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departments 6 THE HIGHROAD: There’s a word for Trump’s latest flimflamming of workers 7 GUEST COLUMN: Danish is all about propaganda 7 DANISH PLAN: The man who sold Mars 9 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views

33 OVERTONES: G. Love and Special Sauce find their sound... again 37 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and

where to go 43 POETRY: by Diane Lockward 44 SCREEN: ‘Kong: Skull Island’ is almost bonkers enough 45 FILM: ‘Kedi’ is catnip for the heart 47 DEEP DISH: Sherpa’s restaurant brings Nepal to the Flatirons 55 DRINK: Tour de Brew: Hops+Handrails 61 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 63 S  AVAGE LOVE: Where does religion fit in kink? 65 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Fear not 67 CANNABIS CORNER: The times, they are a-changin’ — U.S. Air Force edition 69 IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent view of the world Boulder Weekly

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staff

commentary

Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Entertainment Editor, Amanda Moutinho Special Editions Editor, Caitlin Rockett Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley, Emma Murray Interns, Billy Singleton, Carolyn Davidson, Preston Bryant, Ayako Itoi, Ximena Leyte SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Senior Account Executive, David Hasson Account Executive, Julian Bourke Inside/Outside Account Executive, Andrea Ralston Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo Office Manager Lina Papastergiou CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo Cover Art: Hugh D’Andrade, Electronic Frontier Foundation March 16, 2017 Volume XXIV, Number 32 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2016 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

6 March 16, 2017

the

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

Highroad There’s a word for Trump’s latest flimflamming of workers by Jim Hightower

B

y gollies, The Donald delivers! Trump and his new blueribbon panel of working-class champions have announced a bold initiative to create millions of American jobs. A spokesman for the panel, Steve Schwarzman, praised Trump as a leader who wants to “do things a lot better in our country, for all Americans.” Wait a minute... Steve Schwarzman? Isn’t he a billionaire hedge-fund huckster

on Wall Street? Yes — and holy money bags! — there’s Jamie Dimon, head of scandal-ridden JPMorgan Chase. Working-class champions? Trump’s whole “jobs” panel is made up of Wall Street banksters and corporate powers like Walmart that’re notorious for layingoff and ripping-off workers. Trump-the-candidate fulminated against such moneyed elites, calling them “responsible for the economic decisions that have robbed our working class.” But now, in a spectacular flipflop, he’s brought these robbers directly inside his presidency, asking them to be architects of his economic strategy. Worse, he’s doing this in the name of helping workers. Hello — to develop policies beneficial to working stiffs, bring in some working stiffs! But not a single labor advocate is on his policy council, in his

cabinet, or anywhere near his White House. Thus, the so-called “job-creation plan” announced by Trump and his corporate cohorts doesn’t create any jobs, but calls instead for — Ta Dah! — deregulating Wall Street. These flimflammers actually want us rubes to believe that “freeing” banksters to return to casino-style speculation and consumer scams will give them more money that they “can” invest in American jobs. Do they think we have sucker wrappers around our heads? Trump’s scheme will let banks make a killing, but it doesn’t require them to invest in jobs — so they won’t. There’s a name for this: Fraud. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


guest column Danish is all about propaganda by Dennis Duckett

I

occasionally cruise articles by Paul Danish to see what regurgitated right-wing propaganda looks like. His article on the “slobs” of Standing Rock was exemplary. I was at Standing Rock on three occasions. My Peak to Peak community raised $6,000, and provided the Cheyenne River Tribe with a large military tent used as an open kitchen and sleeping quarters for warriors and supporters. We brought winter clothes and gear, and hundreds of pounds of food donations. The immense support for Standing Rock from around the world has been an indication of the commitment humanity feels to end our dependence on fossil fuels and to protect our water. My partner and I joined nearly 700 clergy members from around the nation who came to stand with the water protectors. On the Backwater Bridge they publicly refuted the Doctrine of Discovery, Papal Bulls of the 15th century which gave Christian explorers the right to claim lands they “discovered” for their Christian Monarchs. If pagan inhabitants couldn’t be converted, they could be enslaved or killed. “This Doctrine governs United States Indian Law today and has been cited as recently as 2005 in the decision City of Sherrill V. Oneida Indian Nation of N.Y,” according to doctrineofdiscovery.org. We joined a forgiveness march through the town of Mandan, directed at the sheriff ’s department which had used violence against the protectors, and had destroyed their possessions and sacred artifacts. The march was peaceful, and participants reached out to the Mandan police who lined the route. I didn’t notice any slobs. On my second trip I travelled with a four-year-old, her mom and an Iraq War vet. My little friend was invited to offer a prayer at the Sacred Fire of the Seven Fire Council. She is a part of a hugely historic moment. This was the first time the seven nations of the Sioux had congregated since the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Paul wasn’t there. One morning more than a hundred of us were led by a grandmother to the water’s edge for a water ceremony with Lakota prayer and song. This was the most beautiful religious experience of my life. I am honored to have been invited into this cultural environment in which an extraordinary reverence for the earth Boulder Weekly

was practiced every day. I returned once more as one of 2,000 veterans sanctioned for an action on the bridge. Eight thousand came to Oceti Sakowin over the weekend. The tribes were not prepared for this influx. Permanent and temporary structures were being erected almost immediately, but there was a certain chaos that no one could have predicted. As the action on the bridge was happening, a debilitating snow storm moved in, and people were asked to leave for their own safety. We were all stuck in the casino five miles from camp. As North Dakota’s brutal winter continued, donations of equipment, winter gear and clothing were frozen into the ice and snow. This was later called trash by the right-wing media. President Obama ordered an Environmental Impact Statement which was underway, and immediately cancelled when Trump took office. A permit to drill was issued, and the camp ordered to vacate. Younger warriors attempted to clear the camp while an unusually early spring melt turned the camp site into mud. Vehicles were stuck in the mire. Veterans returned to help clean the camp, but the rapidity of the executive orders left inadequate time to clear the site. The camps condition at the time of the forced evacuation is why Paul Danish referred to the protectors as slobs. They were not. This camp has supercharged a global movement to rid our earth of fossil fuels. It is the center of a challenge for indigenous rights, as the fight goes on for recognition of broken treaties between the Sioux and the U.S. government. The people I met there were mostly beautiful in their countenance, cooperative spirit and reverence to one another and the earth. Paul Danish can burp propaganda, and attempt to minimalize the importance of this resistance and the camp itself. That’s what the uninformed and brainwashed do. Mr. Danish often spouts libertarian views. If property rights are important to folks like Paul Danish, how can they not see fit to honor the treaty rights of the Great Sioux Nation? The pipeline is the problem, not the Sioux Nation occupying its own land, who for Paul’s edification, honor that land, and are not slobs. Dennis Duckett lives in Nederland, Colorado. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

danish plan The man who sold Mars by Paul Danish

T

he most interesting man in the world isn’t the guy selling beer for Dos Equis. It’s Elon Musk. A couple months ago Musk, the founder of SpaceX, Tesla and SolarCity, inventor of the Hyperloop high-speed tube transit system, and builder of the Gigafactory battery manufacturing plant, announced he is going to found yet another company — this one to dig tunnels under Los Angeles to alleviate the city’s hopelessly congested traffic. “Traffic is driving me nuts. Am going to build a tunnel boring machine and just start digging,” he tweeted at 4:05 a.m. “It shall be called The Boring Company.” The announcement prompted some financial analysts to wonder whether Musk lacks focus, or even an adult attention span. OK. It’s easy to see why money guys, who have a hard time focusing on anything beyond a company’s next quarterly report (talk about lacking an adult attention span), get edgy around Musk. His companies burn through capital at a voracious rate, and while the potential payoff from any one of them is riches beyond belief, everything depends on successful execution of business plans that verge on science fiction. (Keep that last thought in mind.) The truth is Musk may be the most

focused man on the planet. He has a laser-like focus, and it’s on a single, four letter word — Mars. Musk has declared he wants to build permanent human settlements on Mars that will eventually be home to millions of colonists. Developing the rockets that will make that happen is the explicit goal of SpaceX. That much is easy enough to understand. But what may be getting overlooked is that the core work of all of Musk’s other companies will also make critical contributions to the success of the Mars venture. Chances are that isn’t accidental. Take Tesla. The car company’s mission is to produce electric, self-driving cars that out-perform internal combustion cars and eventually replace them. On Earth, electric, self-driving vehicles will be a disruptive technology. But on Mars they will be an essential one. There isn’t enough oxygen in Mars’ atmosphere to operate an internal combustion engine. If you want to get around Mars, you’ll need electric-powered vehicles. When the time comes, Tesla will have the ability to supply them. With batteries included, thanks to the gigafactory. What’s more, just about every other human activity on Mars will have to be electrified. If you want to produce see DANISH PLAN Page 8

March 16, 2017 7


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Martian steel or any other metallic material you’ll need an electric furnace. And you’ll need electric mining machinery. And electric-powered robots to build everything from roads to habitats. And electric-powered systems to recover water from Martian soils and carbon and oxygen from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and so on. Speaking of electricity, it has to come from somewhere, and it’s not going to be from fossil fuel power plants. Solar power, using locally produced solar cells, is an obvious solution — especially if the guy who owns the rocket company and the car company also owns a photovoltaics company. Settling Mars will be a non-starter unless it becomes possible to make most of the things the settlers need on the planet, including the things that will have to be made before they arrive. That means robots and additive manufacturing systems capable of running themselves and making things, including copies of themselves, out of local materials will be required. Both Tesla and SpaceX are developing robotic manufacturing technologies that Musk thinks can make his Earthbound factories 100 times more efficient. These technologies will be critical to any serious attempt to do manufacturing on Mars and will be just as important to success of colonization as the cars, batteries and the rockets. Speaking of getting around, hyperloop, which will move people and freight at several hundred miles per hour in a tube, might provide a better option than aircraft for high-speed travel. On Earth, hyperloop is supposed to be in an above-ground tube. On Mars it might make more sense to put it in an underground tunnel — to be excavated by the automated tunneling machines of The Boring Company. They could also be put to work creating underground factories and residences, which might be easier to create than above-ground structures in the early going. And so on. If this sounds like a business plan straight out of science fiction,

it may be because it is. In 1951 Robert Heinlein published a novella called The Man Who Sold the Moon. It told the story of a hard-driving, visionary entrepreneur, D.D. Harriman, who had started several tremendously successful leading-edge companies on Earth, but who was obsessed with settling the moon. All of Harriman’s investments and business decisions come to be focused on the success of the Moon mission. Change the name D.D. Harriman to Elon Musk and the Moon to Mars, and Heinlein’s yarn becomes eerily prescient. I re-read The Man Who Sold the Moon recently. The technology is long in the tooth, but it is still a gripping yarn. And it left me wondering if Musk had read it under the covers with a flashlight when he was growing up and if he’s living the dream. Speaking of living the dream, Musk’s companies also may be producing something even more critical to the Mars project than their technology. Watching a NASA rocket launch is like watching an aerospace engineering class take a midterm. Watching a SpaceX launch is like watching show and tell in elementary school. The SpaceX geeks are bursting with excitement and enthusiasm and joy; they have vision and a sense of mission and they want to share the dream and the adventure with you. Its hard to believe that some of folks cheering themselves hoarse at these launches won’t be on the first settler ships. At the end of another great science fiction classic, The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury, a family from Earth that has fled a nuclear war is standing on the banks of a Martian canal, when a boy reminds his father that he promised to show them the Martians. The father has the family look down in the water and see their reflections. Musk isn’t just creating the technologies required to build a new civilization on Mars. He may also be creating the Martians. Is that focused enough? This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly


letters Time to transition from Xcel

Today policy is at a crossroads; a decision must be made whether to adhere to decaying remnants of our past or to forge ahead. The Boulder City Council made a commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: to have 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030. It’s unclear how we can do this without the establishment of a local utility due to Xcel’s energy source only being 22 percent renewable. Xcel has refused to compromise and the reason is clear: Xcel is not accountable to the people of Boulder, but accountable to shareholders alone. The millions of dollars that Xcel siphons out of Boulder every year alone warrants a transition. The move toward cleaner power is not just practical, but moral. Boulder has the opportunity to take a moral stand on an issue as crucial as climate change. Boulder’s fight for local power is unique and it is one of the only opportunities available to make headway on climate change. Future generations won’t thank us for hesitating. Boulder has twice voted for municipalization, yet Xcel interferes without regard for democracy. Colorado isn’t the state of coal and smog, but one of mountain vistas and crystalline lakes. A locally controlled utility is our best tool in ensuring this remains true for future generations. Jai Rajagopal/Boulder

offer me a “safe ride” home. With grace I thanked her. Her extension of help triggered the deeper reason why I wanted to respond to Paul. Most of us are blindly diving into a new human-created reality of decline, confusion, chaos and great suffering. This new reality has various names but a common denominator; that we will be required to care for others and our planet in ways perhaps never imagined

just to survive. As an individual, it is better to face this now and prepare than to wait until it is too late. As a world community, the suffering can still be lessened to some degree if we can make the necessary decision to leave the remaining fossil fuels in the ground. Many at Standing Rock are aware of this truth, one that James Hansen started to bring to light in the ’80s.

Thank you North Dakota for cleaning up the Standing Rock protection site. Thank you earth protectors, people protectors and helpers of kind. I am grateful for the deeper seed of knowing within each person that can call them to face the truth of our declining world and, if followed, will lead them to know how to act responsibly. Tamara Visser/Boulder

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Bothered by Danish

Paul Danish’s piece condemning the water protectors of Standing Rock for the needed clean up after their forced removal bothered me [Re: “The Cannonball River Slobs,” Danish Plan, March 2]. I wondered how to respond. The response came on a long walk home. On the night of March 7, I found myself in a state of anger. The repair shop neglected to have my car available for me to pick up after hours and I had missed the last bus home by two minutes. Missing my scheduled Local Food Revolution webinar, I began the five mile walk home along Hwy 36 in a huff. Slowly, I remembered my Steps to Knowledge practice for the day. It called for me to be grateful for those who have erred against me. Joy slowly began to fill my experience as I viewed the stars, sang and appreciated how it felt to walk myself home. I wondered if anyone might stop and offer me a ride. Sure enough, half a mile from home, a woman had turned around to Boulder Weekly

® ®

March 16, 2017 9


NEWS

foilies2017

the

A

recognizing the year’s worst in government transparency

A

thick fog is rolling in over Sunshine Week (March 12-18), the annual event when government transparency advocates raise awareness about the importance of access to public records. We are entering an age when officials at the highest levels seek to discredit critical reporting with “alternative facts,” “fake news” slurs and selective access to press conferences — while making their own claims without providing much in the way to substantiate them. But no matter how much the pundits claim we’re entering a “post-truth” era, it is crucial we defend the idea of proof. Proof is in the bureaucratic paper trails. Proof is in the accounting ledgers, the

by the Electronic Frontier Foundation legal memos, the audits and the police reports. Proof is in the data. When it comes to government actions, that proof is often obtained by leveraging laws like the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and state-level public records laws — except when government officials seek to ignore the rules to suppress evidence. At the same time, this is also par for the course. As award-winning investigative reporter Shane Bauer recently posted on Twitter: “I’ve been stonewalled by the government throughout my journalistic career. I’m seriously baffled by people acting like this is brand new.” For the third year, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) presents The Foilies, our antiawards identifying the times when access to information has been stymied or when government agencies have responded in the most absurd ways to records requests. Think of it as the Golden Raspberries but for government transparency, where the bad actors are actually going off script to deny the public the right to understand what business is being conducted on their behalf. To compile these awards, EFF solicited nominations from around the country and scoured through news stories and the #FOIAFriday Twitter threads to find the worst, the silliest and the most ridiculous responses to request for public information.

10 March 16, 2017

The Make America Opaque Again Award: President Donald Trump

A

commitment to public transparency should start at the top. But from the beginning of his campaign, President Trump has instead committed to opacity by refusing to release his tax returns, citing concerns about an ongoing IRS audit. Now that he’s been elected, Trump’s critics, ethics experts and even some allies have called on him to release his tax returns and prove that he has eliminated potential conflicts of interest and sufficiently distanced himself from the businesses in his name that stand to make more money now that he’s in office. But the Trump administration has not changed its stance. No matter where you stand on the political spectrum, the American public should be outraged that we now have the first sitting president since the 1970s to avoid such a baseline transparency tradition.

The Hypocrisy Award: Former Indiana Governor (and current Vice President) Mike Pence

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ice President Mike Pence cared a lot about transparency and accountability in 2016, especially when it came to email. A campaign appearance couldn’t go by without Pence or his running mate criticizing Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton for using a private email server during her tenure as Secretary of State. In fact, The Foilies honored Clinton last year for her homebrewed email approach. But Pence seemed much less bothered by those transparency and accountability concerns when he used a private AOL email address to conduct official business as Indiana’s governor. The Indianapolis Star reported in February that Pence used the account to communicate “with top advisors on topics ranging from security gates at the governor’s residence to the state’s response to terror attacks across the globe.” That means that critical homeland security information was kept in an account likely less secure than government accounts (his account was reportedly hacked too), and Pence’s communications were shielded from government records requirements. Boulder Weekly


The Arts and Crafts Award: Public Health Agency of Canada

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ournalists are used to receiving documents covered with cross-outs and huge black boxes. But in May 2016, Associated Press reporters encountered a unique form of redaction from Public Health Agency of Canada when seeking records related to the Ebola outbreak. As journalist Raphael Satter wrote in a letter complaining to the agency: “It appears that PHAC staff botched their attempt to redact the documents, using bits of tape and loose pieces of paper to cover information which they tried to withhold. By the time it came into my hands much of the tape had worn off and the taped pieces had been torn.” Even the wryest transparency advocates were amused when Satter wrote about the redaction art project on Twitter, but the incident did have more serious implications. At least three Sierra Leonean medical patients had their personal information exposed. Lifting up the tape also revealed how the agency redacted information that the reporters believed should’ve been public, such as email signatures. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada said it would investigate, but Satter says he hasn’t heard anything back for 10 months.

The Frogmarch Award: Town of White Castle, Louisiana

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he only thing that could’ve made reporter Chris Nakamoto’s public records request in the small town of White Castle, Louisiana, a more absurd misadventure is if he’d brought Harold and Kumar along with him. As chief investigator for WBRZ in Baton Rouge, Nakamoto filed records requests regarding the White Castle mayor’s salary. But when he turned up with a camera crew at city hall in March 2016 to demand missing documents, he was escorted out in handcuffs, locked in a holding cell for an hour and charged with a misdemeanor for “remaining after being forbidden.” What’s worse is that Nakamoto was summoned to appear before the “Mayor’s Court,” a judicial proceeding conducted by the very same mayor Nakamoto was investigating. Nakamoto lawyered up and the charges were dropped two months later. “If anything, my arrest showed that if they’ll do that to me, and I have the medium to broadcast and let people know what’s happening to me, think about how they’re treating any citizen in that town,” Nakamoto says.

The Longhand Award: Portland Commissioner Amanda Fritz

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local citizen in Portland, Oregon, filed a records request to find out everyone that City Commissioner Amanda Fritz had blocked or muted from her Twitter account. This should’ve been easy. However, Fritz decided to go the long way, scribbling down each and every handle on a sheet of paper. She then rescanned that list in, and sent it back to the requester. The records did show that Fritz had decided to hush accounts that were trying to affect public policy, such as @DoBetterPDX, which focuses on local efforts to help homeless people, and anonymous selfdescribed urban activist @jegjehPDX. Here’s a tip for officials who receive similar requests: All you need to Boulder Weekly

do is go to your “Settings and Privacy” page, select the “Muted accounts” or “Blocked accounts” tab, and then click “export your list.”

The Fake News Award: Santa Maria Police Department

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n 2015, the Santa Maria Police Department in California joined many other agencies in using the online service Nixle to distribute public information in lieu of press releases. The agency told citizens to sign up for “trustworthy information.” Less than a year later, police broke that trust. The Santa Maria Police posted to its Nixle account a report that two individuals had been arrested and deported, which was promptly picked up by the local press. Months later, court documents revealed that it had all been a lie to ostensibly help the individuals — who had been targeted for murder by a rival gang — escape the city. Police were fiercely unapologetic. The agency has yet to remove the offending alert from Nixle or offer any kind of addendum, a direct violation of Nixle’s terms of service, which prohibits the transmission of “fraudulent, deceptive, or misleading communications” through the service.

The Wrong Address Award: U.S. Department of Justice

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merica Rising PAC, a conservative opposition research committee, has been filing FOIA requests on a number of issues, usually targeting Democrats. Following Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s passing, the PAC sent a FOIA to the Attorney General seeking emails referencing the death. But America Rising never received a response acknowledging the DOJ received the request. That’s because the DOJ sent it to a random federal inmate serving time on child pornography charges. The offender, however, was nice enough to forward the message to the PAC with a note railing against the “malicious incompetence” of the Obama administration.

The Stupid Meter Award: Elster Solutions, Landis+Gyr, Ericsson

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n May 2016 several smart meter companies sued transparency website MuckRock and one of its users, Phil Mocek, in a failed attempt to permanently remove documents from the website that they claimed contained trade secrets. Some of the companies initially obtained a court order requiring MuckRock to take down public records posted to the site that the City of Seattle had already released to the requester. But in their rush to censor MuckRock and its user, the companies overlooked one small detail: the First Amendment. The Constitution plainly protected MuckRock’s ability to publish public records one of its users lawfully obtained from the City of Seattle, regardless of whether they contained trade secrets. A judge quickly agreed, ruling that the initial order was unconstitutional and allowing the documents to be reposted on MuckRock. The case and several others filed against MuckRock and its user later settled or were dismissed outright. The documents continue to be hosted on

MuckRock for all to see. But, uh, great job guys!

The Least Productive Beta Testing Award: Federal Bureau of Investigation

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he FBI spent most of 2016 doing what might be charitably described as beta testing a proprietary online FOIA portal that went live in March. But beta testing is probably a misnomer because it implies that the site actually improved after its initial rollout. The FBI’s year of “beta testing” included initially proposing a requirement that requesters submit a copy of their photo ID before submitting a request via the portal and also imposed “operating hours” and limited the number of requests an individual could file per day. Yet even after the FBI walked back from those proposals, the site appears designed to frustrate the public’s ability to make the premiere federal law enforcement agency more transparent. The portal limits the types of requests that can be filed digitally to people seeking information about themselves or others. Requesters cannot use the site to request information about FBI operations or activities, otherwise known as the bread and butter of FOIA requests. Oh, and the portal’s webform is capped at 3,000 characters, so brevity is very much appreciated! Worse, now that the portal is online, the FBI has stopped accepting FOIA requests via email, meaning fax and snail mail are now supposed to be the primary (and frustratingly slow) means of sending requests to the FBI. It almost seems like the FBI is affirmatively trying to make it hard to submit FOIA requests.

The Undermining Openness Award: U.S. Department of Justice

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ocuments released in 2016 in response to a FOIA lawsuit by the Freedom of the Press Foundation show that the U.S. Department of Justice secretly lobbied Congress in 2014 to kill a FOIA reform bill that had unanimously passed the U.S. House of Representatives 410-0. But the secret axing of an overwhelmingly popular transparency bill wasn’t even the most odious aspect of DOJ’s behavior. In talking points disclosed via the lawsuit, DOJ strongly opposed codifying a “presumption of openness,” a provision that would assume by default that every government record should be disclosed to the public unless an agency could show that its release could result in foreseeable harm. DOJ’s argument: “The proposed amendment is unacceptably damaging to the proper administration of FOIA and of the government as a whole,” which is bureaucratese for something like, “What unhinged transparency nut came up with this crazy presumption of openness idea anyway?” That would be Obama, whose FOIA guidance on his first day in office back in 2009 was the blueprint for the presumption of openness language included in the bill. Perhaps DOJ thought it had to save Obama from himself? DOJ’s fearmongering won out and the bill died. Two years later, Congress eventually passed a much weaker FOIA reform bill, but it did include the presumption of openness DOJ had previously fought against. We’re still waiting for the “government as a whole” to collapse. See FOILIES Page 12

March 16, 2017 11


FOILIES from Page 11

The Outrageous Fee Award: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services

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hen public agencies get requests for digital data, officials can usually simply submit a query straight to the relevant database. But not in Missouri apparently, where officials must use handcrafted, shadegrown database queries by public records artisans. At least, that’s the only explanation we can come up with for why the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services estimated that it would take roughly 35,000 hours and $1.5 million to respond to an exceedingly simple request for state birth and death data. Nonprofit Reclaim the Records, whose name pretty eloquently sums up its mission, believed that a simple database query combined with copy and paste was all that was needed to fulfill its request. Missouri officials begged to differ, estimating that it would take them the equivalent of a person working around the clock for more than four years to compile the list by hand. Although the fee estimate is not the highest The Foilies has ever seen — that honor goes to the Pentagon for its $660 million estimate in response to a MuckRock user’s FOIA request last year — Missouri’s estimate was outrageous. Stranger still, the agency later revised their estimated costs down to $5,000 without any real explanation. Reclaim the Records tried negotiating further with officials, but to no avail, as officials ultimately said they could not fulfill the request. Reclaim the Records has since filed a lawsuit for the data.

The Poor Note-taker Award: Secretary of the Massachusetts Commonwealth

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pdates to Massachusetts’ public records laws were set to take effect in January 2016, with Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin tasked with promulgating new regulations to clear up the vague language of the law. But Galvin didn’t exactly take his duty seriously. Instead he crafted a regulation allowing his office to dodge requirements that public records appeals be handled in a timely fashion. But no regulation could take affect without public hearing. So he went through the motions and dispatched an underling to

sit at a table and wait out the public comment — but didn’t keep any kind of record of what was said. A close-up captured by a Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism reporter showed a pen lying on a blank pad of paper. Asked by a reporter about the lack of notes, the underling said, “I was just here to conduct this hearing. That’s all I can say.”

The Redaction of Interest Award: General Services Administration

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ne of the threads that reporters have tried to unravel through the Trump campaign is how the prolific businessman would separate himself from his financial interests, especially regarding his 30-year contract with the federal government to build a Trump International Hotel at the location of the federally owned Old Post Office in D.C., a paper airplane’s flight from the White House. BuzzFeed filed a FOIA request with the General Services Administration for a copy of the contract. What they received was a highly redacted document that raised more questions than it answered, including what role Trump’s family plays in the project. “The American taxpayer would have no clue who was getting the lease to the building,” says reporter Aram Roston, who was investigating how Trump failed to uphold promises made when he put in a proposal for the project. “You wouldn’t know who owned this project.” After pushing back, BuzzFeed was able to get certain sections unredacted, including evidence that Trump’s three children — Ivanka, Donald Jr. and Eric — all received a 7.425 percent stake through their LLCs, seemingly without injecting any money of their own.

The Whoa There, Cowboy Award: Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke

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ilwaukee Sheriff David Clarke rose to prominence in 2016 as one of then-candidate Donald Trump’s top surrogates, prone to making inflammatory remarks about the Black Lives Matter movement, such as calling them a hate group and linking them to ISIS. But the press has also been a regular target. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Political Watchdog Columnist Daniel Bice filed a series of records requests with the sherBoulder Weekly


iff ’s office, demanding everything from calendars, to details about an National Rifle Association-funded trip to Israel, to records related to a series of jail deaths. So far, Clarke has been extremely slow to release this information, while being extremely quick to smear the reporter on the sheriff ’s official Facebook page. Clarke frequently refers to the publication as the “Urinal Sentinel” and has diagnosed Bice with “Sheriff Clarke Derangement Syndrome.” “I deal with open records requests with local governments and police departments. I do it at the city, county, and state level,” Bice says. “He’s by far the worst for responding to public records.” In May 2016 Clarke published a short essay on Facebook titled, “When Journalism Becomes an Obsession.” Clarke claimed that after he rejected Bice’s request for an interview, Bice retaliated with a series of public records requests, ignoring the fact that these requests are both routine and are often reporter’s only recourse when an official refuses to answer questions. “This lazy man’s way of putting together newspaper columns uses taxpaid, government employees as pseudointerns to help him gather information to write stories,” Clarke wrote. Memo to Clarke: requesting and reviewing public records is tedious and time-consuming, and certainly not the way to score an easy scoop. If anything, ranting on Facebook, then issuing one-sentence news releases about those Facebook posts, are the lazy man’s way of being accountable to your constituents.

The Dehumanization Award: New Orleans City Marshall

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ublic officials often dehumanize the news media to score cheap points, but can the same ploy work when fighting public records requests? That’s the issue in a very strange case between the IND, a Lafayette, Louisiana media outlet, and a city marshal. After the marshal lost his bid to keep records secret in the trial court, he appealed on the grounds that IND had no right to bring the lawsuit in the first place. The marshal, who faced fines, community service and house arrest for failing to turn over records, argues that Louisiana’s public records law requires that a living, breathing human make a request, not a corporate entity such as IND. Make no mistake: there is no dispute that an actual human filed the request, Boulder Weekly

which sought records relating to a bizarre news conference in which the marshal allegedly used his public office to make baseless allegations against a political opponent. Instead, the dispute centers on a legal formalism of whether IND can sue on its own behalf, rather than suing under the name of the reporter. The marshal’s seemingly ridiculous argument does have some basis in the text of the statute, which defines a requester as a person who is at least 18 years old. That said, it’s an incredibly cynical argument, putting the letter well over the spirit of the law in what appears to be a well-documented effort by the marshal to violate the law and block public access. We hope the learned Louisiana appellate judges see through this blatant attempt to short-circuit the public records law.

The Lethal Redaction Award: States of Texas and Arizona

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uzzFeed Reporters Chris McDaniel and Tasneem Nashrulla have been on a quest to find out where states like Texas and Arizona are obtaining drugs used in lethal injection, as some pharmaceutical suppliers have decided not to participate in the capital punishment machine. But these states are fighting to keep the names of their new suppliers secret, refusing to release anything identifying the companies in response to BuzzFeed’s FOIA requests. At the crux of the investigation is whether the states attempted to obtain the drugs illegally from India. At least one shipment is currently being detained by the Federal Drug Administration. The reason for transparency is obvious if one looks only at one previously botched purchase the reporters uncovered: Texas had tried to source pentobarbital from an Indian company called Provizer Pharma, run by five 20-year-olds. Indian authorities raided their offices for allegedly selling psychotropic drugs and opioids before the order could be fulfilled. The Foilies were compiled by EFF Investigative Researcher Dave Maass, Frank Stanton Legal Fellow Aaron Mackey and Policy Analyst Kate Tummarello. The illustrations are by EFF’s art director Hugh D’Andrade. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is a San Francisco-based nonprofit that defends civil liberties at the crossroads of technology and the law. Read more about EFF and how to support their work at eff.org.

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NEWS CPW and the oil and gas industry can’t have it both ways

New evidence emerges from prior O&G environmental assessments that contradict CPW predator management plans that call for the slaughter of mountain lions and bears

by Rico Moore

14 March 16, 2017

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olorado Parks and Wildlife’s (CPW) two predator management plans have been ensnared in contention and doubt regarding their scientific legitimacy and underlying purpose since being unanimously approved by CPW Commissioners in December 2016 (see Boulder Weekly’s “Off target,” Feb. 9, and “Update,” Feb. 23). The plans call for the killing of hundreds of Colorado’s iconic mountain lions and black bears in what is alleged to be a spurious attempt to more rapidly increase mule deer populations in areas where they’re already steadily increasing. Critics assert that cumulative impacts from oil and gas extraction are far more likely the reason for the mule deer’s struggles than predation. As a result of these disparate opinions, a lawsuit challenging the plans, filed against the CPW Commission, CPW, and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) by WildEarth Guardians, is pending in Denver County District Court. And now, new evidence has appeared that lends credence to the critics position that the mountain lions and bears are getting a death sentence for the crimes of the oil and gas industry. It was this controversy that led Colorado Rep. Steve Lebsock (D-Northglenn) to arrange a legislative caucus at the state capitol on Feb. 16. As previously reported by Boulder Weekly, the panel included CPW researchers Mat Alldredge and Chuck Anderson; CPW assistant director for Research, Policy and Planning, Jeff Ver Steeg; Colorado State University (CSU) Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology professors Joel Berger, Kevin Crooks and Barry Noon; and members of the Colorado General Assembly. Also present were DNR executive director Bob Randall and CPW director Bob Broscheid. The caucus focused largely on the best available science regarding mule deer populations. CSU scientists argued that habitat factors, like oil and gas development, are likely the largest factors limiting mule deer populations, as opposed to CPW who argued that predation from mountain lions and bears has more of an impact. Because of the well-attended

caucus, Lebsock asked that Randall request the CPW Commission delay implementation of the predator management plans for a year until it could be determined whether or not they’re based in sound science. Neither Lebsock nor Randall replied to BW’s request for comment. Following the caucus, Broscheid was questioned about the impact oil and gas development has on mule deer populations in northwestern Colorado, known as the Piceance Basin, where one of the predator management plans is set to take place this spring and summer. “I think it’s an over-simplistic view of what’s going on,” Broscheid replied, saying that he thinks oil and gas is not a limiting factor on mule deer populations. Additionally the statewide, “loss of habitat is absolutely key, but in the case of the study and this area — for this part of the state only — it’s not oil and gas.” Seemingly contradicting his claim are CPW’s own progress reports for the area that show fewer deer in areas of high oil and gas development. Broscheid’s claims about the oil and gas industry’s lack of impact on mule deer habitat is at best curious when considered in light of documents associated with a 2006 land and water rights exchange between CPW, the Division of Wildlife (CDOW), and Shell Frontier Oil and Gas, Inc. The lands involved in this exchange sit squarely within the area of the Piceance Basin impacted by the current predator plans. According to the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) dated May 18, 2007, which was issued in accordance to granting the exchange, CDOW proposed to exchange lands with Shell to resolve management and inholding issues at Piceance State Wildlife Area (SWA). As such, CPW deeded some 3,108 acres of land, associated water rights and 17 severed water rights to Shell. In exchange, Shell deeded 1,781 acres of land to CPW, filling gaps in the Oak Ridge SWA. The Piceance parcels and water rights were valued at $3,009,000, and the Shell parcels at $2,880,000. Shell paid CPW the $129,000 difference in cash, a difference representing the 1,308 acre overage and water Boulder Weekly


More than just a walk around the block! rights. That is, Shell paid CPW $99 an acre, including the value of acquired water rights. Because the CPW lands were originally purchased using federal funds from the Pittman-Robertson (PR) Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act, under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1996 (NEPA), an environmental assessment (EA) was required before the exchange could be made. According to the EA, the Division of Wildlife originally purchased the land in the 1950s to acquire big game habitat, primarily deer winter range, as well as to ensure hunter access. Oil and gas extraction was not a motive. The EA notes the parcels CPW was exchanging with Shell were impacted by drought and increased mineral development activities in the surrounding areas. And as a result, citing their own unpublished data, CPW calimed the areas “now exhibit reduced wildlife habitat values and resultant smaller big game populations.” Simply put, according to CPW, drought and oil and gas development were decreasing mule deer populations in the Piceance Basin. The EA further states that increased oil and gas extraction activities are believed to have been responsible for the movement of deer and elk out of the Piceance Basin. The EA was released to the public on March 1, 2007 for a 30-day public comment period that expired on April Fools’ day. Not a single public comment was received. Back in 2006-07 when no one was apparently paying attention, CPW cited the fact that oil and gas extraction lowers big game populations, including mule deer, as evidence to help push through the land exchange with Shell Oil. But when it comes to the predator management plans covering the same area only a few years later, it is reversing its position, claiming that oil and gas has no impact on deer populations, choosing instead to blame predation by mountain lions and bears, which it now plans to destroy despite the outcry from scientists who say such a slaughter will not solve the mule deer’s problems. The end result is that the oil and gas industry’s role in declining wildlife populations and habitat is shielded from the public. But why and at what cost? According to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and CPW documents, the CPW lands exchanged were noted as providing big game winter and severe winter range, mule deer summer range, elk summer range and production area, and sage grouse overall range. This is not to mention the hundreds of other wildlife species in the surveyed Boulder Weekly

area. The EA reads like an elegy to a lifeway lost — an identity destroyed by the extraction of oil and gas — stating that, “Historically this area supported the largest deer herd in the country.” A phrase later repeated as, “the largest deer herd in the nation,” indicating the deer herd in the Piceance was a part of an American identity destroyed and supplanted by the oil and gas industry. And this happened not only to deer, but also to the hunters for whom the deer were quarry, as the EA states, “This part of Colorado was a favorite area to hunt deer and elk.” The EA further states that the oil shale development and associated extraction experiments that have occurred since the original purchase of the Piceance Parcels in the 1950s have resulted in the development of an extensive road network on both private and public lands, which “has likely been responsible for reducing deer populations in the area.” Concurrently, the EA states, along with changes in land use, which have been attributed to increased oil and gas development in the area over the past 20-30 years, deer habitat preferences have shifted to favor other locations outside of the Piceance Basin. “Therefore,” the EA concludes, “both original purposes for purchasing the Piceance parcels — to protect big game winter range and to provide hunter access — have diminished over time.” The EA then notes that development of natural gas resources in the Piceance has generally increased since the late 1980s, is expected to continue, and that past boom-and-bust cycles of oil and gas extraction in the area have most likely resulted in diminished big game populations and overall wildlife values. Furthermore, the EA states, “The recent completion of major new pipelines and the repair and/or enlargement of existing pipelines and transport facilities will also continue to stimulate gas production in the area,” stating that the Piceance is “renowned” for its shale deposits, estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at 1.2 trillion barrels of shale oil. The USGS recently estimated the Piceance holds 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. As a result, the EA states the CPW (“Division”), “believes it will not be able to effectively protect wildlife or public values on a short-term or long-term basis on the Piceance Parcels due to imminent oil shale and energy development activities adjacent in the area, as well as the fact that the Division does not control the subsurface mineral rights for these parcels.” See WILDLIFE Page 16

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This recently unearthed information from the land swap EA raises serious questions about Broscheid’s previously mentioned comment, wherein he states oil and gas extraction doesn’t impact mule deer populations in the Piceance Basin area. Not only do the two positions contradict each other, they both seem to expose what could be described as the general positive stance CPW has toward oil and gas activity in Colorado, a fact well illustrated by the CPW Commission’s policy on energy development in Colorado. Effective Sept. 13, 2007, this policy cites the commission’s intent to uphold their legislative direction, which is “that wildlife and their environment are to be protected, preserved, enhanced and managed for the use, benefit and enjoyment of the people of this state and its visitors.” However, the commission “recognizes the important role energy companies play in providing clean, safe and efficient energy for America’s homes and businesses as well as the substantial economic contribution resulting from jobs, taxes, mineral royalties, etc.” This statement, which reads like an industry advertisement, is set in opposition to wildlife and the environment. And because mineral rights supersede surface rights in Colorado, the policy creates a conflict-of-interest for CPW, wherein their prerogative is no longer the protection of wildlife and its habitat, but “balancing” healthy wildlife and its habitat with oil and gas extraction. A dual purpose — the EA demonstrates quite clearly — is virtually impossible to accomplish. Also in its energy policy, the commission recognizes that energy development “has occurred and will continue in habitats where important wildlife species exist in Colorado,” resulting in greater impacts to wildlife and their habitat. As a result, CPW is concerned these impacts could affect “some of our most important big game herds, and ultimately the quality of hunting, the ability of the Division of Wildlife to effectively manage these herds, local

economies, and the revenue that the Division depends on from hunting licenses.” As such, the commission concludes they must encourage an approach to oil and gas extraction that balances “development with wildlife conservation and the hunting, fishing, and recreation traditions and economies they support.” What CPW fails to address is what is to be done when oil and gas extraction and wildlife and its habitats are in direct conflict with each other’s existence. Because the policy requires CPW attempt to balance the health of wildlife and its habitat with oil and gas extraction, and not choose between them, it only makes sense that different culprits for declining wildlife such as mule deer must be identified in order for the blame for such decline to be shifted away from oil and gas extraction activity which CPW is legally bound to support to the extent possible. In the case of the predator management plans, the blame has been shifted to mountain lions and bears. In this sense, the policy also appears to prevent CPW from ever seeking damages to wildlife and their habitat from oil and gas extraction despite the findings of the aforementioned EA. As a result, the oil and gas industry is effectively shielded and enriched at the expense of the wildlife of the Piceance Basin, the lands they depend on for life, and the Coloradans who enjoy them. As mentioned earlier, CPW purchased the land and water rights exchanged with Shell Oil with funds from the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act. According to the act, the funds were to be used “for the development, revision, and implementation of wildlife conservation and restoration programs and should be used to address the unmet needs for a diverse array of wildlife and associated habitats, including species that are not hunted or fished, for wildlife conservation, wildlife conservation education, and wildlifeassociated recreation projects. Such funds may be used for new programs and projects as well as to enhance existing programs and projects.” Boulder Weekly


The funds clearly aren’t meant for the development of oil and gas resources or the defense of the oil and gas industry’s reputation. Furthermore, it appears that the exchange between CPW and Shell constituted a precedent because only a few years later, after being merged with Colorado’s DNR, CPW engaged in a similar land exchange, disposing of even more of the Piceance State Wildlife Area, but this time with ExxonMobil, represented by XTO Energy. In a letter attached to the property transaction proposal for the exchange, on May 8, 2012, the Rio Blanco County Board of Commissioners sent a letter to Bill de Vergie, CPW area wildlife manager, supporting the exchange. The commissioners called the plan a “win-win situation” because the land would open up some public lands for hunting and would also open areas for “intense energy development, which if developed would add to the assessed value of the county.” However, the commissioners did not address the health of the wildlife or their habitat on the lands being disposed of by CPW. According to the property transaction proposal, CPW would exchange 900 acres of land and water rights within Piceance SWA valued at $2,025,000 for 1,991 acres of land and water rights in other nearby areas valued at $2,808,000. ExxonMobil owns the mineral rights beneath the SWA, and had plans to develop them. Apparently, there was no cost to CPW for the difference in estimated value. And there’s a likely good explanation for this seeming generosity on ExxonMobil’s part. ExxonMobil reserved the mineral rights under the lands it was exchanging with CPW, leaving them vulnerable to future development which would, should it occur, defeat any value that might have ever existed for CPW making the land swap in the first place — at least any value for wildlife. Finally, because CPW originally purchased the lands with federal funds, similar to the aforementioned exchange between CPW and Shell Oil, an EA was required under NEPA. The EA reads similarly to the one covering CPW’s exchange with Shell, often repeating phrases verbatim, even though they were written half a dozen years apart. “Over the past several decades,” it reads, “the Piceance SWA has not only been impacted by drought, but also by increased mineral development activities in surrounding areas. The SWA now exhibits reduced wildlife habitat values and has resulted in reduced big game populations.” That is, oil and gas extraction is again noted as Boulder Weekly

NEWS

being responsible for decreasing mule deer populations in the Piceance, an area just north of the one being proposed as grounds for the predator management plan, where CPW contends oil and gas extraction has no impact on mule deer populations, instead blaming mountain lions and bears. The ExxonMobil EA goes on to state that CPW is considering the proposed exchange because the habitat value of the Piceance Parcel has been compromised, “primarily by pressures resulting from nearby oil and gas development,” stating that the situation is unlikely to improve. Furthermore, the EA states the use of the Piceance Basin by deer has changed, which is attributed to several causes including lower deer population numbers, shifting of deer habitat preferences to favor other locations outside of the Piceance Basin, and by changes in human use primarily related to energy development. The EA then repeats a tragic story that cumulative impacts from oil and gas extraction have resulted in an extensive road network, “which has most likely been responsible for reducing deer populations in the area,” marking the steep decline of “what was once an important deer use area both in Colorado and in our country.” Again, CPW’s insistence that oil and gas extraction doesn’t limit mule deer populations, in the context of their predator management plans, directly contradicts the findings of the EAs they contributed to in the exact same area. The fact such an exchange repeated is a sign it is a pattern where oil and gas development is prioritized over wildlife and their habitats. On Feb. 14, 2017 two days before the aforementioned legislative caucus discussing the predator plans, George Wittemyer, CSU professor in the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology gave an interview on Aspen Public Radio. Wittemyer has been studying oil and gas extraction’s effects on mule deer in the Piceance Basin for the past five years, and was asked his opinion about the impacts. He noted behavioral avoidance of the drilling phase was having an impact, but that the precise impact on populations is less clear. Wittemyer also noted that his study, which is being done in collaboration with CPW, is occurring as human impacts from oil and gas drilling are decreasing, and as mule deer populations are increasing. When asked about CPW’s predator management plans during the radio interview, Wittemyer replied that habi-

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Boulder Weekly


WILDLIFE from Page 17

THE POSITION,

NEWS

WHICH SEEMS tat treatment, which CPW Noon says the key has engaged in, “would be stressors experienced by TO CONTRADICT THE FINDINGS OF THE probably the most logical populations are habENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS, APPEARS wildlife approach in terms of increasitat loss, declines in habitat TO REVEAL THAT CPW’S INTERESTS ARE ing mule deer populations.” quality and the fragmentaThe predator removal plan, ULTIMATELY THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY’S tion of habitat — not shortWittemyer notes, “is really a term losses due to predation. INTERESTS. secondary approach,” adding “In contrast,” Noon says, that he thinks it’s widely “land-use/land-change acknowledged that much of effects are growing in extent what’s gone on with mule in Colorado, are chronic in deer is habitat related. nature, and effectively irreFollowing the Feb. 16 cauversible.” cus, what occurred within the ranks of which seems to contradict the findings Those become high priority areas CPW and in their collaborative relaof the aforementioned EAs, appears to for research, specifically focused on how tionships with CSU reveals the nature reveal that CPW’s interests are ultito mitigate their adverse effects, Noon of what it currently means to point a mately the oil and gas industry’s interconcludes. finger of guilt at oil and gas extraction ests. Furthermore, it appears that Ver The fate of CPW’s predator manwhen dealing with CPW, even when Steeg would like to blame predation agement plans remains unknown, but doing so is based in the best available from mountain lions and bears for some their energy policy and its implementascience. negative impact on mule deer population are obvious. CPW is required to In emails, obtained as part of an open tions, and is searching for ways to mini- balance oil and gas extraction with records request, on the morning of the mize the lack of any data to support wildlife and its habitats; a balancing act 2017 caucus, CPW’s assistant director for that, and instead denies and deflects that is proving impossible. Despite their Research, Policy and Planning Ver Steeg any questioning of the cumulative own findings and the best available sciforwarded news of Wittemyer’s radio impact oil and gas extraction has on ence, CPW continues to defend their interview to CPW researchers Alldredge mule deer populations. plans while devoting their efforts to and Anderson. As a result of the radio Following the caucus panel discussion, shielding the reputation of the oil and interview and the testimony at the legisNoon, who has been a prominent oppogas industry. If this continues, belief in nent to the predator plans since their pas- the agency may well wane, and scrutiny lative caucus discussion, Anderson wrote sage, was asked by BW to comment on in an email to his CSU colleague and of it’s inner workings will certainly the role of a research scientist and profes- intensify. collaborator Wittemyer on Feb. 20 that, sor in a land-grant university like CSU. “our director was furious. Hope this Before Coloradans stand by and “Just about all of our work is funded watch the unnecessary (according to the doesn’t compromise our ability to collabby public dollars,” Noon says, “and it’s orate in the future.” science) slaughter of our state’s most my opinion that by accepting the Citing Wittemyer’s aforemenmajestic large predators — mountain money, it’s like entering into an implicit lions and bears — they are owed the tioned interview in a Feb. 22, 2017 contract with the public to report back email to Douglas Vilsack, legislative truth. to the public on policy-relevant issues liaison for DNR, Ver Steeg asserts CPW, the CPW Commissioners that are informed by your science.” that Wittemyer “acknowledges that and their overseers at the Department Noon notes that’s actually part of while deer behavior certainly changed of Natural Resources must publically [because of oil and gas activity], we the explicit mission of land-grant uniexplain why the agencies fabricated the have been unable to detect that this versities, “to actually engage on policyscience in the land swap EAs in order behavioral change negatively impacted relevant issues in Colorado and nationgive oil and gas companies the lands the deer population. So we have inde- wide.” they wanted to drill. Or, if that science pendent corroboration from a differIndeed, CSU’s mission reads, was not fabricated, they must explain ent CSU faculty person.” “Inspired by its land-grant heritage, why they are fabricating the science Here, Ver Steeg cites Wittemyer Colorado State University is committed now in the predator plans in order to to “corroborate” CPW’s claim that oil to excellence, setting the standard for provide cover for the oil and gas indusand gas extraction doesn’t impact public research universities in teaching, try’s negative impact on the state’s mule mule deer populations, when research, service and extension for the deer population which has already been Wittemyer actually notes that it is benefit of the citizens of Colorado, the explained within the earlier EAs. rather a question as to the degree to United States and the world.” Noon They cannot have it both ways. which oil and gas extraction impacts says that in essence, he and his colBefore the killing is allowed to begin, mule deer populations. Wittemyer leagues view it as “a responsibility to officials from the state of Colorado also states that over the course of his engage,” adding, “In my opinion, as a must choose which of their explanastudy, as oil and gas activity has been state employee funded by tax payer dol- tions for diminishing mule deer populadecreasing, mule deer populations tions is true. Is it predation, the posilars, we have a responsibility to deploy have been increasing. tion that has only recently been posited our knowledge in the service of society Furthermore, Ver Steeg neglects to in Colorado and beyond.” and which has virtually no support address Wittemyer’s criticism of the from the scientific community? Or is it In response to CPW’s predator predator management plans, giving at the extraction practices of the oil and plans, Noon says, “I would speak to the least the appearance of being more gas industry, which even the CPW fact that this is not scientifically justiconcerned with public perception of fied.” He adds that if the goal is to ben- itself has long claimed is a major culprit oil and gas extraction’s impact on in mule deer declines and is a position efit wildlife in the largest sense, “we mule deer populations than with mule need to look at what environmental more fully supported by the scientific deer populations themselves. community? drivers, or key stressors, are putting Secondly, Ver Steeg’s position, We’re waiting for the answer. wildlife populations most at risk.” Boulder Weekly

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Hundreds gather in Denver for the 34th Climate Reality Leadership Corps training session

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ike an increasing number of parents these days, Harriet Shugarman, mother of two, often worries not only about how climate change will affect us today but also how it will affect future generations. While Shugarman, a Canadian native residing in New York, worked as a policy analyst with the International Monetary Fund for the United Nations, she says did not hear a widespread call for climate action until 2006, when former U.S. Vice President Al Gore released his film, An Inconvenient Truth. Then in 2007, shortly after watching the film, she attended a Climate Reality Leadership Corps training session. She is now one of the 10,812 trained climate leaders working to raise awareness of global warming in their com-

by Ximena Leyte

munities through the Climate Reality Project, a nonprofit organization founded by Gore to help communities around the country foster conversations around similar topics to those raised in his film. More than a decade after its establishment, the organization has trained thousands of individuals and has expanded its presence to 135 countries. During the first weekend of March, the Colorado Convention Center was filled with hundreds of diverse individuals attending the 34th Climate Reality Leadership Corps training, the first training following the Sundance See CLIMATE REALITY Page 24

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CLIMATE REALITY from Page 23

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premier of Gore’s An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power. After the 2006 film ignited a conversation around climate change in the popular media, An Inconvenient Sequel focuses on the worldwide efforts to tackle this issue. Many of the topics in the movie were elaborated upon in the training, such as the 2016 Paris Agreement and the importance of investing in renewable energy. Shugarman, like many climate reality leaders, uses the Climate Reality Project and training as reliable resources for facts about climate change and possible solutions. Her experience led her to start Climate Mama, an online community of parents with advice and tips on how to talk to children about global warming. Parents who choose to become part of the Climate Mama community receive newsletters with the latest information on environmental policies and occurrences. They also have the opportunity to connect, organize marches and reach out to their representatives about the degrading planet. “I would never have felt empowered to establish Climate Mama had it not been for my training with the Climate Reality Project,” Shugarman says. The Climate Reality Project is composed of hundreds of distinct experts ranging from educators to scientists. Trained leaders organize community meetings, develop campaigns to support legislation that recognizes the urgency of climate change, build public support to address climate change, go to town halls, call representatives and form organizations targeting specific communities, like Climate Mama does. The recent training in Denver primarily focused on the rising temperatures in the West, with a focus on public lands, water resource management and changing winters. It addressed the variable precipitation patterns that have led to flooding in Colorado and presented the personal narratives of first responders whose lives are at greater risk from the increase in forest fires and floods. With a decrease in snowfall costing ski resorts and companies approximately $1 billion in potential revenue, a big focus at the conference centered on the Climate Reality Project’s I AM PRO SNOW program. I AM PRO SNOW is a grassroots initiative partnering with athletes and major industries to fight against warming winters. Its outreach aims to encourage communities worldwide to adopt practices that work toward being run by 100 percent renewable energy. Another program branching from the Climate Reality Project is the 100% Committed campaign. During the training, Park City, Moab, Ski Butlers and Colorado State University all made the pledge to transition to 100 percent renewable energy before 2030. Cities, companies and colleges interested in making the transition can contact the Climate Reality Project for resources and step-by-step procedures on how to do so. Ken Berlin, president and CEO of the Climate Reality Project, also spent time at the recent training addressing concerns fueled by the new Trump administration. Berlin broke down climate policies and described which actions the president can and can not take — all with a big emphasis on the importance of the people’s voice. While 71 percent of people think climate change will affect future generations, only 40 percent think it is going to affect them. Climate leaders are asked to bring a sense of urgency regarding climate change to their communities through presentations and daily conversations. “We have a tremendous problem with climate change and the only way we’re going to solve it is if people are involved, if people make this an issue they care about, if they go to their friends, if they go to their congressmen and congresswomen, their senators, their governors,” Berlin says. “We need people to become climate activists to solve this very difficult problem. It’s going to affect them and their children but [positive change] is not going to happen unless people stand up and take a stand on this issue.” After the 34th training in Denver, the number of Climate Reality Leaders grew to 11,700. The training highly emphasized the importance of individual action and congratulated attendees for taking the first step toward helping address climate change in their communities. Leaders were encouraged to personalize their presentations and projects however they see fit, like what Shugarman has done with Climate Mama. “Everybody has a differentiated ability to do things,” Shugarman says. “We each can do things and maybe it’s not that giant leap that’s going to solve the climate change crisis, because no individual is going to do that by themselves, but we have to all work together on it.”

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Boulder Weekly


ADVENTURE

Courtesy of CU Slackers

ON

Picking up the slack

After years of negotiations between community members and city officials, slacklining is officially allowed

by Emma Murray

a clear, quiet day in July 2015, a group of University of Colorado Boulder students tightened a length of flat webbing between two trees and above the weathered grass. That day Martin Park, a greenspace in South Boulder they often frequented, was surprisingly empty, creating the perfect slacklining conditions. Tyler Shalvarjian, then a junior at CU Boulder, stepped onto the slackline and walked across the tightrope-like set up. The balancing act came easy for him — a product of years of practice. The group took turns walking back and forth along the line, performing tricks like changing directions and jumping on and off the webbing, cheering each other on and lounging in the sun. Mid-balancing act, an officer appeared and demanded the slackline be removed, evoking Boulder’s City Code 6-6-6(c), which prohibits attachments or installations on any city-owned tree. Shalvarjian stood up and took the blame, along with the $250 citation. “That’s when I jumped into the legalization process,” Shalvarjian says. “I spent the last two years chatting with city officials, going back and forth analyzing parks and trees to see [which

26 March 16, 2017

David Taschner

could best] support slacklining.” Shalvarjian joined an initiative already gathering steam. As early as 2012, Ken Wagers, a slackliner since the ’80s, had helped start the conversation with government officials. To him, it didn’t seem fair to punish someone, especially kids, for being outdoors, active and social, especially when they were just as concerned with keeping trees and people safe. Wagers’ son, Justin, now a professional slackliner, has traveled around the world competing, and often placing, at Slackline World Cup events. He was with Shalvarjian the day he received the ticket. In early February, the multi-year negotiations between Boulder’s slackliners and city officials finally broke through. A new city manager’s rule now permits slacklining in eight city parks,

Despite its popularity, slacklining in the City of Boulder public spaces wasn’t permitted until recently.

Boulder Weekly


using the support of specific, designated trees and certain height and length stipulations. “Last year we finally pulled together all the right people,” Wagers says. “We sat down with the [City’s] chief forester, Jeff Haley, their legal staff, and we talked. They were really open to what we had to say.” Jeff Haley, Boulder Parks and Recreation planning, design and community engagement manager, says slacklining itself was never outright illegal. “It basically got lumped into this general rule meant to protect trees — what we consider our urban forest. Over the years, as slacklining became more popular and prevalent, some citations were indeed given simply because the rules inherently included slacklining.” Slacklining has been a part of Boulder’s diverse recreational scene since the 1940s. Even the sports pioneers, who were among the first slackliners in the country, could never resist taking advantage of the city’s abundant green spaces, despite the known rules which had been put in place to prevent horses from being tied to trees. Yet for a long time, the relatively small numbers of dedicated slackliners kept the threat of abrasive webbing damaging tree bark fairly low. That held true until the past decade or so, when the sport garnered more mainstream popularity thanks in part to the rise of adventure companies, organizations and sponsorships like Red Bull and the X Games. Starting in the late 2000s, slacklines began popping up between Boulder’s trees before the City could reconsider or adapt its policies. As though overnight, it seemed slacklining — an invigorating after-school activity, cheap social hang out or portable adventure — was everywhere. In 2008, Slackline Industries set up its headquarters in Boulder and began selling some of the first high-quality slackline rigs in the country. But in 2013, they left town. “[It was] like starting a brewery in the 1930s or being a Cuban travel agent,” Ricardo Bottome, Slackline Industry’s CEO, told the Outdoor Industry Association. “It was unbelievable,” says Brad Schneider, a sales manager for the company. “We started hearing from students and our customers they were being told to take slacklines down. Some were being fined. Close-minded people were pushing down [new cooperation] initiatives on multiple fronts. All because back in the day they didn’t want people to tie their horses to trees.” In December, after nearly four years away, the company relocated back to Boulder Weekly

Boulder once they heard the policy shift was imminent. “We couldn’t be happier about our return to our roots in Boulder,” Bottome said. “All [of a] sudden you’re not such an outlaw.” Early last year, a coalition of slackliners, including Shalvarjian and Wagers, presented a policy draft to the City. They used examples from places that do allow slacklining, like Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and CU Boulder (which sanctioned slacklining on campus three years ago) so as to model successful and safe slacklining scenarios. When it came time for the City to make a decision, Haley says, “It was a great process. We involved several people from the community, our risk management team, maintenance people, our law officers... It was a very positive, very collaborative process. We used a lot of the same language as [CU Boulder’s campus], looking for consistency throughout the city.” The new ruling outlines eight parks approved for slacklining — Howard Heuston, North Boulder, Martin, Bear Creek, Beach, Scott Carpenter, Admiral Arleigh A. Burke and Melody Park — along with an interactive map identifying which trees are permissible to use. It also mandates how to properly protect trees with carpet squares or cloth pads, how high the lines are allowed to extend off the ground (four feet at the midpoint) and other measures to protect participants and spectators. “I’m pretty satisfied with the results,” Shalvarjian says, though he’s also expressed concern about the stipulations preventing more advanced slacklining practice. “There’s a lot of room left for negotiation, so I almost see this as a trial period. There’s lots of flexibility where the rules stand. We can work with the City forester to take out [designated] trees and suggest new ones, [depending on] how things go. The City was super cooperative and we’re really thankful.” And leaving room for future adaptations was key in helping the slacklining community self-police. “I know they don’t want to push their luck, so we’re counting on them to help us out,” Haley says. At the end of the day, the new slacklining policy fosters community as well as the expansion of the sport in Boulder. “We saw it was an excellent opportunity to engage the youth — teenage to university students who aren’t out on playgrounds but don’t necessarily like team sports,” Haley says. “It’s a healthy sport to get people outside. You don’t need a team, or any really special equipment. It’s social, and builds community.”

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Boulder Weekly


buzz

Magic f lutes,

Courtesy of Sir James Galway/ Paul Cox

golden flutes and

flutists of all ages

FROM SIR JAMES GALWAY TO CU OPERA, A WEEK OF FLUTES AT CU

T

here will be many kinds of flutes at the University of Colorado Boulder next week: Magic, golden, and from piccolo to bass. The central event will be a two-day meeting of flutists at the College of Music, Tuesday and Wednesday, March 21–22. Under the title “Once a Flutist: Rekindling the flutist within,” this free event is open to flutists young and old. The culminating events will be a masterclass for CU flute students with Sir James Galway —“The Man with the Golden Flute” — at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in Grusin Music Hall, and a concert by Galway and his wife, Lady Jeanne Galway, Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in Macky Auditorium. Sir James Galway, who has recorded just about the entire classical flute repertoire, has performed with Stevie Wonder, Joni Mitchell and Sir Elton John, and recorded film music for The Lord of Rings, is one of the world’s best known musicians of any genre. But before all of that gets underway, CU’s

Eklund Opera Program will set the scene with Mozart’s Magic Flute, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 17–19, in Macky Auditorium. Christina Jennings organized “Once a Flutist” to celebrate her 10th year teaching flute at CU. “There are a lot of flute players out there,” she says. “I can’t tell you how many times [I’ve met] people who say, ‘I used to play the flute!’ Or ‘My daughter plays the flute!’ “The idea for this festival came from that.” Thinking “once a flutist, always a flutist,” she decided to “rekindle the flutist within” for both current and former players. In addition to her own 18 students at CU, participants will include students as young as kindergarten, 30 CU alumni, members of the Colorado Flute Association, College of Music faculty and staff, and other flutists from around the country. With the list growing every day, “I

by Peter Alexander

Boulder Weekly

don’t know how many people to expect,” Jennings says. Jennings will play a recital March 21 for the College of Music “Faculty Tuesdays” series, at 7:30 p.m. in Grusin Hall. But she will not hog the stage: appearing with her will be a flute orchestra of no fewer than 60 players, all on the Grusin stage. As part of the two-day event, there will be 40 “Little Galways,” young flutists in grades kindergarten through eighth who will have the chance to rehearse and perform with Galway himself. Unsurprisingly, that group filled up almost as soon as it was announced. Another guest is literally an out-of-thisworld flute player: astronaut Cady Coleman, who took her flutes onto the International Space Station. In 2011 she played live from orbit on National Public Radio. Jennings says “Once a Flutist” is “bigger than anything I’ve ever done before. And of course, you can’t get any bigger than the Galways!” Now well into his eighth decade, Galway shows no sign of slowing down. “That’s what I do,” he says. “That’s why I’m here: to play the flute.” see FLUTES Page 30

March 16, 2017 29


FLUTES from Page 29 Courtesy of University of Colorado/Glenn Asakawa

In addition to playing, he loves teaching and passing on what he knows. “I’m probably one of the most experienced flute players ever,” he says. To share his experience he has created “First Flute,” a set of video lessons for flutists from beginners on, he runs annual flute festivals, he presents masterclasses and academies, many of them with his wife. “I’m absolutely convinced that everybody can do what I do,” he says. “The only difference between me and them is that I practice a tremendous amount and they don’t. I’m hoping to infuse the practice bug into people.” If you have seen and heard Galway perform you may have noticed his remarkable tone quality, and the ease with which he plays. He never gets nervous, he says, because of the preparation he does. The tone he attributes to listening to great Italian singers. “Do you know Franco Corelli?” he asks. “Do you know Bergonzi, Gigli and Caruso and all these characters? They all sang with the same sort of passion. Every note was full. There were no passing notes in a phrase.” The Macky concert will feature both Galways with Cathal Breslin, a young Irish pianist who is accompanying the flutists on their current U.S. tour. The program will include a sonata by Philippe Gaubert, who Galway describes as “The Brahms of the flute.” “And we’re playing a few little pieces which I’m well know for as encore pieces — we’re putting those in the middle of the program,” he says. “And Carnival of Venice, which everybody knows.” Among the encores which are sure to follow every concert he gives, the “Little Galways” will get the chance to play one piece with the man known justifiably as “the living legend of the flute.” • • • • The CU production of The Magic Flute will be directed by Herschel Garfein, a Grammy Awardwinning librettist, a composer and a stage director. And if you know the rather fantastic plot of The Magic Flute, he wants you to know that he does not see the opera as a fairy tale. “From the beginning, I’ve seen it as sort of a metaphysical comedy of manners,” Garfein says. “I think it can be taken both more seriously, and more comically, than usual. There’s a very compelling love story between Prince Tamino and Pamina, and there’s also a

ON THE BILL: The Magic Flute by W.A. Mozart

University of Colorado Eklund Opera Program. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 17–18,2 p.m. Sunday, March 19, Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303492-8008.

Once a Flutist: Rekindling the flutist within!

Tuesday and Wednesday, March 21–22 CU Imig Music Building, 1020 18th St., Boulder. All events free and open to the public, including:

James Galway Master Class

1:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 21, Grusin Hall.

Christina Jennings, flute, recital with

Eisenhower Elementary School and CU Choirs, CU Family Flute Orchestra 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 21, Grusin Hall.

Lady Galway Master Class

1 p.m. Wednesday, March 22, Macky Auditorium.

Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway and Friends

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 22 Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

huge strain of philosophical thought that runs through the opera.” The philosophical aspect comes from Mozart’s engagement with the Masonic movement and 18thcentury Enlightenment thought. At the same time, there is a great deal of humor, which comes from the opera having been written for a popular theater, where audiences expected to be entertained. “The Magic Flute was written in response to specific needs of a specific theater, in one specific season in Vienna,” he says. “The owner of the theater commissioned the piece to respond to trends that were popular at the time among the rival theaters.” Among those trends were comic operas with elements of magic in the plots. “The libretto is a bit of a hodgepodge, but somehow all of those contradictions work beautifully in the opera” Garfein says. “It is my job as director not to suppress them, but to make them more contradictory and still add up to the message that I think Mozart

intended.” Helping make the contradictions work is the stage design of Peter Dean Beck. “Our designer has gone for a much more abstract set design than one usually sees,” Garfein says. “It looks like the cosmos with the navel of the world at center stage and things radiating outward from that.” In working with the student cast, Garfein wants to bring out the humanity of the characters. “It’s important that they see it as being a dramatization of very basic human interactions,” he says. “And I really wanted to use the youthfulness and the energy of this cast. So I’m using their youth and athleticism from the very first entrance of Tamino into the opera. “And on from there it’s a very, very physical production.” And does it tie into the next week’s celebration of the flute? Garfein seems to think so. “The story (of the opera) is largely the story of Tamino earning the title of Prince,” he says. “He does this through the agency of a magic flute.”

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Boulder Weekly


overtones

T

he 1994 self-titled debut album from G. Love & Special Sauce was unique enough that it earned the group’s music a label — hiphop blues — that has stuck ever since. But Love hears his latest album, Love Saves The Day, and he has a different and simpler term to describe the new music — rock ‘n’ roll. “We just keep pushing that sound, and now it’s become more rocking than ever,” Love says. “So I really do feel this is rock and roll. And it has elements of hip-hop, but it’s rock and roll.” To Love, he has gone through a process over his past three albums that’s similar to how classic groups like Led Zeppelin, Cream and the Rolling Stones found their sounds. Those groups immersed themselves in Delta blues, drew on their influences from outside the blues genre and created their own unique styles of blues-based rock and roll. Now G. Love has followed a similar arc, beginning with his 2011 album, Fixin’ to Die, on which he reconnected with his roots. “I really think it was coming home to the blues,” Love says. “If you look back at the records before Fixin’ To Die, we were kind of in a little more poppy [place], not in a bad way, but a little more poppy, focusing more on hip-hop and kind of infectious, hook-driven songs. And we had some success doing that. And then it was like let’s flip it up. So I went back on Fixin’ to Die, and delved back into the blues of Bukka White, Lightin’ Hopkins and even to the rootsy Americana of Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan, kind of my roots as to who I was as a young folk-blues singer in high school. That really reconnected me to the blues.” The next step in that journey was

the 2014 album Sugar. This time, Love reunited with ON THE BILL: G. Love his Special Sauce band& Special Sauce. 8 p.m. Friday, March 31, Fox mates, drummer Jeffrey Theatre, 1125 13th St., “Houseman” Clemens and Boulder, 720-645-2467. bassist Jim “Jimi Jazz” Prescott (who had last played together eight years earlier, before Love went on to work with different musicians). The trio plugged in and rocked out on songs that were similar in spirit to the debut album, only louder, faster and harder hitting. “With Sugar, we stumbled upon like the obvious blueprint for what was the hip-hop blues, or what is the hip-hop blues, and that was with the song ‘Come Up of ) Special Sauce. Man,’” Love says. “That record was all Of course, Love (real name Garrett based around one song, ‘Come Up Dutton) was no stranger to the blues or Man.’ And the ‘Come Up Man’ [song] any number of other musical styles by was basically a Cypress Hill-style beat, the time he made Fixin’ to Die. The with Elmore James-style slide guitar on Philadelphia native has been mixing and top of it. And then that was kind of like matching blues, hip-hop, rock and soul in varied combinations for 20 years now, building an audience large enough to consistently headline theaters and large clubs. Love says he hadn’t planned to follow up Sugar so quickly with Love Saves The Day. But his label, Brushfire Records, was ready for a new album to be made early last year. Despite having a short window to write and record OK, that’s the sound.” the album, Love and Special Sauce not Love sees Love Saves The Day as a only made a strong album, they were logical extension of the Sugar album, able to recruit several guest musicians pushing the rock and blues sides of G. who added some extra spice to the proLove & Special Sauce even further to ceedings. David Hidalgo of Los Lobos create the heaviest, hardest rocking — joins in on three songs, adding some and quite possibly the best — of the 11 searing guitar to the title track, “Dis albums Love has made with (or outside Song” and “That Girl,” the raucous

Love saves the day

G. Love and Special Sauce find their sound. . . again by Alan Sculley

tunes that open the album. Ozomatli brings some urban soul and funk to the horn-spiced “Let’s Have A Good Time.” The group’s horn players, Asdru Sierra (trumpet) and Ulysses Baya (sax), also join Citizen Cope on “Muse,” a folkier tune that still rocks nicely. Lucinda Williams, meanwhile, duets with G. Love on rockabilly-tinged “New York City.” Love is proud enough of Love Saves The Day that he and Special Sauce have been playing a good number of songs from the album on tour, while also covering quite a few songs from across Love’s album catalog, with a setlist built largely around requests received online from fans. “We’re excited about the new record, and we want to get people hooked on it,” he says. “We feel like we know that we really made something pretty great, and we feel like it’s a huge step for us. I think it’s the kind of thing like hey, let’s go out there and really show where we’re at and what we’re doing right now. And then, yeah, obviously the fans come first and we want to play the songs they want to hear as well.”

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Lowriders are a celebration of culture and cars by Zach Evens

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W

hen a woman dresses up, if she wears a dress, shoes and combed hair she looks plain, right? But when she puts on a watch, ankle bracelet, a hair piece, a diamond ring, paints her toenails, manicures [her] fingernails … she’s accessorized and eye popping,” says lowrider enthusiast Randy Lopez in an email with Boulder Weekly. “That’s what we do to our cars.” Showing at the Longmont Museum through May 14, Lowriders: Cars & Culture explores the vast world of these unique automobiles, which have an extensive following in Boulder County. “The lowrider scene in Longmont, it’s pretty extensive; there’s like 200 lowriders just in Longmont,” says Jared Thompson, curator of exhibits at the museum, “We just want to showcase these guys and their skill level and artistry.”

The exhibit hall displays five cars, along with several The Lowriders: Cars & Culture exhibit, other tricked-out vehicles, currently on display including pedal cars and at the Longmont Museum features more bicycles designed with the than just cars. same ethic, giving kids a chance to partake in the car culture without a learner’s permit. Also dispersed throughout the room are pieces associated with the early days of lowriding culture, from zoot suits to long-outdated hydraulic systems. The exhibit also features a half-car frame, painted in stages to show the intricate multitude of steps in the exhaustive process of adorning the bodies of these artistic vehicles. The exhibit was curated in recognition of the large Latino community in Longmont, where lowriders are often associated with Chicano culture. But it also acknowledges Boulder Weekly


Zach Evens

ON THE BILL:

Lowriders: Cars & Culture. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303651-8374. Through May 31.

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Mar 24

MIGHTY MYSTIC & THE HARD ROOTS MOVEMENT w/ Hosanna

that as time passes, people of many cultures are gaining interest in the art form. “I love the diversity lately in lowriding, black, white or purple, lowrider culture has grown,” Lopez says. As a mechanic, he works on lowriders as a hobby and says he enjoys the fact that every part can be customized to the desires of the owner. The cars usually have specific indicators that classify them as lowriders, such as a hydraulic system that allows the vehicle to be raised or lowered on command. They are also commonly fitted with 13-inch wire spoke wheels and whitewall tires. Lowriders are direct descendants of the “hot rod” trend in Southern California during the 1920s, where young men of various ethnic groups would purchase very cheap used cars, cut away parts of the body to accommodate a larger engine and lighten the load. But the culture did not really take off until the ’70s, and by then it was clear that it was a way for Mexican-American men to celebrate their diversity. Saturday nights on Whittier Boulevard in Los Angeles became famous for the vibrantly painted cars bouncing up and down as they drove along low and slow. Such nights created an atmosphere of celebration for Mexican-American customs, and created the space where a historical and cultural context could begin to be created around these vehicles, as it says in the exhibit. The tradition of building and sharing lowriders has continued to this day. Tomas and Alberto Quiroz are brothers who own Auto Body and Glass of Boulder Weekly

Longmont. The shop has its roots in the single bay space where the duo originally started out working on lowriders. Tomas has been working on cars for over 15 years, and is the creator of the red Chevrolet pickup truck featured in Longmont Museum’s exhibit. The brothers now have about 20 bays that they use mostly for their repair work, but also to build lowriders for themselves and their customers. For them, the work is a labor of love, as it takes months at a time to complete the customization of just one vehicle. “For us, running a body shop, we don’t make a living out of [building lowriders] we do it because we love working on the car,” Tomas says, “We have to be happy, because you’re getting paid for what you love to do.” According to the brothers, every step in the process is important. At each step it is necessary to visualize where the project is going next and to pay attention to the fine details in order to get a quality finished product. Lowriders have transcended the mechanic’s bay and joined the realm of art for a reason: The effort and creativity put into the detail of the car can only be viewed as art. There are roughly eight steps to the painting process of a lowrider, depending on the finish of the vehicle. First stripping off the old paint to get the car down to its metallic shell makes way for several layers of primer that will hold the paint properly to the frame. Next, several layers of paint get added to the car, and refined until there are no bumps, drips or runs, making a smooth finish. Custom

details from etchings to pinstripes are then added. Beyond the paint job, lowriders generally have a lot of custom work on the interior of the car as well. For example, the seats and console can have all of the original material replaced with leather, stitched with intricate thread designs, creating patterns that reflect the artist’s tastes. The steering wheel can be replaced with different sculpted pieces of glossy metal, and the windows of the vehicle can be etched to showcase any type of design. While some cars lend themselves to these modifications more easily than others, any car can be lowered with the type of suspension that gives lowriders their name. As long as the car has its tires replaced to compensate for the difference in height, it can become a lowrider. For the Quiroz brothers, it’s at the very end of this long process, which takes months of work and thousands of dollars to complete, that the car is finally presented to the customer. “My favorite part is when the customer comes to pick up the car and they kind of have an idea of what the car is looking like,” Alberto says. “But to see the smile on their face, and handing them the keys, seeing the satisfaction in their face is [the best].” Kevin Rodriguez, who works with the brothers at their shop, believes this is art in its finest form. “The work that these guys do on these vehicles is pure artistry,” Rodriguez says. “It’s hard for people to fathom what they bring out of their minds to apply to a vehicle to make it turn out the way it does.”

Mar 31

w/ Smooth Money Gesture

Apr 1

JYEMO CLUB & INTUIT

GENETICS

w/ DJ Mbanza

Apr EUFORQUESTRA w/ Electric Toast 7 Apr 8

TENTH MOUNTAIN DIVISION

w/ Miles Over Mountains

Apr 14

WE DREAM DAWN & TAARKA

Apr 15

THE SEXTONES

Apr GRANT FARM 28 Feat. Keith Mosley Apr 29

RAPIDGRASS w/ Bonnie & The Clydes

LIVE MUSIC SPECIAL EVENTS PARTIES RECEPTIONS & MORE /thecaribouroom 303.258.3637 www.thecaribouroom.com

NEDERLAND March 16, 2017 35


ENERGY COST R U O Y T S! U C Quality You Can Count On... We Even Insulated the Governor’s Mansion!

Energy Audits & Rebates Available Hear us on: Mr Fix It, Saturdays 9am

Xcel Rules and Regulations Apply

Using Recycled newspapeRs foR 40 yeaRs! BestwayInsulation.com • 303-469-0808

BOULDER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Your Boulder Phil Goes to D.C.!

MICHAEL BUTTERMAN, MUSIC DIRECTOR

Nature & Music Saturday, March 25, 7:30 PM Macky Auditorium, CU Boulder

Your Boulder Phil presents a world premiere by “composer-adventurer” Stephen Lias inspired by our own Rocky Mountain National Park and choreographed to nature photography from the park. Jeff Midkiff’s mandolin concerto evokes the Appalachians with hues of bluegrass and Americana. Prairie dogs star in the cinematic Ghosts of the Grasslands, and Copland’s iconic Appalachian Spring is brought to life in unforgettable fashion by Frequent Flyers® Aerial Dance. 36 March 16, 2017

Photo: Glenn Ross Photo

Come see the program selected to open the SHIFT Festival of American Orchestras at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.!

Tickets start at $13; Students $5 www.BoulderPhil.org • 303.449.1343

Boulder Weekly


Courtesy of DCPA/Matthew Murphy

Kinky Boots. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345

Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through March 26.

Thursday, March 16 SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@ boulderweekly. com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

Music 300 Days Band. 8 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown, 303-442-5847. Adult Ukulele and Song Writing Bootcamp. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Big Gigantic. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW. Brian Kimmel. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

eTown Live Radio Show Taping with Rodney Crowell and Special Guests. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Hippie Buckaroos. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Jessica Eppler and Michael Wooten. 6 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910. Open Mic Night hosted by Brian Rezac. 7:30 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Outback Saloon Open Mic Night. 9 p.m. Outback Saloon, 3141 28th St., Boulder, 573-569-0370. see EVENTS Page 38

Think

Party

Engage

How to Diffuse a Bomb: The Project Climate Story

Kegs & Cabbage

Cultural Cul-de-sac: Coffee with Muslims: Casual Conversation with your Muslim Neighbor

7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 16, Broomfield Auditorium, 174 Community Park Road, Broomfield, 303-601-1931. In 1975, Denis Mulcahy founded Project Children, an organization offering summer vacations in the U.S. to kids living with widespread political violence in Northern Ireland. How to Defuse a Bomb tells the story of Project Children and the 14,000 kids it served. The BBC-sponsored documentary, narrated by Liam Neeson, has received international acclaim since its 2016 release. Celebrate St. Patty’s Day with some history and a good cause. Admission is free. — Billy Singleton

Boulder Weekly

6 p.m. Friday, March 17, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., 303-786-7030. Don’t forget to wear green this Friday for Boulder Beer’s St. Patrick’s Day celebration at the Boulder Theater. The free, 21 and up event, co-sponsored by Jameson Irish Whiskey, features live music, Irish food and drink, and the debut of Boulder Beer’s latest creation, the Irish Blessing Oak-Aged Coffee Stout. Musical guests include Colorado-natives Lady and the Gentlemen, Cycles, and Moontang. Grab a beer, do a jig and look for that pot of gold under the rainbow. — Billy Singleton

5 p.m., Thursday, March 23, Entrance at Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122.

Courtesy Cultural Cul-de-sac

Being a Muslim in America is becoming harder every day, thanks to President Trump, among other things. As a part of the Cultural Cul-de-sac series, BMoCA, in cooperation with the Islamic Center of Boulder, provides an opportunity to talk with Muslim neighbors to better understand their experience. Everyone is welcome to ask uncomfortable questions in a safe and open environment over coffee donated by Ozo coffee. — Ayako Itoi

March 16, 2017 37


events WE’RE Your ...

St. Patrick’s Day

Headquarters!

EVENTS from Page 37

Reggae Night, Selasee and the Fafa Family. 10 p.m. Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922.

St., Longmont, 303-485-5020.

Spain and the Americas with Richard Savino and Clea Huston. 7 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church, 1001 13th St., Boulder.

Masterclass with Guitarist Richard Savino in Co-presentation with University of ColoradoBoulder College of Music. 2:30 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder, 720-507-5052.

Spanish Wine Dinner. 5 p.m. Dagabi Cucina, 3970 North Boulder, 303-786-9004. Events

673 30th St., Boulder Corner of 30th & Baseline in Williams Village Shopping Center (between Moe’s BBQ & Gameforce)

303-440-8515 • theatricalcostumesetc.com

NEW HOURS: 10AM - 7PM DAILY

Cultural Cul-de-sac: OFF Cinema presents Floating, Drifting, Flying through an Invisible Reality: Two Films by Robert Fulton. 5 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303443-2122.

LIVE FACULTY TALK: THE GREAT AMERICAN ECLIPSE 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY: PRINCE FRIDAY MARCH 17 7:00 PM

DYNAMIC EARTH 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY: MICHAEL JACKSON 10:30 PM

LASER FLOYD: THE VISION BELL 11:59 PM

LIQUID SKY: MAYNARD VS. REZNOR SATURDAY MARCH 18 1:00 PM

PLANETS & LASERS 2:30 PM

SUPERVOLCANOES 7:00 PM

LIVE FACULTY TALK: THE GREAT AMERICAN ECLIPSE 9:00 PM

SOLAR SUPERSTORMS 10:30 PM

LASER: MILLENNIUM POP 11:59 PM

LASER: JOURNEY SUNDAY MARCH 19 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

MOONS & LASERS 3:00 PM

DYNAMIC EARTH 4:30 PM

HABITAT EARTH

EXPLORE A FISKE MEMBERSHIP BECOME A MEMBER 50% Discount on regular shows 25% Discount on special events 10% Discount on items for purchase, rental fees, annual membership renewal fees, and much more!

Visit www.colorado.edu/fiske for info.

Hipsters vs Vampires: A Comedy Debate. 7 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-4428292. Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884. Third Thursday Improv. 7 p.m. Wesley Foundation, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-588-0550. Up Down Circus — Juggling & Ground Skills Class. 4 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. Views & Brews: The Motorcycle Diaries. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

The Art of Being Human. 7 p.m. Boulder Shambhala Center, 14th and Spruce Streets, Boulder, 303-444-0190. Celtic Steps Irish Dancers. 3:30 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Dance Nia. 6 p.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-7744800.

Heike Huslage-Koch

Decadent Saint Tasting Room Grand Opening. 1 p.m. Decadent Saint, 1501 Lee Hill Road, Suite 14, Boulder, 303-9636342.

Thursday, March 16

Monday, March 20

Beebe Bahrami — Cafe Neandertal. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

The Nobel Lecture Series: Herta Müller. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Idris Goodwin, Nico Wilkinson and HR Hegnauer. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303495-3303.

“So, You’re a Poet” Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

Friday, March 17 Duncan Barlow and Tobias Carrol. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Saturday, March 18 Matt Clifford. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Sunday, March 19 Tamara Palmer — Missing Tyler. 5 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Friday, March 17 Music Amelie Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-335-4581. The Austrian Connection. 10 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-3288328. Concert and Art Show featuring Beth Gadbaw Celtic Trio. 2:30 p.m. Longmont Museum, Stewart Auditorium, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-6787869. The Coteries. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Boulder, 914-413-3332. Johnny & The Mongrels. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-7747698.

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002

Kevin Dooley. 7 p.m. Rosalee’s Pizzeria, 461 Main

38 March 16, 2017

Events

The Boulder Book Store presents its Nobel Lecture Series on March 20, focusing on the work of novelist and poet Herta Müller, who won the prize for literature in 2009.

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

The Motet. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

words

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452.

THURSDAY MARCH 16 7:00 PM

Lucas Swafford. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Todd Snider with Rorey Carroll. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637.

Tuesday, March 21 Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder, 303-495-3303. Peter Heller — Celine. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-4472074. Wednesday, March 22 Blake Bauer — You Were Not Born to Suffer. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Robert Johnson and The BBQ. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-4992985. Special St.Patrick’s Day Live Music. 5 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898. St. Patrick’s Day Celebration. 6 p.m. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. St. Patrick’s Day Encore Concert: Beth Gadbaw Celtic Band. 6 p.m. City of Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-6518374.

Kegs and Cabbage Part Deux. 5 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303786-7030. St. Patrick’s Day Craft. 10 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-6042424. St. Patrick’s Day Java Crawl. 10 a.m. Senior Services Center, 103 S. Iowa Ave., Lafayette, 303-665-9052. Stand Up for Climate Change: An Experiment With Creative Climate Comedy. 7 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder, 303-7350451.

WordPress One-On-One Consulting. 10 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Saturday, March 18 Music The Alcapones and Peak2Peak. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-2976397. The Angle. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Author Visit and Story Time with Heather Preusser. 10:30 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

St. Patrick’s Day Party. 6 p.m. Very Nice Brewing Co., Shopping Center Lower Level, Nederland, 303-258-3858.

BLOrk (Boulder Laptop Orchestra). 7:30 p.m. ATLAS Institute, Black Box Theatre, 1125 18th St., Boulder, 303-735-4577.

St. Patty’s Day Celebration featuring Mumbouli. 10 p.m. Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922.

see EVENTS Page 40

Boulder Weekly


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events EVENTS from Page 38

A gathering place for great food, drinks & entertainment Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday March 16th

BARBARA JO AND THE HIPPEE BUCKAROOS FREE ADMISSION

Friday March 17th

THE LONG RUN SOLD OUT

Saturday March 18th

LAST MEN ON EARTH “Arena Rock”

Wednesday March 22nd

BLUES & BOURBON WITH MOJO MAMA FREE ADMISSION

Friday March 31st

PARADISE THEATER “A Tribute to Styx”

& PROJECT FOREIGNER “A Tribute to Foreigner”

Friday March 24th

MY BLUE SKY SPECIAL GUEST

MIKE MASSE “A Tribute to The Allman Brothers”

Saturday March 25th

HOMESLICE BAND

Boulder Bassoon Quartet 10 Year Anniversary. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303443-8696.

Don’t Yell At Me... Episode 18. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 40 March 16, 2017

Mathias Kessler: Artifacts & Other Errors of Perception. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29.

Meetings in Isolation — Anna Olsson. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through April 30.

Grateful Bluegrass Boys. 7 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder, 720-849-8458.

Mi Tierra. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Oct. 22.

GUBNA Imperial IPA Release Party. 12 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Ninel Senatorova. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through March 31.

Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339.

Cars get the spotlight in Longmont Museum’s Colorado Lowriders exhibit. Read more on page 34.

Longmont Humane Society Homeward Bound. 6 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. The Magic Beans. 9 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. The Mighty Twisters. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. Nothing Really Mattress (Featuring Members of Amoramora). 10 p.m. Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub, 1922 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-1922. Peace Through Music Benefit Concert. 7 p.m. Unity Columbine Spiritual Center, 8900 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 303-546-0114. Scott Martin Trio with Alicia Baker. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303499-2985. Spain and the Americas with Richard Savino and Clea Huston: Longmont. 7:30 p.m. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 720-507-5052. Three Legged Dog. 10 p.m. No Name Bar, 1325 Broadway Ave., Boulder, 303-948-5977. Uncle Jake & the 18 Wheel Gang. 8 p.m. Jamestown Mercantile, 108 Main St., Jamestown. Events

“Classic Jazz”

www.nissis.com/events

Mark Bueno: Ghost Lights. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-4432122. Through March 24.

Matt Angiono. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303497-1174. Through March 31.

Zach Evens

Ghost Towns of Colorado. 10:30 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, Benefit, or wedding at Nissis. Award winning Cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting

Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303492-8300. Through June 24.

David Coile, Singer-Songwriter. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-4628.

Sunday March 26th

NEIL BRIDGE TRIO AND KAREN LEE

Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through May 7.

Cleason, Dunn, Wright. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-7747698.

Decadent Saint Tasting Room Grand Opening. 1 p.m. Decadent Saint, 1501 Lee Hill Road, Suite 14, Boulder, 303-963-6342.

“Variety Dance”

arts

Buffoons 2017 Spring Concert. 7 p.m. Old Main, Boulder, 303-444-6434.

Bobbie Benson. Community Art Program Gallery, NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-497-1174. Through March 31. Double Exposure: An Exhibition of Photography and Video. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-898-7200. Through March 26. Dylan Gebbia Richards: Eclipse. Boulder Museum of Contempoarary Art, 1750 13th St., 303-443-2122. Through May 29. Home: American photography at the CU Art Museum. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8300. Through July 15. Impossible Humans: The International Collection. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through April 9. Lowriders: Cars & Culture. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-6518374. Through May 31.

Seuss-A-Palooza. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-4413100. Seuss-A-Palooza. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Sunday, March 19 Music Boulder Phil Musical Hike: Nature in Music. 10 a.m. Realization Point on Flagstaff Mountain, Boulder.

Ryan McGinley: The Kids Were Alright. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through Aug. 20. Signature — Bug. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through April 9. Shockwave. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through May 28. Star Wars and the Power of Costume. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through April 9. Stop/Look/See — James Milmoe. Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada, 720-8987200. Through March 26. Then, Now, Next. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver, 720-865-5000. Through Aug. 31. Transmission — Michelle Robinson. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Through April 9. Wall Writers: Graffiti in its Innocence. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver, 303-298-7554. Through May 7.

Takács Quartet: Chamber Series. 4 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Events Boulder Jewish Film Festival. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 303-641-2056. Dance Nia on Sunday Mornings at LRC. 11 a.m. Longmont Recreation Center, 310 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-774-4800.

Brian Parton in Rollinsville. 12 p.m. Stage Stop, 60 Main St., Rollinsville, 303-944-6854.

Decadent Saint Tasting Room Grand Opening. 1 p.m. Decadent Saint, 1501 Lee Hill Road, Suite 14, Boulder, 303-963-6342.

HAPPY HOUR JAZZ. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-447-9772.

The Magic Flute. 2 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423.

Saturday Dance Series. 9:30 a.m. Community Dance Collective, 2020 1/2 21st St., Boulder, 401-450-2006.

Felonius Smith Trio. 6 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids & Solids, 1555 S. Hover Road, Longmont, 303-499-1665.

Monday, March 20

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Navruz Celebration in Central Park. 1 p.m. Central Park Band Shell, Canyon Blvd. and 13th St., Boulder, 303-579-7357.

Responsive Web Design with Bootstrap Hands-On. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Music Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-BREW. see EVENTS Page 42

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March 16, 2017 41


events

theater

Courtesy of DCPA/Matthew Murphy

Catch the final days of the Gershwin classic An American in Paris, playing at the DCPA through March 19. An American in Paris. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720865-4239. Through March 19. Beowulf: A Thousand Years of Baggage — presented by The Catamounts. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303440-7826. Through March 18. Disenchanted. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through May 6. Kinky Boots. Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver, 720-865-4239. Through March 26. Other Desert Cities. Longmont Theatre Company. 513 Main St., Longmont, 303-772-5200. Through Dec. 26. The Unsinkable Molly Brown. 7:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303-682-9980. Through April 2.

Symphonic Tribute To Comic Con: The Tetralogy

MARCH

M AY

Symphonic Tribute To Comic Con: The Tetralogy

GEEK

Cristian Macelaru, conductor Nicholas Phan, Evangelist Hadleigh Adams, Jesus Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director Colorado Children’s Chorale, Deborah DeSantis, artistic director J.S. BACH St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244

Christopher Dragon, conductor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Taylor Martin, assistant director

APRIL

The Music of Michael Jackson

POPS

SAT 7:30

A Symphonic Beauty and the Beast

FAMILY

SAT 7:30

Mahler Symphony No. 3 Conducted by Andrew Litton

MASTERWORKS

SUN 1:00

Mozart Performed By Jason Shafer

MASTERWORKS

FRI-SAT 7:30 SUN 1:00 ■

Brett Mitchell, conductor Jason Shafer, clarinet DUKAS La Péri, Poème danse MOZART Clarinet Concerto in A major, K. 622 RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Scheherazade, Op. 35

On the Beautiful Blue Danube

Andrew Litton, conductor Michelle DeYoung, mezzo Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director Colorado Children’s Chorale, Deborah DeSantis, artistic director MAHLER Symphony No. 3 in D minor

The Music of Star Wars MAY 27

POPS

SAT 7:30

Christopher Dragon, conductor

MASTERWORKS

APR 21-22 FRI-SAT 7:30 Kevin John Edusei, conductor Gabriel Preisser, chansonnier J. STRAUSS JR. On the Beautiful Blue Danube, Op. 314 HK GRUBER Frankenstein!! BRAHMS/orch. SCHOENBERG Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25

Movie at the Symphony: E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial APR 27

MAY 13

POPS

MAY 19-21 FRI-SAT 7:30 SUN 2:30

Andres Lopera, conductor

APR 7-9

Dianne Reeves in Concert Christopher Dragon, conductor

Brent Havens, conductor James Delisco, vocals

APR 2

MASTERWORKS

MAY 5 & 7 FRI 7:30 SUN 1:00

EVENTS from Page 40

MAR 24-25 FRI-SAT 7:30

APR 1

Bach St. Matthew Passion

Half Notes Please join us for family-friendly pre-concert activities in Gallery 2. The performance includes FULL SCREENING OF THE FEATURE FILM! The pre-recorded soundtrack is removed from these features and performed live by your Colorado Symphony.

GEEK

TICKETS

THU 7:30

Christopher Dragon, conductor Concert performance includes full screening of the live action feature film! ©A.M.P.A.S.® E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is a trademark and copyright of Universal Studios. Licensed by Universal Studios Licensing LLC. All Rights Reserved.

coloradosymphony.org T 303.623.7876

box office 1000 14th St., No. 15, Denver, CO 80202 Boettcher Concert Hall at the Denver Performing Arts Complex

From Good Homes. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Longmont Chorale Rehearsal. 7 p.m. Faith Community Lutheran Church, 9775 Ute Highway, Longmont, 303-651-7664.

42 March 16, 2017

colorado symphony proudly supported by

Smokes & Jokes. 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884.

Open Mic Night. 8 p.m. Johnny’s Cigar Bar, 1801 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0884.

Wednesday, March 22

Events

Drop-In Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave, Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Movie Monday presents Manchester by the Sea. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder, 303-444-7888. Tuesday, March 21 Music Brian Parton at Upslope. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-944-6854. Once a Flutist Festival. 10 a.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder. Open Mic with The Prairie Scholars. 6 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo: A Very Intimate Acoustic Evening. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Salsa Level 1. 6 p.m. Art Underground, 901 Front St., Louisville, 720-675-9656. Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. 12 p.m. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000.

presenting sponsor

Producing the Documentary. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-8004647.

Events Open Mic. 6 p.m. Twisted Pine Brewing Company, 3201 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-771-4940.

Music

Fly Fishing Film Tour Happy Hour. 4:30 p.m. Rocky Mountain Anglers, 1904 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-447-2400. The Fremonts. 6 p.m. Espresso Vino by Brewing Market, 2770 Dagny Way, Lafayette, 720-890-3993. James Galway. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. John Bunzli. 7 p.m. Rosalee’s Pizzeria, 461 Main St., Longmont, 303-485-5020. Once a Flutist Festival. 8:30 a.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder. Open Mic Night. 7 p.m. Sanitas Brewing Company, 3550 Frontier Ave., Unit 1, Boulder, 303-442-4130. Reggae Night at the Boulder House. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder, 303997-4108. The Wallpaper House Band. 4 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th St., Boulder, 303-939-0898. Events Facebook Marketing Hands-On. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-8004647. The Fly Fishing Film Tour. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Swing Dancing. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont, 303-774-7698. Boulder Weekly


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the pear-shaped fruit. He took a knife and plied his way into the thick skin with a bravado and gentleness I’d never seen in him. He nudged the halves apart, grabbed a teaspoon and carefully

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eased out the heart, holding it as if it were fragile. He took one half, then the other of the armadillohided fruit and slid his spoon where flesh edged against skin, working it under and around, sparing the edible pulp. An artist working at an easel, he filled the center holes with chopped tomatoes. The broken pieces, made whole again, merged into two reconstructed hearts, a delicate and rare surgery. My boy who’d gone away angry and wild had somehow learned how to unclose what had once been shut tight, how to urge out the stony heart and handle it with care. Beneath the rind he’d grown as tender and mild as that avocado, its rubies nestled in peridot, our forks slipping into the buttery texture of unfamiliar joy, two halves of what we shared. American Life in Poetry: Column 622: There are those like me who can’t even tell when an avocado is ripe, and those who know exactly how to perfectly prepare a ripe one. Here’s a poem of avocado expertise by Diane Lockward from The Uneaten Carrots of Atonement, published by Wind Publications. The poet lives in New Jersey. — Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate

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March 16, 2017 43


Friday & saTurday March 10-11

The new MasTersounds

3/16: GraTeFuL BLueGrass Boys w/ The sweeT LiLLies & Burn iT BLue (cd reLease parTy)

Thursday March 9 w/ new orLeans suspecTs

eVery Thursday The oTher Thursday@March 9 side

FeaT Jadakiss, sTypLes p & sheek Louche w/FeaT uncLe Murda, youTh’n’azia, speciaL GuesT keLissa youTh ‘n’ azia, & oTis w/ Jah9 & MaxByz GLazer

Free BeFore 8pM & Free BeFore 9pM For aLL TexT MessaGe suBscriBers (inFaMous sTrinGdusTers)

The Lox wednesday March 15

Grass For ThaT ass

JereMy GarreTT & andy FaLco

chronixx

(FederaTion Friday & saTurday sound) March 10-11

Thursday March 16 The new MasTersounds

TexT cerVanTes To 91944 To siGn up & danny Barnes 3/16: GraTeFuL BLueGrass Boys w/ The sweeT w/ cLusTerpLuck LiLLies & Burn iT BLue (cd reLease parTy)

Friday March 109 Thursday March

younG Buck

w/ new orLeans suspecTs

JereMy GarreTT GreaT aMerican Taxi

March 15 17-18 Fridaywednesday & saTurday March chronixx duaL Venue!

w/ chicaGo FarMer & Good Touch & andy FaLco

FeaT speciaL GuesT keLissa w/ Jah9 & Max GLazer (FederaTion sound)

(inFaMous sTrinGdusTers)

The werk ouT wesT Music & arTs FesTiVaL

Thursday March 3/17: Mark Farina, GoLF Thursday March 16 Thursday March 99 cLap, GriMyounG & darLinG, TeLeMeTry, The Lox Buck FeaT sTypLes p dJJadakiss, russo & spinrad Friday saTurday March 17-18 FeaT&&Jadakiss, sTypLes p sheek Louche 3/18: pooLside, TheyouTh’n’azia, parTy peopLe, w/ uncLe Murda, duaL Venue! & sheek Louche cure For The‘n’ coMMon, shuJ rosweLL youTh azia, Byz & oTis w/ uncLe Murda,ouT youTh’n’azia, The werk wesT && FLux capaciTor Friday saTurday March 10-11 youTh azia, Byz & oTis Music &‘n’arTs FesTiVaL

Monday March 13

& danny Monday niGhTBarnes MenaGerie w/ cLusTerpLuck FeaT JakaTTak, VinJa, eVery Thursday @ The MarspLuTo, oTher side dank LLoyd wriGhT, sound saFari, Friday March 10 ass Grass For ThaT Grass For ThaT ass Free BeFore 8pM & Free BeFore 9pM For dJGreaT wadada, wayLo, GahLakTus & seen aMerican Taxi

The Lox

The new MasTersounds sunday March 19 3/17: Mark Farina,March GoLF cLap, Friday & saTurday 10-11 w/ new orLeans suspecTs & darLinG, TeLeMeTry, nipsey hussLe wednesday March 15 TheGriM new MasTersounds dJ russo &March spinrad Thursday 23 chronixx new orLeans suspecTs 3/18:w/ pooLside, The parTy peopLe, FeaT speciaL GuesT keLissa reLoad 18 year cure For The coMMon, shuJ w/ Jah9 & Max GLazer wednesday March 15 rosweLL & FLux capaciTor (FederaTion sound) anniVersary chronixx Thursday March 16 FeaT Bad coMpany (uk),19 LoadsTar, sunday March

Free aLL BeFore & FreesuBscriBers BeFore 9pM For TexT8pM MessaGe w/ chicaGo FarMer & Good Touch wednesday aLL cerVanTes TexT MessaGe suBscriBers TexT To March 91944 To15 siGn up Monday March 13 re: search 3/16: GraTeFuL BLueGrass Boys w/ The sweeT

TexT cerVanTes To 91944 To siGn up Monday niGhT MenaGerie BorahM Lee Band parTy) LiLLies &FeaT Burn iT BLue (cd reLease 3/16: GraTeFuL BLueGrass Boys w/ The sweeT JakaTTak, MarspLuTo, W/ FeaT Dr. FaMeuS FeatVinJa, DrIZNO, Thursday March 9Mux MOOl, dank & LLoyd wriGhT, sound saFari, LiLLies Burn iT BLue (cd reLease parTy) Mikey Thunder & JuBee JereMy GarreTT dJ wadada, wayLo, GahLakTus & seen & andy FaLco Thursday March wednesday March 922 (inFaMous sTrinGdusTers) wednesday March 15

JereMy GarreTT re: & danny Barnes re: search search & andy FaLco

FeaT deFunk, ForT knox The parTy w/ BorahM cLusTerpLuck FeaT LeeFiVe, Band peopLe & FunksTaTik W/ Dr. (inFaMous FaMeuS Feat DrIZNO, sTrinGdusTers) Friday March 10 Mux MOOl,

FeaT speciaL GuesT keLissa younG Buck dc Breaks LeGion, hussLe Mc dino, MysTicaL nipsey w/ &Jah9 & Max GLazer17-18 Friday inFLuence saTurday&March Fury Thursday March 23 (FederaTion sound) duaL Venue!

Thunder & JuBee GreaT aMerican Thursday March 23 Taxi &Mikey danny Barnes

w/ chicaGo FarMer & Good Touch

wednesday ThaT 1March Guy22

Friday March 2416 reLoad 18 year The werk ouT wesT Thursday March The drunken hearTed Music & arTs FesTiVaL anniVersary younG Buck

w/ cLusTerpLuck Monday March 13

re: search

w/ Berne uniT (LaTe seT) Monday niGhT MenaGerie Friday 10 The parTy FeaT deFunk, ForT March knox FiVe, FeaT JakaTTak, Jessica Jones, JaMes duMM FeaT VinJa, MarspLuTo, peopLe & FunksTaTik dank LLoyd wriGhT, sound saFari, (Fox sTreeT), Jonah wisneski (oTher dJw/ wadada, wayLo, GahLakTus & seen chicaGo FarMer & Good Touch

Medicine show17-18 Friday & saTurday March duaL Venue!

GreaT aMerican Taxi

3/17: Mark Farina, GoLF cLap, FeaT Bad coMpany (uk), LoadsTar, GriM & darLinG, TeLeMeTry, dc Breaks LeGion, Mc dino, MysTicaL & spinrad FeaT dJ Therusso VicTor wooTen Trio inFLuence & Fury peopLe, 3/18: pooLside, The parTy & (FeaT dennis chaMBers BoB cure For The coMMon, Friday MarchshuJ 24 rosweLL Francheshini) & FLux capaciTor

worLds), charLie MerTens Thursday March (iMproMpTu), 23 March&15 eric wednesday Low (Fox sTreeT) ThaT 1 Guy Monday March 13 chris re: search speasMaker (The(LaTe conGress) w/ Berne uniT seT)

The werk ouT wesT Music & arTs FesTiVaL

FeaT niGhT BorahM Lee Band Monday MenaGerie FeaT Jessica Jones, JaMes duMM

The hearTed w/ The drunken Band oF heaThens, sunday March 19 The drew eMMiT &Medicine andy Thorn duo, ThecLap, drunken 3/17: Mark Farina, GoLF show nipsey hussLe hearTs, Brad parsons FeaT The VicTor wooTen Trio GriMThursday & darLinG, TeLeMeTry, March 23Band &russo coraL creek (FeaT dennis chaMBers & BoB dJ &18 spinrad reLoad year Francheshini) 3/18: pooLside, The parTy peopLe, anniVersary saTurday March 25 w/ The Band oF heaThens, The drew FeaT Bad coMpany (uk), LoadsTar, cure For The coMMon, shuJ rosweLL eMMiT & andy Thorn duo, The drunken dc Breaks&LeGion, Mc dino, MysTicaL FLux capaciTor

saTurday March 25

W/ FeaT Dr. FaMeuS Feat DrIZNO, Mux MOOl, JakaTTak, VinJa, MarspLuTo, (Fox sTreeT), Jonah wisneski Mikey Thunder & JuBee(oTher

dank LLoyd wriGhT, sound saFari, FaTher son orchesTra worLds), charLie MerTens wednesday March(iMproMpTu), 22 dJ wadada, wayLo, &(phiL seen& FeaT roB Low Barraco &GahLakTus roB eaTon eric (Fox sTreeT) & chris re: search speasMaker (The conGress) Friends/dark sTar orchesTra), roBin FeaT deFunk, ForT knox FiVe, wednesday March 15The parTy syLVesTer (raTdoG), roB eaTon Jr & peopLe & FunksTaTik saTurday March 25 ThoMas Barraco Thursday March 23 FaTher son orchesTra BorahM Lee Band w/FeaT The TreVor Jones Band ThaT 1roB Guy FeaT roB Barraco eaTon & W/ Dr. FaMeuS Feat&DrIZNO, Mux(phiL MOOl, w/ Berne uniT (LaTe seT) Friends/dark sTar orchesTra), roBin sunday March 26 Thunder & JuBee FeaT Mikey Jessica Jones, JaMes duMM

The dance parTy TiMe Machine FeaT Marc BrownsTein, aron MaGner, The drunken hearTed saTurday March 25 nipsey hussLe aLLen aucoin (disco BiscuiTs),

re: search

hearTs, Brad parsons inFLuence & Fury Band sunday March 19 & coraL creek Friday March 24

Medicine show ToM haMiLTon (Jrad), Mike The dance parTy Thursday March 23 TiMe Machine reLoad 18 year

FeaT The VicTor wooTen Trio (LoTus)& BoB (FeaT GreenFieLd dennis chaMBers w/ MeMBers oF yaMn, aron Fox sTreeT, Francheshini) FeaT Marc BrownsTein, MaGner, w/ aLLen The Band oF heaThens, The TiGer parTy & anaLoG sondrew aucoin (disco BiscuiTs), eMMiT &Bad andy Thorn duo, The drunken FeaTToM coMpany (uk), LoadsTar, haMiLTon (Jrad), Mike hearTs, Brad parsons Band dc Breaks LeGion, Mc(LoTus) dino, MysTicaL GreenFieLd & coraL creek

anniVersary Friday March 31

Marco BeneVenTo

inFLuence & Fury w/ MeMBers oF yaMn, Fox sTreeT, saTurday March 25 TiGer parTy & anaLoG son w/ The copper chiLdren

MarchparTy 24 TheFriday dance Friday March Friday apriLhearTed 731 TiMe Machine The drunken

Marco BeneVenTo Joey porTer’s shady Medicine show Business

FeaT Marc BrownsTein, aron MaGner, aLLen aucoin (disco BiscuiTs), w/ The copper chiLdren ToMThe haMiLTon Mike FeaT VicTor (Jrad), wooTen Trio GreenFieLd (LoTus) Friday apriL 7 & BoB (FeaT dennis chaMBers FeaT Joey porTer (MoTeT), kris w/ MeMBers oF yaMn, Fox sTreeT, Francheshini) TiGer parTy & McGee), anaLoG JenniFer son Myers (uMphrey’s

Joey porTer’s shady

w/ The Band oF Band), heaThens, harTswick (Trey GarreTT sayers Business Friday March 31 The drew FeaT Joey Thorn porTer (MoTeT), krisLyLe eMMiT & andy duo, The drunken (MoTeT), adaM sMirnoFF (LeTTuce), Marco BeneVenTo Myers (uMphrey’s McGee), JenniFer w/ TheBrad copper chiLdren hearTs, parsons Band diVinsky (MoTeT), drew sayers (MoTeT) harTswick (Trey Band), GarreTT sayers apriL 7 &Friday coraL creek & con Brio (MoTeT), adaM sMirnoFF (LeTTuce), LyLe

Joey porTer’s shady Business

saTurday March diVinsky (MoTeT), drew sayers saTurday apriL 825 (MoTeT)

The dance parTy FeaT Joey porTer (MoTeT), kris & con Brio phoFFMan/Beck QuarTeT Myers (uMphrey’s McGee), JenniFer TiMe Machine FeaT pauL hoFFMan & anders saTurday apriL 8 harTswick (Trey Band), GarreTTBeck, sayers phoFFMan/Beck QuarTeT

FeaT Marc BrownsTein, aron MaGner, (MoTeT), adaM sMirnoFF (LeTTuce), LyLe BiLLy sTrinGs & saMson GrisMan diVinsky (MoTeT), (MoTeT) aLLen aucoin drew (discosayers BiscuiTs), FeaT pauLThursday hoFFManapriL & anders 13 Beck, & con Brio ToM haMiLTon (Jrad),GrisMan Mike BiLLy sTrinGs & saMson

QuannuM Mc’s saTurday apriL 8 GreenFieLd (LoTus) Thursday apriL 13

syLVesTer (raTdoG), roB eaTon Jr & (Fox sTreeT), Jonah wisneski (oTher ThoMas Barraco worLds), charLie MerTens (iMproMpTu), GoLd & xp &Band eric Loww/ (Fox sTreeT) chris Jones w/ The TreVor speasMaker (The conGress)

iLLMacuLaTe wednesday March 22 re: search

Monday MarchFiVe, 27 The parTy sunday March 26 FeaT deFunk, ForT knox saTurday March 25 peopLe & FunksTaTik iLLMacuLaTe FaTher son orchesTra w/ GoLd & skunk, xpeaTonkineTik FeaT roB MiLky duBz, papa FeaT Barraco &March roB Thursday 23 (phiL & Friends/dark sTar orchesTra), roBin GrooVe, phLoeThik, JanG, Monday March 27BankaJL, syLVesTer (raTdoG), roB eaTon Jr & poppa Bear, wrecker & sean ryan ThoMas Barraco Monday niGhT MenaGerie w/ Berne uniT (LaTe seT) Jones Band w/ wednesday TheduBz, TreVor FeaT MiLky papa skunk, kineTik March 29 duMM FeaT Jessica Jones, JaMes GrooVe, phLoeThik, JanG, sunday March 26 BankaJL, (Fox sTreeT), Jonah wisneski (oTher poppa Bear, wrecker & sean ryan iLLMacuLaTe worLds), MerTens (iMproMpTu), FeaT charLie GoVinda & Brownie dJ seT w/ GoLd & xp wednesday March&29 eric Low (Fox BiscuiTs) sTreeT) chris (disco Monday March 27 speasMaker (The conGress) w/ opTion4, Mikeysearch Thunder & noTorious re: Monday niGhT MenaGerie FeaT GoVinda &papa Brownie dJ seT conducT FeaT MiLky duBz, skunk, kineTik

Monday niGhT MenaGerie ThaT 1 Guy

re: search

saTurday March 25 apriL 4 FaTherTuesday son orchesTra

(disco BiscuiTs) GrooVe, phLoeThik, JanG, BankaJL, w/ opTion4, Mikey Thunder & noTorious poppa Bear, wrecker & sean ryan

kaTchaFire

conducT FeaT roBwednesday Barraco & March roB eaTon 29 (phiL & Friends/dark sTar orchesTra), roBin w/ inna Vision & MindsTaTe re: search Tuesday apriL 4 FeaT GoVinda & Brownie dJ seT syLVesTer (raTdoG), roB eaTon Jr & kaTchaFire wednesday apriL 5 (disco BiscuiTs) ThoMas Barraco w/ inna Vision & MindsTaTe w/ opTion4, Mikey Thunder & noTorious w/ The TreVor Jones Band conducT apriL 5 Mosis, FeaT Twowednesday Fresh, dynohunTer, Tuesday apriL 26 4 sunday March Mikey Thunder & JuBee re: search

re: search

kaTchaFire iLLMacuLaTe wednesday apriL 5 TropideLic saTurday apriL27 8 Monday March

FeaT Two Fresh, dynohunTer, Mosis, w/ inna Vision & MindsTaTe saTurday apriL 8 Mikeyw/ Thunder GoLd & & xpJuBee

FeaT (chieF xceL & GiFT phoFFMan/Beck QuarTeT w/ BLackaLicious MeMBers oF yaMn, Fox sTreeT,

QuannuM Mc’s pauL hoFFMan & LaTeeF anders Beck, oFFeaT GaB), Lyrics Born & (LaTryx) TiGer parTy & anaLoG son

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n spurts, Kong: Skull Island is the whacked-out, This version of the gleeful nonsense director Jordan Vogt-Roberts king of the monkey clearly longed to make. Straight-jacketed by a stumonsters is good but could have dio determined to craft a broad-demographicbeen great. appealing “shared universe” using their giant monster characters, Vogt-Roberts still managed to work in a high-quality sequence of Tom Hiddleston chopping pterodactyls in half with a friggin’ sword and maybe the best single-use F-bomb in PG-13 movie history. To his credit, none of the boilerplate big-budget content is particularly bad, it just prevents Skull Island from mutating into the quirky, batshit-insane joyride it could have been. Showing that it is clearly a work of fiction, Skull Island begins with a sitting U.S. Congressman actually concerned about Russia. Bill Randa ( John Goodman), an executive with a government contractor, and his colleague, Houston Brooks (Corey Hawkins), convince said congressman to commission a military expedition to an uncharted island before the Russkies get there. The leader of that military expedition is Preston Packard (Samuel L. Jackson). The Vietnam War has literally just ended, and Packard is hella pissed his boys seemingly died for nothing. He’s basically one angry Ahab in search of a Moby Dick to harpoon. Randa and Brooks hire a “tracker” named James Conrad (Tom Hiddleston), whose name is such a direct reference to Joseph Conrad that his name may as well have been “Mr. Heart of Darkness.” Photographer Mason Weaver (Brie Larson) also joins, presumably because all winners of the Best Actress Oscar are contractually obligated to immediately appear in a movie that wastes their talents. The ragtag group arrives on the island to find giant spiders, dinosaur-lizard thingies, King Kong and John C. Reilly. Kong may get top billing, but Reilly’s marooned World War II veteran is easily the star here, spouting gibberish and being utterly G.D. fabulous. A friend described the film perfectly: Skull Island is like eating a buffet of great individual dishes that never comes together into one coherent meal. A diagnostic report may fail to find a single component that outright fails. Kong looks great and finally gets treated like the bad-ass warrior hero he is. Reilly is uniquely brilliant comic relief. The soldiers are all distinct without being distracting. The monster fights are epic and kinetic. And coming off of Logan, naming a character Conrad and aping Heart of Darkness/Apocalypse Now in every other scene now feels like a positively restrained homage. And yet, the film never gets to put its cuckoo cap all the way on. Scenes like the one where Hiddleston goes HAM, where Reilly randomly threatens to stab a friend while giggling or where a soldier’s heroic self-sacrifice does not go heroically are understandably and appropriately where Vogt-Roberts’ heart is. Instead of more wacky mayhem like that, Skull Island simply follows a fairly banal blockbuster pattern, focusing acutely on getting to the moment shown in the credit cookie. To be fair, it’s one hell of a monster cookie, even if what came before was slightly overbaked and somewhat underwhelming. This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

Light on bananas

‘
Kong: Skull Island’ is almost bonkers enough by Ryan Syrek

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Boulder Weekly


film Owned by none, loved by all ‘Kedi’ is catnip for the heart by Michael J. Casey

C

ON THE BILL: Kedi.

ats have been woefully maligned by March 17–23. The Boedecker cinema. Sometimes they are villains Theater, The Dairy Arts Center, — like the conniving Si and Am 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303440-7825, thedairy.org. from Lady and the Tramp — or a symbol for women on the prowl — International Film Series such as Cat from Breakfast at Tiffany’s — or a March 23-24, 7:30 p.m. Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 symbol of a sad and lonely woman — the “cat Colorado Ave., University of lady” pejorative. Cats have been set up as easy Colorado Boulder, 303-492targets for those who have never had the privi8662. internationalfilmseries. com. lege of time with a feline. For those people, Kedi is here to set the record straight. Kedi, Turkish for cat, is an unusual and life-affirming documentary from director Ceyda Torun about the cats that roam the city of Istanbul, Turkey. These cats — neither wild nor tame — have no permanent owners, preferring to call all of Istanbul their own. And with hundreds of thousands of them in the city, they are as much a part of Istanbul as any structure or any square. Torun’s camera observes these cats, completely engrossed by their habits, their personalities. Sometimes the cats can just barely be seen, blending into the environment just so, other times they lounge on the sidewalk in plain view. In some instances, Torun’s camera races along the ground giving the viewer a cat’s eye view of Istanbul and its residents. If there is a resident of Istanbul who does not have time for these magnificent creatures, then Torun has no time for them. Instead, she speaks with those who freely give their time and money to care for these cats. One woman cooks over 20 pounds of chicken a day to feed the neighborhood furries. Another man suffered a nervous breakdown in 2002 and has since spent his free time and spare money feeding the cats by the docks. He knows full well that this is what saved his life. “God brings us together in different ways,” he tells Torun. “For me, it was these animals.” The woman would agree but she needn’t say it. The cats return the favor. One seaside restaurant was suffering due to an infestation of mice until one devoted and territorial mouser showed up and cleaned house. He now lives at the restaurant, dining on mice and some of the best scraps around. Another cat, Smokey, decided to take up residency at a meat and cheese shop. The owners describe her as a cat with manners — she doesn’t bug the patrons for food but paws at the window when she wants dinner. For her respect, she is rewarded with smoked turkey and manchego cheese. There are more. Thousands more. More tabbies, more calicos, more Angoras; more ginger cats, white cats, black cats, piebald cats, more cats than you know what to do with. Some fight for territory, some fight for scraps. Most just lounge and watch, waiting to be pet by a passerby, which almost everyone does. I have been lucky enough to share my life with three cats — Mr. Bojangles, Joseph and Clark Gable — and am a better person for it. And that’s just three cats; Istanbul has legions. I can’t image how much better off they are for them. Boulder Weekly

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deep dish BY CAITLIN ROCKETT Susan France

I

n 1971, Tibetan Buddhist meditation scholar Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche came to teach at the University of Colorado and, as most everyone does, fell in love with Boulder. Just three years later he cofounded the Naropa Institute, now University, which became the first accredited Buddhist university in North America. Rinpoche is often considered the first link in Boulder’s Himalayan connection. The city, filled with mountaineers and travel junkies, is kind of obsessed with all things Himalayan. And it seems the infatuation goes both ways. Boulder has a significant population of Sherpas, an ethnic group that originated in Tibet and migrated to Nepal where they became reknown for their endurance as Himalayan mountaineers. “[Colorado] is a good state for Sherpas,” Lhakpa Sherpa told the LA Times back in 2010. “There are a lot of connections because we meet so many people from Colorado in Nepal.” Possibly one of the first Sherpas in Boulder was Pemba Sherpa, owner of Sherpa’s Restaurant on Walnut Street. Pemba is an adventurer’s adventurer. He’s lead nearly 50 trekking trips to the Himalayas in the past 20 years. He ran up and down Mt. Kilmanjaro in one day. And he does some world-class ice climbing and average person stuff like that, too. For Sherpa’s Restaurant, Pemba blended his love of Himalayan culture and cuisine with his passion for adventure. In the converted house the restaurant is located in, you’ll find a “traveler’s lounge” filled with adventure and travel books. If you’re interested in visiting the Himalayas, Pemba and the other Sheraps working there will help you plan a trip, whether that’s scaling mountains or doing volunteer work in the region. You can peruse a book or two over a cold pint of Sherpa ale while you wait for a table.

They even host guest speakers — mountaineers, rock climbers, social justice advocates and the like — from time to time. These are free and open to the public. It’s a pretty unique place. There’s also food. Really delicious food, like momos. Momos are a type of dumpling — you might call them pot stickers — native to Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan and the Himalayan states of India. They’re a popular fast food in Nepal, and they’ve become pretty popular around the world. Making momos from scratch is a labor of love that’s not too laborious: sift plain flower into a bowl, then make a little “bay” of sorts in the middle of the flower to slowly add some water, kneading until the dough is firm. It’s much like making pasta. You let the dough sit for about a half an hour before rolling it into a long cylinder and cutting one-inch chunks out to roll out flat into the wrappers. At Sherpa’s, momos can be filled with vegetables, chicken or beef — maybe yak if you ask real nice, but I never have — then steamed or fried. At home, drop a tablespoon of filling into the wrapper, then use a sort of push-andpinch method to keep the filling tucked in while you create the pretty creasing that closes the momo. Line those little bundles of scrumptiousness into a lightly oiled steamer pan and steam for 15 minutes. Let them cool and then enjoy with chutney. Steamed, they’re actually pretty healthy, with a single momo coming in at only 35.2 calories and less than a gram of total fat. If you’re planning to make momos at home, that’s great, but you might want to go and have a few dozen taste tests at Sherpa’s just to get a feel for what’s it’s like when you do it right. Sherpa’s Adventurers Restaurant & Bar. 825 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7151.

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Boulder Weekly


nibbles

Susan France

BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

Beetroot to Beefsteak

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V

egans are hard to find in much of the United States. Not so in Boulder, a town awash in vegans and vegan-friendly folks plus lots of vegan food companies, vegan cafes, vegan menu items, buffets and cooking classes. Yet chances are most locals have never heard of Ron Picarski, the person in Boulder who may be having the most impact in promoting a healthy, meatless diet in the United States. Last year Picarski spoke at the United Nations about the health benefits of a vegan diet, and its potential to fight world hunger. The classically trained chef feeds hundreds of thousands of people heart-healthy vegan fare every year, but you can’t buy his Eco-Cuisine products at a supermarket. You won’t find his name on a restaurant menu. It would be easy to pigeonhole Picarski, a former Franciscan monk, as one of those strident purists preaching the vegan gospel, but the ste-

Boulder’s Ron Picarski quietly introduces 100,000 diners to heart-healthy cuisine

see NIBBLES Page 50

Boulder Weekly

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Susan France

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NIBBLES from Page 49

reotypes don’t fit. One of his products is designed to mix with ground meat. He graduated from culinary school and earned his meat-cutting certification after he became a vegan. In 1976, nobody knew what the word meant. “I cut and cook steaks for my lovely wife, bacon once a week,” he says with a broad smile. The east Boulder home he shares with landscape architect Nancy Loving doubles as his corporate headquarters and research facility. The refrigerator is jammed with examples of his food research making everything from chicken curry and a spot-on Salisbury steak to a natural, vegan and kosher fruitcake. Q: You are passionate about animal-free cuisine but you are very accommodating to cooks who aren’t. A: I believe in being vegan, but I know human nature. Listen, we’re omnivores — we have teeth for meat and grains. We have moved too much too far to the carnivore side. I’m trying to move us back on the herbivore side. Q: Did you cook as a kid? A: I grew up in Petoskey Michigan, on the shores of Lake Michigan. When I was 12 years old my mother opened a really busy diner and I started working there. She already had a reputation as a great cook, especially the traditional Polish favorites. Q: How did you end up studying to be a Franciscan monk? A: After working at the restaurant, I was sure I didn’t want to be in the restaurant business. In high school I was interested in committing my life to service. I didn’t want to be a priest. I liked the connection the Franciscans had to animals and nature.

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Q: What led you to become vegan versus simply vegetarian? A: When I started in the order, my health wasn’t good. I had a lot of lung problems. I started on a diet, not vegan but healthier, and began to lose weight. The first time I went home my parents almost didn’t recognize me. In early 1976, I gave up eating meat but not eggs and dairy. I felt even worse so in October ’76 I became a vegan. I’m 69

“Vegan food should be comfort food. You have to give people what they like,” Boulder chef Ron Picarski says.

years old now and healthy. I just had my annual physical. I’m not on any medications.

Q: How did you end up as a chef? A: I started working in the seminary kitchen and that’s when I started really getting into cooking. I talked the order into letting me take classes at a professional culinary school and I really developed my skills. I also started studying nutrition. I passed the meat-cutting exam after I became a vegan. I would taste the meat and then spit it out and wash my mouth out. Q: What led you to leave the Franciscans? A: I wanted to compete in the International Culinary Olympics in Germany in 1980 and my monastery refused. I thought the Olympics could bring vegan credibility as a cuisine worthy of a five-star restaurant. I competed and eventually won and my efforts made a difference. Sixteen years later, the International Culinary Olympic Committee made a vegetarian category mandatory for all teams. Q: What does your Boulder company Eco-Cuisine make? A: I call it “speed-scratch.” I have created dry cooking and baking mixes for restaurant, university and hospital foodservice and supermarkets that are vegan, natural and kosher. I do a lot of on-site teaching. I’m working with Rice University to develop their vegan menu because of an increased demand from staff and students. The products are shipped in 25-pound bags. Q: How many people eat your food every year — vegan and non-vegan? A: Vegan is a big market if you include people adopting heart-healthy and wellness diets. It’s hard to estimate but certainly at least 100,000 judging by our orders and shipments. see NIBBLES Page 52

Boulder Weekly


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Susan France

nibbles NIBBLES from Page 50

Q: Vegan meat substitutes have had a less than savory reputation flavor-wise? A: That has really changed in the past few years. I have tried to apply classical chef techniques to making center-of-the-plate entrees like a piece of meat or fish. I use protein from pulses: beans, peas and lentils in my mixes that can be infused with flavor as chicken, beef or pork and sautéed, steamed, baked or grilled. You want the right

chewiness, that textural experience, and what we call “lubricity.” That’s the creaminess that requires fat. My Mixed Medium product is designed to be 35 percent meat and 65 percent mix for meatloaf, meatballs and sausage. Q: Do you have any food vices left? A: Yes, good natural potato chips — reduced fat and salt. I like to eat them with raw carrots. Q: What does the future hold for you and vegan food? A: I also earned my teaching accreditation and my passion is for education. I wrote a cookbook in 2015 that has become a textbook, The Classical Vegetarian Cookbook For Professional Chefs and Inspired Cooks (Eco-cuisine.com). I want to take people to a place where they are eating and feeling better. We need to be responsible for our own health and not put it in the hands of doctors.

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Originally opened in 2013, Radek Cerny’s L’Atelier is closing in Boulder this month. It will reopen as Atelier by Radex in Denver. Cerny previously operated the European Café in Boulder, Le Chantecler in Niwot and Denver’s Papillon Café. ... The 28,000-squarefoot restaurant and game venue, Wild Game Entertainment Experience, has opened at 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd. in Longmont. ... La Revolución Taqueria y Cantina has closed at 701 Main St. in Louisville.

Food Words Update

“Sous vide” and “risotto” are two recently obscure food terms that have crossed-over into mainstream parlance joining “balsamic.” Starbucks is now selling Sous Vide Egg Bites in two flavors, bacon and gruyere, and egg white and roasted red pepper. Sous vide means sealing food in a bag and cooking it very slowly in a hot water bath. Meanwhile, Walmart is stocking frozen, plastic-bagged “risotto,” the Italian dish that makes Arborio rice creamy by slowly adding broth. Great Value Risotto is really just precooked rice with cheese sauce.

Words to Chew On

“If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you better stay home.” — James Michener John Lehndorff hosts an hour-long edition of Radio Nibbles on March 16, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. on KGNU (88.5 FM, kgnu.org). Comments: Nibbles@boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly


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by Michael J. Casey

L

eft Hand’s Hops+Handrails is not your typical beer fest. Sure, it has beer and music, what fest wouldn’t? It has the requisite food and local businesses giving out marketing in the form of swag and wheel-o-prizes that you can spin — I got a beaded necklace from Floyds and I’ll cherish it forever. It even has a 40-foot high ramp covered in snow and dominated by riders trying to impress the crowd with their best tricks. “[Hops+Handrails] is really a celebration of everything we do great here in Colorado,” Left Hand’s Josh Goldberg tells Boulder Weekly. “It’s skiing and snowboarding. It’s craft beer. It’s jam-band, bluegrass-y music. And it’s outdoors with either puffy jackets on if it’s cold or flip-flops if it’s warm.” The weather was typically Coloradan for the Fifth Annual Hops+Handrails this past March 11. With rain in the morning, the festival opened at noon to overcast skies and chill — a chill that quickly lifted with the first pour of delectable beer. “Our goal and our mantra here is always to challenge ourselves and strive to create something we call, ‘Not Just Another Beer Fest,’” Goldberg says. “In the Susan France spring and summer, there are no shortage of beer festivals. Some of them are wonderful and dynamic and exciting, and others are a little stale or uninspired. They might be a couple of tents in a parking lot or they might be in a field, in a town park, but there is not a unique trait or story that it tells or experience that it creates besides drinking beer for $30 for four hours.” The breweries that Goldberg invites are what make Hops+Handrails “Not Just Another Beer Fest.” Many of the usual suspects were on hand — Avery, Odell, New Belgium, Oskar Blues — but of the 70 brewJosh Goldberg, community and events manager, Left eries pouring more than 200 Hand Brewing Company beers, a dozen or so were joining the festivities for the first time. This was the first year The Bruery from Placentia, California, was featured and their offerings — Or Xata (7.1% ABV), a horchata-inspired blonde ale, and White Chocolate (13.8%), a bourbon barrel-aged wheatwine with cacao nibs and vanilla — were two of the best at the fest. The Bruery is well known among craft beer drinkers and having them pouring helps draw people in. Hopefully, those people stopped by another first-timer’s tent, Open Door Brewing Company, and gave their delectable Over the Moon Milk Stout (5.6%) a quaff. Barely a year old, Open Door is a small Boulder brewery with only three labels as of yet — their Short Arms IPA (6.5%) was one of my associate’s favorites from the fest — and being featured at Hops+Handrails provides them with a significant amount of exposure. Bringing attention to fellow craft breweries is a major part of Goldberg’s aim with Hops+Handrails. As he tells BW, Left Hand was equally nurtured as it was up and coming. Now that they have the resources to put together these types of festivals they can “rally the breweries together for a unique event.” “If we keep doing good, we keep being a force for good, and we keep creating memorable experiences and bringing our beer brothers and sisters, then we’re doing a favor to the whole industry,” Goldberg says. “And we’re all going to be elevated as a result. Boulder Weekly

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ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: The more unselfish and compas-

sionate you are in the coming weeks, the more likely it is you will get exactly what you need. Here are four ways that can be true: 1. If you’re kind to people, they will want to be kind to you in return. 2. Taking good care of others will bolster their ability to take good care of you. 3. If you’re less obsessed with I-me-mine, you will magically dissolve psychic blocks that have prevented certain folks from giving you all they are inclined to give you. 4. Attending to others’ healing will teach you valuable lessons in how to heal yourself — and how to get the healing you yearn for from others.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I hope you will consider buying yourself

some early birthday presents. The celebration is weeks away, but you need some prodding, instigative energy now. It’s crucial that you bring a dose of the starting-fresh spirit into the ripening projects you’re working on. Your mood might get overly cautious and serious unless you infuse it with the spunk of an excited beginner. Of course only you know what gifts would provide you with the best impetus, but here are suggestions to stimulate your imagination: a young cactus; a jack-in-the-box; a rock with the word “sprout” written on it; a decorated marble egg; a fox mask; a Photoshopped image of you flying through the air like a superhero.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Many Geminis verbalize profusely

and acrobatically. They enjoy turning their thoughts into speech, and love to keep social situations lively with the power of their agile tongues. Aquarians and Sagittarians may rival your tribe for the title of The Zodiac’s Best Bullshitters, but I think you’re in the top spot. Having heaped that praise on you, however, I must note that your words don’t always have as much influence as they have entertainment value. You sometimes impress people more than you impact them. But here’s the good news: In the coming weeks, that could change. I suspect your fluency will carry a lot of clout. Your communication skills could sway the course of local history.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Your world is more spacious than it has been in a long time. Congrats! I love the way you have

been pushing yourself out of your comfort zone and into the wilder frontier. For your next trick, here’s my suggestion: Anticipate the parts of you that may be inclined to close down again when you don’t feel as brave and free as you do now. Then gently clamp open those very parts. If you calm your fears before they break out, maybe they won’t break out at all.

LEO

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: I expect you will get more than

your usual share of both sweetness and tartness in the coming days. Sometimes one or the other will be the predominant mode, but on occasion they will converge to deliver a complex brew of WOW!-meets-WTF! Imagine chunks of sour apples in your vanilla fudge ripple ice cream. Given this state of affairs, there’s no good reason for you to be blandly kind or boringly polite. Use a saucy attitude to convey your thoughtfulness. Be as provocative as you are tender. Don’t just be nice — be impishly and subversively nice.

JULY 23-AUG. 22: I like rowdy, extravagant longing as much as anyone. I enjoy being possessed by a heedless greed for too much of everything that feels rapturous: delectable food, mysterious sex, engrossing information, SCORPIO liberating intoxication and OCT. 23-NOV. 21: “I surprising conversations want to gather your darkthat keep me guessing and ness in my hands, to cup improvising for hours. But it like water and drink.” I am also a devotee of simSo says Jane Hirshfield in ple, sweet longing ... pure, her poem “To Drink.” I watchful, patient longing ... Go to RealAstrology.com to check out bet she was addressing a open-hearted longing that Scorpio. Does any other Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO brims with innocence and sign of the zodiac possess HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE curiosity and is driven as a sweet darkness that’s as HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes much by the urge to bless delicious and gratifying as are also available by phone at as to be blessed. That’s the yours? Yes, it’s true that 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. kind I recommend you you also harbor an unappeexplore and experiment tizing pocket of darkness, with in the coming days. just like everyone else. But that sweet kind — the ambrosial, enigmatic, exhilarating stuff — is not only safe to imbibe, VIRGO but can also be downright healing. In the coming days, I AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: You know that forbidden fruit hope you’ll share it generously with worthy recipients. you’ve had your eyes on? Maybe it isn’t so forbidden any more. It could even be evolving toward a state where it SAGITTARIUS will be both freely available and downright healthy for NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Saturn has been in your sign steadily you to pluck. But there’s also a possibility that it’s simply since September 2015, and will continue to be there until a little less risky than it was before. And it may never December 2017. Some traditional astrologers might say become a fully viable option. So here’s my advice: Don’t you are in a phase of downsizing and self-restraint. They’d grab and bite into that forbidden fruit yet. Keep monitorencourage you to be extra strict and serious and dutiful. To ing the situation. Be especially attentive to the following them, the ringed planet is an exacting task-master. There questions: Do you crave the forbidden fruit because it are some grains of truth in this perspective, but I like to would help you flee a dilemma you haven’t mustered the emphasize a different tack. I say that if you cooperate courage to escape from? Or because it would truly be good with the rigors of Saturn, you’ll be inspired to become for you to partake of the forbidden fruit? more focused and decisive and disciplined as you shed any flighty or reckless tendencies you might have. Yes, Saturn

astrology

can be adversarial if you ignore its commands to be faithful to your best dreams. But if you respond gamely, it will be your staunch ally.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Born in the African nation of Burkina Faso, Malidoma Somé is a teacher who writes books and offers workshops to Westerners interested in the spiritual traditions of his tribe. In his native Dagaare language, his first name means “he who befriends the stranger/enemy.” I propose that we make you an honorary “Malidoma” for the next three weeks. It will be a favorable time to forge connections, broker truces, and initiate collaborations with influences you have previous considered foreign or alien.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: EVERY relationship has problems. No

exceptions. In the beginning, all may be calm and bright, but eventually cracks will appear. Here’s the corollary to that rule: EVERY partner is imperfect. Regardless of how cool, kind, attractive, or smart they may seem in the early stages, they will eventually unveil their unique flaws and troubles. Does this mean that all togetherness is doomed? That it’s forever impossible to create satisfying unions? The answer is HELL, NO! — especially if you keep the following principles in mind: Choose a partner whose problems are: 1. interesting; 2. tolerable; 3. useful in prodding you to grow; 4. all of the above.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Would you like some free heal-

ing that’s in alignment with cosmic rhythms? Try this experiment. Imagine that you’re planning to write your autobiography. Create an outline that has six chapters. Each of the first three chapters will be about a past experience that helped make you who you are. In each of the last three chapters, you will describe a desirable event that you want to create in the future. I also encourage you to come up with a boisterous title for your tale. Don’t settle for My Life So Far or The Story of My Journey. Make it idiosyncratic and colorful, perhaps even outlandish, like Piscean author Dave Eggers’ A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius.

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SAVAGE

Love

by Dan Savage

Dear Dan: I went to Dark Odyssey biases make me feel that it is. Or is it Winter Fire, the big kink hotel takeover possible that covering is their kink? event in Washington, D.C., in February. What would you make of that? There was one thing I saw there that is — Washington Kinkster messing with my head, and I hope you Wondering can set me straight. There was this lovely little six-person orgy going on with two Dear WKW: “With all the hateful cute-as-could-be hippie anti-Muslim rhetoric out © Rachel Robinson girls and four older dudes. there these days, it is Then these four people came tempting to romanticize along. They sat and Islam,” says Eiynah, a watched — a guy and three Pakistani-Canadian chilwomen in hijabs and dressdren’s book author who es that went wrist to ankle, also hosts a podcast that fully covered. After a while, focuses on sex, Islam and one of the hippie girls apostasy. “The impulse is turned to them and said, understandable, but Islam “I’d be happy to flog you is another one of the blalater if you’d like.” The tantly sex-negative three women in hijabs gigAbrahamic faiths.” gled. The whole scene was The other blatantly really sweet, but I just couldn’t get over sex-negative Abrahamic faiths, for those of you keeping score out there, these three women. I saw them walking are Judaism and Christianity. around all night, taking it all in. “Nothing outside of ultra-vanilla Intellectually, I know there is no reason plain ol’ two-person hetero sex within to think that conservative Islam is incompatible with kink. But my cultural the confines of marriage is permissi-

Boulder Weekly

ble,” Eiynah says. So as much as I’d love to agree with WKW that conservative Islam isn’t incompatible with kink, there’s every reason to say that it is. It’s even incompatible with a woman being slightly ‘immodest’ in front of men. Modesty codes are pretty rigid in Islam, and in non-Muslimmajority countries, modesty garments tend to stick out rather than blend in. Which achieves the exact opposite purpose — attracting more attention, not less.” And when sex-negativity, modesty and religion mix it up, WKW, the part of our brain that grinds out kinks — precise location yet to be determined — kicks into high gear. That’s why there is Mormon-undergarment porn out there and nun porn and hotpriest calendars for sale on sidewalks just outside Vatican City. “Islamic modesty has become fetishized for some — quite literally,” Eiynah says. “There’s hijabi porn and hijabi Lolitas. So the people WKW saw could be into some form of hijab

kink.” I’ve seen a few people dressed up as Catholic nuns at fetish parties, WKW, and I didn’t think, “Hey, what are nuns doing here?!?” I thought, “That person has a nun kink.” (Related point: The nuns you see at queer pride parades? Not really nuns. #TheMoreYouKnow) “Finally, it’s possible they could be a more ‘open-minded’ polygynous Muslim family that ventured into the hotel in a moment of adventurousness,” Eiynah says. “We are all human, after all, with urges, kinks, curiosities, and desires that surface, no matter what ancient morality code we try to follow.” Amen. Eiynah tweets @NiceMangos, her terrific podcast — Polite Conversations — is available on all the usual podcast platforms, and her children’s book, My Chacha Is Gay, can be ordered at chachaisgay.com Send questions to mail@savagelove.net and follow @fakedansavage on Twitter.

March 16, 2017 63


EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

Fear not

L

ast week, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions used to do in a state that’s legalized it,” he said on The made a surprise appearance at the New Hugh Hewitt Show. Hampshire Youth Summit on Opioid But while Sessions may not have the resources to Awareness regaling middle and high school go after cannabis consumers, producers and retailers in audiences with tales about a fabled time when states where marijuana is legal, he can work to create “drug users were not cool.” fissures in the ideological foundation of legalization by “In the 1980s, I was a federal prosecutor,” he said. “It way of messaging, chipping away at public opinion and was a terrible time for drugs. Illegal drug use had surged. frightening state legislators to the point of eroding their Cities were filled with heroin addicts. Families broke up, own legalization efforts. Far from fantasy, this strategy is young people dropped out of already proving effective schools and universities. Crime Wikimedia Commons/Carlos Toledo and Gunnar Grah right here in Colorado. and violence threatened public Since 2012, the safety. The purity of the street Centennial State has been a heroin and cocaine — and leader of decriminalization marijuana — was much lower and regulation. For years the than it is today. But the impact state upheld this position, was still enormous. despite being in conflict with By describing that era as a federal law. But the strongtime dominated by danger, hold appears to be weakenviolence and immorality, and ing. On March 13, House Bill attributing that climate to 1220 passed the Colorado drug use, Sessions is effectively House with broad, bipartisan returning to the rhetoric of the support. Citing organized war on drugs. crime and drug trafficking, “There are three main the bill would put new limits ways to fight back against this on home-grown marijuana problem: prevention, criminal to 16 plants per residence for enforcement and treatment. both medical and recreationCriminal enforcement is essential to stopping the transal purposes. This is a drastic national criminal organizations cut from the 99 currently which ship drugs into our allowed under medical law. country, and to stop the thugs and gangs who use vioMany statements from those in favor of the bill echo lence and extortion to move their product ... We are the rhetoric of Sessions, citing the need to crack down going to get rid of them. Of that you can be sure.” on criminals and organized crime to keep the street safe To be sure, this rhetoric is a far cry from a return to from criminals and prevent a federal crackdown. In a war on drugs policy. Given that 60 percent of Americans statement to the Denver Post, House Majority Leader KC support legalization of marijuana and eight states have Becker (D-Boulder) said, “I can think of no quicker way legalized it recreationally, any direct federal action would to jeopardize Colorado’s billion-dollar industry than to be met with too much resistance to be effective. Even allow our state to become a significant source of marijuaSessions admits, “It’s not possible for the federal governna in other states where it isn’t legal.” ment, of course, to take over everything the local police Opponent of the bill Jonathan Singer (D-Longmont)

Boulder Weekly

told Colorado Public Radio that while action is needed to stymie illegal trade, he fears the bill goes too far, worrying it is a step backwards and a perilous return to a war on drugs mentality, one that also happens to unduly affect medical patients. Singer is right to be wary of stripping rights away from subpopulations of Colorado in order to protect an industry. The integrity of Amendment 64 lies not in its potential for profit, but in its ability to dismantle systemic discrimination induced by criminal drug laws — in this case, with regard to patients seeking marijuana as medicine. Although it is just as crucial to ending systems of religious, racial and socioeconomic oppression. To that point, there are growing claims that Colorado’s rise in homelessness is connected to the legalization of marijuana based on the fact that there has been an eight percent rise in homelessness in Colorado since 2013, the same year pot markets opened for business. Despite no evidence of causation, some legislators and social service workers are quick to claim one. “There’s no question that marijuana and other drugs — in combination with mental illness or other disabling conditions — are essential contributors to chronic homelessness,” Governor John Hickenlooper recently said in his state of the state address. Of course the Governor’s failed logic is concerning, but his willingness to paint the correlation in pejorative terms is more so. As easily as one can claim that marijuana induces homelessness, one can claim that it can ween the impoverished and mentally ill off of addictive prescription painkillers and street drugs. Bottom line, the relationship is uncertain but, homeless or not, the right to consume marijuana is not — it is constitutionally protected. There is a long, violent and destructive history of bundling “unsavory” groups of people with marijuana to conveniently scapegoat them both. It happened in the 1920s to demonize Mexican immigrants and in the 1930s, ’70s and ’80s to criminalize urban black neighborhoods. In 2012, Colorado had the gall to legislate against the status quo, and for five years has upheld its positioning. Now is the time to be proud, not afraid.

March 16, 2017 65


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The times, they are a-changin’ — U.S. Air Force edition

H

ere’s a story that didn’t get a lot of attention when it broke in January but should have: The United States Air Force has decided to lighten up on potential recruits’ past pot use. Smoking marijuana before trying to join the service is no longer considered a disqualifier. “We are always looking at our policies, and when appropriate, adjusting them to ensure a broad scope of individuals are eligible to serve. These changes allow the Air Force to aggressively recruit talented and capable Americans who until now might not have been able to serve our country in uniform,” said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. James Cody in a statement. Airmen still won’t be allowed to use marijuana after they join, and the Air Force still won’t accept you if you’ve ever been “psychologically or physically dependent” on marijuana, or if you have been a dealer. But it is no longer interested in whether you smoked pot before you joined. The service also lightened up on new recruits’ ink. It used to be having more than 25 percent of your exposed skin tattooed was a disqualifier. Now new recruits can have their entire bodies tattooed except for their faces, scalp, throat, and hands. Obscene, racist and gang-related tattoos are still out. No word on whether old ganja tattoos will be allowed. Before we continue, let’s get the de rigueur pun out of the way: The new policy gives a whole new dimension of meaning to the phrase “Joint Strike Fighter”. OK. Onward.

The new policy seems to have grown out of a multi-service review of recruiting standards ordered by then-Secretary of Defense Ashe Carter last November. So far the Air Force is the only service that has announced it’s changing its policy on marijuana. As a practical matter, there is less to the new policy than meets the eye. Under the old policy, recruits who had used marijuana fewer than 15 times were still eligible, and recruits who had used it 16 to 25 times could still get in if a Drug & Alcohol Specialist signed off on them. Even those who had used pot more than 25 times could get a waiver if the service wanted them badly enough. Presumably the other services are still following this policy. The services long ago abandoned a zero-tolerance policy regarding past pot use. However, the Air Force’s policy change is important for reasons that go beyond counting past tokes. It’s no secret that since the 1960s, marijuana has been a political wedge issue in the U.S. Worse, it has been a social and cultural wedge issue as well, fracturing American society in a number of invidiously destructive ways. One of those ways is by alienating tens of millions of Americans who have used marijuana from the criminal justice sys-

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tem and the military. That alienation is found in at least two generations of Americans, the boomers and the X-ers, and is gestating in the millennials. And it is doing real damage to the country’s ability to defend itself and maintain a decent respect for the rule of law. In order to function properly, those institutions require the trust of the American people — and their hostility to pot has cost them dearly in the trust department. Undoing the damage is going to require full legalization, but a necessary pre-condition for change will be for the country’s governmental and public institutions to quit pounding on the wedge. The Air Force’s decision is an important step in that direction. Hopefully the other services will follow suit. Probably, sometime in the next few years, legalizations will have reached the point where the services will have to treat marijuana use the same way they currently treat alcohol use among active personnel — don’t use it on duty and if you use it off-duty, don’t abuse it. In the meantime, the Air Force has a very practical reason for adopting its more culturally relaxed recruiting standards: It’s obviously missing out on too many otherwise qualified recruits that it needs. While the service didn’t say how many recruits it was missing out on due to past inhalations, it did reveal how many it was losing due to tattoos. Air Force recruiters reported that half of their contacts, applicants and recruits had ink, and one in five of those had tattoos that may have been disqualifying, with the top disqualifier being the 25 percent “excessive exposure” rule. If the marijuana disqualifier rules weren’t as bad, chances are they wouldn’t have been changed.

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March 16, 2017 67


NEWS MEDIA MUST QUIT CRYING ‘WOLF’ There are two kinds of news these days. No, not real and fake. Fake news isn’t news at all. It’s the bullshit people of questionable intellectual prowess read in their social media feeds and then are stupid enough to pass along because they want it to be true. It’s fodder for the single-celled politicos who are destroying our democracy. The hard truth is, it only exists because half of us are too stupid to deserve to live in a democracy, a form of government that actually requires a modicum of civic responsibility rather than just going on an endless digital quest to find content that tells us we are always right and smart, and that people who disagree with us are wrong and stupid. As media consumers we are the equivalent of first graders who haven’t had a nap. We have Trump because we deserve Trump, because we won’t do the work required for meaningful self-rule. Sorry, we digress. The two types of news: 1) news that is gathered to inform and 2) news that is generated to draw the largest audience possible and only serves as a distraction to the other kind of news. The most recent example being the two pages of Donald Trump’s 2005 tax return that quite possibly were leaked by the Trump folks themselves. Why Rachel, why did you take the Trump Trojan Horse and pull it inside the nation’s news-media fort? Just so you could drive MSNBC ratings by claiming, “We have the tax returns?” That is what you said and in context it is as big a lie as anything Trump has told. And just when you were doing such good work on Trump/Russia of late. Thanks to your taking and overhyping this Trumpland tax bait, we have once again been distracted into losing two or three days of critical reporting time on issues like Russia/ Trump, Trump lies about Obama “wiretapping,” healthcare destruction and the gutting of our environmental regulations. It’s time for the mainstream media to get serious and stay serious. Remember what happened to the boy who cried wolf too many times?

WHAT DID YOU SAY? Every so often in the BW office, we hear a voice appear out of nowhere, no human attached. For some reason any one of the plethora of iPhones around here will start talking to us via the human-like bot Siri. No one has pushed any buttons or asked her a question... she just starts talking as her owner scrambles to shut her up and Boulder Weekly

icumi

(IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world

turn her off. Although iPhone users have complained about this phenomena for years, it seems to be happening more and more frequently. Some may call it a glitch, while other more conspiratorial types may blame it on aliens. It very may well be the federal government, or at the very least Obama wiretapping Boulder

Weekly. Or maybe we are just making sounds similar to “Siri” and “Alexa” while never saying the names explicitly. Regardless, it’s another example of the increasing robotization of American society, something we all better get used to. This includes the Trump administration who doesn’t seem to understand that it’s not just

Americans who will be loosing our jobs to increasing automation in the future, it’s everyone. And if the U.S. really wants to lead the world instead of just talk about leading the world, if we really want to be the best instead of just believing we are the best, we should probably start creating innovative solutions to create more American jobs and stop blaming it on, once again, Obama. P.S. The same thing happens often with Google’s bot Alexa, although thank God we don’t have any of those in the office. Yet.

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