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F R E E E v e r y T h u r s d a y F o r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / M a r c h 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 9


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Court programs seek to reduce active warrants in one fell swoop by Angela K. Evans

Facing bad air quality, Front Range runners unite for change by Emma Murray

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The strange and terrible tale of the Mayaguez incident by Will Brendza

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The Lafayette Electronic Arts Festival returns for its fifth year by Caitlin Rockett

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overtones:

The golden-voiced Shara Nova on learning to dance again by Caitlin Rockett

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nibbles:

Edwin Zoe brings Pacific tastes together at Chimera by John Lehndorff

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community table:

Endless, healthy ways to consume cabbage this time of year by Ari LeVaux

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The Highroad: Robot farmers — bull, bull, bull, bull! Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Danish Plan: The race question Arts & Culture: Eklund Opera will present Tchaikovsky’s ‘Eugene Onegin’ in Russian with English surtitles Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Film: Ready to leave the couch? ‘The Conformist’ is worth it Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Plenty of places to indulge in craft beer this time of year Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Blood, sperm and hall passes Weed Between The Lines: NFL considers change to cannabis policy Cannabis Corner: With little drama, New Mexico moves toward legal marijuana

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COUNTY 2019

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Editorial interns, Giselle Cesin, Lenah Reda Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Marketing Coordinator, Lara Henry Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Cover photo, Joel Dyer March 14, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 31 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper.

690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

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welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

Robot farmers — bull, bull, bull, bull! by Jim Hightower

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ow’re you gonna keep ’em down on the farm after they’ve seen... Angus? Not “Angus,” the breed of cattle, but Angus, the 1,000-pound “farmer of the future.” He is not actually a he, but an it: A robot, toiling away on an indoor hydroponic farm that is soilless, and — yes — soulless. Programmed by a multimillion-dollar Silicon Valley start-up named Iron Ox, Angus’ homestead is an 8,000-squarefoot concrete warehouse in a San Francisco suburb. The farm bot is more of a heavy lifter than a heavy thinker, wheeling around I

the warehouse to lift, move and hand-off large pallets of produce to another robot that, so far, hasn’t earned a name. The human overseers of this robotic animal farm don’t wear John Deere gimme caps, but clean-room hairnets, apparently to prevent anything organic from contaminating the edibles or the bots. Started by a Google engineer, Iron Ox hopes to install duplicates of its faux farm in metro areas across the country. “If we can feed people using robots,” he says, “what could be more impactful than that?” How about this: Reconnecting our food system to nature, a democratic MARCH 14, 2019

economy and humans? The roboticists brag that local warehouses can provide fresher lettuce than the mega farms ship from thousands of miles away. But wait — local farmers markets do that, and the consumer dollars stay in the community, rather than being siphoned off to Iron Ox and the Wall Street financiers of Angus robots. The robotic indoor farm hucksters quietly concede that their real business plan depends on “sidestepping” the cost of human labor and local farm owners. Instead of democratizing our food economy, their scheme concentrates food profits in a handful of absentee syndicators, rich investors and technology giants. Deep in his digital brain, even Angus must know that this is stupid. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. I

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Stop pretending that France’s gas tax was a carbon tax French President Emmanuel Macron buckled under a yellow-vested hurricane of opposition after his well-intentioned attempt at a “carbon tax” ran headlong into political reality. Travis Metcalfe sets the record straight on this oversimplified narrative in his piece, “Making the planet great again” (Re: Lab Notes, Feb. 21, 2019). Let’s take a closer look at where France went wrong, and where America might look to for better policy. First things first: France never had a carbon tax. Macron’s tax — say it with me — was a gasoline tax. And the distinction matters. A carbon tax puts a price on emitting carbon dioxide by imposing a fee on the extraction of fossil fuels. From the source, all the way downstream, it incentivizes innovation and conservation. But the tax reduces emissions to differing degrees in different economic sectors. The central divide is between electricity-generating and non-electricity-generating sectors. Transportation is very much of the latter group: driving behavior is notoriously insensitive to price changes. A carbon tax therefore does not do much to reduce automotive emissions. A tax on gasoline is that one small part of a carbon tax: the part that doesn’t do much. The nuances of price elasticity, however, were not what drove French workers into the streets. They rightly feel overburdened by rising costs of living. All energy taxes, but especially gas taxes, are regressive — that is, they cost poor people a larger fraction of their income. Governments should resist the temptation to raise revenues with these taxes. That is, unless they use the simple, elegant fix that Metcalfe suggests: return all money raised evenly to the citizenry. A flat dividend gives more money to poor people than the tax takes away, making their net cost of living go down, not up. Had France’s gas tax entailed a monthly check sent to all citizens, I very much doubt it would have sent them into the streets, except en route pour la banque, peut-être. Precisely this idea — the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act 8

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(H.R. 763) — enjoys bipartisan support in our own House of Representatives. Its 90 percent projected emissions reductions by 2050 would mark a paradigm shift in our nation’s contribution to global warming. But its largest impacts will actually accrue beyond our borders. A tariff on carbon-intensive products arriving at our ports, applied only upon countries without similar policies, creates a domino effect that brings the whole world — France included — on board. This is what carbon pricing looks like. Daniel Palken/Boulder

Backwards Buck

The race question

The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed H.R.8, a bill to “require a background check on every firearm sale.” This proposed law has the clear intent to close the current huge loophole in federal law that exempted gun show sales and private sales from background checks. Of course, criminals love this loophole. But in an America awash with mass shootings and gunshot deaths, this is a long overdue step to limit such gun violence. But our Colorado congressman Ken Buck (CD-4) voted against this common sense measure. No surprise: Buck is the second highest recipient of NRA money in the House. It’s a fair guess that Buck claims he’s a conservative. We now know much more of what he means by that. A caring and compassionate congressman would want to conserve his constituents’ health and lives. But Buck has it backwards; Buck instead wants to conserve gun deaths at their present level of 35,000 dead Americans every year. A caring congressman would want to limit the access to guns by criminals and homegrown terrorists. Backwards Buck instead wants to conserve easy access to guns by those criminals and terrorists. Do the people of eastern Colorado really want a congressman who is so totally devoted to the gun manufacturers, and so devoid of caring and compassion for his constituents? Do Coloradoans want a congressman who takes the side of criminals and terrorists? Stan Gelb/Longmont

he U.S. Supreme Court last month agreed to expedited consideration of a case challenging the constitutionality of adding a citizenship question — Are you a citizen of the United States? — to the 2020 Census form. The Court is scrutinizing the wrong question. The question whose inclusion should be questioned — hell, that should be excised from the census and forever banned — is the race question. The race question has been asked by every U.S. census since the first one in 1790 and the 2020 census is no exception. It will ask Americans to state their race and/or their ethnic identity. In 1790 the question represented a cancer growing on the republic, and more than two centuries later it still does. But there was a rational (albeit evil) reason for asking the race question in 1790 and up through the 1860 census. Those censuses asked about race because Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution, the part that mandates that a census will be conducted every 10 years for purposes of apportioning seats in the House of Representatives, also mandates that the count will include “the whole number of free persons” in a state — free persons, not citizens — plus “three-fifths of all other persons.” Or more plainly, black slaves. The Fourteenth Amendment, adopted in 1868, got rid of the “threefifths” rule and the need to take race

MARCH 14, 2019

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By Paul Danish

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into account for distributing seats in Congress. But that hasn’t stopped the feds from asking Americans to state their race or ethnic identity for other reasons, like providing information that can be used for handing out government benefits targeted toward minorities or for fighting discrimination. Or for perpetuating discrimination maybe, because arguably just asking the race question enables racism. By including the race question (or more accurately the race questions; there are more than one) the government isn’t just asking you to disclose your race or ethnic identity, it’s demanding that you choose one. And that violates a foundational principle of republic — that all men are created equal. Why? Because sorting Americans by race and ethnicity is by its nature an act of segregation. Racial segregation is unconstitutional because the concept of “separate but equal” is inherently unequal. That was the pivot on which the case Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education turned. But the principle applies more broadly as well. When you sort people by race or ethnicity, you aren’t celebrating diversity. You are weaponizing it. The race questions on the census are invidious for other reasons as well — starting with the fact that the racial categories the census wants to stuff us into are arbitrary and capricious. The 2020 Census race question, see DANISH PLAN Page 9

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


DANISH PLAN from Page 8

which is a garden of earthly delights for the practitioners of American identity politics, starts out by asking, “What is this person’s race?” and then helpfully provides no fewer than 15 boxes you can check for your race, along with blank spaces for you to fill in with your ethnicity, examples of which are also helpfully given. The first box is for whites. The accompanying instruction above the blank space for your ethnicity reads “Print, for example, German, Irish, English, Italian, Lebanese, Egyptian, etc.” That’s right, for purposes of the 2020 census, Arabs are white, not persons of some color or another. Pakistanis, on the other hand are explicitly listed as an example under the “Other Asian” race category — along with “Cambodians, Hmong, etc.” But absolutely, positively not under the “Asian Indian” race category, which has no ethnic examples given next to it. Blacks or African Americans have their own race box along with examples of black ethnicity —African American, Jamaican, Haitian, Nigerian, Ethiopian, Somali, etc. American Indians or Alaska Natives have a separate race box; they are told to write in the names of their enrolled or principal tribes. Hispanics are not listed under the race question. That’s because the 2020 census has a separate but equal question for them: “Is this person of Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin?” There are five boxes under it: 1) No, not of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin; 2) Yes, Mexican, Mexican Am., Chicano; 3) Yes, Puerto Rican; 4) Yes, Cuban; and 5) Yes, another Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin — with Salvadoran, Dominican, Colombian, Guatemalan, Spaniard, Ecuadorian, etc. given as examples of the ethnicities you’re asked to write in the space below. Fortunately, there is a way to answer the race question that is nonracist. Two ways, actually. At the bottom of the race question is one last response choice: “Some other race — Print race or origin.” When my high school civics teacher got to the race question on the 1960 census, he told us about a guy who answered it by writing “human” in the “Some other race” space. An excellent response. I’ve used that a couple of

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

times. But there’s one I like even more. I came across it nine years ago, in a post by Scott Johnson on the Powerline Blog discussing how to answer the race question on the 2010 census. J. Hector St. John De Crevecoeur was a Frenchman who came to America before the Revolution and fell in love with it. He sent dozens of letters back to France describing America and Americans, three vol-

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umes of which were eventually published as a work titled Letters From an American Farmer. Here’s a passage from one written in 1782 (emphasis added): “What then is the American, this new man? He is an American, who, leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He

MARCH 14, 2019

has become an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater. Here individuals of all races are melted into a new race of man, whose labors and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world. Americans are the western pilgrims.” The post went on to suggest that the proper answer to the race question is “American.” That’s how I answered the question in 2010, and that is how I intend to answer it in 2020.

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U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO

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s I wind my way north on the narrow two-lane road, I realize Wyoming can’t be far off. I squint over the steering wheel into the hazy distance, at a cone-shaped mountain creeping over the horizon. I assume it must be Hahns Peak. I’m getting close. This strange journey — to meet a Vietnam veteran who fought in the last battle of that terrible war, a survivor of the infamous “Mayaguez incident” of 1975 — was not one I could have anticipated coming across in the Rocky Mountains. But in this business sometimes the stories pick you. So when this tale of captured ships, island combat, terrorist freedom fighters, American hostages, Marine casualties and Cambodian luxury resorts came my way, I felt compelled to follow it down the rabbit hole. It’s one of those tales that begins at its end, with the 2012 funeral of a Colorado Marine, Private First-Class James Joseph Jacques. Jacques died almost half a century ago, half a world away on the island of Koh Tang, on a chaotic half-baked rescue mission that ended in disaster. Jacques’ remains were abandoned on the island during a hasty retreat, after an ugly encounter with Cambodian Khmer Rouge soldiers. Jacques, along with 12 other deceased Marines, was returned stateside in 1995, but he wasn’t laid to rest until 2012 after DNA testing finally made it possible to identify him. He had been 19 at the time of his death and would have been 56 when he was buried in Denver’s Fort Logan National Cemetery, surrounded by family members he’d never met, and his sister Deloise Guerra, who hadn’t seen him since he left for duty in October 1974 — shortly after his 18th birthday. “We always wondered what hap-

The last names on the wall

The strange and terrible tale of the Mayaguez incident

by Will Brendza

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WHEN THE U.S.S. MAYAGUEZ went missing at the end of the Vietnam War, it set off a chaotic halfbaked rescue mission that ended in disaster.

pened to him,” Guerra told Denver’s local CBS news affiliate in 2012. “We didn’t ever lose hope that someday we would hear something.” Jacques’ Colorado burial may have closed a chapter in American history, but it surely didn’t finish the story. While the identification of Jacques and several other previously missing in action American soldiers offered at least partial closure, there were still missing Marines who had been left behind. Some were known to have been killed in the battle, but others had been left behind alive, never to be heard from again. There were also survivors who’d made it home — veterans who lived to tell their horrible tales, including one who lives in Colorado. Barely. MARCH 14, 2019

“It’s called Hahns Peak Village. Do you know where that is?” “Not a clue,” I told the Mayaguez Marine veteran over the phone. “That’s OK, young man. It’s up by Steamboat. Let’s meet in the afternoon, though, so my meds have time to kick in,” he said with a chuckle. “Good thinking,” I told him. “Semper fi.” A week later, I was driving almost an hour north of Steamboat, finally closing in on Hahns Peak and the small village at its base. There’s not much to this place. Nothing but a handful of houses, a roadhouse and the Hahns Peak Café, where we’d agreed to meet. He was not hard to spot. Sitting alone at a table inside, a large green plastic box beside him, the only person in the restaurant. He stood when I entered, peering at me from beneath a green military cap pulled low over his eyes, wearing a silver I

dream catcher necklace, a green buttoned-down shirt and a long dangly earring hanging from one ear. He stuck his hand out, “Radar.” We shook hands and sat down for burgers. Radar (aka Richard Alan Frazee) is a third-generation Marine. A gruff, tough man who spent his post-military years lumberjacking and wrestling the demons he brought back from Koh Tang. He discussed at length his disdain for the VA’s “ass-backwards” policies on providing vets disability, having been turned away by VA therapists because he was “too fucked up,” as he described it. He’s had two back surgeries, the result of his years logging, and was forced to stop working about six years ago. Now, he helps get free meals and free rides for “shutins” in his area — veterans who can’t drive, or who don’t leave home often — and also works on veteran suicide prevention. We ate. I listened. We shot the shit. And all the while, I kept glancing down at that green box. I wanted to know what was in there. Something told me that box held most of — if not all — the answers to my questions. “You drink whiskey?” he asked when our plates were empty. “Sure do.” “Great,” he said, standing and lifting that green box of his. “Get us a couple of double Makers straight and I’ll meet you outside.” I followed orders. And when I stepped out into the afternoon sunlight, the vault was open wide. The table before Radar was completely covered in photos, documents and old keepsakes, the green box, empty. I handed him his drink and sat down. • • • • The day was May 15, 1975. The Vietnam War (in those parts of the BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


COURTESY OF RICHARD ALAN FRAZEE

world, referred to as the “American War of Aggression”) was over — or at least it was supposed to be. A few days earlier, radical Cambodian communists, the Khmer Rouge, had seized an American cargo ship known as the S.S. Mayaguez and took its crew hostage, compelling the U.S. military to respond. The cargo ship had been seized in Cambodian territorial waters en route to Thailand, carrying a number of Americans and some 107 containers of routine cargo, 77 containers of government and military cargo, and 90 empty containers — a load insured for $5 million. But the U.S. was already pulling out of the region, tail tucked and illtempered after 10 years of jungle warfare gone awry. In the government’s eyes, this hostage situation was an act of aggression that could not be tolerated, one that needed to be dealt with in order to save American lives, lost cargo and, perhaps more importantly, America’s already wounded pride. It was decided within the white marble halls of Washington D.C. that this “rescue” mission would be the last battle of the war and it would be a face-saving, overwhelming victory. Problem was there was no one left in the South China Sea to send to the rescue. Saigon had been evacuated two weeks earlier, the rest of the region’s forces were in rotation, and there was almost no one left to deploy. No one, except for the 2nd Battalion 9th Marines on Okinawa, including James Jacques and Radar. These Marines were still in training. They had never seen combat. “We were actually training in the field when they called us in and said, ‘You’re going’, and we loaded up right away,” recalls 1st Lieutenant Dan Hoffman, Radar’s lieutenant who now lives in South Carolina. Only 18 at the time, Hoffman was suddenly in charge of a battalion of men, headed into the maw of action. According to the CIA intelligence passed down to them, Hoffman says, the Khmer Rouge were holding the Mayaguez ship, its crew and cargo hostage on a small island off the Cambodian mainland. In order to BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

RICHARD ALAN FRAZEE, aka Radar,

reach that island, Koh Tang, the entire assault force was going to have to be shuttled via transport helicopters and dropped off on two separate beaches. Originally, the plan went like this: eight helicopters would swoop in on the first attack wave, landing Marines on both the east and west beaches of Koh Tang. Between those landing zones was a narrow strip of jungle where the enemy was supposed to be hiding. Upon landing, the Marines would group up and the east beach Marines would drive through the jungle, through the Khmer Rouge, into the west beach Marines, who would hold their position. They’d then link up and sweep the island together like a scythe. The Khmer Rouge were not supposed to put up much of a fight. According to the briefing, this island, where the Mayaguez and its crew were allegedly being held, was only guarded by 15 to 20 lightly armed fishermenpirates. Or so they thought. When the Marines showed up on Koh Tang promptly at 6:03 a.m. on the morning of May 15 in their big, loud and overloaded Knife-21 helicopters and attempted to land, they were met with extremely heavy machine gun fire, mortar fire and rocket-propelled grenades. The island was not only fortified, but guarded by I

well over 100 highly trained, battlehardened Khmer Rouge soldiers. “The CIA did a horrible, horrible job with the intelligence,” Hoffman says. “The island was reinforced with a Khmer Rouge infantry battalion of their Marine troops, who were specialized, and they were armed with heavy machine guns.” Not only that, but they had heavy artillery, too. Somewhere on the island a 90mm anti-aircraft cannon was ripping holes in their helicopters like they were made of tin foil. According to the government’s executive summary of the battle, “In the first 20 minutes of the assault, three helicopters were shot down and one sustained severe damage.” The first helicopter landed safely on west beach and unloaded, but it took so much damage in doing so, that it lost an engine before taking off and crashed three quarters of a mile off shore. The second chopper was immediately hit so hard that it had to turn back before it even dropped off its Marines and crash landed in Utapao, Thailand. The third helicopter went down over the water, 50 meters from east beach. Seven Marines and two Navy corpsmen were killed in the crash, three more were shot trying to approach the shore and one died in the burning wreckage of the chopper. Somewhere among them, was Jacques MARCH 14, 2019

of Colorado, who on the island of Koh would remain lost Tang, May 15, 1975. to the ocean for another 20 years. The other 13 Marines on that helicopter swam out to sea and were rescued by a passing Navy ship some two hours later. Lieutenant Hoffman and his men were in helicopter number five and landed on west beach, where all remaining helicopters were forced to land. Radar describes it as a true moment of “fear and loathing.” Which Hoffman backs up: “As soon as we crouched out of the helicopter, the guy right next to me got shot,” he recalls. Of the 180 Marines and sailors in the initial attack wave, only 109 of them had made it ashore. And they were scattered: 60 on east beach, 20 with Hoffman and Radar on west beach, and 29 more with the battalion command element isolated south of them; all pinned down by extremely disciplined marksmen, all taking extremely heavy fire. Of the original eight helicopters in the initial attack wave, three had been destroyed and four more were damaged too badly to continue on — leaving only one helicopter in working order and two more in reserve. That presented a serious problem for extraction. But that was hardly the most pressing problem at that moment; these Marines had bigger, more immediate problems. They had no food, no water and no idea how they were supposed to proceed. The plan had instantly gone to pot and now they were stuck in a situation that was further imploding by the minute. As luck would have it, though, Radar and Hoffman had landed right near a Khmer Rouge supply depot, full of grenades. They hunkered down behind the thatched walls of that sanctuary, lobbing grenades into the enemy-populated jungle and returning fire whenever they could. During the skirmish, Radar recalls running out from under cover to save a Marine see MAYAGUEZ Page 12

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MARCH 14, 2019

who’d been injured on the beach. He sprinted out, bullets flying past and picked up his brother in arms. “He was stumbling and non-equilibrium, dizzy and all that, and I was trying to get him to run,” Radar says. As they were making their way back to cover, a Khmer Rouge mortar landed right next to them, blowing both men off their feet, straight into the latrine — an open pit of human waste that had been baking in the sun, likely for days. “It was everywhere, it was in my mouth, my ears, my nose, my eyes. ... And all I could think was, ‘I’m not going to die covered in Gook shit.’” After they were pulled to safety, out of “the crapper,” Radar waded straight out into the ocean. Right in the middle of that firefight he stripped naked and washed himself off. “I got wrote up for that,” Radar recalls, shaking his head. “For ‘blatantly endangering government property,’ they said. But I didn’t care.” Hours went by, as Lieutenant Hoffman and Radar organized air strikes from the supply depot, Radar operating the radio (earning him his nickname) and communicating with the other Marines spread across that island. Around noon, a full four hours into the assault, the Marines had managed to piece together a plan over the radio. Lieutenant Hoffman was going to lead what he would later call a “posit assault squad” to try and link

up with their command element, which was isolated some 1,000 meters to the south of their position on west beach. Radar went with, as did their mutual friend and Marine brother Lance Corporal Ashton P. Loney and eight other Marines. “That was when I went from being a boy to being a man,” Radar says, staring into the distance. The jungle was far too dense to move through covertly. Instead, these young Marines clung to the shoreline, speaking in hand signals and navigating the rocky terrain. At the same time, the command element was moving toward them from the south. The two groups were to meet up right in the middle, but they found a bunker between them, occupied by Khmer Rouge soldiers. “I had one grenade,” Hoffman recalls. He and his men crawled right up under the bunker, as stealthily as possible and simultaneously, on Hoffman’s order, threw their grenades inside. The bombs detonated and before the dust had settled, the Marines charged. Hoffman and his men cleared that bunker, discovering a cache of machine guns, mortars and the troublesome 90mm anti-aircraft cannon that had been making it so difficult

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

RADAR AT THE VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL WALL places his hand on the name of Ashton P. Loney, his friend (pictured left) who died on Koh Tang.


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for their helicopters. It was a daring plan in an otherwise chaotic mission, one that earned Hoffman the Bronze Star. But it also came at a great price. Loney was killed at some point during the skirmish. Radar recalls following the man who he believed had killed Loney, chasing him out of the bunker, through the jungle in what he described as a “fugue state.” Radar can’t remember how long he chased that man, but when he finally caught up to him he wasn’t in a mood for mercy. “I emptied my clip into him when he stopped,” Radar recalls, a glassy, red look in his eyes. “I cut that motherfucker in half.” Loney’s death still clearly haunts Radar, and Lieutenant Hoffman as well. The squad wrapped Loney’s body in a poncho and carried him, along with the Khmer Rouge weapons, back to the west beach and the other Marines waiting for them at the supply depot. It was part victory parade, part funeral procession. Toward dusk, at 6:23 p.m. a U.S. plane flew by and released a strangelooking object over the enemy territory. It wasn’t an encased bomb, but a palate, and it looked like supplies. The Marines feared the worst. Everyone thought that the Air Force had just delivered the enemy all the supplies they so desperately needed. But that wasn’t the case. “In fact, it was a huge, 15,000BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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bomb that actually knocked people off their feet,” Hoffman says. “It was the largest non-nuclear weapon in the U.S. arsenal at the time.” According to Hoffman, things on the island went deadly still for a while after that cataclysmic boom. It’s worth taking a moment here to consider just how intensely grim and miscalculated this entire mission was from the start. The ship that these Marines had been sent to rescue, the S.S. Mayaguez and its crew, wasn’t even on Koh Tang. It never had been. It had been on another island the entire time. And at 6:07 a.m. (four minutes after Hoffman, Radar, Jacques and Loney had descended upon Koh Tang) the Cambodian propaganda minister released a statement: “Regarding the Mayaguez ship. We have no intention of detaining it permanently and we have no desire to stage provocations. We only wanted to know the reason for its coming and to warn it against violating our waters again.” This whole operation, all the blundering and bloodshed, all the lives lost, all of it was unnecessary from the getgo. By 10:05 a.m. the Mayaguez crew had been secured, the ship was safe see MAYAGUEZ Page 14

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MAYAGUEZ from Page 13 RICHARD ALAN FRAZEE

and its cargo, accounted for. By 10:05 a.m. the Marines on Koh Tang had already been under fire for three hours. They were stuck there in the heat of combat, trying desperately to figure out how they were going to escape alive. Not long after that unexpected BLU-82 Daisy Cutter dropped, Hoffman says, “The decision was finally made, we were going to try and get out of there before nightfall.” But that was going to be no easy feat. As the executive summary points out, “With the decision to extract, the forces at Koh Tang began to execute one of the toughest tactical scenarios: a helicopter extraction in the midst of intense enemy fire during darkness.” The U.S.S. Holt, which had earlier towed the SS Mayaguez into international waters, had finally arrived and positioned itself to support west beach, providing cover fire for the extraction helicopters flying in from the U.S.S. Coral Sea. As twilight settled over the island, the tide began to move in. Where Marines once stood on sand and solid ground they were now waist-deep in water, wading out to overloaded helicopters, as green enemy tracer rounds screamed past. Hoffman got on the second to last chopper out, Radar on the very last. He didn’t want to leave his Marine brothers’ bodies there, he says, least of all Loney’s. “I was the last guy off that island,” Radar says. “I almost didn’t make it. We were getting overwhelmed, and it was very dark.” Radar’s helicopter landed on the U.S.S. Coral Sea, so badly damaged it was on fire, Radar says. It nearly blew up with him inside, as he recalls, but a

MARINES run to rescue helicopters on Koh Tang, leaving behind three marines in the chaos of the extraction.

sergeant pulled him out at the last second. “[He] reached over through the machine gun square window, grabbed me, pulled me out, and when I laid down under the helicopter, it blew up.” Radar was safe. He was alive. Which was more than many of his fellow soldiers could say. And for his bravery he would receive the “Valor Under Fire” medal. Hoffman’s helicopter made an insane and incredible landing on a moving ship, only five minutes after he was picked up. The pilot put the Marines down on a flight deck that was too small to land on. He had to hover the tail over the water while holding the front end over the deck of the bobbing, lilting ship. “It was the most amazing feat of flying I’ve ever seen or heard of,”

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Hoffman says. When it was all over, 15 Americans died in action on Koh Tang and 23 more in helicopters en route to the island — among them, Jacques and Loney. Jacques’ remains wouldn’t be identified for another 37 years. Loney’s remains have never been recovered. There were also three Marines left behind in the chaos of the extraction, “missing in action and presumed dead” the executive summary reads. Lance Corporal Joseph Hargrove, Private First Class Gary L. Hall, and Private First Class Danny Marshall had been on west beach, and protecting a flank of the perimeter when the last rescue helicopter took off leaving them for dead. Hargrove was captured the next day and executed on the spot. Hall and Marshall became prisoners of war, never to be seen or heard from again. “The story that we were told at

the time was that they had to have been killed during the extraction,” Hoffman recalls. “And so we just moved along our merry way.” Years later when the terrible truth finally came to light, both Radar and Hoffman said they experienced severe PTSD. It’s something that has tormented them ever since. “The last 41 names on the [Vietnam Veterans Memorial] Wall are from Koh Tang,” says Hoffman. “And that’s very special to us.” Every year Hoffman, along with at least some of the surviving Mayaguez veterans, gather in Washington D.C. for a reunion at that Wall. They convene to remember, to pay their respects, to cry together for those who died. “It’s very cathartic,” says Hoffman, emotionally. “When you share it with your brothers who were there with you, it’s extremely meaningful.” Each reunion, fewer and fewer of the Mayaguez veterans show up; their group grows smaller by the year. But those who are able to make the journey keep going back, seeking closure they may never find. Their story is far from over. There are still American Marines over there, whose bodies have never been returned, and the clock is ticking on whether or not they ever will be. A Cambodian real estate company World Land Bridge has purchased Koh Tang and plans on developing it as a luxury resort — complete with hotels, restaurants, dive shops and bungalows. What was once a hellacious, bloodstained historic battleground may someday soon become a vacation destination. And whatever bodies might still be over there, will be lost to history forever.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Court program seeks to reduce active warrants in one fell swoop by Angela K. Evans

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he legislative season at the State House is in full swing and buried amid controversial bills that would repeal the death penalty, further regulate the oil and gas industry and institute paid family leave, in an effort to reduce the number of people in jail for missing court dates. It’s estimated that 40-60 percent of people held in county jails around the state are there for failing to appear in court, and a bipartisan bill, now under consideration in the Colorado Senate, would require the state court administrator to implement a text reminder program at the district, county and municipal levels. “Many offenders held in custody at the jail have a history of failing to appear for court dates,” says Boulder County District Attorney Michael Dougherty. “If we can improve the attendance rate through text reminders, we would likely see a reduction in the jail population as well as in the taxpayer dollars used to fund law enforcement’s efforts to locate people on warrant status.” The DA’s office is also taking it one step further, opening the Boulder Justice Center on Saturday, April 13, for anyone with an outstanding warrant on low-level crimes to come in, quash a warrant without fear of arrest and hopefully resolve their case. The City of Boulder has also signed on. “Since court’s open Monday through Friday, during business hours, I would assume that we have people who are working and/or have kids and other responsibilities and can’t make it to the courthouse to clear the warrants, especially if they’re worried that if they go to the courthouse today, they might be in jail overnight,” Dougherty says. “If you’re struggling to make ends meet and you have a job and you have the choice between skipping a day at work and losing your job or skipping the court, a lot of people choose the [latter].” He also hopes the Fresh Start warrant forgiveness program will draw immigrants who may not come to court in fear of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) being alerted through public court dockets. But this day there will be no dockets, and any eligible defendant with an outstanding warrant can come to the courthouse without fear of arrest. “Hopefully [this will] make an impact on not only the number of outstanding warrants that we have but on the lives of the members of our community who are out there living with the the stress of having an active warrant and not knowing from day to day if they’re going to get arrested,” says Adrian Van Nice, the assistant district attorney who is organizing Fresh Start. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Based on a similar program in the Bronx and Brooklyn, anyone with non-violent misdemeanor charges who also missed a court appearance that resulted in a warrant is eligible, Van Nice says. This includes non-DUI traffic cases, low-level harassment or theft charges, and citations for using marijuana in public. It excludes domestic violence, third degree assault charges or anything that would require victim contact under the Victim Rights Act. The DA’s office can assess eligibility on any warrant prior to April 13, as well as the day of. Van Nice estimates there are about 900 people who are eligible for the program through the DA’s office. At the municipal level, there are about 1,500 active warrants, according to Chris Reynolds, assistant city attorney for Boulder. “Almost all of these warrants are for failing to appear to court,” he says. Although there are others who qualify, Reynolds says the majority of eligible people for the Fresh Start program are experiencing homelessness, with tickets for violating the camping ban, trespassing, open container and other similar laws in the city code. “It’s just kind of an unfortunate consequence of the system, how it’s set up,” Reynolds says. And while this doesn’t change the City’s position on enforcing these laws, it hopefully will provide an alternative to issuing warrants, arrests and jail time. “When you look at the effects of having an active warrant, [it] can keep you from being eligible for housing vouchers. They can keep you from being eligible for Section 8 housing. They can keep you from being able to get a job,” Van Nice says. “And, of course, those are all stability pillars.” For the City of Boulder, partnering with the I

MARCH 14, 2019

DA’s office for the one-day Fresh Start program is a chance to see if they could start something similar to Denver’s “homeless court” here, Reynolds says. For the past two years or so, the Denver County Court has been running what it calls Outreach Court at the Denver Rescue Mission, a nonprofit that serves the homeless population in the city. Every other Wednesday, they deal with about 100 or so different cases, says James Warren, a clerk who regularly works at the Outreach Court. He says people are never arrested. Rather, their warrants are cleared and cases resolved, often exchanging any fines for community service served the same day. People are also often connected to a variety of services through the Rescue Mission. “What we’re doing is hopefully making it easier for the homeless population in Denver to navigate the court system. It’s not a perfect panacea, but it’s something,” Warren says. “And it’s a way to take what could be a big hassle to take care of and possibly result in jail time, and turn it into some hours of community service and then they can move on with their lives.” Outreach Court is “a model that Denver has adopted and regularly runs with and I think this is the City of Boulder dipping our toe into the pool and seeing how it feels,” Reynolds says. Both Van Nice and Reynolds say Fresh Start will result in cost savings for the City and County, although they couldn’t say exactly how much. Reynolds says it could be significant given that any warrant resulting in an arrest requires hours of staff time from arresting officers, to jail bookings, to prosecutors, public defenders, court staff and judges. Plus, it costs approximately $132 a night to keep someone at the Boulder County Jail. “So there are definitely cost savings for taking care of warrants out of custody,” Reynolds says. At the Boulder Justice Center on April 13, there will be clerks, judges, interpreters, sheriff ’s officers providing security, immigration and defense attorneys on hand to assist in each case. If cases aren’t resolved that day, defendants will be given a new court date. Regardless, their warrants will be quashed and with it their risk of arrest. “It recognizes that sometimes life gets in the way and if we can get your case moving, that is better for us, it’s better for the community and that is better for victims,” Van Nice says. “And it’s better for you. If we can resolve it then everybody wins.” More info: Fresh Start warrant forgiveness program. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, April 13, Boulder Justice Center, 1777 Sixth St., Boulder. bouldercounty.org/district-attorney I

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n Wednesday, March 6, a cloud of brown haze descended upon Denver. “Highly elevated pollution levels will continue for large sections of the northern Front Range,” the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced that morning in an air quality statement. For at least the next 36 hours, CDPHE advised everyone in the seven-county Denver metro region, extending from Boulder south to Castle Rock, to “reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion,” as more particulate matter was in the air and the visibility was worse than standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency. Seventy-two hours after the announcement, however, dozens of runners started gathering at the base of Granite Peak, a 8,500-foot mountain located on a private conservation easement 30 miles southwest of Denver. Peter Downing, whose family owns the property, directed the event Running Up For Air — Colorado (RUFA-CO), a mountain endurance race that was created seven years ago, in Salt Lake City, Utah, to raise awareness, money and trail-runner involvement for better air quality initiatives. “Running is good, clean air matters and the view is worth it,” Downing said to the swarm of athletes, a mix of elite ultra-runners and casual trail fiends, all antsy at the start line. Participants had signed up for one of three endurance categories — three, six or 12 hours — with the goal to run a 3.1-ish mile loop, up 800 feet to the summit of Granite Peak and back down, as many times as possible within their allotted time. Mike Bell, a biologist in the National Park Service’s Air Resources Division and an avid trail runner based in Golden, came to run the six-hour session. He made it six laps through what would become a snow-filled, mud-ridden, ice-pocketed loop of slush. The nasty conditions didn’t irk him, though

Running up for air

Facing bad air quality, Front Range runners unite for change By Emma Murray — this day wasn’t about speed, it was about community. “I’ve been studying air quality for about 13 years now, and been trail running for about six, so [RUFA] combined these two things that I’m super passionate about,” he said. “Seeing so many other runners and people talking about air quality and raising awareness, and talking about what they can do to minimize air impact — it was awesome.” In urban settings that abut mountain ranges, like Salt Lake City and Denver’s metro area, winter can usher in some of the worst air quality conditions of the year, as cold air can get trapped below warm air. This creates an inversion (normally, temperatures drop as you go up in elevation, not rise), and because cold air is denser than warm air, any pollutants mixed with the cold air can’t rise and disperse into the atmosphere. On the Front Range, cold air that sweeps in from the eastern plains can get pinned down by the warmer air that comes up and over the Rockies from the Pacific Ocean. If the cold air carries many pollutants,

the brown cloud appears. It’s been a long time since air quality along the Front Range has been ideal. The American Lung Association recently gave Boulder County an F grade on its air quality “Report Card” and Denver a D, with an asterisks noting in 2018 the city was also ranked the 14th most-polluted in the country. Most of the pollutants infiltrating the Front Range come from private vehicle and oil-and-gas emissions, according to the National Center for Atmospheric Research. To help educate and protect those living in the sevencounty metro area, CDPHE enacts its Winter High Pollution Advisory Program every year between Oct. 31 and March 31, issuing daily pollution forecasts that can trigger mandatory restrictions on indoor burning, voluntary driving reductions and public health recommendations. A few weeks before RUFA-CO, Patagonia Denver hosted trail runners and community members interested in RUFA’s mission for a night of informational presentations on how poor air quality can impact Front Range trail runners. One speaker, Taunia Hottman, an account manager at Webb Strategic Communications, the consulting firm advising the Denver metro area’s Regional Air Quality Council and one of its programs, Simple Steps for Better Air, said, “We as Coloradans are used to bright blue sunny days, but that’s really hiding the problem.” Even when there isn’t a brown cloud, it’s important to understand many gaseous pollutants (like ozone) are invisible, she explained, and heeding CDPHE warnings is imperative, especially as air quality worsens. Ground-level ozone affects everyone and can spawn breathing difficulties, irritated eyes, reduced resistance to lung infections and colds, more asthma attacks and worsened symptoms of chronic pulmonary conditions. “On a high ozone day, you see AIR QUALITY Page 20

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RUNNERS tag the summit of Granite Peak before heading back down.

really need to go inside and protect yourself,” Hottman said. Lauren Merideth, another consultant speaking at the Patagonia event, told the crowd to think of ozone damage “like a sunburn — it’s a scar on your lungs that won’t heal [if you continue to exercise outside], just like your skin can’t heal if you’re exposing it all day, every day.” She added, “Don’t think for a second that this isn’t affecting your ability as an athlete on the Front Range.” Race Director Downing, who is also the co-founder and executive director of Suffer Better — a Boulderbased nonprofit that creates opportunities for outdoor athletes to give back to their communities and become voices for resource conservation — orchestrated the first RUFA-CO last year. “It was a tremendous success,” he said. “This year we tripled our participants, and could have quadrupled them but we just didn’t have the capacity.” Colorado is the first location outside Utah to host a RUFA event, and nearly $6,000 was raised this year, all of which was donated to Protect Our Winters (POW), a climate advocacy group for the winter sports community, and Breathe Utah. At the outset, running is, more or less, an individualistic sport — you need no partners or much more than a pair of shoes to trail run. But any runner who’s participated in a race or a group run will tell you of the alchemy two runners experience when they hit the same stride. When together, the whole running experience can be more powerful, more fun and faster. A parallel exists in environmental advocacy: Individuals are capable of reducing the impacts of their lifestyles and starting conversations about the importance of air quality, but when individual efforts and voices come together, greater, faster and more powerful change can be

effected through city- and state-level policy and public standards. “What made Saturday so special was not only doing this hard thing, but doing it together. In giving community direction, it seemed like it became a greater mission,” Bells, the biologist, said. After the first loop, professional ultra-runner and Boulder resident Clare Gallagher peeled off a layer, commenting to the rest of the runners eating snacks and refilling water bottles: “The AQI (Air Quality Index) isn’t so bad today,” adding, with a sarcastic drawl, “‘T’ God!” Gallagher regularly uses her social media and public speaking platforms in conjunction with sponsorship opportunities (Patagonia is her main sponsor and she’s an ambassador for POW) to communicate the importance of climate activism and showcase the political channels that trail runners or any private citizen can use. Her Instagram is riddled with howto instructions on contacting elected officials and information about current climate change mitigation legislation. “Running extrapolated and compounded by love for the earth,” she said at the Patagonia Denver event. “Five hundred years from now, I want other trail runners to experience what we get to experience today,” she said. “That’s why POW is so important.” Collectively, RUFA-CO runners ran more than 1,550 miles and climbed over 345,000 vertical feet throughout the day. Even with soggy socks, mud-sprayed backs and frozen fingers, everyone was all smiles at 5 p.m., when everyone finished running at the same time. “We have this problem, and its poor air quality and climate change,” Gallagher said. “That’s all depressing, right? What’s inspiring is that this many runners care.”

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JOSHUA OTT, PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID FODEL

Blurring the lines The Lafayette Electronic Arts Festival returns for its fifth year

by Caitlin Rockett

T

he Lafayette Electronic Arts Festival (LEAF) is a place for hackers. Not hackers like Gary McKinnon or Albert Gonzalez, but hackers like Brian Eno, disassembling and refashioning our collective vision of what music (or as Eno might say, “non-music”) and art can be. Like Eno, the diverse artists performing and presenting at the fifth annual LEAF (March 15 and 16) all believe, in their own ways, that the world is most interesting when you manipulate it constantly. Whether it’s putting washers and glass beads on the strings of a baritone guitar to create otherworldly sounds, or creating audio-visual art through the manipulation of electronic BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

signals, these are artists who have devoted their careers to continuing to search the haystack for hidden surprises even after they’ve found the needle. Digging is an apt metaphor for the festival’s focus on media archaeology this year, looking at old technology in new ways and vice versa, first with a day of performances followed by a day of artist talks. Festival director and curator David Fodel landed on the theme after seeing a pattern in the type of work emerging from artists he liked. Finding patterns is a fascination for Fodel, and a central theme in most of his work. He often uses the motion of humans — moving about spaces like art galI

MARCH 14, 2019

ON THE BILL: leries and downtown interLAFAYETTE sections — to create realELECTRONIC ARTS time abstract projections FESTIVAL — featuring Derek Holzer, Janet Feder, and soundtracking. He’s Joshue Ott, L’Astra Cosmo, worked with scientists to Sean Winter, Angie Eng, do similar work using Jason and Deborah Gernagozzi and libi rose solar wind data to generstriegl. 7 p.m. March 15 ate patterns and sounds, and 16, Center for Musical and with medical profesArts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, leafcolorado.org/ sionals to capture brain leaf2019/. waves during a seizure. “A large LED panel was mapped to a variety of notes,” Fodel explains. “And so as brain-wave activity would change, you would hear and see the patterns that were represented.” With LEAF, Fodel takes pleasure in curating the work of others who are blurring artistic lines, like American-born, Europe-based light and sound artist Derek Holzer. When Holzer’s not using electronic signals to create psychedelic light and soundscapes, or building a new see LEAF Page 24

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instrument, or creating new code for audio-visual projects, he’s teaching other people how to do it all in workshops around the world. “I always tell my students that I do this for two reasons,” Holzer says. “One was that I failed every math class I ever took in my life and second was that I failed to learn how to play guitar when I was a teenager. “If you told me when I was a teenager that I would be building synthesizers and programming computers for audio-visual stuff in my 30s and 40s, I would have laughed because it was just inconceivable to me that I would do these things.” As a teenager experimental music piqued Holzer’s interest, particularly a German band called Einstürzende Neubauten who used jackhammers and shopping carts and other oddities to create sounds in their music. It made an impression on him, but not the kind of impression that immediately drove him to the work he does today. Instead, Holzer became a jeweler and metalsmith. “I left sound for a long time but came back to it when I realized that I’d been mixing up music and sound,” he says. “I actually wasn’t interested in composing with notes and tempos and things like that. I was interested in sound as another kind of thing.” Holzer’s vector synthesis laser performance on Friday — and corresponding talk on Saturday — has military roots. “Computers as we know them are a product of World War II for the Manhattan Project,” Holzer says. “Computational stuff came out of the need to be able to calculate very accurate artillery trajectory

tables and things like that.” Holzer, on the other hand, will be making a light show. His talk will dive deeper into the military origins of computer graphics and the pioneering computational artists who usurped those technologies, like Paul Desmond Henry. An Englishman, Henry combed Army depots in the desert in Southern California in the 1960s, buying up old mechanical gun calculating computers and bomb calculators and using them to make drawing machines. Joshua Ott will also be creating realtime visualizations like Holzer during the performance portion of LEAF, but his creations will be set to the sounds of Janet Feder’s baritone guitar. A Colorado native, Feder became “obsessed” with her father’s guitar when the guitar was bigger than she was. At 5, her parents bought her a ukulele, which the young Feder adored and learned on, but she was so obsessed with her father’s guitar that she literally dreamed of how she could learn to play using only the top four strings — the only strings her tiny arms could wrap around the body of the guitar to reach. She played that way for more than a year. It was eventually classical guitar that became Feder’s passion, the works of J.S. Bach functioning as the verbs of her musical language. “I did that as religiously as I’d done anything in my life,” Feder says. And then she had a “falling out” with classical. “I didn’t know what I was going to do,” she says. “By then I was a classical guitar player. I was doing wallpaper gigs and weddings. And I was miserable. Then one

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day someone very dear to me made a random suggestion: Doesn’t anyone play guitar with anything but their fingers? It was like a peanut butter and chocolate moment. How do these things work with guitar? And I started putting objects on my guitar.” Using common household objects and other less readily available odds and ends, Feder makes her custom nylonstring baritone electric guitar weep, wail, creak, ring, sizzle and pop with the technique and flair of a classically trained guitarist. She creates a new atmosphere, other worlds, like listening to bells ring a cathedral or the echo of a plucked string in a canyon. It’s often hard to believe Feder is the only source of sound. Fittingly for a soul raised on Cream, Traffic and The Beatles (not to mention her adult love of Tool and Nine Inch Nails), Feder will speak about psychedelia’s role in not only art, but across all aspects of life. “I realized we humans have been pursuing [psychedelic experiences] for so long and then getting in our own way, to disrupt it and deny it, criminalize it, this thing that is really at the base of who we are as a human organism,” Feder says. “What is more psychedelic than just the organism? The smallest things under a microscope? What’s more fascinating than the base elements of who we are? What’s more analog than that? Nothing. We eventually attached technology to it. We’ve tried to make psychedelia digital and yet I think we’re confused about what that means. ... It’s this quest to digitize this thing that fundamentally reaches us in the most analog way possible, through that thing we call our soul or spirit, that BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

JANET FEDER uses thing that’s not common household tangible.” objects to make her More tangielectric guitar weep, wail, creak, ring, sizbly, libi rose zle and pop. striegl (stylized as such), an artist and Ph.D. candidate in intermedia arts at CU Boulder, will be bringing some reimagined pieces of so-called obsolete ’80s technology for festival attendees to interact with: a Vectrex video game console and an Atari with a game that was programmed specifically for the console in 2010. Striegl studies obsolete technologies and questions of convenience, productivity and dysfunction. She also reworks dead technologies, like dot matrix printers, to run on contemporary codes to create art. “To me it’s this sort of fascination with what leads to things being determined no longer useful,” striegl says. “I think that same logic applies to people because we discard people who don’t function the way we want.” As an artist, striegl enjoys the “constructive constraints” that come from using old technology in modern art, but also the escape these pursuits provide from the “homogeneity that modern user interfaces encourage.” “If you’re no longer offered your set of 20 Instagram filters, what happens?” she asks. “They’re both sides of the same coin: the constraints of the device in its slowness or with unfamiliarity with its language, but then the endless possibilities of escaping what has been normalized.” Both nights of the Lafayette Electronic Arts Festival will be free and open to the public. I

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W

hen Shara Nova laughs, it’s like a break in storm clouds. You can feel warm sunlight flooding over everything in the general vicinity, vanquishing shadows and chasing away lingering chill. You can hear the classical training in her laughter, hints of the powerful mezzo-soprano that rises light yet powerful — like fog on the Swiss Plateau — from her diaphragm on stage with her baroque-pop project My Brightest Diamond. You can hear motherhood in her laughter, the gentle way she must coo and chuckle with her 8-year-old son over vegetables in the garden of their home in Detroit. But there’s another kind of love that surfaces in her laughter when I ask what prompted her to create a playlist of love songs recently on Spotify. Her blushing is almost audible through a mischievous laugh. “I fell in love,” she admits, drawing out the ‘o,’ only half bashful. It’s a big deal for Nova, who ended a 22-year marriage in 2016. Not quite ready to talk about new love yet, we gently pivot to talk about the love song “Another Chance” off her 2018 release A Million and One. Everywhere I’ve been has got me right here now/ I have no regrets/ Every love I had, I bless you, thanks/ I don’t take it back. “A friend of mine pointed out, ‘This is so vulnerable,’” Nova says of the song. “I was like, ‘Really?’ My friend said, ‘Yeah, because you’re basically admitting things that you did that you don’t want to do again.’ Even though I have no regrets, I’m sure as hell gonna be different next time.” A Million and One is evidence of Nova’s commitment to metamorphosis. A self-taught multi-instrumentalist who studied opera in college, Nova has always placed her focus on lush orchestration. But with A Million and One she was ready to strip away some of the accoutrements. The result is My Brightest Diamond’s rawest album to date, and surely its most danceable, with carefully placed synths and indie clubready beats punctuating the 10-track collection. Nova (a surname the singer chose for herself after her divorce — Latin for “new”) has always been quick to acclimate to new situations. She moved around a lot growing up, her father a music minister in the Pentecostal church. Nova had lived in nine states by the time she was in high school. If it was tough, Nova doesn’t let on. “I had to adapt quickly and assimilate myself, so I feel at home in the world,” she says. “I feel at home, deeply at BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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My brightest dancer

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by Caitlin Rockett home, in many ON THE BILL: MY places.” BRIGHTEST DIAMOND — with She is proWes Watkins. 9 p.m. tective of her Wednesday, March 27, Ophelia’s Electric childhood, careSoapbox, 1215 20th ful when disSt., Denver. Tickets cussing the are $15-35, opheliasinfluence religion denver.com. had on her life and music. “We were in a Pentecostal church, so there was trance, there was ritual, there were the kind of things that now the white American church has pretty much purged itself of and become very left brain,” she says. “There would be trance and you don’t really hear that anymore. When I began to travel the world, people would make fun of people speaking in tongues — but I fell over too. You know what I mean? So I had personal experiences that were significant to me, and I think what that does is it makes me long for that kind of shift into the unconscious or shift into the altered state of mind which happens when I’m songwriting. I go into an altered state. It is like a trance. You’re in another way of listening to whatever it is that you’re tapping into — the field of whispers.” Nova laughs, then pauses. “I’m sorry,” she says finally. “It’s a very hard question and something I never talk about because it’s tremendously difficult to talk about the effect of the church. It’s an enormous subject and one that is so important that I don’t talk about it. People try to co-opt you and I say fuck that. People wanna know if they need to burn your records or not. And hey, I grew I

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6–MILLION DOLLAR BAND “80s Dance Party” Sunday March 17

up like that too. I mean my family didn’t, but I grew up in a church culture where they would have record burnings.” As a young girl, Nova wasn’t allowed to go to school dances, so she would sneak off to homecoming and other similar events of youth culture in America. At 19, away at college, she began to sing in a funk band and soon found a new kind of release in dancing on stage. But a catcaller quickly put an end to Nova’s freedom on stage. “Some women feel empowered by that — I felt completely disempowered,” she says. “I made a decision from that night forward there was not going to be dancing in my music. I was going to be taken seriously as an intelligent person. You see all of this defensiveness, this intellectual display, and I think you hear that in the music as over-efforting. Now I can look back and hear that as over-efforting.” A Million and One kicks off with a song called “Me On The Dance Floor,” a salute to the bodily autonomy Nova has found in recent years. I was looking for someone who might see me/ And I might see too/ Maybe that is you/ Maybe it’s me/ It’s me I’m looking for/ It’s me on the dance floor. “You come to a point where you don’t have to show off,” Nova says of her music. “Vulnerability is OK. You can be powerful and vulnerable. ... Why did I let that one person who whistled at me or the hundred men who thought I was stupid at the Guitar Center dictate this about my life?” She laughs, and the clouds break open again. MARCH 14, 2019

ST. PATRICK’S DAY WITH THE LILT COLLECTIVE “Gaelic Fun” CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE SPECIAL Wednesday March 20

BOURBON & BLUES RANDALL DUBIS BAND “Blues” FREE ADMISSION Thursday March 21

DUELING PIANOS “Have fun, Be Loud & Party” Friday & Saturday March 22 &23

ELTON DAN & THE ROCKET BAND “The Elton John Tribute”

Wednesday March 27

NELSON RANGELL “Contemporary Jazz” Friday March 29

SOUL SCHOOL “Dance Classics”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 I

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


T

GLENN ASAKAWA

he University of Colorado Eklund Opera Program is doing something it has never done before: performing a full opera in Russian, with English surtitles. The opera is Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, one of the most well-known and popular Russian operas, in and outside of Russia. The cast of CU students will be directed by Leigh Holman, director of the Eklund Opera Program, and conducted by Nicholas Carthy, the program’s music director. Eugene Onegin is about the unrequited love between Onegin, a bored ne’erdo-well aristocrat, and Tatyana, a naive country girl whose sister is engaged to Onegin’s friend, Lensky. Tatyana impulsively writes a letter declaring her love to Onegin, who brushes her aside. Soon after, Onegin kills Lensky in an impetuous duel that neither man wants, and then wanders the world for several years in despair. Returning to St. Petersburg, he realizes he is in love with Tatyana, now married to an older nobleman. When he declares his love, Onegin finds the shoe is on the other foot, as Tatyana turns him aside out of loyalty to her husband. Carthy has wanted to conduct Eugene Onegin since he coached singers in a production at the Salzburg Festival 30 year ago. “I thought, ‘I really need to do this,’ and I’ve been waiting ever since,” he says. Because it requires bigger voices, Onegin is not an opera that a university company can always perform. This year, the stars aligned and the singers were available for Onegin at CU. Holman called Carthy while he was on sabbatical last year to say she thought this would be the year. “We’re just excited to have the big voices now that can do [Onegin],“ she says. “It ticks all the boxes,” Carthy says. “It’s the most wonderfully Romantic piece. The orchestra [members] are in heaven with the rehearsals — it’s music that appeals. Educationally, it’s a stretch, singing in Russian for the first time. [Russian opera] is a fantastic genre, and for [the students] to be able to say, ‘We’ve done an opera in Russian!’” The singers are learning the Russian phonetically and being coached in Russian diction by visiting experts. But the language is not the only challenge: The opera is based on a novel in verse by Alexander Pushkin that is beloved and revered in Russia, and known to almost every Russian. Tchaikovsky set only four scenes from the full story from the novel, and called his

ON THE BILL: ‘Eugene Onegin’ by Tchaikovsky. CU Eklund Opera Program. 7:30 p.m. March 15-16. 2 p.m. March 17, Macky Auditorium, 1591 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Tickets: cupresents.org/event/1609/cu-opera/ eugene-onegin

score not an opera, but “lyric scenes in three acts.” Of all Russian operas, “It’s the one with the least dramatic continuum,” Carthy says. The missing scenes are so familiar to Russian audiences that they easily fill in the gaps. But for young American singers, those gaps are less easily filled. “We’ve worked in depth on those scenes that were left out in the opera,” Holman says. “First of all, all of the singers have read the novel. “We’ve worked on the wandering, before Onegin comes back to St. Petersburg (covered in the novel but omitted in the opera). We talked about what he might have experienced, the remorse he feels for killing Lensky, and how unfulfilled he feels as a human being.” That kind of background “is part of an opera singer’s education,” Carthy says, “not just that you have this fabulous voice. Nowadays, the literary background of what you do becomes evermore important.” For this opera, Onegin is the key character. He is both the protagonist and the villain who causes all of the dramatic events that take place. “He causes mayhem to happen,” Carthy says. “In the first act Onegin destroys Tatyana, in the second act Onegin destroys Lensky, and in the third act Tatyana destroys Onegin.” Nevertheless, he is a character we can relate to. Holman describes him as “a 25-year-old guy who really doesn’t know what love is ... and with no idea of the consequences that his actions have,” Carthy adds. And part of the power of the opera is that these are basic human experiences that are still familiar. “The human emotions are both universal and eternal,” Carthy says. “What they feel, we feel, what they do, we do. We don’t die in duels, but we do humiliate people, we do destroy people, and we do get destroyed. And the music speaks very, very directly to emotions that we all know.” Learning their parts in Russian, studying the literary source, exploring their characters, and rehearsing a large and complex opera is a lot of work for the cast. “It takes an awful amount of effort, an awful amount of work,” Carthy says. “My goodness, but the rewards!”

Musically appealing, educationally valuable

Eklund Opera will present Tchaikovsky’s ‘Eugene Onegin’ in Russian with English titles

by Peter Alexander

THE 7TH ANNUAL

SEE FILM SCHEDULE AND PURCHASE TICKETS AT THEDAIRY.ORG/ONLINE/BJFF19

B O ULDE R

JEW ISH

FFESTIVAL ILM MARCH 7 - 17, 2019

@ DAIRY ARTS CENTER GALA OPENING AT THE BOULDER JCC TM

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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WWW.FOXTHEATRE.COM

1135 13TH STREET BOULDER 720.645.2467 JUST ANNOUNCED MAY 24 .................................................................. FLASH MOUNTAIN FLOOD JUN 26 ............................................................................ YAK ATTACK + GOOSE JUL 10 .............................................. ROSE HILL DRIVE PLAYS LED ZEPPELIN

THURS. MAR 14 MILIAN ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS

BOULDER MELTDOWN

NOODLEPAPI, SHAQNLIVIN, DAZE DAVINCI, PK FREEZE, SAFA GAW, MAXIE, MUTE SMITH, MELLO, LOW HANGING FRUIT, DJ AMBITIOUS BOY FRI. MAR 15 BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

SATSANG

ZIMBIRA, THE ALCAPONES SUN. MAR 17 103.5 THE FOX, BOULDER WEEKLY, GRATEFUL WEB AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

GEORGE PORTER JR. TRIO FEAT. JOE MARCINEK TULA

TUES. MAR 19 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

JADE JACKSON

THE ARTISANALS, THE SWEET LILLIES WED. MAR 20 88.5 KGNU, WESTWORD AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

CASS MCCOMBS SAM EVIAN

THURS. MAR 21 CPR OPENAIR, WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

RUBBLEBUCKET TWAIN

FRI. MAR 22 JAMMIN’ 101.5 & WESTWORD PRESENT

MARCHFOURTH SOUTHERN AVENUE SAT. MAR 23 BOULDER WEEKLY, TERRAPIN CARE STATION & THE ROOT KAVA CO. PRESENT

POLICULTURE

INDUBIOUS, HUGH MANATEE WED. MAR 27

WWW.BOULDERTHEATER.COM 2032 14TH STREET BOULDER 303.786.7030 JUST ANNOUNCED APR 19 .......................................... SHAKEDOWN STREET PLAYS 4/19/87 THURS. MAR 14 88.5 KGNU PRESENTS

THE STEELDRIVERS WOOD BELLY

SAT. MAR 16 ROOSTER PRESENTS

THE FLOOZIES NOBIDE, LYFTD

SUN. MAR 17 THE ROCK AND ROLL PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS

THE MUSIC OF PRINCE FOR KIDS SUN. MAR 17 88.5 KGNU AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO TUES. MAR 19 TURNED ON, TUNED IN AND UNPLUGGED

BILLY IDOL & STEVE STEVENS WED. MAR 20

FLY FISHING FILM TOUR FRI. MAR 22 PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: MOUNTAIN MAGIC TOUR 2019

JUSTIN MARTIN, CHRISTIAN MARTIN SMALLTOWN DJS FRI. MAR 29 TWIST & SHOUT PRESENTS

ANTONIO SANCHEZ & MIGRATION WALTER GORRA GROUP THURS. APR 4 103.5 THE FOX & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

ZOSO - THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE TO LED ZEPPELIN MR. MAJESTYK’S 8-TRACK REVIVAL FRI. APR 5 HDYFEST GLOBAL WARNING TOUR

105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

FLOSSTRADAMUS

THE RUNNIKINE

THE SUBDUDES

SISTER SPARROW & THE DIRTY BIRDS THURS. MAR 28

BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

THE CREAM CHEESE ACCIDENT + CONSIDER THE SOURCE BOULDER SOUND LAB FRI. MAR 29 BOULDER WEEKLY, GRATEFUL WEB AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

GHOST LIGHT SAT. MAR 30

SAT. APR 6 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND PRESENTS

KEVIN FITZGERALD FRI. APR 12

JOSEPH

HALEY JOHNSEN SAT. APR 13 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS 35TH ANNIVERSARY - “BACK WHERE IT ALL BEGAN”

CHRIS DANIELS & THE KINGS

WITH FREDDI GOWDY AND FRIENDS, HAZEL MILLER, KENNY PASSARELLI, STANLEY SHELDON WITH CASS CLAYTON BAND

88.5 KGNU, WESTWORD & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

TUES. APR 16

AYLA NEREO

TAKE ME AS I AM 2019 TOUR

BY THE LIGHT OF THE DARK MOON TOUR 2019 ELIJAH RAY, AMBER LILY TUES. APR 2 95.7 THE PARTY PRESENTS

JULIA MICHAELS BILLY RAFFOUL

THURS. APR 4 BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

ROBERT WALTER’S 20TH CONGRESS + EUFORQUESTRA THE ANGLE

FRI. APR 5 KUVO 89.3, BOULDER WEEKLY & GRATEFUL WEB PRESENT

JAZZ IS PHSH FEAT. MEMBERS OF RUBBLEBUCKET, THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS AND MORE! SKY POND, KALEID SAT. APR 6 BOULDER WEEKLY & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

FRONT COUNTRY + THE MIGHTY PINES WOOD BELLY

SUN. APR 7 105.5 THE COLORADO SOUND & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

SUSTO

WHITACRE, FRANCES CONE WED. APR 10 CPR OPENAIR, WESTWORD AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

SOCCER MOMMY AMERICAN GRANDMA, LEFTY THURS. APR 11

PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS AND TWIST & SHOUT PRESENT

SLOW MAGIC COVEX

FRI. APR 12 PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

TRAMPA

IIVX, YOKO B2B IAM_JACKO SAT. APR 13

AN EVENING WITH

CHRISTOPHER CROSS SAT. APR 20

ESCORT LIVE BAND

THE JIVE TRIBE, CHEWY&BACH, PHIL BERARDUCCI WED. APR 24

AN EVENING WITH

GEORGE WINSTON FRI. APR 26 88.5 KGNU PRESENTS 27TH ANNUAL

MICROBREWERIES FOR THE ENVIRONMENT: DAVE BRUZZA UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED

FT. LYLE BREWER, MIKE SHIMMIN, MATT ROWLAND, DOMINIC DAVIS, WITH TENTH MOUNTAIN DIVISION SUN. APR 28

THE SPRING QUARTET

JACK DEJOHNETTE, JOE LOVANO, ESPERANZA SPALDING & LEO GENOVESE THURS. MAY 9 UPSLOPE BREWING CO. PRESENTS

AN EVENING WITH

YACHT ROCK REVUE TUES. MAY 14 COMEDY FOR MUSICIANS BUT EVERYONE IS WELCOME

FRED ARMISEN THURS. MAY 16 CHANNEL 93.3 PRESENTS

ELLE KING BARNS COURTNEY FRI. MAR 24

RIVERSIDE MAY 29 ................................................................................................... SLEEP JUL 6 ...................................................................... THE MARCUS KING BAND JUL 23 ..................................................................................THE GIPSY KINGS JUL 27 .......................................................... JOEY ALEXANDER (NEW DATE!) AUG 7 ............................................................................. ARTURO SANDOVAL AUG 17 ....................................................................... ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL SEP 6 & 7 ................................................................. DARK STAR ORCHESTRA

WESTWORD & TERRAPIN CARE STATION PRESENT

EMINENCE ENSEMBLE APR 14 APR 17 APR 18 APR 19 APR 22 APR 23 APR 24

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OPEN DURING EVENTS 2028 14th Street • 303.998.9350

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

7 p.m. Sunday, March 17, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

South Africa’s Ladysmith Black Mambazo was assembled in the early 1960s by Joseph Shabalala, then a young farm boy turned factory worker. Joseph took the name Ladysmith from his hometown, which lies in the province of kwaZulu Natal. The word black is a reference to oxen, the strongest of all farm animals. Mambazo is the Zulu word for axe, a symbol of the group’s vocal strength. Joseph retired from the group in 2014 and passed the torch onto his sons, who continue to sing songs of love, peace and compassion.

see EVENTS Page 32

RAPH PH/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

events PUPPY PARADE.

Noon. Sunday, March 17, Boulder Beer Company, 2880 Wilderness Place, Boulder, 303-444-8448.

Spend some quality time with your pooch on St. Patrick’s Day. It’s a furry take on the world’s shortest parade, with your canine by your side. Come early and stay late for photos with your furry friend and make your own paw-print. There will be prizes for best owner and dog look-a-like, dog costume and coolest trick. There’s a $5 donation per dog with 100 percent of donations going to the Humane Society of Boulder Valley — and you’ll get a free beer! Please be sure your doggo is comfortable around new friends and new environments. No dogs will be allowed inside the building. All pups must be on leash at all times.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

BODY SONG — WITH MARTA AARLI AND MERLYN HOLMES.

SPECTACLE 2019: NIWOT HIGH SCHOOL ALL-STARS JAZZ BAND — WITH MOJOMAMA AND JACKSON CLOUD ODYSSEY.

6 p.m. Monday, March 18, Boulder Circus Center, 4747 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110.

7 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, Niwot High School Auditorium, 8989 Niwot Road, Niwot.

The voice is a powerful instrument, hidden inside our bodies and played through a series of invisible processes. The key to opening one’s singing voice is to unlock the body and let it flow through. Beginning with breath, embodiment practices, visualization, movement, vocal exercises, internal and interactive play, this vocal workshop will help you connect these energies within yourself to allow for full expression of the voice. All voices and all bodies are welcome. No experience necessary. Tickets are $25. Contact mer@hottea.com or visit mmmwhah.com/vocal-improv.

Join the Niwot High School All-Stars Jazz Band for a special event including collaborations with guest artists Jackson Cloud Odyssey and Mojomama. Jackson Cloud, a student at Niwot High School, has led his own band since middle school, creating a fusion of rock that sounds a little like a jam session with members of Led Zeppelin and Pearl Jam. Mojomama is an awardwinning jazz/funk/blues band based in Longmont. This event will also feature vendor tables for a local artist, a local author and album sales by Jackson Cloud. A percentage of the proceeds will go to the NHS Band Program. Old Oak Coffeehouse in Niwot will provide refreshments.

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words THURSDAY, MARCH 14 Open Improv: Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder. Peter Heller — The River. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, MARCH 15 Adam Agee and Jon Sousa. 2:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. The Denver Moth — StorySLAM. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

IN ‘UNLEASHING YOUR DOG,’ Marc Bekoff and Jessica Pierce show that it is possible to let dogs be dogs without wreaking havoc on our own lives. They reveal what smell, taste, touch, sight, and hearing mean to dogs and then guide readers through everyday ways of enhancing a dog’s freedom and minimizing deprivations in safe, mutually happy ways. The authors will speak about their book at Boulder Book Store on Wednesday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Writer’s Workshop. 7 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

David Loy — Ecodharma. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, MARCH 19 Engineers without Borders Story Telling Night. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Amy Rivers — All the Broken People. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

MONDAY, MARCH 18 Mesa de Português. 4 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Oksana Maksymchuk and Max Rosochinsky — Words for War. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 MFA Showcase Matthieu LaGrenade. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Marc Bekoff and Jessica Pierce — Unleashing Your Dog. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 31

FILMs

THURSDAY, MARCH 14 Music Boulder Meltdown. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Brett Young. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. CBDB. The Lazy Dog, 1346 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-3355. Cody Canada & The Departed, Micky & The Motorcars. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Darlingside. 7:30 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. The Drood. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Live eTown Radio Show — with Penny & Sparrow + very special guest. 8 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. LVDY. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 ‘NY International Children’s Film Festival Kid Flicks One.’ 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m., and 5:30 p.m. ‘What She Said – The Art of Pauline Kael.’ 7:30 p.m.

Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Robert Cline Jr. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452.

The Songwriter Hour featuring Pamela Machala and Andrew Sturtz. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Genealogy: Hiding in Plain Databases. 1 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Swing Night — with Chez Coucou. 8 p.m. The Waterloo, 817 Main St., Louisville, 303-522-6162. Events 7th Annual Boulder Jewish Film Festival. 6 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 720-749-2530. Through March 17. Adultology: Slow Cooked. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Artist Talk: ‘A Gradual Loss.’ 6 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 14 ‘Love, Gilda.’ 11 a.m. ‘As You Like It by William Shakespeare.’ 7 p.m. ‘The Museum.’ 1:30 p.m. ‘To Dust.’ 4 p.m. ‘Operation Finale.’ 6:30 p.m.

FRIDAY MARCH 15 ‘Scaffolding.’ Noon. ‘The Museum.’ 2 p.m. ‘The Waldheim Waltz.’ 4:15 p.m. ‘Pinocchio.’ 7 p.m. ‘You Were Never Really Here.’ 8:45 p.m.

Denver Immersive Opera presents Bartók’s ‘Bluebeard’s Castle.’ 7 p.m. Colorado Convention Center, 700 14th St., Denver, 303-228-8000. More performances at denverimmersiveopera.com.

The Steeldrivers. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

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All shows at Dairy Arts Center’s Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. See thedairy. org for ratings, run times, more movies and other show times.

MARCH 14, 2019

It Might Be a Netflix Special: 10 Comics Film Their Best Stuff. 7:30 p.m. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver, 303-477-9984. On The Ground: Contemporary Photography After Ansel Adams featuring Noah Mclaurine. 7:15 p.m. Longmont Museum & Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Ricky Velez. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. More performances at comedyworks.com. Steppe: The Grasslands that Nurtured Humankind. 6 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 ‘The Interpreter.’ 10 a.m. ‘Love, Gilda.’ 4 p.m. ‘Operation Finale.’ 1 p.m. ‘The Mamboniks (Gordon).’ 6:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 ‘Salvador Dalí: In Search of Immortality.’ 1 p.m. ‘The Sower.’ 4:30 p.m. ‘The Fly Fishing Film Tour 2019.’ 7:30 p.m.

Taste Test Thursday @ Main. 4:15 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Thursday Cinema Local Filmmakers’ Showcase ‘Mondo Hollywood.’ 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. FRIDAY, MARCH 15 Music The Aces. 8:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Adia Victoria. 8:30 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Citizen Cope. 8 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 970-349-0860. The Delta Sonics Duo. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Fiesta for All — Celebrating Hispanic and Latin Music & Dance. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 321-4022861. Through March 17. see EVENTS Page 34

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LIVE MUSIC!

theater The Basque Things in Life. The BiTSY Stage, 1137 S. Huron St., Denver. Through April 14.

Overt Defiance Friday, March 15 6:30-9:30 PM Jack Brown (age 13), Kai Hagen, Henry McDowell, and Tannish Jagtap, from Fairview High, play rock, blues and funk. 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, Co 80302 www.tunupboulder.com

Chicano Power 1969: Fire in the Streets & War of the Flowers. Su Teatro Cultural and Performing Arts Center, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Through March 31. The Diary of Anne Frank. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humantiies, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 17. Disenchanted!. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through March 31.

‘CHICANO POWER 1969’ presents two original one-act plays about a pair of important local events that helped shape the Chicano Movement of the ’60s. On Feb. 15, 1969, Lupe Briseño and four striking women chained herself to the gates of the Kitayama Carnation plant in a non-violent protest. Immediately, Weld County sheriffs arrived and sprayed her with tear gas. On March 19, 1969, the students at West High School walked out to protest racism and marginalization in the schools. They, too, were met with tear gas, arrests and police batons in an event remembered as The West High Blowouts. ‘Chicano Power 1969’ is now showing at Su Teatro in Denver through March 31.

Every Brilliant Thing. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through April 14. Everything was Stolen. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through March 30.

Falstaff in Love. Loft Theatre, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Through March 17. A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Vintage Theater, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through March 24.

Magnets on the Fridge. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Shows the first Wednesday of the month from February-June. The Moors. Arvada Center, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 18. The Play That Goes Wrong. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Buell Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through March 17. Rock of Aging — presented by Firehouse Theater. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through March 16.

Silent Sky — presented by Evergreen Players. Center Stage, 27608 Fireweed Drive, Evergreen. Through Sin Street Social Club. Arvada Center, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 19.

Jekyll & Hyde, The Musical. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through April 14.

Xanadu. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Garner Galleria Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through March 31.

Finn O’Sullivan. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Columbine Spiritual Center, 8900 Arapahoe Road, Boulder, 303-546-0114.

Grant Farm. 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

A Romantic Opera Cabaret: Le French Affaire. 7 p.m. Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-731-2036.

Achieve With Us Colorado Film Festival. 2 p.m., 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sie FilmCenter, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-864-9334.

Eugene Onegin: An opera by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 32

THURSDAY MARCH 14 7:00 PM

LIVE FACULTY TALK JUNO: THE LATEST FROM JUPITER 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY COLD PLAY FRIDAY MARCH 15 7:00 PM

LIVE FACULTY TALK JUNO: THE LATEST FROM JUPITER 9:00 PM

LASER GAGA 10:30 PM

LASER BRUNO MARS 11:59 PM

LASER FLOYD: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON SATURDAY MARCH 16 1:00 PM

Mandolin Orange. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Max Davies and Toni Oswald, Clay Rose, Jeff Suthers. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Nina Nesbitt. 6 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Noise Island. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-444-1562. Ottmar Liebert and Luna Negra. 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Parachute Play. 10 a.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4821. Peace Through Music 2019. 6:30 p.m. Unity

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS & PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 7:00 PM

BEARS AND AURORA OF ALASKA 9:00 PM

10:30 PM

LASER ZEPPELIN: WHOLE LOTTA LED 11:59 PM

LIQUID SKY THE WALL SUNDAY MARCH 17 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES & HABITAT EARTH 1:30 PM

STARS AND LASER GALACTIC ODYSSEY 3:00 PM

WE ARE STARS 4:30 PM

DREAM TO FLY

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

THURSDAY, MARCH 14 Mark Pulliam: The Exploitation of Labor and Other Myths. 5:30 p.m. Hale Science, 230, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder. Brain Awareness Week Free Lecture: Inflammation and Stress and the Brain. 6 p.m. Center for Community, Abrams S336, 2249 Williard Drive, Boulder. LASC Latin American and Latinx Film Series: Gender Trouble — ‘Histórias que Só Existem Quando Lembradas’ (Found Memories). 6 p.m. Eaton Humanities, 1B80, 1610 Pleasant St., Boulder. God and the Big Bang: Discovering Harmony between Science and Religion — with Kabbalah Scholar Daniel Matt. 7 p.m. Benson Earth Sciences, Room 180, 2200 Colorado Ave., Boulder.

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 34

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Selasee: Reggae fusion. 2:30 p.m. Stewart Auditorium, Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 720-443-0565. St. Patricks Blowout — with CITRA, Arrested Youth, HoldFast. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Wylie. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Events

Fine Arts Festival. 5:30 p.m. Skyline High School, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-521-6967. Irish Dancers. 7 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910. Napoleon Dynamite: A Conversation with Jon Heder. 7 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Ricky Velez. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. More performances at comedyworks.com.

see EVENTS Page 35

CU INFO.

2:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES LIQUID SKY JOURNEY

Satsang. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Barley-Har-Har Comedy Open Mic Night. 7:30 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

MARCH 14, 2019

Juno: The Latest from Jupiter. 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium and Science Center, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder.

Guest Master Class: Angelina Gadeliya, piano. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder.

FRIDAY, MARCH 15

TUESDAY, MARCH 19

CBIS Talk: Addiction in the Archives, Dr. Rebecca Lemon, USC. 5 p.m. Norlin Library, M549 (British and Irish Studies Room), 1157 18th St., Boulder.

Faculty Tuesdays: John Seesholtz, baritone. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder.

SATURDAY MARCH 16 Ancient Aliens and Contemporary Archaeology. 1 p.m. Jennie Smoly Caruthers Biotec Building, Butcher Auditorium, 3415 Colorado Ave., Boulder.

MONDAY, MARCH 18 Visiting Art History Scholar: Hui-shu Lee. 5:30 p.m. Eaton Humanities, Lecture room 150, 1610 Pleasant St., Boulder. Hijab Fashion Show! 6 p.m. University Memorial Center (UMC), Glenn Miller Ballroom, 1669 Euclid Ave., Boulder.

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 Political Contests and Moral Battles: A Perspective on Bhutan’s Democratic Transition. 5 p.m. British and Irish Studies Room, Norlin Library, Boulder. Laura Weinrib: The First Weaponization of the First Amendment. 5 p.m. Hale Science, 270, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder. Batsheva Dance Company: ‘Venezuela’ by Ohad Naharin. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EVENTS from Page 34

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 Music Amelie Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-666-4361. Bonnie and the Clydes. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Boulder Symphony Presents ‘STORY.’ 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 1820 15th St., Boulder, 303-402-6400. The Brevet. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Chelsea Cutler. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Dave Fulker Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. The Floozies­­— with special guest Nobide, LYFTD. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. The Fremonts. 7 p.m. Salto Coffee Works, Nederland, 303-258-3537. George Nelson Quartet. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Last Men On Earth. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

Forest Bailey. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

lective. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

John Cusack. 7 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

George Porter Jr. Trio featuring Joe Marcinek. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

St. Patrick’s Sing-Along. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

McTeggart Irish Dancers. 11 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424.

Graham Good and the Painters. 6 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Jackopierce. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. The Music of Prince for Kids. 11 a.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. A Romantic Opera Cabaret: Le French Affaire. 7:30 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-731-2036. St. Patrick’s Party — with the Lilt Col-

The Sweet Lillies. 6 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Weekend Coffee Shop Jazz Jam. 12 p.m. Vic’s Espresso, 3305 30th St., Boulder, 303-440-2918.

Purim Carnival. 9:30 a.m. Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 303-998-1900. MONDAY, MARCH 18

Events

Music

Boulder Comedy Show (2 shows). 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863.

Brooks Hubbard Band, Dominick Antonelli. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Irish Dancers. 6 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910.

see EVENTS Page 36

Celebrating 15 Years in Boulder!

Laura Veirs. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Mandolin Orange. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Mojomama St. Paddy’s Eve Bash. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder, 303-530-7423. Red Hot Rockabilly — with Dixie Leadfoot. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720-600-4875. Shine Spring Dance Party: Let Your Heart Shine. 8 p.m. Shine Restaurant & Potion Bar, 2480 Canyon Blvd., Suite M-1, Boulder, 303-449-120.

When: Saturday, March 16th 9AM Where: Celestial Seasonings Cafe 4600 Sleepytime Dr - Boulder

Toubab Krewe — with The Sweet Lillies. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637. UA. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. West Coast High 2019 featuring Cypress Hill and Hollywood Undead. 6:30 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Events Celtic Steps Irish Dancers. 11 a.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200.

Sign Up Now!

There’s still time to register!!

Irish Dancers. 7 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Longmont, 303-258-6910.

Register today to go bald for this great cause! Go to: www.stbaldricks.org

Learning Dog Dance: A Dance Workshop. 1 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. Moriarty-Moffat Irish Dancers — Part One. 5 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. SUNDAY, MARCH 17 Music Brian Rezac. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Christopher Laughrey. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Together we can put an end to Childhood Cancer I

MARCH 14, 2019

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Aftereffect: Georgia O’keeffe and Contemporary Painting. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26. Amanda Wachob: Tattoo This. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26. Andrew Jensdotter: Flak. Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through May 26. Ansel Adams: Early works exhibit. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY MARCH 14

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM FRIDAY MARCH 15

MAX DAVIES & TONI OSWALD, CLAY ROSE, & JEFF SUTHERS 8PM SATURDAY MARCH 16

SHANNA IN A DRESS & FRIENDS 8PM SUNDAY MARCH 17

FOREST BAILEY 8PM CHRISTOPER LAUGHREY 9PM MONDAY MARCH 18

DOMINICK ANTONELLI 8PM BROOKS HUBBARD BAND 9PM TUESDAY MARCH 19

GRUPO CHEGANDO LÁ AND FRANCISCO MARQUES 8PM WEDNESDAY MARCH 20

JAZZETRY NIGHT! FEAT. VON DISCO 8PM THURSDAY MARCH 21

TIM OSTDIEK, BOB BARRICK, MOLLY KOLLIER 8PM FRIDAY MARCH 22

TAYLOR SHAE 8PM ELMR 9PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 36

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Don Coen: The Migrant Series. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St.,Boulder. Through May 27. Dinosaurs: Land Of Fire and Ice. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 12. DIOR: From Paris to the World. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. Through March 17. Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2019. Eyes On: Erika Harrsch. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 17. Eyes On: Julie Buffalohead. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. Through April 21.

‘HIDE N SEEK,’ BY FRÉDÉRIQUE DAUBAL

arts THE DAIRY ART CENTER’S current exhibit attempts to bring to light the complexities of photography and tell a story behind, through and in front of the camera. See behind the scenes of epic ’90s sitcoms and examine striking photo manipulations. Now showing through April 14.

Everyday Magic: Mixed Media Paintings by Arthur Secunda. Bricolage Gallery, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. Through April 6. Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit. Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change. The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9. Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18.

Karen Kitchel: Grasslands. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through April 21. Living with Wolves. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 20. Matthew Pevear: Mastering the Art of French Cooking. BMoCA at Macky, Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado Boulder, 1595 Pleasant St., Unit 104, Boulder. Through May 5. Month of Photography: Noah Mclaurine and Leah Schretenthaler. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through April 7. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Poveka: Master Potter Maria Martinez. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), Anthropology Hall, 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Through Sept. 8. Telling stories behind, through and in front of the camera. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through April 14. Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Opens March 2. Through January 2020. Water Flow: Under the Colorado River. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26.

EVENTS from Page 35

Illuminati Hotties. 7 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Marques. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731..

Mt. Joy. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Jade Jackson. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Pip The Pansy, Sam Burchfield. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Lily and Madeleine. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Events

Mike Krol. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003.

Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Drop In Aerial Foundations. 5:45 p.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Modern Physics Book Discussions. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Moon and Mars: Lunar Gateway to Mars Base Camp. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. VIVA Theater at the Library. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. TUESDAY, MARCH 19 Music 3rd Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents: Colcannon. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Billy Idol and Steve Stevens: Turned On, Tuned In and Unplugged. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Grupo Chegando Lá and Francisco

MARCH 14, 2019

Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. Reynolds Reading Pals. 4:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Night Beats. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20

Events

The Artisanals. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

‘Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary Life of Ben Ferencsz’ Film Screening. 7 p.m. Sie FilmCenter, 2510 East Colfax, Denver, 720-785-7300. All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Lap Babies. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-4413100; 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Neighborhood Liaison Office Hours @ Meadows. 9:30 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Music

Cass McCombs. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Delicate Steve. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Jazzetry Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Metric and Zoé — with July Talk. 7:30 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303837-0360. Reptaliens. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Events The Art of the Video Interview. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647. Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. BTAB @ MAIN. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Mortified Live! 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Tilt VR

Boulder County’s Only Virtual Reality Arcade NOW OPEN! 30+ GAME TITLES TO CHOOSE FROM

Now taking bookings at www.TiltColorado.com 25% discount on bookings for March - Use Code BW25 640 Main Street, Louisville, CO 303-997-9548

www.TiltColorado.com • VR@TiltPinball.CO

Wild Basin Lodge Wedding Expo

Relax with a view

all about you and your wedding

The most geothermal pools in Colorado.

March Special! This is a FREE event. Please register on our website www.wildbasinlodge.com

Soak: Buy 1, get a future pass for only $8* * MUST BRING THIS AD TO RECEIVE FUTURE PASS DISCOUNT

Saturday, March 23, 11am–2pm Vendors, Food and Beverage, Prizes, and More.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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MARCH 14, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Not a question of where, but why

Ready to leave the couch? ‘The Conformist’ is worth it

by Michael J. Casey

Thursday March 14

Grouch

W

atching movies in 2019 is no longer a question of where, but why. It could be everywhere: Multiplexes, art house theater, film societies, living rooms, bedrooms, bathrooms, public transportation, parks — name the space and you’ll be able to watch a movie there. And you can watch any kind of movie: big, small, old, new, professional and private. Access to the world of cinema has never been more prolific than it is today, which might explain why that age-old debate — Where is one meant to watch a movie? — has reared its multifaceted head again. Instigating this debate du jour: Steven Spielberg. Considering a new rule for the Academy Awards voting committee that would exclude movies that bypass theaters for streaming, Spielberg reheats the old sentiment: Movies are in theaters, TV is at home. “Once you commit to a television format, you’re a TV movie,” Spielberg told ITV News in 2018. Netflix took to Twitter to offer its rebuttal, highlighting that it provides “access for people who can’t always afford, or live in towns without, theaters” and “letting everyone, everywhere enjoy releases at the same time.” Fights like this are never fun. While there’s an air of tradiON THE BILL: ‘The tional superiority to Spielberg’s claim, Netflix’s “everyConformist.’ 7 p.m. one, everywhere” argument assumes everyone can Saturday, March 16, International Film Series, afford a Netflix account and has access to high-speed Muenzinger Auditorium, internet. Both sides have a point, but both miss the 1905 Colorado Ave., mark: True moviegoing exists somewhere in-between. Boulder. Where you see a movie doesn’t matter as much as why you choose to see it there, and, as Christopher Nolan told Indiewire, that “why” falls upon the filmmaker’s shoulders: “The pressure is on us as never before to give people a reason to get out of the house.” And, lucky for those in the Boulder area, there is no greater reason to get out of the house and see a movie on the big screen than CU-Boulder’s International Film Series’ in memoriam screening of Bernardo Bertolucci’s 1970 masterpiece The Conformist. They haven’t built a screen big enough for The Conformist, but Muenzinger’s will do nicely. These images, magnificently crafted by Vittorio Storaro, are so large you are practically swallowed by them. And that’s exactly what they do to Marcello (Jean-Louis Trintignant), a fascist gopher on his way to kill his former professor. Along the way, he thinks of his youth, the family chauffeur who took playtime a step too far, his wife, the woman he has fallen for and all things in-between. As a piece of storytelling, The Conformist is engaging and enigmatic; as a succession of images, it’s a masterpiece with jaw-dropping grandeur. It’s no wonder Spike Lee counts it among the greatest of all time, screening it each year for his students at New York University. Yes, you could watch The Conformist at home. Most libraries have DVD copies, and Kanopy has a nice transfer on its service. But you’ll lose a lot in translation, and your experience will be all the poorer for it. The Conformist is a movie made for the big screen, so why settle for less?

Thursday March 14

new KinGsTon

w/ aTyya, spaceGeisha, ulTrasloTh, KeoTa & FoxTail

w/ For peace band, collierad & selecTa razJa

Friday March 15

GeorGe porTer Jr Trio FeaT Joe MarcineK & Toubab Krewe

The expendables

w/ ballyhoo!, Kash’d ouT & p-nucKle

saTurday March 16

Friday March 15

(laTe seT) w/ lieberMonsTer

Keller williaMs’ peTTyGrass

saTurday March 16

wednesday March 20

Tuesday March 19

FeaT The hillbenders

Tobe nwiGwe Thursday March 21

phour.0

(phish TribuTe) w/ broThers oF brass

Friday March 22

andre nicKaTina

w/ old Man saxon, riMes, los & a.w.a.r.e.

saTurday March 23

phuTurepriMiTive

w/ planTrae, edaMaMe & MuMuKshu

Thursday March 28

John KadleciK’s wesT philly Fade away

FeaT John KadleciK (FurThur), Marc brownsTein & aron MaGner (disco biscuiTs), MiKe GreenField (loTus) & JaMie shields (The new deal) w/ luKe The KniFe & Friends

Friday March 29

dance parTy TiMe Machine

FeaT Marc brownsTein & allen aucoin (disco biscuiTs), MiKe GreenField (loTus), JaMie shields (The new deal), JeFF Franca (Thievery corporaTion) & ryan JalberT (The MoTeT) w/ MeMbers oF analoG son, yaMn & TiGer parTy

saTurday March 30

GhosT liGhT

w/ KinGFriday The 13Th

Thursday april 4

ThouxanbanFauni

w/ warhol.s.s., Ghoulavelli, slouch, abhK, hyFy & TahaThaKidd

Friday april 5

chali 2na + cuT cheMisT (one collaboraTive seT) w/ Thin air crew, oTis & J.o.b.

sold ouT!

Thursday april 11

earl sweaTshirT & Friends w/ bbyMuTha & liv.e

Friday april 12

shoreline MaFia saTurday april 13

Krs-one

wednesday april 17

dababy

w/ sTunna 4 veGas

Friday april 19

JeFF ausTin

w/ larry Keel, laney lou and The bird doGs

saTurday april 20

MeThod Man & redMan

w/ cunninlynGuisTs, devin The dude & proxiMiTy

Thursday april 25

on The cineMa aT The cineMa live! FeaT TiM heidecKer & GreGG TurKinGTon

Friday & saTurday april 26-27

blueGrass Generals

FeaT chris pandolFi & andy hall (inFaMous sTrinGdusTers), williaM aposTol, MiMi naJa (FruiTion), MiKe devol (GreensKy blueGrass) 4/26: The billy FailinG band FeaT billy FailinG, silas herMan & eric Thorin 4/27: TurKeyFooT

Tuesday april 30

saGe Francis & b. dolan epic beard Men w/ vocKah redu

saTurday May 4

sTarT MaKinG sense w/ waKe up & live

dead Floyd w/ GhosT revue

reGGae Tuesdays

indubious & policulTure w/ hosanna

wednesday March 20 re: search

borahM lee (breaK science/pllive), birocraTic, chris Karns (world dMc chaMp/pllive) & alvin Ford Jr (TroMbone shorTy/pllive) w/ MiKey Thunder, Jordan polovina, shuJ roswell & unFold (laTe seT)

Thursday March 21

Juno whaT?!

w/ dirTy revival & The Jive Tribe

Friday March 22

JacK harlow

w/ dae zhen, Trayce chapMan & dava

saTurday March 23

con brio

w/ eMMa Mayes & The hip, eM possible

Tuesday March 26

The FunK sessions

w/ MichelanGelo carubba (TurKuaz) FeaT GarreTT sayers, ryan JalberT & lyle divinsKy (The MoTeT), JeFF Franca (Thievery corp/conGo sanchez), nicholas Gerlach (Michel MenerT & The preTTy FanTasTics), Gabriel Mervine & Todd sToops (raQ)

wednesday March 27 re: search

dJ nu-MarK

w/ chris Karns, lusid – TurnTablisM (laTe seT), MiKey Thunder & Jordan polovina

Thursday March 28

younG nudy

w/ draKo, ransTeez, scroGGinsallday, KyTae, lil saTanna & Gunna Gunna

Friday March 29

The biG wu w/ The worKshy

Monday april 1

ann Marie w/ younG b

Tuesday april 2

sTeve’n’seaGulls w/ clusTerplucK

wednesday april 3 re: search

liTTle people

w/ Marley carroll (laTe seT), GuGGenz, MiKey Thunder & Jordan polovina

Thursday april 4

Jazz is phsh

w/ Thin air – picKin’ on widespread panic

Friday april 5

roberT walTer’s 20Th conGress & euForQuesTra w/ elder Grown

saTurday april 6

MicKey avalon & dirT nasTy w/ pdF, nevv & luvsicK

wednesday april 10 re: search

exMaG

w/ lwKy, plaid hawaii (laTe seT), MiKey Thunder & Jordan polovina

Thursday april 11

Joey porTer’s viTal orGan & phour.o (laTe seT)

w/ dave halchaK & Friends (FeaT MeMbers oF dubsKin, a-Mac & The heiGhT & rasTasaurus)

Friday april 12

dave waTTs & Friends FeaT Todd sToops, GarreTT sayers, KiM dawson, ausTin zalaTel, Gabriel Mervine & dJ williaMs w/ Michelle sarah band & booT Gun

saTurday april 13

K+lab

Monday april 15

draKe bell

w/ bluprinT, sadboiz & wes luna

Tuesday april 16

aaron KaMM & The 1 drops w/ Green buddha

TexT cervanTes To 91944 For TicKeT Giveaways, drinK specials, discounTed TicKeT proMoTions & More

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


by BOULDER WEEKLY staff Rocky Mountain Oysters

World Famous Dark Horse Bar & Grill 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, darkhorsebar.com

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Nopales Navajo Fry Bread Taco

Syntax Physic Opera 544 S. Broadway, Denver, physicopera.com

W

hat is a physic opera? According to the folks at Syntax, it means “medicine show” — a place where food, drink, music, art and performance is all medicine for those who visit. It’s an eclectic venue, with an equally varied menu, which includes the Navajo fry bread tacos. With myriad options to choose from, we went with the nopales: crispy cactus, with black bean corn relish underneath a lush bed of cilantro microgreens drizzled with white balsamic-serrano sauce. The fry bread is both crisp and moist, with just a bit of sweetness, so that regardless of the filling, each bite is delicious. Still, the cactus and accompaniments add a wealth of flavor. $5 on happy hour.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ertainly there’s a novelty factor when it comes to eating bull testicles, or Rocky Mountain oysters as they’re commonly known. If you’ve never had them, you might have some negative thoughts about what they taste like, or what they’ll feel like to eat. But the truth is, they’re pretty mild and, if you get them at the Dark Horse, pretty delicious. Thin strips of meat are breaded and fried, and the “oysters” are served alongside horseradish. The strips have a distinctly beefy flavor, but shouldn’t be anything too unfamiliar to your palate, and so the horseradish sauce makes a suitable, zesty dip. $9.59.

Pork Ribs

Wayne’s Smoke Shack 406 Center Drive, Superior, waynessmokeshack.com

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e knew Wayne’s was going to be a hit within a week of them opening a few years ago. Immediately, they were packed at lunch time, and they often sold out of many of their barbecue offerings by 1 p.m. Even though they recently renovated their interior, namely expanding the joint, they’re still fighting off customers rabid for their barbecue beef, pork, fish and turkey, which many say is the best in the state. We tried their St. Louis-style pork ribs recently, and yeah, they’re as good as you can get here. Thick, flavorful bark covers falloff-the-bone meat that’s juicier and more flavorful than you can imagine. $16/pound.

Adobada Tacos

Tacos El Rey Century Place, Louisville, (behind Lowe’s)

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he only thing more surprising than finding a trailer on an unassuming service road behind Lowe’s in an unassuming part of Louisville, is finding out that the folks inside that trailer serve ridiculously good, and heinously underpriced tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Actually, the most surprising thing is how long it took us to get out to Tacos El Ray — judging by the long line of folks at lunch time assembled in front of the trailer’s small window, we’re late to the party. We got a plate of adobada tacos. The pork is tender, smokey and a little spicy. The corn tortillas are the best we’ve had in a while, and the toppings and salsas are fresh and generously apportioned. $1.50 each.

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The BEST East Indian Food this side of New Delhi Dinner:

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The Noodle Nerd Edwin Zoe brings Pacific tastes together at Chimera

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

IN

SUSAN FRANCE

Greek mythology, the chimera (pronounced kai-mere-uh) was a fire-breathing creature with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, a serpent’s tail and some complicated personal issues. Edwin Zoe says he can relate. The Boulder chef and restaurateur was born in Taiwan and grew up in the middle of Missouri. He worked in his family’s Chinese restaurant, where he experienced a duality: They served sweet and sour pork to the customers and authentic Chinese specialties for their family meals. He says he felt the pull of two worlds. After graduating from University of Coloardo-Boulder with a business degree, he turned his precise mind far away from food and toward starting a successful software company. Still, the family business beckoned. In 2010, he opened Zoe Ma Ma with his mother, Anna Zoe, in Boulder, serving quick Chinese street food, and then opened a second location in Denver. Zoe Ma Ma is, naturally, Edwin Zoe’s mother’s baby, and he dreamed of doing something completely different. When the former Sushi Tora space became available next-door, this father of two young children decided to launch Chimera, a full-service restaurant and lounge showcasing dishes from Pacific Rim countries. “Now I have an actual kitchen. At Zoe Ma Ma next door, we only have five linear feet of cooking space,” Zoe says with a look of relief. He emphasizes that Chimera’s menu doesn’t involve fusion — there’s no wienerschnitzel lo mein here. It’s a curated collection of specific dishes. “I respect the tradition of the dish but then I add my own elements,” Zoe says. It’s all about paying attention to details. THE ZEN OF NOODLING Take noodles. Zoe is a bona fide noodle nerd. When he decided to focus Chimera’s menu on ramen he had to make a choice. There are loads of places in Colorado now serving the dish, but almost all use readyto-cook, factory-made fresh or frozen ramen noodles. “It’s not authentic. If you were a pizza restaurant you wouldn’t use frozen pizza dough and claim it was fresh,” he says. That’s how Zoe became the proud owner of a new $40,000 noodlemaking machine. He is clearly in his element showing off the machine and the minute adjustments he can make in a noodle’s dimensions and character. Nearby, big pots simmering on a stove are jammed with roast duck bones, chicken feet and pork feet to make the rich broth that is the backbone for several variations on the ramen theme. He creates fresh, organic wheat ramen noodles that are massaged lightly to get the right texture, chew and flavor-grabbing capacity. Zoe is something of a ramen historian. Ramen is ubiquitous in the U.S. now. The 10-for-a-dollar, plastic-wrapped noodle units are in almost every college dorm room, home pantry and office worker’s desk drawer. However, America was a ramen-free zone until 1971, when instant noodles arrived after a Chinese-Japanese chef, Momofuku Ando, invented shelf-stable dried ramen by deep-frying the noodles. Then, about a decade ago, restaurants started opening offering “real”

EDWIN ZOE owner of Chimera, in Boulder, displays the fine art of making ramen noodles from scratch.

see NIBBLES Page 44

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NIBBLES from Page 43

ramen. “Ramen is not one thing. Ramen culture in Japan is like pizza culture, which varies across Italy. You see big differences between different regions in the broth, what’s in it,” Zoe says. At Chimera, this is anything but a quick, cheap, forgettable meal. One tasty showstopper on the menu is lobster ramen. It is a parade of textures, shapes, colors and flavors that hit all the right notes with fresh noodles in broth with SUSAN FRANCE enoki mushrooms, seaweed, corn kernels and a tea-marinated soft boiled egg. The dish comes with a side of drawn butter to dip the soft pieces of butterpoached lobster. Slurping is not only allowed, it’s celebrated. “The biggest compliment I can get is when a guest picks the white bowl up to finish the last of the broth,” Zoe says. DUMPLINGS AND BAO AND WINGS THAT NUMB When he talks about the menu, Zoe expresses his passion for everything from the smashed cucumber appetizer to the wonderful Shanghai xiao long bao, the sip-able soup dumplings filled with broth, crabmeat and pork. It is obvious that Chimera gives him an excuse to serve the yummiest foods he found while travelling in Asia. His simple, smile-inducing bao — little soft bun-wrapped bites — are filled with lightly fried soft shell crab, pork belly, roast duck or panko-crusted eggplant. The juicy mala wings are uncrusted chicken wings dusted with chile and Sichuan peppercorns, which produce a fun, tingling numbness on the lips and tongue. With papaya shreds, crunchy long beans and peanuts in a tart chili-lime dressing, the green papaya salad with grilled shrimp is a cool-spicy texture fest.

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ing,” he says. However, Mom recently stopped by Chimera to eat. “She gave me a great compliment. She said: ‘I didn’t know you could make something this good,’” Zoe says with a proud grin. LOCAL FOOD NEWS The Happy Trails Cafe in Nederland has closed after 25 years in business. ... Among the new eateries opening this summer at the 13,000-square-foot Avanti, Boulder’s first food hall, will be Denver-based Masterpiece Deli. ... Slow Food Boulder County hosts a Seed Exchange and Colorado Producers Open House March 21 at the Mountain Fountain in Hygiene. You can pick up or trade your vegetable seeds and sign up for CSAs with local farms. Schools can pick up seeds for their school gardens. ... There are only 22 days until the Boulder County Farmers Market reopens for the season in Boulder and Longmont. ... Do Boulder County organizations, causes or churches publish spiral-bound community cookbooks? Let me know at: Nibbles@boulderweekly.com TASTE OF THE WEEK As anyone who has ever drunk a “near” alcohol-free beer will tell you, the beverage has questionable flavor and pointless calories. Boulder-based Hoplark cans Sparkling HopTea, high-quality black and green teas brewed with hops. It is reminiscent of a good craft beer but free from sweeteners, additives and alcohol. I tasted The Original One beverage made with organic black teas and Citra and Simcoe hops with zero calories and 70 mg of caffeine. It’s a genuinely refreshing taste with nice IPA citrus notes and a floral aroma. The tea’s slight natural sweetness balances just enough bitterness. Hoplark has plans to open a Boulder taproom soon.

A FEW ENCOURAGING WORDS FROM MOM There is a second meaning of “chimera” — a thing one wishes for that is impossible to ultimately achieve. So far Zoe seems to have created multi-faceted tastes that team up to make a singular dining destination. Zoe’s mom now mainly oversees the Union Station Zoe Ma Ma. “She works too hard, but for her, working is like breath-

WORDS TO CHEW ON “Let’s face it, a nice creamy chocolate cake does a lot for a lot of people; it does for me.” — Audrey Hepburn John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU. Podcasts: news.kgnu.org/category/ radio-nibbles.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Front Range Food for Front Range Families Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Brinner!

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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SHAWN NIELSEN/COLORADOBEER.ORG

Colorado Craft Beer Week is here Plenty of places to indulge in craft beer this time of year by Michael J. Casey

1025 Delaware Ave Longmont CO 80501 @grossenbartbrewery

F

rom March 16-23, Colorado breweries will celebrate the state of craft beer with the seventh annual Colorado Craft Beer Week, a celebration of all suds independent. But there’s an international twist to this year’s festivities, instigated by the infamous drinking day that marks every March 17: St. Patrick’s Day. For those not raised Catholic, or those who dozed off during Sunday school, Patrick was a fifth-century missionary who brought Christianity to Ireland and drove the snakes from the Emerald Isle. But, since no snakes resided in Ireland, that’s probably a metaphor for the druids. A bit of St. Paddy’s trivia to drop at the bar: the feast of St. Patrick falls on March 17 because two arguing sects could not compromise on which day Patrick was born: March 8 or March 9. The decision, add the two together and celebrate then. As tradition demands, green beer (typically light lager with green dye) and Guinness dominate glasses on March 17, but Left Hand Brewing Co. has thrown their dark ale in the ring with the campaign #AmericasStout to position Nitro Milk Stout as a local alternative. Additionally, Left Hand will be running milk stout specials and holding a nitro-beer-pouring contest, Pour Hard, at their Longmont taproom all afternoon long. Regardless of the stout they pour on Sunday, though, Coloradans will have plenty of places to fill their mugs. Heck, you can even down a few after taking a stroll with your pooch around Boulder Beer Co. as Colorado’s first craft brewery puts a canine spin on the gone-but-not-forgotten Conor O’Neill’s’ World’s Shortest Parade with The Puppy Parade. The parade starts at 1 p.m. at the brewery, and if you donate $5 to the Humane Society of Boulder Valley, Boulder Beer will hand you a beer on them. Then on Wednesday, March 20, Colorado Craft Beer Week celebrates its centerpiece event: Colorado Pint Night. Buy a pint at any participating brewery, and you get to keep the commemorative glassware illustrated by Shawn Nielsen. Drinker beware, these glasses go fast, so if you’re looking for a day to leave work early, make it Wednesday. For more events and special tappings throughout the week, check coloradobeer. org for a list of participating breweries. There you will also find information and tickets for The Big Reveal, the inaugural closing event that gives drinkers a chance to play beer judge. Held at the underground Gallery Bar at Denver’s Union Station on Saturday, March 23, ticket holders will blindly taste 20 of Colorado’s traditionally brewed India pale ales, voting for their favorite as they go. After tasting and voting is complete, Colorado’s undisputed best IPA will be awarded, and you can either pat yourself on the back for contributing or cry shenanigans and demand a recount. Or maybe just quietly and politely tell your neighbor that you thought number 17 had a better hop profile. Either way, there’ll be plenty of Colorado craft on tap March 16–23. Sláinte. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

BEER * FOOD TRUCKS * LIVE MUSIC * HAPPY HOUR

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featuring gluten reduced beers

MARCH 14, 2019

CRAFTED TO REDUCE

GLUTEN

www.grossenbart.com

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ARI LEVAUX

Substance and sauce

Endless, healthy ways to consume cabbage this time of year

by Ari LeVaux

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t a Vietnamese restaurant during college, my friend Wayne observed that most of the world’s meals could be divided into “substance and sauce.” That night, for example, rice was the “substance” of nearly every menu item, either in the form of whole white grains or noodles, and was dressed in an array of curries, soups, dips and other synonyms for “sauce.” Wayne’s paradigm is not perfect by any means; one could have a field day finding exceptions. But the formula contains a kernel of truth that has given me years of insight into the structure and function of food. Inevitably, the “substance” is something that, for a variety of reasons, we should be eating, while the sauce makes us want to eat it. Rice is an affordable way to fill a belly with calories, therefore it is good and we should be eating it. In a dish like pizza, the sauce makes the cheaper but relatively bland crust more interesting. In a sand-

MARCH 14, 2019

wich, the “sauce” in the middle gives more purpose to the bread. A pat of salted butter is the only sauce a baked potato needs, while a fried potato gets ketchup. Cheap white carbs aren’t the only type of substance to which “Substance and Sauce Theory,” as we called it, can be applied. Vegetables are not as cheap as grain-based calories, and many people are even less inclined to eat them. Yet we “should” eat them because they have vitamins, fiber and other good stuff. Unfortunately, a plate of naked greens won’t appeal to most omnivores. Ditto for a serving of steamed broccoli. And then there is cabbage, a vegetable that is at once belly-filling, cheap and flush with vitamins, minerals, a sweater’s worth of fiber and unbound versatility. Cabbage can be served raw, cooked or fermented, with a flavor that can range from sweet to spicy to pungent, and a texture that can be crunchy or tender.

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CAESER SLAW is one delicious way to test the theory that all dishes are comprised of two components: substance and sauce.

BOULDER WEEKLY


In 2018, the European vegetable to use it. But I will leave you with one distributor Ribambelle built a machine specific substance and sauce combinathat cuts cabbages in half and wraps tion: Caesar slaw. each half in plastic, showcasing a Coleslaw is practically synonymous beautiful cross-section of its many tight with picnic, but excels in many other layers. This is an old sales tactic. situations, with a variety of seasonings. Parents have known forever, and My favorite is Caesar slaw: chopped or research has recently confirmed, that grated cabbage with Caesar dressing. kids will eat more apple if it’s served in This Caesar sauce contains mustard pieces, rather than whole. Ribambelle powder, which compliments the muscredits this “cutting machine” for the tardy undertones in cabbage. This, 5-percent increase in cabbage sales it counter-intuitively, dulls the sulfuric flasaw last year, and I wondered if cutting vor. It also includes mayo (or up a mess of cabbage at home would Vegenaise) in place of the raw egg likewise increase used in a typical JEFFERY MARTIN/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS my own consumpCaesar dressing, tion. because I find it I chopped two less icky. For a large heads, crossfinal bit of mojo, it wise from tip to also contains heart, removing the Worcestershire core from the slicsauce. Finally, do es that contained not neglect the it. This filled a large lemon zest. mixing bowl with ribbons of fettuccini CAESAR SLAW shaped cabbage I like to leave slices. Using that the cabbage in cabbage was praclarge, chopsticktically effortless. friendly strands that I kept the bowl recall the large in the fridge, tightly chunks of romaine covered but at the ready to be deployed with which Caesar dressing is typically on demand. served. But chopping the cabbage to a I started with tossing it into the narrower width is good too, and easier to speckled broth of a fancy packet of eat with a fork. instant Ramen, in place of noodles. Lightly cooked in this brothy sauce, the 8 servings cabbage barely lost its crunch. This was followed by stir-fried cabbage slic1 lb green cabbage, chopped heades in bacon, garlic and oyster sauce to-core to ¼-inch slices like I would cook rice noodles. But cab2-4 cloves fresh garlic bage is less filling than rice noodles, ½ teaspoon salt and you can eat heaping serving after 2 teaspoons grated lemon zest heaping serving. Eating sliced cabbage ½ teaspoon mustard powder is one of the few instances where ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce chopsticks offer a distinct tactical 1 teaspoon anchovy paste (or whole advantage. Real noodles can be eaten anchovies, or fish sauce) with a fork, but crunchy cabbage, not ¼ cup olive oil so much, as the shards are unwieldy ½ cup mayo for either a fork or spoon. Fork and ¼ cup of lemon juice spoon work, if you use both hands. But ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese real chopsticks allow you to nab any Fresh ground black pepper shard of leaf you wish. If you aren’t good at chopsticks, chop it finer. Add the chopped cabbage to a mixThat sliced cabbage straight up ing bowl, and gently break it apart and begged me to make fish tacos, and I tousle it, like you’re trying to make it look could only comply. Soon, I added the like Meg Ryan’s hair. Blend the garlic, cabbage as a base for most lunch and salt, zest, mustard powder, dinner plates. It would cling to other piec- Worcestershire sauce, anchovy and olive es of food and sneak into the kids’ oil. mouths while they were chewing, and When smooth, add the mayo, lemon they wouldn’t spit it out. juice and half of the cheese. Toss the That bowl of sliced cabbage is a reci- cabbage in the dressing, sprinkle with pe unto itself — many recipes, in fact — the remaining cheese, and black pepper and having it around will teach you how to taste, and serve. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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WEEKLY EVENTS Tuesday 5pm–9pm Prime Rib Night Wednesday 3pm–close $5 Burgers Night You can have a small draft beer addition for $5 more. We Also have a $9 Veggie Burger deal featuring the Beyond Meat Burger Thursday Ladies Night $5 specialty cocktails(change every week), 3$ house red/white/rose wines, $1-off draughts beers. Live music Featuring Andy Eppler and accompanied by other musicians Every Evening we feature 2 for $40. 2 specialty entrees (change daily) and comes with two drinks (small draught beer, house wines, or well cocktail) $40 a couple.

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HELP WANTED LAWN DOCTOR of Longmont & Boulder Is now taking applications from qualified candidates for full and part time positions including turf service techs, tree & shrub techs, and aerators. Help us service our valued area customers. Full training. Full team support. Valid driver’s license with clean record required. Send resume to lawndoctorlawncare@gmail. com or call 303-772-2827.

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HELP WANTED Sushi Zanami, located just one block north of The Pearl St. Mall is hiring Sushi Chefs. We are a fast paced, high volume sushi restaurant that has been in business since 1985. For this position you must be able to work days, nights and weekends. Being fluent in Japanese is a plus but not necessary. Must have at least 2 years of prior sushi chef experience or equivalent kitchen experience. To be considered for this position please stop by our location to fill out an application and or drop off your resume. If you are located outside of the Boulder area please send a cover letter and your resume to sushizanmai22@yahoo.com.

All credit cards accepted No text messages

HELP WANTED Administrative Assistant Needed. We are currently searching for an administrative assistant who can handle various projects including HR, finance, and oral skills. Successful applicants will demonstrate attention to detail, and a passion for continual improvement. We hire for character and integrity, and train for job-specific competency computer skills helpful, ($500) weekly. We will consider any applicant who demonstrates the following: • Commitment to integrity • Goal-oriented mindset • Ambition to achieve and continually improve If interested apply at: rostc65@gmail.com

HELP WANTED The Health Center is now hiring Full Time Budtenders at our Boulder location! Applicants must have a MED Badge; Key or Support. Prior industry experience not required, but definitely a plus. If you are a team player and are interested in working for a well respected company please send your resume and a copy of your MED Badge to boulderemployment@ thchealth.com. This position is for immediate hire.

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All ballots must be submitted online. Vote by March 31 now at boulderweekly.com. There is only one Best of Boulder™ Only in the Weekly.

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ARIES

LIBRA

time to acquire a flamethrower. It would come in handy if you felt the urge to go to a beach and incinerate mementoes from an ex-ally. It would also be useful if you wanted to burn stuff that reminds you of who you used to be and don’t want to be any more; or if you got in the mood to set ablaze symbols of questionable ideas you used to believe in but can’t afford to believe in any more. If you don’t want to spend $1,600+ on a flamethrower, just close your eyes for 10 minutes and visualize yourself performing acts of creative destruction like those I mentioned.

same as the role of the lover,” wrote author James Baldwin. “If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don’t see.” To fully endorse that statement, I’d need to add two adverbs. My version would be, “The role of the artist is exactly the same as the role of the lover. If I love you, I have to kindly and compassionately make you conscious of the things you don’t see.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I recommend that you Libras enthusiastically adopt that mission during the coming weeks. With tenderness and care, help those you care about to become aware of what they’ve been missing — and ask for the same from them toward you.

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: The coming weeks might be a good

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Taurus aphorist Olivia Dresher writes

that she would like to be “a force of nature,” but “not causing any suffering.” The way I interpret her longing is that she wants to be wild, elemental, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure — all the while without inflicting any hurt or damage on herself or anyone else. In accordance with your astrological omens, Taurus, that’s a state I encourage you to embody in the coming weeks. If you’re feeling extra smart — which I suspect you will — you could go even further. You may be able to heal yourself and others with your wild, elemental, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure energy.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: In some major cities, the buttons you

push at a crosswalk don’t actually work to make the traffic light turn green faster. The same is true about the “Close Door” buttons in many elevators. Pushing them doesn’t have any effect on the door. Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer says these buttons are like placebos that give you “the illusion of control.” I bring this phenomenon to your attention, Gemini, in hope of inspiring you to scout around for comparable things in your life. Is there any situation where you imagine you have power or influence, but probably don’t? If so, now is an excellent time to find out — and remedy that problem.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Philip Boit was born and raised in Kenya, where it never snows except on the very top of Mount Kenya. Yet he represented his country in the cross-country skiing events at the Winter Olympics in 2002 and 2006. How did he do it? He trained up north in snowy Finland. Meanwhile, Kwame NkrumahAcheampong competed for Ghana in the slalom in the 2010 Winter Olympics. Since there is no snow in his homeland, he practiced his skills in the French Alps. These two are your role models for the coming months, Cancerian. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ll have the potential to achieve success in tasks and activities that may not seem like a natural fit.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: In the process of casting for his

movie The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, director David Fincher considered selecting A-list actress Scarlet Johansson to play the heroine. But ultimately he decided she was too sexy and radiant. He wanted a pale, thin, tougher-looking actress, whom he found in Rooney Mara. I suspect that in a somewhat similar way, you may be perceived as being too much something for a role you would actually perform quite well. But in my astrological opinion, you’re not at all too much. In fact, you’re just right. Is there anything you can do — with full integrity — to adjust how people see you and understand you without diluting your brightness and strength?

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: In 1993, an English gardener

named Eric Lawes used his metal detector to look for a hammer that his farmer friend had lost in a field. Instead of the hammer, he found the unexpected: a buried box containing 15,234 old Roman silver and gold worth more than $4 million today. I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because I suspect that you, too, will soon discover something different from what you’re searching for. Like the treasure Lawes located, it might even be more valuable than what you thought you wanted.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: “The role of the artist is exactly the

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SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: For thousands of generations, our early ancestors were able to get some of the food they needed through a practice known as persistence hunting. They usually couldn’t run as fast as the animals they chased. But they had a distinct advantage: they could keep moving relentlessly until their prey grew exhausted. In part that’s because they had far less hair than the animals, and thus could cool off better. I propose that we adopt this theme as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks and months. You won’t need to be extra fast or super ferocious or impossibly clever to get what you want. All you have to do is be persistent and dogged and disciplined.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Wompsi’kuk Skeesucks Brooke is a Native American woman of the Mohegan tribe. According to her description of Mohegan naming traditions, and reported by author Elisabeth Pearson Waugaman, “Children receive names that are descriptive. They may be given new names at adolescence, and again as they go through life according to what their life experiences and accomplishments are.” She concludes that names “change as the individual changes.” If you have been thinking about transforming the way you express and present yourself, you might want to consider such a shift. 2019 will be a favorable time to at least add a new nickname or title. And I suspect you’ll have maximum inspiration to do so in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: For many of us, smell is our most neglect-

ed sense. We see, hear, taste and feel with vividness and eagerness, but allow our olfactory powers to go underused. In accordance with astrological omens, I hope you will compensate for that dearth in the coming weeks. There is subtle information you can obtain — and in my opinion, need quite strongly — that will come your way only with the help of your nose. Trust the guidance provided by scent.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Essayist Nassim Nicholas Taleb says humans come in three types: fragile, robust or antifragile. Those who are fragile work hard to shield themselves from life’s messiness. The downside? They are deprived of experiences that might spur them to grow smarter. As for robust people, Taleb believes they are firm in the face of messiness. They remain who they are even when they’re disrupted. The potential problem? They may be too strong to surrender to necessary transformations. If you’re the third type, antifragile, you engage with the messiness and use it as motivation to become more creative and resilient. The downside? None. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aquarius, I urge you to adopt the antifragile approach in the coming weeks.

PISCES

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MAVEN spacecraft into orbit around Mars. The cost of the mission was $671 million. Soon thereafter, the Indian government put its own vehicle, the Mangalyaan, into orbit around the Red Planet. It spent $74 million. As you plan your own big project, Pisces, I recommend you emulate the Mangalyaan rather than the MAVEN. I suspect you can do great things — maybe even your personal equivalent of sending a spacecraft to Mars — on a relatively modest budget.

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BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: My partner and I have been together for 11 years and have always had a great sex life. I love his cock, we have similar appetites and until recently everything was great. But he has always had an aversion to blood. He is a pacifist, a vegetarian and a recovering Muslim, so as much as I don’t understand his fear, I would never push him to have sex during my period. The problem is now I bleed whenever we have sex — just a tiny bit, but that’s enough to kill it for him, and the sex is immediately over. We already have enough constraints with differing schedules, kids, lack of privacy, periods. This is a big deal for me, and I don’t know how to deal with it. Any ideas? —Afraid To Bleed Dear ATB: Turn off the lights, draw the curtains, have sex in the dark, get him a blindfold — and insist he see a therapist who specializes in helping people overcome their irrational phobias. Dear Dan: I’m deep in the grips of a run-of-the-mill midlife crisis. My marriage is in a slump, and I’ve been sexless longer

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

than at any time since I was a teenager. My wife has granted me the DADT “hall pass,” but I have no idea how to go about using it. My life is work, children, activities related to the children, and a few solo hobbies to keep myself fit and sane. I rarely meet new people, except at work, and I can’t start a relationship with anyone I meet there. In fact, my career means I am subject to a fair amount of social scrutiny and discretion is paramount. Do you have any suggestions? —Hall Passing

Dear Dan: I’m a gay woman in an open marriage. I have met some women I am interested in who are bi and have husbands or male lovers. While I’m into being with these women, I have a concern. I know that sperm can’t live outside the body very long, but it can still be alive and kicking inside a woman for several days. If a woman fucks a man, and hours or days later, I fuck that woman with fingers or toys that are later inside of me, can I accidentally get pregnant? —Actively Looking

Dear HP: Remember Ashley Madison? The hookup site for married people looking for affair partners? The site that did a terrible job of protecting its user data? The site that got hacked? A hack that outed millions of adulterers and ruined lives? According to a story at the Outline, Ashley Madison is back, baby, and lots of women — real women, not the bots that plagued the site pre-hack — are using it. “Once the dust had settled and other scandals entered the headlines, many people largely forgot about Ashley Madison,” Stephanie Russell-Kraft reports. “This might explain why Ashley Madison’s user numbers have shot up in recent years.”

Dear Dan: Any etiquette tips or best practices for introducing my husband to my boyfriend? —Poly Processing

I

Dear AL: No.

Bleed. She wrote that she bleeds whenever she has sex, and she was concerned about her partner’s aversion to blood, which you did address. But women should not bleed after vaginal intercourse. There are many reasons why they might — so it needs to be investigated. Please encourage ATB to visit a doctor. —Concerned Reader Dear CR: Big oversight on my part, thank you for writing in! Dear Dan: If I write you a letter asking for advice and don’t want it published, even anonymously, will you answer? —Keeping It Confidential, ’Kay?

Dear PP: Keep it casual and keep it brief, PP. A quick drink before you and your husband head to a sold-out show you have only two tickets for. If your husband has an unexpectedly emotional reaction to meeting your boyfriend in the flesh — if it dredges up jealousy issues — you won’t be putting him in a situation where he has to bottle that up for hours or, worse yet, for a weekend.

Dear KICK: While I can’t respond to every letter I receive, KICK, I do sometimes respond privately. Just one request: If you send a letter that you don’t want published, please mention that at the start. I will frequently read an extremely long letter — so long that I start making notes or contacting experts before I finish reading it — only to discover “please don’t publish this” at the bottom. If a letter isn’t for publication, please mention that at the beginning. I promise that doing so increases your chances of getting a private response.

Dear Dan: Hey, Dan, you missed an opportunity in your response to Afraid To

On the Lovecast: Yikes! It’s the trigger show. Listen at savagelovecast.com.

MARCH 14, 2019

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NFL Considers Change to Cannabis Policy by sidni west

T

he National Football League (NFL) is finally ready to chill, at least when it comes to cannabis. According to a report from NBC Sports earlier this week, “the NFL is prepared to make major concessions regarding the substance-abuse policy, especially as it relates to marijuana,” in the next QUINCEMEDIA VIA PIXABAY

collective bargaining agreement (CBA) with players. Sports analysts expect that the NFL will likely use the offer of any revision of the substance abuse policy as a bargaining chip in negotiations and expect concessions from the players union in return. The details of the concessions aren’t yet known, but a complete abandonment of its archaic cannabis ban is possible. However, the NFL would need to have a procedure in place for players who could still face charges in states where cannabis continues to be illegal. Under the current policy, players are subject

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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to suspensions following two positive tests. The first positive test puts a player in the NFL’s Stage Two intervention program, which means increased testing for up to 24 months. Lifting the cannabis ban would be beneficial to players, who could freely turn to marijuana for pain relief instead of getting hooked on opioids. In a 2016 survey of 226 of the NFL’s nearly 3,000 players on active rosters or practice squads, ESPN found that 61 percent believed that players would take fewer injections of strong antiinflammatory drugs such as Toradol if they could treat pain legally with marijuana. In another study, ESPN reported that 71 percent of 644 NFL players surveyed misused opioids. David Irving, the Dallas Cowboys defensive end who is currently serving a suspension, responded to the news on Instagram: “Well once they do that, give me a call,” Irving replied. “Cuz it’s bulls–t how I have Xanax bars n hydros right next to me to take, given to me by the NFL of course. However, we can’t smoke the same weed the staff itself smokes.” Irving, 25, was suspended indefinitely March 1 for repeated violations of the NFL’s drug policy. He was suspended for the first four games of the 2018 season for testing positive for a substance on the league’s substances of abuse list. Retired Miami Dolphin Larry Chester is quoted in a CBS4-Miami report as saying that, after retiring from the NFL, he coped with chronic pain by practically “eating opioids,” which he

MARCH 14, 2019

said made him belligerent toward his family and others. What allowed Chester to quit using opioids was a prescription to cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient that helps to alleviate ailments such as pain, inflammation and anxiety, all without inducing a “high.” Chester called the prescription life-saving. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in January that he and the NFL Players’ Association (NFLPA) have spoken about the league’s cannabis policy but offered no update on the ban: “[Medical advisers] look at this constantly, they look at the data, they look at the science and they make those recommendations to us on that basis,” Goodell said. “The union and the NFL work very closely on this. Dee (NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith) and I spoke about this the last two weeks.” The current CBA is set to expire in 2021, meaning any changes won’t be immediate. In recent years, many retired and current professional athletes have come out of the cannabis closet, advocating for the accepted use among athletes, entering the space as investors and launching brands of their own. The NFL should consider taking notes from the National Hockey League (NHL), which routinely tests players for performance-enhancing substances, but tests only a randomly-selected one-third of players for illicit substances like cannabis. If and when the league detects cannabis use, it compiles those cases into a statistical snapshot, which goes to the league’s Performance Enhancing Substances Program Committee without naming any players. That’s it, no penalties and no suspensions, but a spokesman has been quoted saying the NHL does not “condone” cannabis use.

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With little drama, New Mexico moves toward legal marijuana By Paul Danish

E

ver since Colorado voters legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, the state has been a little like West Berlin during the Cold War — an island of liberty surrounded on all sides by sclerotic authoritarianism. No state bordering Colorado has legalized pot, and a couple of them sued in federal court (unsuccessfully) to block Colorado’s WIKIMEDIA COMMONS legalization law. But Colorado’s isolation may be about to change. With little fan-fare, a bill to legalize recreational marijuana in New Mexico has been moving through the state legislature. The bill was passed by the New Mexico House of Representatives last week and last Saturday was approved by the state Senate’s Public Affairs Committee. The next step is a hearing in the Senate Finance Committee. If it passes there, it will move to the Senate floor. The bill that passed the House squeaked through on a 36-to-34 vote, and as a result picked up some churlish amendments. According to the Marijuana Moment website, provisions that would have allowed home cultivation were stripped out on the House floor. Another amendment would require consumers to carry purchase receipts or else face criminal charges for marijuana possession. However the thing that sets the New Mexico bill apart from other legalization legislation is that, under it, the primary conduit for distribution would be staterun retail dispensaries. Privately run dispensaries

+

would be allowed only in places at least 25 miles from state-run operations. Surprisingly, the proposal to socialize New Mexico marijuana sales came from Republicans in the state Senate. It was incorporated into the house bill prior to the floor vote. A handful of states have state-run liquor stores. It’s not clear why the idea would be sufficiently appealing to Republican state lawmakers to prompt them to adopt it for New Mexico pot sales. Maybe the desire to get a bigger cut from legal marijuana than the state would otherwise get from taxation. New Mexico’s Democratic Governor Lujan Grisham said she supported marijuana legalization during her campaign last year. New Mexico isn’t the only state touching Colorado where the prospects of legal recreational ganja are looking up. A poll taken in Arizona last month found that for the first time a majority of Arizonans favored legalization. The poll of 600 likely Arizona voters found legalization was supported by a 52-to-41 percent margin with 7 percent undecided. The survey was conducted by OH Predictive Insights, which did two similar polls in 2016, neither

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of which found majority support for legalization. A June 2016 poll found 39 percent support versus 53 percent opposition, while a September 2016 survey found 43 percent in favor and 47 percent against. Arizona voters defeated a recreational marijuana legalization initiative that year by a 48.7-to-51.3 percent margin. Pollster Noah Rudnick said at least part of the reason for the flip in polling results may have been that his company changed the way it worded the question. The old question wording asked whether marijuana should be used recreationally, he said. “This time we specified whether it would be for adult use.” He said he thought a lot of the increase in support for legalization is how people perceive it. “If you’re looking at, like, alcohol, a lot of people think, ‘Ah, recreational, I’m worried about the kids’… but if you specifically put adult use, it puts people’s minds at rest,” he added. He also noted that if legalization was put back on the Arizona ballot, he thinks it would be likely to pass. “If the election were held today, and we’ve seen that it’s only been growing over time, it’s probably overwhelmingly likely to pass,” he said. Rudnick also said that the greater-than-50 percent support was “a big deal, especially as it looks like it’s going to be up for a vote again this cycle.” Just before the 2012 election in which Colorado became the first state in the country to legalize recreational marijuana, polls showed Coloradans’ support for legalization in the low 50s. Amendment 64, the legalization measure, ultimately passed with 55 percent of the vote. If New Mexico and Arizona end up legalizing recreational marijuana, it will be possible to go down to the Four Corners area and stand in three states with legal marijuana. Just don’t try it when you’re too high or you might fall into Utah.

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