesn’t have the authority. That and the fact that federal authorities don’t need a weatherman to tell them what way the wind is blowing on marijuana legalization. They have the Gallup organization.

March 8 , 2018 59


icumi (IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) AN IRREVERENT AND NOT ALWAYS ACCURATE VIEW OF THE WORLD

STUDY: NIGHT LIGHT FOR TIKES BLUNDERS SLUMBER

A new study from University of Colorado researchers found that an hour of dim light before bed time helps toddlers go to sleep. The study also found that lowering their coffee intake, reading Nelson DeMille novels and chamomile tea help the youngsters hit the sack easier. The study was conducted by getting a bunch of three- to five-year-olds on a routine sleep schedule and then swabbing their mouths to check for melatonin levels at various times. Kids were asked to enter “the cave,” a room where the windows were blocked and lights were dimmed, which their

parents were reportedly “totally cool with.” Once leaving the cave, kids were exposed to bright light for an hour, and had levels of melatonin 88 percent lower compared to their base levels. What the study didn’t mention is that the bright light was coming from a slow-moving stream of Donald Trump tweets on a 90-inch TV. Kids exposed to the ominous glow of hate also experienced higher blood pressure and a sudden increase in maritime vocabulary. Billy Sampson, 4, was allegedly removed from the study when he asked if all lives mattered or just black lives, and what Pocahontas was doing with Crooked Hillary anyway. Sleep tight, kids.

FANTASTIC PLASTIC

After 59 years of subtly and notso-subtly influencing young girls, Barbie finally got the memo. Not all four-year-old girls are bone-thin, paler than Twilight’s Edward Cullen or, as astute Facebook Commenter Mari P. Reynolds notes, “made from sex-toy measurements.” Congratulations, Barbie! You opened your too-large eyes a little wider and have finally glimpsed the edge of reality. After surveying 8,000 mothers, the company found 86 percent of them “are worried about what kind of role models their daughters are exposed to.” Enter 17 new dolls on the Barbie market. Among them you’ll find the likes of badass Tracheotomy Bob via Flickr snowboarder Chloe Kim, the illustrious Frida Kahlo, fearless pioneer Amelia Earhart, bodyactivist babe Ashley Graham and the nowfamous NASA scientist Katherine Johnson (think Hidden Figures.) Replete with women of color, a few (but not enough) varying body sizes and a diverse career pool, looks like Barbie is trying to take yet another step in the right direction. But, despite the good try, she may have missed the mark. Stephanie Hancox, Facebook Commenter II, writes, “Don’t you think it is time to retire Barbie? The bodies all look alike, the faces and proportions. The only difference is costuming. This is not an advancement.” Either way, this new cohort of dolls will be available in stores soon, and if you’re keen, you might want to get in line starting at midnight the night before. We’re sure they’ll go fast to people like Facebook Mari, who also writes, “Come to think of it I might buy some some of these dolls even though my girls are grown up.” 60 March 8 , 2018

Boulder Weekly


Dear Dan: I’m an 18-year-old cis hetero girl from Australia and I’ve been listening to your podcast and reading your column since I was 13. Thanks to you I’m pretty open minded about my sexuality and body. Having said that, I do have a few questions. I started watching porn from a youngish age with no real shame attached but I have some concerns. 1. I get off really quickly to lesbian porn but it never feels like a “good” orgasm. My guess is that subconsciously I think it’s inauthentic and therefore degrading. 2. I really enjoy and have the best orgasms to vintage gay male porn and trans FTM porn, which seems odd to me because I’m so far removed from the sexual acts that these kind of porn movies portray but I always feel satisfied after getting off to them. 3. I get off to tit slapping videos but it screws with me morally. I understand why I like these kinds of videos. I have quite large breasts and I feel resentment towards them. It seems both morally wrong towards the progress I’ve made towards accepting my body and also to the message being sent about violence towards women. Care to weigh in? — Concerned About Porn Preferences

our identities or bodies only after our erotic imaginations have seized on the fears or self-loathing induced by those messages and turned them into kinks. Take smallpenis humiliation (SPH). Before a guy can ask a partner to indulge him in SPH, CAPP, he has to accept (and kind of dig)

his small cock. So the acceptance is there, but the kink — a turn-on rooted in a resolved conflict — remains. It can be freeing to regard a kink like SPH or your thing for tit slapping as a reward — as the only good thing to come out of the shitty zap the culture put on the head of a guy

On the Lovecast—Finally! Porn that makes consent SEXY: savagelovecast.com. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

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Boulder Weekly

by Dan Savage

Love

FEA

Dear CAPP: 1. There are gay men who watch straight porn, lesbians who watch gay porn, and 18-year-old hetero girls in Australia who watch lesbian porn and vintage gay porn and trans FTM porn. So many people get off watching porn that isn’t supposed to be for them — so many people fantasize about, watch and sometimes do things that aren’t supposed to be for them — that we have to view these quote/unquote transgressions as a feature of human sexuality, not a bug. 2. Lesbian porn gets you off, vintage gay porn and trans FTM gets you off, but you feel conflicted after watching lesbian porn because it seems inauthentic. That’s understandable — a lot of socalled lesbian porn is inauthentic, in that it’s made by and for straight men and features non-lesbian women going through the lesbian motions (often with long and triggering-for-actual-lesbian fingernails). Some gay porn features gayfor-pay straight male actors, of course, but most gay porn features gay actors doing what they love; the same goes for most trans FTM porn, which is a small and mostly indie niche. I suspect your orgasms are just as good when you watch lesbian porn, CAPP, but the sense — suppressed when you were turned on, surfacing once you’re not — that the performers weren’t really enjoying themselves taints your lesbian-porn-enhanced orgasms in retrospect. The solution? Seek out lesbian porn featuring actual lesbians — authentic lesbian porn is out there. (I found a bunch with a quick Google search.) 3. Sometimes we overcome the negative messaging our culture sends us about

SAVAGE

with a small cock or, in your case, a young woman with large breasts. So long as we seek out other consenting adults who respect us and our bodies, we can have our kinks — even those that took root in the manure of negative cultural messaging — and our self-acceptance and self-esteem, too.

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Call (303) 499-3040 or visit: www.marijuanalawscolorado.com www.gardlawfirm.com

($71.52 pretax)

*Member Pricing ($81.77 pretax)

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

8a- 6:45p Sun-Tues • 8a- 9:45p Weds-Sat

www.elementsboulder.com

The Drum Shop 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122 pINE sTREET

Reduced Pricing on Limited Medical

Ounces

just $99 for Members & $124 for Non-Members Member Pricing ($90.96 pretax) Non-Memeber Pricing ($113.92)

VALID THRU 3/31/18. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. NOT COMBINABLE WITH OTHER OFFERS. LIMITS MAY APPLY. must present coupon.

alternatives

pINE sTREET

SPRUCE STREET

SPRUCE STREET

1537 PEARL ST, SUITE B BOULDER, CO 80302

(720) 287-0645 Open 10am -7PM Daily On Pearl Street, Across from the Mall, next to Mountain Sun and down the stairs. Free parking Available at the Garage on Pearl & 15th!

www.trillcannabis.com

alternatives

PEARL STREET mALL

LAWRY LANE

WALNUT STREET

PEARL STREET

15TH & pEARL

PARKING GARAGE

PEARL STREET 16TH STREET

MED ounces

303.440.1323

16TH STREET

rec ounces

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com

15TH STREET

* 89

$

Craft Cannabis

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

15TH STREET

89

$

Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Quest Concentrates, Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar, Keef Cola, Indigo Pro

14TH STREET

you're in Luck!

It’s 4/20 a month early At trill...

$100 HALF OZ Strains* Strains will rotate. For available strains, please visit thefarmco.com/shop * Not to be combined with other discounts. While supplies last. Some exclusions may apply.

WALNUT STREET

3 8 18 boulder weekly  
3 8 18 boulder weekly