Page 1

F R E E E v e r y T h u r s d a y Fo r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / Fe b r u a r y 7 - 1 3 , 2 0 1 9

IN SEARCH OF A PATH

Community members are divided on how to best move forward with potential Eldo-to-Walker connector trail by Emma Murray


KEEP CONNECTED

news:

Community members are divided on how to best move forward with potential ‘Eldo-to-Walker’ connector trail by Emma Murray

boulderganic:

Earth Guardians release new EarthTracks app by Will Brendza

adventure:

A day in the life of the Eldora Ski Patrol by Tom Winter

buzz:

Flaming Lips to play ‘The Soft Bulletin’ with Colorado Symphony, again by Angela K. Evans

arts & culture:

Jordan Casteel hopes to change the culture of viewing art with ‘Returning the Gaze’ by Caitlin Rockett

nibbles:

Kids suffer as hipster parents name them after trendy foods by John Lehndorff

community table:

Grossen Bart’s Taylor Wise and Walter Bourque on beer and beards by Matt Cortina

facebook.com/boulderweeklymedia twitter.com/boulderweekly

11 17 19 23

boulderweekly.com

VALENTINE’S RED SHOE SALE UP TO

30% OFF

30+ Red Shoe Styles included!

comfortableshoes.com BOULDER On the Downtown Mall & in The Village

DENVER - NOW OPEN Next to REI at 15th & Platte

29

Shop local.

45

25% off Gift Cards ($20.00 value for $15.00)

49

departments 5 6 8 27 33 40 41 43 51 55 57 59 61

The Highroad: 70-percent tax rate on the superrich would be good for America The Anderson Files: Manipulation... Venezuela style Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Overtones: Japanese psych rockers Kikagaku Moyo have come a long way Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘Moving Here From There’ by Derek Brown Film: 2019 Oscar-nominated short films to play area art houses The Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Catching up with cans from New Image and Boulder Beer Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Quickies Weed Between The Lines: Magic mushrooms coming soon? Cannabis Corner: Two U.S. Senators on pot

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

Save on local dining, entertainment, retail and wellness.

bestofboulderdeals.kostizi.com FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

3


• Best of Boulder • Best of Boulder • Best of Boulder • Best of Boulder • Best of Boulder • Best of Boulder • Best of Boulder •

2018 Best of Boulder Galleryof winners Best Costumes

~

The ritz

959 Walnut St., Boulder 303.443.2850 • theritzcostumes.com

Best Chinese Restaurant

~

Zoe ma ma

Best Dental Care ~

North boulder dental

North Boulder D E N TA L

2010 10th St., Boulder 303.545.6262 • zoemama.com

Best Pet Bourding ~

1001 North st., BOULDER 303.447.1042 • boulderdental.com

COTTONWOOD KENNELS

Best Medical Marijuana Evaluation Service

7275 VALMONT RD., BOULDER 303.442.2602 • COTTONWOODKENNELS.com

Best Moving Company

~

~

Holos health

3000 Center Green Dr. SUITE 210 • BOULDER 720.273.3568 • holoshealth.org

Taylor moving

Best Tattoo/Piercing Parlor

~

2735 IRIS AVE. SUITE A • BOULDER 303.444.7380 • BOLDERINK.COM

4949 Broadway #110, Boulder 303.443.5885 • taylormove.com BEST OF BOULDER

Bolder Ink


Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Editorial interns, Giselle Cesin, Lenah Reda Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama February 7, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 26 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER WEEKLY

Why a 70-percent tax rate on the superrich would be good for America by Jim Hightower

O

nce upon a time, there was a place where the prevailing ethic of the very richest people was that monetary self-indulgence was tacky and that wealth was a matter of good fortune, carrying with it an obligation to the Common Good. Believe it or not, that place was the U.S.A.! Where did it go? The prevailing ethic of today’s billionaire’s club is one of entitlement, superiority and grandiosity — including flaunting their wealth like the robber barons of old. For example, a ludicrously large “house” is under construction in Florida for one of our modernday barons, boasting 11 kitchens, five I

swimming pools and a 30-car garage. Worse, the billionaire class is asserting its sense of plutocratic privilege by weaponizing their huge fortunes. They’ve been spending massively (and often secretly) to build a culture of inequality across our land. To their dismay, however, America’s workaday majority is rebelling, with newly elected democratic populists like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez proposing a 70-percent tax rate on incomes above $10 million. “Oh, the horror,” shrieked billionaires like computer magnate Michael Dell: “Name a country where that’s worked,” he demanded dismissively. OK, Michael: How about the FEBRUARY 7, 2019

FOR MORE INFORMATION on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www. jimhightower.com.

United States? Yes, between the end of World War II in 1945 and Ronald Reagan’s start of coddle-the-rich government in 1981, the top tax rate never fell below 70 percent — and that was a period of unparalleled growth and prosperity for America’s middle class. Dell, who lives in a sprawling 33,000-square-foot house with all the charm of a shopping mall, confuses value with money and has no grasp of the essential richness of American egalitarianism. We should not be listening to people like him (much less being governed by them) just because they are rich. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. I

5


• Gifts for any cook • Fun and colorful kitchenware • Specialty foods, local and imported • Gadgets, cookware, and kitchen essentials • Louisville’s one-of-a-kind kitchen shop Present this coupon for

15% OFF

VOTED 1st PLACE KITCHEN SUPPLY STORE

a single regularly priced item. *some exclusions apply

728 Main Street • Louisville • 720.484.6825 www.SingingCookStore.com

Manipulation... Venezuela style by Dave Anderson

T

Valentine’s Day is Thursday, February 14th

F l o wer s. Local Chocolat es. Gifts. Just Call and We Will Deliver 303.442.6663

2851 Valmont in Boulder • 303.442.6663 sturtzandcopeland.com

6

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

wenty years ago, Hugo Chávez proclaimed the dawn of a new era of social justice in Venezuela after his landslide presidential election. He spoke of creating a “21st-century socialism.” He cut poverty and unemployment in half and doubled government spending on health care and education. Grassroots movements had experiments in “participatory democracy.” His party won 16 of 17 elections held between 1998 and 2012. Chávez had a cult of personality but he wasn’t a dictator. Jimmy Carter, who won a Nobel Peace Prize for his work through the election-monitoring Carter Center, proclaimed in 2012: “As a matter of fact, of the 92 elections that we’ve monitored, I would say that the election process in Venezuela is the best in the world.” Chávez’s social advances were made possible by the high price of oil from 2003 to 2008 and 2010 through mid-2014. Venezuela has the largest proven oil reserves in the world. It depends on oil for 95 percent of its exports. Unfortunately, this extreme dependency on oil has its downside. In the market, whatever goes up will eventually go down. I

In a report on Chávez in 2000, the late Venezuelan anthropologist Fernando Coronil was skeptical of the triumphalist celebration of Chávez. He said it was problematic that many believed Venezuela could break from the past with a “revolutionary magic,” which is “rooted in a traditional reliance on a messianic leader which has found in Venezuela’s subsoil a fertile source of inspiration and rich resources with which to pursue it.” Coronil said that ever since Venezuela became a major oil exporter, there have arisen heads of state of different political stripes who “appear as extraordinary figures capable of conjuring up the most fantastic dreams of progress.” Fast forward to today. Alejandro Velasco, associate professor of modern Latin America at New York University and an editor of the leftist NACLA Report on the Americas, notes that the massive improvements in the lives of ordinary people introduced by Chávez have “suffered deep reversals.” He goes on: “Hyperinflation has made wage gains and the currency worthless. Corruption, the target of Chávez’s first election in 1998, exploded during his government as a BOULDER WEEKLY


valentine’s gift card sale “WE MUST CONDEMN the use of violence against unarmed protesters and the suppression of dissent. However, we must learn the lessons of the past and not be in the business of regime change or supporting coups.” — Bernie Sanders fixed exchange rate coupled with a wave of petrodollars created incentives for currency speculation, now the primary source of wealth and influence for Chávista elites. “Years of electoral legitimacy hard-won through mass mobilization efforts in vote after vote now lies sacrificed by naked manipulation of electoral rules aimed at keeping Chávez’s successor, Nicolás Maduro, and a narrowing circle of confidants in power. Meanwhile, grassroots movements, once the lifeblood of Chávismo’s most exciting and progressive experiments in popular power, grow increasingly marginalized by a government ever deafer to their mounting critiques.” Bernie Sanders got it right when he issued a statement criticizing both Maduro and Trump: “The Maduro government in Venezuela has been waging a violent crackdown on Venezuelan civil society, violated the constitution by dissolving the National Assembly and was re-elected last year in an election that many observers said was fraudulent. Further, the economy is a disaster and millions are migrating. The United States should support the rule of law, fair elections and self-determination for the Venezuelan people. We must condemn the use of violence against unarmed protesters and the suppression of dissent. However, we must learn the lessons of the past and not be in the business of regime change or supporting coups — as we have in Chile, Guatemala, Brazil and the Dominican Republic. The United States has a long history of inappropriately intervening in Latin American countries; we must not go down that road again.” Mexico, Uruguay and the Vatican have offered to mediate between Maduro and the opposition. You wouldn’t know it from the U.S. mainstream media, but there is a dissident left in Venezuela. On Jan. 19, the Citizen Platform

in Defense of the Constitution (PCDC) held a press conference at the Central University of Venezuela campus, saying, “No to the parallel state imposed by the United States, the European Union and the Lima Group,” but also declaring its rejection of the “sell-out [entreguista] and unconstitutional regime of Nicolás Maduro.” The statement called for a popular referendum to “renovate all the public powers” in the country. The PCDC is made up of long-time social leaders of the left, including former cabinet ministers under Chávez and followers of the Socialist Tide (Marea Socialista) Party. Venezuelan left intellectual Edgardo Lander, who is active in PCDC, initiated an international declaration by a group of 120 people including academics, writers, lawyers and journalists from Latin America, North America and Europe. Their main demands are: “We reject the authoritarianism of the Maduro government, as well as the government’s repression in the face of growing protests throughout the country, for food, transportation, health, political participation, public services, living wages, among others. The Venezuelan people, who suffer the enormous precariousness and the current repression, have the right to protest without being criminalized for it. “We reject the self-proclamation of Juan Guaidó and the creation of a parallel State in the country, which will only lead to greater conflict and does not solve the main problems the country is facing. “We repudiate any anti-democratic political shortcut that does not pay tribute to a peaceful solution decided by the people. “We reject U.S. interventionism, as well as any other form of foreign interference.” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

buy two $85 for $139 Gift Cards

Save over

30

$

Downtown 1100 Spruce • 303.440.1992 Whole Foods 2905 Pearl • 303.545.6611 bodyworkbistro.com

SELECTED LINGERIE & SLEEPWEAR

UP TO 50% OFF

Lingerie, Swimwear & Apparel VISIT OUR SITE FOR SPECIAL OFFER

2425 Canyon • 303-443-2421 • www.christinasluxuries.com Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 12-5 FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

7


FEB 14 What better way to celebrate love than with a sushi dinner with us? PRIX FIXE MENU (OPTIONAL)

$55 per person. Enjoy with special cocktail and sake pairings for an additional $40 per person. R E S E R V E TO DAY

+1 303 938 0330 BoulderJapango.com

• Insurance • Wealth Transfer • Retirement Planning • 401k Options JASON KURTZ, CFP® Financial Advisor Edward Jones 1400 Folsom St. Ste 102, Boulder, CO 80302 Office: 303-449-2555 www.edwardjones.com/jason-kurtz Edward Jones is a licensed insurance producer in all states and Washington, D.C. through Edward D. Jones & Co., L.P., and in California, New Mexico and Massachusetts through Edward Jones Insurance Agency of California, L.L.C.; Edward Jones Insurance Agency of New Mexico, L.L.C.; and Edward Jones Insurance Agency of Massachusetts, L.L.C.

8

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

On the Buzzfeed Trump story

As much as one hates to venture into conspiracy speculation, the evidence of clandestine happenings in media and politics is indisputable, and here the Buzzfeed Cohen/Trump story has all the markings of a Russian counter intelligence program operation intended to discount the credibility of the Mueller investigation. The release of a false story, followed by a predictable official claim of its inaccuracy, is a classic example of an effort to manipulate public opinion. Predictably, conservative talk radio is hot on the trail, decrying, “Fake News! Fake News!” and Trump supporters are eagerly joining the show. Robert Porath/Boulder

On proposed gun ranges

Thanks for the informative article, “On the range.” (Re: News, Jan. 17, 2019). We used to have three outdoor ranges in Boulder County. I like how the need for a public range was fairly presented since the blanket forest restrictions, annexations and those without a brain have absolutely created this problem. Also, the writer was clear that forest restrictions will not affect hunters. This point should be listened to carefully, particularly by those anti-hunters. In effect, the NRA is also a group of anti-hunters, when they spew, “the Second Amendment is not about hunting.” Hunters use their guns enough to hold their firearm responsibilities in high regard versus the average handgun nut that can’t wait until the time to use it. Even so, I should not generalize about handgunners because many shoot safely without question. Where I saw some bias was in the paragraph, “Though it represents a solution to the problem posed by dispersed shooting in the forests, communities near the potential ranges have expressed concern about noise, wildlife disruption and water contamination from spent lead bullets.” I find that almost funny, given the mass influx of humanity that has made things worse for our state in every way, including the three mentioned in this paragraph. If we were truly concerned about that, then forest squatting, mountain bikes on forI

est trails and many other encroachments would be restricted. It’s just that guns are the demon. I always thank the Boulder Rifle Club range officers for keeping this single range open to the public, if even only during 14 days between spring and fall. Thanks and keep up the objective reporting. Michael Ortiz/Lafayette

Re-do 1-percent tax rate math

Dave Anderson’s otherwise fine column “Trickle Up Economics” (Re: Anderson Files, Jan. 24, 2019) fails to point out that the U.S. 70-90 percent tax rates from the 1950s to the 1970s were nominal rates. The effective tax rates paid by the 1 percent were considerably lower as a result of various deductions and widespread use of tax shelters and only partial taxation of capital gains. Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Picketty, two fairly left-leaning economists estimate that the effective tax rate on the 1 percent was about 42 percent, not that much higher that the current 37 percent. I think Boulder Weekly readers deserve a balanced perspective. John Mayer/Boulder

Thanks for Forest Service support

The five-week government shutdown was not like anything we have experienced before. It was a trying time for many Forest Service employees and their families and, yet, we made it through, together. On behalf of the Forest Service employees, I want to thank you, our communities, for your outpouring expressions of care and concern of our federal workforce. It is heartwarming and humbling to know that you saw beyond the “workforce” to see the people and the lives affected, and you reached out to make us one with you. Times like this accentuate the importance of shared stewardship. Our shared commitment to public lands and each other is invaluable. We are well aware and grateful of the partner and community work that kept some of our visitor services functioning. We have great gratitude and respect for our partners, and we are so thankful for those strong partnerships we have in place to help deliver our mission. BOULDER WEEKLY


Allergies, Cold, Sleep Issues?

Try Chinese Herbs!

Free consult in our Herb Clinic (normally $19.25) Mon., Thurs. and Fr. afternoons (Herbs not included in consult)

During the past five weeks, citizens, partners, elected officials and the media showed up for us. For example, • Private citizens, businesses and providers of all types of services made extraordinary offers toward the feeding, care and well-being of our employees. • The media carried on our conservation conversation on social media, TV and newspapers. • Our partners carried on our shared conservation work. • Volunteer organizations picked up trash at trailheads and campgrounds. • Citizens stocked outdoor restrooms with toilet paper. Across the Rocky Mountain Region of the Forest Service, we have 11 forest and grassland management units. We have over 2,800 Forest Service employees that work and live in communities across the five states of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming. Our communities have a special bond with nature, the magnificent scenery of mountains, rivers, wildlife and plains. National forests and grasslands are an essential element in communities that provide goods and services such as clean water and world-class recreation opportunities. As community members, our shared values connect us and we share in life’s trials and triumphs. We cherish our part in the community connection and strive to be good neighbors and to reciprocate kindness and availability in times of need. We thank you wholeheartedly for the outpouring of support, and we look forward to continuing our conservation mission with you in the future. Brian Ferebee/Rocky Mountain Regional Forester, USDA Forest Service After 20 years of discussion, starts and losses in momentum, the multiuser trail connecting Eldorado Canyon to Walker Ranch is moving forward. Over the past few years, we’ve seen Colorado Parks and Wildlife, Eldorado Canyon State Park, Boulder County and Boulder City work together beautifully to move

toward a solution. They held a public process and heard loud and clear that they hadn’t focused enough on the existing impacts on Eldorado Springs caused by the ever-growing population in the Front Range. They then modified their focus to be the trail alignment and to work on the problems facing the residents of the town, exactly as the process should work. I believe this is how most government projects should function. No single agency lives in a vacuum so working together ensures that CPW can represent the landscape-wide environmental impacts and all the agencies can ensure that trail connections are made in a way that makes sense for the entire area, not just on the land they control. We have to think regionally in the Front Range since thinking locally doesn’t work as our population grows. Unfortunately, at the Boulder County Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee (POSAC) meeting, the members of POSAC voted to slow the momentum by declaring that the problems of the town need to be solved before construction of the trail can begin. This is lose-lose for both the trail and the town because, as we’ve seen over the past 20 years, when a government loses momentum, things grind to a halt. My fear is that a loss of momentum leads to no trail, no solution to the problems facing the town and possibly the three agencies becoming disinclined to work together. Instead, we should continue to move the trail forward (which will take years) while using the trail opening date as a hard deadline for when the transportation problems of the town need to be mitigated. Everyone functions better with a deadline. I would like the focus to be the recreation community working hand in hand with the Eldorado Springs residents. I’m weary of the overcrowding in the Front Range causing our community to fight out of fear of the problems that crowding cause. We should rise above and work together towards a better overall community. Marcus Popetz/The Indian Peaks Traverse Coalition and the Boulder Mountainbike Alliance

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

On Eldorado Canyon trail

Call for your appointment today! Southwest Acupuncture College • 6630 Gunpark Drive • Boulder, CO

Call 303.581.9933 to make an appointment

Oriental Medicine has been used effectively by billions of people for thousands of years.

VOTED BEST OF BOULDER 2013

Nina’s

Flowers & Gifts

The Trusted Louisville Florist for your Valentine! For the perfect flower arrangements, look no further than Nina’s Flowers & Gifts

906 Main Street, Louisville, CO • 720-890-7500 • www.ninasflowersandgifts.biz

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

9


Cool winter savings (inside and out) throughout downtown at many of your favorite stores! Alpaca Connection Art Mart Gifts Art Source International Barbara & Company Boulder Book Store Canoe Club Canova Home Chantique Antiques and Chandeliers Chelsea

Crystal Galleries Experimac Boulder Freebird Stores Fresh Produce Front Range Anglers Full Cycle Goorin Bros. Hat Shop Hurdle’s Jewelry Island Farm Jackalope & Co.

The Little Jewel Lolo Rugs and Gifts Momentum MudbuM Old Tibet Pedestrian Shops Peppercorn Ragstock Ramble on Pearl Red Fox Outdoor Equipment

Savvy on Pearl Shoe Fly Starfish Topo Designs Two Hands Paperie Two Sole Sisters Voss Art + Home Weekends Where the Buffalo Roam Zeal Optics Zuni

Sponsored by

BoulderSidewalkSale.com


In search of a path

Community members are divided on how to best move forward with potential ‘Eldo-to-Walker’ connector trail

By Emma Murray

T

EMMA MURRAY

urn west off Highway 93 onto Highway 170 and follow the pavement until the speed limit drops from 45 to 35, 25 to 10 mph. Right around there is where the road turns to dirt, and potholes appear soon after. Ten mph seems about right — you don’t want to fly by the town of Eldorado Springs and the walnut trees Vira Ann Barber planted after arriving from Pennsylvania in 1860, or the ponderosa pines under which Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower might’ve lounged during their honeymoon in 1916, or the eclectic collection of homes that line the dirt road like old friends watching a summerday parade. Wind your way past the potholes, past the Eldorado Springs pool, an area where indigenous tribes like the Ute, Cheyenne and Arapaho used to frequent for health and spiritual renewal, and past the Eldorado Canyon State Park entrance station. Here you enter a 1.6-billion-year “panorama of geologic history,” as Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) describes the canyon’s steep sandstone cliffs, granite flakes and quartzite ridges, which evolved from Earthcore molten magma and compressed sand dunes long ago. For decades, outdoor recreationists — hikers, climbers, mountain bikers, picnickers, dog-walkers, hunters, snowshoers, fly fishers and equestrians — have visited Eldorado Canyon, drawn to its narrow profile, with some walls taller than the Eiffel Tower and only 600-odd-feet apart. Further west, beyond the slot, the terrain climbs higher, into the Rocky Mountains, eventually up and over the Continental Divide, nearly a straight shot to Winter Park. Many outdoor

enthusiasts dream of creating a nonmotorized, multi-use trail that would officially connect Boulder County to Grand County via Eldorado Canyon — providing car-free access to pristine wilderness straight from their front doors. Increasing connectivity and the networking of larger trail systems is, for some, a solution to increasing outdoor recreational demands that come with Front Range population growth. But others who live and breathe the impacts of that, like those who live in Eldorado Springs today, wonder how to protect the remaining integrity of their rural neighborhoods and the health of the environment that surrounds them, while also reckoning with the surge of public desire to access public land. Everyone wants solutions to increasing congestion, but how to create those solutions, and how to prioritize the various public demands, remains up for debate. Since Eldorado Canyon’s designa-

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

DEBATE OVER AN Eldo-to-Walker connector trail brings intensifying congestion issues in Eldorado Springs front and center.

tion as public land in 1978, CPW has recorded about 200,000 visitors each year. In 2005, 215,339 people visited the park; 2016 welcomed 279,473. But last year, more people than ever made it beyond the pavement, through the potholes, past the town’s colorful homes, around the historic pool, and into the canyon — in 2018, CPW counted 524,668 visitors. From his living room window, Christian Griffith watches it all: cars driving by, day in and day out, sometimes back and forth, again and again, as they search for places to leave their cars when the 220 parking spaces in the canyon are full, which is often before 10 a.m. these days. (To be clear, there is no public parking allowed in town, but people do it anyway.) On busy days, Griffith watches as his 7-year-old daughter darts across the road like she was playing a game of Frogger. On busy days, the dust is so thick he says he can’t open a window. FEBRUARY 7, 2019

“I mean, we’re effectively a oneroad-town,” he says. “When I drive in, rarely are both my hands on the steering wheel because most of the time I’m waving to someone. That’s just how it works out here.” Griffith moved to Eldorado Springs, a town of a few hundred people, from Boulder in 2010, but involved himself in the community before that as a rock climber and property owner. As a single dad, he wanted to raise his daughter, Alaina, in a “community that was more stable,” he says. “I wanted her to have a traditional, classic childhood.” Which is why, in the middle of January, Griffith helped draft and circulate a petition around town. He wanted to get everyone on the same page in their fight against the collective motion of CPW, Boulder County Parks and Open Space (POS), and City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP) to recommend to the Boulder County Commissioners that a new, multi-use trail connecting Eldorado Canyon to Walker Ranch, about three miles west, is indeed feasible. The last thing Griffith and most Eldorado Springs residents want is more people coming and going through town. But the support for a multi-use trail leaving from the back of the canyon and arriving at Walker Ranch (Eldo-to-Walker) is strong among the Boulder County community at large, and has been for a long time. The see ELDO-TO-WALKER Page 12

I

11


ELDO-TO-WALKER from Page 11

original vision for this connector trail was documented as early as 1999, in the County Trails Map of the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan. Since then, the idea has been highlighted in several documents, including former Gov. Hickenlooper’s 2016 project “Colorado the Beautiful,” which identified 16 top-priority trails across the state, this potential connector being one of them. Many trail-runners, bike-packers and through-hikers want an official access point in Eldorado Canyon that would take them to the greater Rocky Mountains, providing an epic opportunity for the extension of non-motorized recreation on the Front Range. “We need to create places for people to experience nature close to where they live,” says Jason Vogel, president of the Indian Peaks Traverse Coalition, a multi-use group advocating for the official designation of a 60-mile patchwork of trails known as the Indian Peaks Traverse, which would lead adventurers from Boulder to Winter Park on foot, bike or horse. The group considers the Eldo-toWalker connector as the traverse’s final “missing link.” “Why not provide that opportunity in a responsible way, and also create an opportunity for people who don’t want to get in a car?” Vogel also serves on the board of the Boulder Mountain Bike Alliance (BMA), which has been advocating for the Eldo-to-Walker connector for years. He currently leads BMA’s Advocacy Committee, which channels volunteer energy into working with local officials, boards and councils to address the needs and concerns of Boulder County’s estimated 25,000 mountain bikers. Hans Preiss, BMA’s OSMP liaison, explains the Eldo-to-Walker connector matters a lot to mountain bikers. “This trail has been talked about for over 20 years, and BMA has been involved because, if you look at Boulder County, we have no trail that connects the Plains with the Foothills,” he says. The only thing that comes close, Preiss says, is Chapman Drive, a trail to the summit of Flagstaff, but it’s only accessible via Boulder Canyon Drive. Once atop Flagstaff, it’s back to roads. “So, you always have to face traffic,” Preiss says. 12

I

In general, mountain bikers feel they’re often overlooked as a recreation group in Boulder County. Of the 560.8 miles of trails in the County, 60 percent welcome bikes, 74 percent allow horses, while 100 per-

2013 Walker Ranch Management Plan) and the land north of Eldorado Springs (OSMP’s 2011 West Trail Study Area Plan), which both explicitly call for more research and discussions between community groups to

COURTESY OF INDIAN PEAKS TRAVERSE COALITION

cent are available to pedestrians. As it stands, some mountain bikers choose to risk riding on private property or trails where bikes aren’t allowed when they descend from popular biking areas around Nederland and elsewhere in the surrounding national forests, because they don’t want to ride alongside cars. On the BCPOSoperated Betasso Preserve trail, bikes aren’t allowed two days each week. “But we are sharing those Betasso trails with everybody else,” Preiss says. “There is no ‘biker only’ day.” Considering the terrain profile, the Eldo-to-Walker connector would be considered an “expert” trail, one of only a few within a reasonable after-work commute for Boulder County folks. “If we’re looking at the South Boulder system, it’s very beginner, a little bit of intermediate,” says Wendy Sweet, BMA president. “There really aren’t a lot of options for advanced bikers.” Over the course of at least the past five years, BMA has been leveraging its advocacy work and volunteer energy to encourage Boulder County to follow through with the recommendations of historic documents and recent updates to management plans involving Walker Ranch (BCPOS’s FEBRUARY 7, 2019

see if a multi-use trail connection from Eldorado Springs to Walker Ranch is even feasible. At the moment, Walker Ranch — a 7.6-mile bike-, pedestrian- and equestrian-friendly loop maintained by BCPOS — is accessible from Eldorado Canyon via foot or horse, though the three-mile Eldorado Canyon Trail is steep and heavily eroded at points. To bike Walker Ranch, the quickest way is a halfhour drive up and over Flagstaff where two trailheads lie. Renovating and adding to the existing trail in order to make it bike-friendly could cut down on car-use and also provide a legal way to access the dozens of trail miles west of Boulder County. A few years ago, to build momentum on the consideration of a new trail, “We were able to get people together to attend meetings at the state park,” Preiss recalls. “We said, ‘Folks, let’s talk about this. What are your concerns? And what can we do to help move this forward, at least to get the study going?’” He adds, “So where we’re at right now is we have a study.” Back in 2014, the three agencies whose land would be involved in a I

new connector trail — CPW, BCPOS and OSMP — decided to conduct official research on its viability. They created a shared plan, hired consultants and initiated the “Eldorado Canyon to Walker Ranch Connection Feasibility Study.” Due to continuing restoration priorities after the 2013 100-year flood and some leadership changes, the study wasn’t completed until the end of 2018. In November the three partner agencies announced, based on their findings, that a multi-use trail along the north side of the canyon is indeed feasible when compared to other options in the area. But the study is just the beginning of the process; to actually break ground on a multi-use trail, several other steps must be completed. It’s supposed to work like this: After listening to public concerns, the state, county and city agencies are tasked with collecting both scientific information and community comments, hence the feasibility study. Based on what they gather, the individual agencies then make an official recommendation about what they think is appropriate action to their respective boards and committees. BCPOS reports to the Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee (POSAC); OSMP reports to the City of Boulder Open Space Board of Trustees (OSBT). POSAC and OSBT then consider the agencies’ recommendations, plus feedback from the community, and make their own recommendations to the Boulder County Commissioners, who ultimately have the power to approve, or prohibit, a new trail. Public input has been important from the start, BCPOS Resource Planner Jeff Moline says, especially “in big issues that the community has a lot of interest in.” So, in August 2018, the partner agencies first notified the public about the feasibility study; anyone interested could submit comments about the project’s timeline and process, the analysis topics that could be used to evaluate route options, and which routes should be considered in the study. They hosted an information open house, and 100 people attended; approximately 475 comments were submitted. Griffith received a postcard about BOULDER WEEKLY


the feasibility study and saw a flyer about the open house posted at the post office. “You know, the same size postcard as you get when your neighbor wants to put an addition on their house or, you know, wants to adjust a lot line,” he recalls. He went to the open house with about 30 other Eldorado Springs residents. Laura Tyson, an Eldorado Springs resident of 30 years, says she doesn’t remember ever getting a postcard. “I found out about the whole thing through a neighbor’s email.” BMA, meanwhile, spread the word through its e-newsletter, social media channels and other community gatherings. After analyzing impacts like environmental and cultural resources, visitor experience, trail construction costs, trail management and maintenance, and interface with Eldorado Canyon State Park, the partner agencies narrowed the possible trails down to three options: a route north of the canyon, one to the south, or “no action,” keeping the current trail as is. At a second open house on Nov. 28, 2018, the partner agencies announced their preliminary recommendation of the north route as it “completes the multi-use trail connection in a way that best balances the conservation and recreation needs of the area.” They assessed parts of the existing Eldorado Canyon Trail could be used, in addition to adding more than two dozen switchbacks in order to ease the terrain for bikers. The partner agencies believe, “Choosing a [route] will strengthen the capacity and momentum for the community and partner agencies to collaborate on providing access, connecting visitors to enjoyable experiences, and addressing transportation issues,” as the study states. Over 120 people attended this meeting; 675 comments were submitted. More than 90 percent of Eldorado Springs residents officially rejected the route. “We are a unanimous voice echoing from this canyon right now,” Griffith says. Even if the partner agencies claim it’s possible to balance recreation and conservation with a new trail, most residents still wonder about the quality of life in town. Most don’t want any more action in the

canyon until the congestion situation is assuredly resolved. Conditions have changed since the publication of the 2011 and 2013 documents that the partner agencies and BMA used to catalyze the feasibility study, both Griffith and Tyson point out. “We need to have our concerns and the impacts on our livelihood and the wellbeing of our homes addressed before you put your little

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

bike path in,” Griffith says. “For them, it’s another recreational opportunity. For us, this is where we live, right? We are already inundated.” Tyson says, “We were not really invited to the table as a stakeholder in the process. We were invited to comment online, but then what happened was the online system was pretty much overrun by mountain bikers. There are 200 of us in Eldorado

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Springs, thousands of bikers in Boulder, with a well-organized and well-funded organization, and they got lots of people to do the online survey,” she says, and adds, “Now there’s some afterthought of ‘Well, we’ll build a trail and then we’ll come up with a management plan and include people of Eldorado Springs,’ see ELDO-TO-WALKER Page 14

I

13


ELDO-TO-WALKER from Page 13 EMMA MURRAY

but that’s really putting the cart before the horse.” “Our comments were lumped into this big melting pot,” Griffith says. “How fair is it to compare the opinions of someone who’s living out of [town] to someone who literally lives at the mouth of the canyon?” Tyson’s not convinced adding more agencies and elements to the solution process will speed anything up or ensure resolutions are found. “As an Eldorado Springs resident, I still feel pretty dismissed and not really included in the process.” Kacey French, OSMP planner, says the partner agencies have considered all input from all stakeholders. “It’s not a vote,” she adds. “We are considering all aspects of the recommendation.” Two months later, on Jan. 24, Marni Ratzel, BCPOS Resource Planner II, presented to POSAC the first official north route recommendation, along with a renewed promise to continue interagency collaboration on congestion solutions at the public hearing in downtown Boulder, where 53 people testified over the course of nearly five hours. Seven-year-old Alaina Griffith, her father, IPTC’s Vogel, BMA’s Sweet and others from all over Boulder County were among them. Most Eldorado Springs residents want discussions of a new trail tabled until tangible congestion solutions are in place and a proper assessment of the environmental impacts of new switchbacks across vulnerable, pristene slopes is completed; most mountain bikers think moving ahead with the planning process will create a stronger collaborative environment in which solutions for Eldorado Springs’ concerns can be created. In the end, POSAC voted 5-1 to approve the partner-agency north route recommendation, but they included an amendment aimed at the people of Eldorado Springs: a motion to ensure “capacity mitigation efforts are identified, funded, and executed, and relevant metrics are met prior to initiating construction of trail.” On Feb. 13, OSMP will make their official recommendation to OSBT and there’ll be another opportunity for public testimony. In March, Boulder County Commissioners will convene, revise the spectrum of input 14

I

and make a final decision. If approved, the partner agencies state they will continue collaboration with Eldorado Springs residents and will ensure capacity mitigation efforts are in place before opening the trail to bikes. Nevertheless, Tyson and Griffith plan to be at these meetings and to continue speaking up against the recommendations. They want the trail idea tabled until the mitigation efforts are proven and in place. “We haven’t even gotten into the environmental impacts yet,” Tyson says. She worries how construction and more visitors would impact the OSMP Habitat Conservation Area that the new trail would have to pass briefly through. “I’ve never gotten involved in public process like this, never spoken at a meeting. This has lit a fire in me.” BMA, IPTC and the three partner-agencies are well aware of Eldorado Springs’ residents’ concerns, though they see the current momentum that’s building toward a green light as an opportunity to join forces and find solutions to at least the congestion and crowding issue. According to the feasibility study, a new multiuse trail would attract around 60 more people on a peak day. “This can’t be insurmountable,” Preiss says, offering the support of BMA’s volunteer workforce, which amounted to thousands of hours of human-power last year. “It’s actually this conversation about this trail bringing people together and saying, ‘Hey, we have a problem here, what can we do to fix it?’” Preiss says. Sweet adds, “It’s kind of a bummer [the congestion is] coloring their perception of this ... when this is a FEBRUARY 7, 2019

state park, which is a resource for all people in Colorado.” If only there was an obvious solution that appeased everyone. “To be honest, I’m not sure there is a solution,” says Tyson. “As a town, along with the private people who own the road, we’ve been trying for years to figure out solutions.” Part of what makes a solution to the congestion issue so complicated is the variety of stakeholders involved. Highway 170 is owned and operated by Colorado Department of Transportation; the dirt road, Eldorado Springs Drive, is owned by the same private company that owns the pool; then CPW takes care of the section winding through the Canyon, until it turns to Kneale Road, which is privately owned by the handful of historic residences that are situated west of the park. People have tossed around ideas of a reservation system, but not many are keen on the spontaneity-squashing advance requests for visitation days and times. A shuttle system might work, perhaps like the one operated at Nederland’s Hessie Trailhead, but then where would all the parked cars hang out? The nearby lots at the trailheads of Marshall Mesa, Doudy Draw and South Mesa are as jampacked at inside the Canyon on any given fair-weather day. “There’s no one answer at this point,” says CPW public information officer Jason Clay. “We completely understand a lot of the problems existing with congestion. … Through the whole process when the construction starts, we’ll be sure the congestion mitigation efforts will be ongoing and continuing.” As of late, managing Eldorado I

Canyon State Park has been no easy feat. In tandem with tremendous visitation spikes, CPW has also faced budget cuts. As such, CPW recently announced plans to initiate a Visitor Use Management Plan for the canyon as soon as it secures funding, and to continue collaboration with partner agencies, state park visitors and the Eldorado Springs community. Over email, BCPOS’s Ratzel states this effort exemplifies the partner agencies’ commitment to examining and addressing concerns. “The process will include robust public input to seek ideas for possible solutions, to weigh options, and to generate a final plan that will attend to existing capacity issues at the park,” she writes. While Park employees are not allowed to publicly comment on the ongoing debate, Tyson says, “In my conversations with them, [they] are pretty much unanimously opposed. They see it too, it’s not a good fit.” Other Eldorado Residents corroborate this claim. Up at Walker Ranch’s Ethel Harrold trailhead, Vogel points to the back side of the OSMP ridge that sits like a wall between Highway 93 and Walker Ranch — public land on which mountain bikers are not allowed. “This range of mountains always prevents you from getting that final piece of trail in,” he says. “There’s a lot of trail to be had west of here, [but] the only legal ways to get down are roads.” He adds, “You always end up with losing two thousand feet of elevation at the very end of your day, all on a road, and it’s just... it’s just horrible.” Embracing connectivity plays a large role in the way Vogel wrestles with congestion issues, both in the context of collaboration between people with differing perspectives, and in terms of literal trail networks. “The world is dying,” he says. “We need to figure out ways to pull nature into people, or people will lose contact with nature. And that’s just the beginning of the end.” It’s clear a fix for the situation in Eldorado Springs is long past due, whether or not a new trail is built or mountain bikers come through. The question now is if the situation should be fixed before or after consideration of a new trail continues. The answer? Depends on which side you ask. BOULDER WEEKLY


Dear Friends, It is with great joy and renewed ease that I am opening my new somatic classroom in south Boulder with many class times on the schedule starting this week. The yoga practice is the most important thing we can do to regulate our nervous systems, and thereby change our outlook, our minds and our actions. Come join the practice. ~ Michelle Anderson MS, C-IAYT, BCST

Kaiut/ Therapeutic Yoga • Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 - 5:00pm & 5:30 - 6:30pm • Wednesday and Friday 10:30 -11:30am & 12:00 - 1:00pm (Saturday Classes beginning in March)

For more information about the class schedule and events visit Biodynamicyoga.net.

At the Boulder Mennonite Church, Downstairs Fellowship Hall 3910 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO

I t ’ s a n e w day f o r d e p r e s s I o n t r e at m e n t.

Richard L. Suddath MD Earle Shugerman MD

Now Participating With Several Major Insurance Providers

LASER TAG

We offer an advanced medical treatment, known as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), to alleviate depressive episodes that have failed to improve with the use of antidepressant medication. • Comfortable Office Setting in Central Boulder • Treatments Are Well Tolerated and Do Not Interfere With Usual Daily Activities • Non-Invasive, FDA Approved Procedure • No Anesthesia or Sedation Required

2501 Walnut, Ste. 207, Boulder, CO bouldertms.com • 303.449.0318

LASER TAG

LASER TAG

Broomfield Lanes

Horsetooth Lanes

North College Lanes

Classic Lanes

Estes Park Lanes

100 Nickel - 303-466-9700

217 W. Horsetooth Rd. - 970-226-6327

830 N. College Ave. - 970-226-6327

2454 8th Ave. - 970-353-4275

555 South Vrain - 303-466-9700

BROOMFIELD

BOULDER WEEKLY

FORT COLLINS

I

FORT COLLINS

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

GREELEY

ESTES PARK

I

15


Steve’s Carpet Care

State of the Art Truck-Mounted Power

www.StevesCarpetCare.net

303-530-4900

Clean Your Carpets, Air Ducts and More...

FOR LESS

Carpet Cleaning Special

35

$

Air Duct Special

Carpet Cleaning Special

159

$

Per Room

3 Room Minimum

Up to 5 Rooms

Coupon valid on residential work only. Any room over 260 sq. ft. qualifies as multiple rooms. Expires 3/6/19.

Coupon valid on residential work only. Up to 1000 sq. ft. Expires 3/6/19.

10 Vents Only

189

$

• We Clean Each Individual Duct • Certified Technicians Additional Vents $25 and Furnace $30-$50 Extra Coupon valid on residential work only. Expires 3/6/19.

Carpet Pre-Spray Included and Carpets Dry in 1-2 Hours • Technicians Certified & Trained • Locally Owned All Work Guaranteed • No Hidden Charges • Eco Friendly and Safe for Children & Pets • Truck Mounted Steam Clean • Patented Air Duct cleaning

42 YEARS IN BOULDER COUNTY AND SURROUNDING AREAS

THE 7TH ANNUAL

SEE FILM SCHEDULE AND PURCHASE TICKETS AT THEDAIRY.ORG/ONLINE/BJFF19

B O ULDE R

JEW ISH

FFESTIVAL I LM @ DAIRY ARTS CENTER GALA OPENING AT THE BOULDER JCC

MARCH 7 - 17, 2019

TM

Cold Heart Cash STAY BETWEEN

2/11-2/17

1 NIGHT

2 NIGHTS

159

259

$

$

50

$ IN-HOUSE CREDIT per stay, Includes a enjoy a cocktail at License No. 1 or dine with us at Spruce Farm & Fish or The Corner Bar.

Book now!

CALL: 303.442.4344 OR VISIT: BOULDERADO.COM USE CODE: CHC19 BOULDERADO.COM 16

I

|

303.442.4344

|

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

2 1 1 5 1 3 TH S T R E E T B O U L D E R , C O 8 0 3 0 2 I

BOULDER WEEKLY


A fitness tracker for the planet Earth Guardians release new EarthTracks app

by Will Brendza COURTESY OF EARTH GUARDIANS

F

or 26 years the Earth Guardians have been working to amplify the voices of the world’s youth in the environmental and social justice movements. What started as a single school initiative in Maui, Hawaii, has grown to encompass 44 different countries, inspiring and empowering tens of thousands of young people to stand up for their future, to fight for their planet. Now based in Boulder, this youth-powered nonprofit is educating a new generation of activists approaching climate change as a social justice issue. They’ve sued the Trump administration over the approval for the Keystone XL pipeline, advocated for municipalizing Boulder’s energy grid and even helped establish a moratorium on fracking. Recently, a group of Earth Guardians’ youth plaintiffs sued the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission for failing to consider public health and the environment in its rulemakings. Known as the “Martinez Case,” the lawsuit made it all the way to the Colorado Supreme Court before getting shot down in January 2019. Despite the loss, the Earth Guardians are still forging on, fighting against climate change. And soon they’ll have a techy new environmental tool to spread their message: the EarthTracks app. EarthTracks, the Earth Guardians latest environmental innovation, is set to debut in over 20,000 classrooms across the country this February. It will connect groups of young environmentalists around the world, helping people achieve more sustainable lifestyles and expanding the Earth Guardians’ network of activists. “It’s really the first step that we’ve been able to take to aggregate data to look at our impact,” says Tamara Roske, the visionary director of the Earth Guardians. “[EarthTracks] will allow us to bring peo-

Earth Guardians worked in partnership with Amplifier — an organization that seeks to amplify grassroots movements through iconic visual art — which has worked with campaigns such as March for Our Lives, The Women’s March, We The People and Power to the Polls. The app will supplement a series of lesson plans in the participating classrooms that approach climate change ple together, to give people a through the lens of social justice. These Earth Guardians’ new app, way that they can take action unconventional lesson plans use art, EarthTracks, will help streamline and engage.” storytelling, peer-to-peer engagement environmental activism across the globe and encourage youth to Roske describes the app as and open conversation to inspire cliparticipate in solutions-oriented actions essentially a fitness tracker for mate action and activism and to cultiaround their communities. the planet. It’s a tool designed vate sustainable mindsets. to incentivize sustainable When the app goes live, some halfchoices and encourage environmentally conscious million kids between the sixth and 12th grades will lifestyles in communities, in schools and among embark on their own Earth Guardian adventure, individuals; a means for plotting one’s environmental each school forming its own crew. They will commit impacts and committing to actions to reduce them. to actions to reduce or minimize their environmental “You can set up reminders to take these actions,” footprint — such as eating less meat, using less water says Roske. Reminders will prompt users to bring a or driving less. From there on, the app tracks the travel mug instead of using a paper coffee cup, or crew’s progress, awarding points for sustainable bike instead of drive. “And then it calculates how choices. much of an environmental impact you’re having.” The EarthTracks app also represents a new and Individuals can track their own environmental comprehensive way for Earth Guardians to streamimpacts, and so can Earth Guardian “crews,” which line crew training. It will allow them to compile is one of the most important aspects of the app, data from all their crews around the world, so difaccording to Roske. Earth Guardians has over 250 of ferent groups and individuals can see what kinds of these “youth-led groups of mobilized leaders” spread environmental impacts they’re having on the planet, out across the globe. A crew can be a family, a school, and so that the Earth Guardians can track progress a group of friends, a business or an entire community. toward sustainability. It will allow crews to share They are the activists, artists and musicians that are information more easily than before and to collaboout there driving action, fueling the cultural shift rate with other crews around the world. toward a sustainable future. “The big vision is that we all become Earth “The app is definitely youth-driven,” explains Guardians and we change our relationship with the Roske. It was developed in coordination with young Earth,” says Roske. “And we do it by how we live our people, for young people, she says. It gamifies environlifestyles, how we teach our kids, how we empower mentalism in engaging and exciting ways. For example, each other and our leaders.”

Fast, Secure, Professional

Boulder’s Best Massages! Organic or Antiaging Facial Pure Essential Oils (Rose!) Sanitas, Astara & Hauschka Skincare Acupuncture Facelift!

LIGHTNING FAST SERVICE OF PROCESS AND DOCUMENT DELIVERY SINCE 1987, DBC HAS CUT DOWN ON TRAFFIC & A LOT OF POLLUTION ALONG THE FRONT RANGE WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM | WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM/QUICKQUOTE | (303) 571-5719 BOULDER WEEKLY

I

Deep Tissue Massage Gentleman’s Facial Tom Kat Herbal Tonic Reflexology Pharos Essential Oil

Bring this ad for $10 off a Valentines Day Gift Certificate!

(exp. 3/31/19)

728 Pearl Street - Boulder FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

17


Relax with a view

The most geothermal pools in Colorado.

February Special! Soak: Buy 1, get a future pass for only $8* Stay: $28 off your room rate Promo Code FEBBW * MUST BRING THIS AD TO RECEIVE FUTURE PASS DISCOUNT

Tilt VR

Boulder County’s Only Virtual Reality Arcade Opening February 2019 30+ Game TiTles To choose from

Now taking bookings at www.TiltColorado.com 25% discount on bookings for February - Use Code BW25 640 Main Street, Louisville, CO 303-997-9548

www.TiltColorado.com • VR@TiltPinball.CO 18

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


A day in the life of the Eldora Ski Patrol story and photos by Tom Winter

T

he morning dawns clear and cold, the eastern sunrise kissing the peaks on the Continental Divide. Up at Eldora ski area, Travis Brock has already been awake for hours. He’s the first cog in the highly professional machine that is one of the most important interfaces between the behind-the-scenes operations that make Eldora run and the more public positions of the resort. If Brock feels the pressure, he doesn’t show it. He’s got a mountain to open and it’s a holiday weekend. Time to rock and roll. Ski areas like Eldora become small cities during the winter, with hundreds of employees and thousands of visitors. The backend employees such as snowmakers, lift mechanics, cat drivers and maintenance workers are bolstered by the “front of the house” staff: the ski instructors, lift operators, bartenders and ticket window cashiers that interact with most skiers and snowboarders. Bridging this gap are the patrollers. These essential employees perform a complex dance that creates the glue that holds ski areas together. Not only is the ski patrol tasked with opening terrain and keeping the mountain safe, they’re also first in line when it comes to tweaked knees, lost children and reckless skiers. It’s a delicate balancing act that involves highly attuned people skills, expert skiing and riding ability, and a true passion for the outdoors and mountains, along with the ability to withstand brutally cold temperatures, ground blizzards, frostbite and pretty much anything else that Mother Nature can throw at you. But for the men and women who make up Eldora’s Ski Patrol, they wouldn’t have it any other way.

7:53 a.m.

Ski Patrol Director Brock puts the finishing touches on the plans for the day. Brock has worked at Eldora for 14 years, serving as Patrol Director for the last seven. In the winter he oversees a staff of 31, the team a mix of 14

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

full-time professional patrollers assisted by 17 volunteers. With constantly changing weather and snow conditions, each day brings different challenges, from opening new terrain to managing early morning race training or other special events.

8:00 a.m.

Each morning the members of the patrol who are on duty for the day gather for a morning briefing. Along with snow, weather and ava-

lanche updates, the team goes over any special events or other needs. Meetings are open, highly communicative affairs, with plenty of participation and consultation. Employees are also recognized, in this case patroller Zack Ryan, who was named Eldora Employee of the Month for January, and there’s always a review of best practices when it comes to personal injury prevention, including a stretching session prior to heading out for on-snow work on the mountain. While the atmosphere is light, with plenty of good-natured banter and joking, there’s an underlying seriousness and relaxed professionalism that permeates the room.

ASSISTANT SKI PATROL DIRECTOR Matt Phillips doesn’t shy away from the on-hill tasks that all patrollers have to do.

see SKI PATROL Page 20

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

19


Boulder’s Winter Sports Rental Headquarters We sell Discount Loveland Lift Tickets

20% OFF Demo/Performance Ski or Board Daily Rental

FREE

Hot Wax 2019 Ski Season

Expires 2/21/19

Cannot combine discounts.

u u 1933 28th St. • Boulder, CO 80301 u u 303 n 449 n SNOW (7669) crystalskishop.com

FeBruArY is MACulAr deGenerAtion AWAreness MontH

Dr. Terri Oneby

10 million Americans have age-related macular degeneration (AMD), by far the leading cause of severe vision loss. Our doctors use OCT-Angiography, the most advanced imaging technique available to detect the earliest changes of macular degeneration when management can often prevent serious vision loss. By combining OCT with a detailed history and clinical examination, our doctors will make a plan specific to your condition. The goal is to keep your vision the best it can be based on the recommendations of the latest research. Don’t have AMD? Our doctors will provide steps you can take to reduce your risk.

Boulder Vision Center 303-443-4545

or visit bouldervisioncenter.com

28th near apapahoe

- buffalo village

MeDiCare, MeDiCaiD anD va aCCepteD 20

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

SKI PATROL from Page 19

8:13 a.m.

With the lifts scheduled to open to the general public, the patrol fans out over the mountain to check ski area boundaries, signage and closures. Here, Brock adjusts a rope closure on the edge of a trail. Brock leads by example and doesn’t shy away from hard work or the more mundane onhill tasks that all patrollers have to do. It’s an approach that has won him unparalleled loyalty from his team and is a reflection of his dedication and passion for patrolling. “It’s always exciting, always changing,” Brock says. “Everyone knows we’re not getting rich doing this job, we’re doing it for the love.”

8:20 a.m.

Charlie Allen is all smiles as he wraps up his morning routes around the mountain prior to opening. Allen, 64, has been a volunteer with the Eldora Ski Patrol for 12 years. “This is my home hill,” says Allen, “and it’s nice to be part of the inner workings.” “I like the people,” he adds. “I get to work with people of all ages and there are new people here every year. I

I’m happy to be part of it.”

10:12 a.m.

“O.B.” holds down the first aid room at the base of the mountain. “It’s an amazing crew,” says O.B. of the Eldora Ski Patrol team. “I like doing patient care and I like to ski, so I get to do all the things I like to do. Plus you have a lot of other outdoorsy people who like to work with people, so it’s a really good environment.”

11:30 a.m.

Ed LeBlanc talks to customers on top of the Corona sector of the mountain. A love of interacting with people is a common theme Eldora ski patrollers use to describe why they like their jobs and stick with it year after year. LeBlanc was seeing if he could connect a lost wallet with its owner. “I’ll find her,” LeBlanc says. “We’re not that big of a mountain so it’s easy to track people down.”

12:30 p.m.

With an afternoon storm expected to roll in, Zack Ryan monitors BOULDER WEEKLY


9 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE

srt, mitsubishi, subaru, duramax, cummins, ls, ecotec, ecoboost

TOP LEFT: PATROLLERS CAN warm up at the top of Eldora’s Alpenglow lift, but the structure serves as a command center. Bottom left: Ski Patrol Director Travis Brock prepares to brief his team for a day on the mountain.

the weather from the top of the Corona lift. Rapidly changing weather and snow conditions add an extra dimension of responsibility for ski patrollers, as they need to make real-time decisions regarding open terrain and monitor unusual weather events to ensure that mountain operations are not impacted by sudden storms or high winds. The bonus? Knowing when it’s going to snow, how much it’s going to snow and exactly where to find first tracks on a powder day.

“You get a lot of autonomy here.” Assistant ski patrol director Matt Phillips wrangles snow fencing in the Indian Peaks sector of the resort. “We didn’t have these hammers back in the day,” laughs Phillips, “But now the snow fencing isn’t as good!”

4:18 p.m.

Patroller AJ Baeseman works the phone while on duty at patrol dispatch at the top of the Alpenglow lift. From skiers who don’t have lift tickets to missing kids to emergency responses dispatch oversees the day’s patrolling ecosystem. “I love that it’s a small patrol here and you get to do everything,” says Baeseman, who oversees dispatch one to two days each week. BOULDER WEEKLY

I

As an afternoon storm blows in, patrollers have a room with a view at the top of Eldora’s Alpenglow lift. The structures serve as a private warming hut, command center and a place to resupply with boundary ropes, bamboo, signs and other tools of the trade.

2:38 p.m.

Reliably serving Boulder County since 1987

3:16 p.m.

With the mountain shuttered for the day and the storm gathering strength, it’s time for a sweep and one last look to make sure that everyone is off the mountain safely. Ed LeBlanc surveys the landscape before heading down to wrap up his day. “You sometimes find people out here when it’s all closed,” he says. “They have a flask of whiskey or something and they’re just enjoying the moment, the quiet.” According to Brock, Eldora usually has a few openings each winter. “You need to be a hard worker, have a great sense of humor and be an expert skier,” Brock says. Along with those traits, EMT or Outdoor Emergency Care certification is required. Additional courses such as Avalanche I training can help a candidate move to the front of the line. Eldora usually holds on-snow tryouts in late March, with positions commencing when the ski area opens in November.

1:46 p.m.

Trident Commercial Snow Removal 303.857.5632 DOCUMENTARY FILM

Dig into the stories of these young Colorado farmers building community around locally-grown food

HOW WE GROW FEB 22 | 7:00 PM TICKETS: chautauqua.com 900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

coloradochautauqua

I

colochautauqua

21


BOULDER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA MICHAEL BUTTERMAN, MUSIC DIRECTOR

The Heavenly Life SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 7:30 PM Macky Auditorium, Boulder

MARK O’CONNOR Strings and Threads SAMUEL BARBER Knoxville, Summer of 1915 GUSTAV MAHLER Symphony No. 4 Mary Wilson, soprano The wonder and wisdom of childhood imbues both Barber’s

MARY WILSON, AMERICAN SOPRANO

nostalgic reverie and Mahler’s sublime evocation of Heaven. Fiddle virtuoso Mark O’Connor’s Strings and Threads connects to Knoxville’s Appalachian setting and we’ll enjoy soprano Mary Wilson’s easy virtuosity and deep musicianship.

22

I

Event of Note

Tickets start at $15; Students $5

Thursday, February 7, 7-9 PM The Chapel at The Academy, Boulder $60/person

Feb. 9 concert sponsored by Three Leaf Concepts

BoulderPhil.org 303.449.1343

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


BRANDON MARSHALL

The best of both worlds

Flaming Lips to play ‘The Soft Bulletin’ with Colorado Symphony, again

by Angela K. Evans

I

n 1969, thousands of people crammed into the Royal Albert Hall in London to watch Deep Purple perform their Concerto for Group and Orchestra with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The band’s long hair and unbuttoned shirts were juxtaposed with the tux-wearing and neatly groomed orchestra players. The concerto begins almost as a battle of the bands, the orchestra pitted against Deep Purple, competing for preeminence of the musical realms. By the end, the two integrate seamlessly, unified in both sound and performance. The crowd was likewise bifurcated. Some observers sat still in their seats, heads maybe cocked to one side or the other, a few lit cigarettes dotted the crowd. Others, however, were on their feet dancing, headbanging to the combination of electric guitars and cellos, synthesizers and horns, a classic rock drum kit and orchestral percussion. At the end, the entire audience gave a standing ovation, clapping, cheering and waving British flags as Jon Lord of Deep Purple stood to shake conductor Malcom Arnold’s hand, a formality not often seen at rock concerts. It’s the performance credited with starting the trend of classical orchestras collaborating with contemporary rock bands — from Roger Waters playing with the The Military Orchestra of the Soviet Army on The Wall — Live in Berlin to Arcade Fire jamming with the Manchester Orchestra at Summerfest and everything in between. It’s the genesis of uniting seemingly disparate groups, audiences and musicians alike, an effort to bring new audiences into the symphony, to preserve and appreciate a classical art form while remaining relevant. “All orchestras really, all around the world, have been quite smart about this idea that if you get a new, younger audience in there, and have their minds blown by this sound, and it’s really mindblowing, it’s a great experience,” says Wayne Coyne, frontman of The Flaming Lips, who are set to revisit their 2016 Red Rocks performance of The Soft Bulletin with the Colorado Symphony Feb. 22 at the Boettcher Concert Hall in celebration of the album’s 20th anniversary. It’s “us playing to a slightly different audience, playing something in a slightly different atmosphere, but also bringing something see THE SOFT BULLETIN Page 24

IN 2016, The Flaming Lips performed their seminal album ‘The Soft Bulletin’ with the Colorado Symphony at Red Rocks.

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

23


BRANDON MARSHALL

THE SOFT BULLETIN from Page 23

different to the symphony.” It’s hard for Coyne to believe what’s often described as the band’s seminal record was released two decades ago. The band has been playing and recording together since 1983, and time seems almost irrelevant to him now. “We don’t really remember how we made it, but we know we did,” Coyne says about the album. Created over the few years preceding its 1999 release, The Soft Bulletin utilized emerging technology to create a record rich in orchestration without the use of an actual orchestra. The entire album displays dense instrumentation, distorted drumbeats and piano riffs with overlays of synthesized string parts and vocal harmonies. The middle track, “The Observer,” is perhaps the pinnacle of such electronic orchestration, a sweeping instrumental piece with an angelic chorus of heavenly voices. “We’re not symphonic composers and all that, but in making it our own way, it sounds like that,” Coyne says. “We just went about it like we knew what we were doing, but we don’t really know what we’re doing.” “We’re the sun and we’re the clouds but if you want to see the sunset, you can’t be the sun and clouds,” he expounds a few minutes later. “You have to be standing away from it. And I think it’s a little bit like that, this stuff that we made, when you stand away from it, it does have this great effect, but when you’re in the middle of making it, you don’t know what it is.” When The Soft Bulletin first came out, Coyne says the band was excited by the new material, playing to audiences who may not have had any idea what to 24

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

Christopher Dragon, conductor of the Colorado Symphony.

expect, but nevertheless were accustomed to the Lips’ experimental and out-of-thebox tendencies. As time went on, however, it became clear the album had broader appeal than the group originally realized. “After a couple of years of playing it, we noticed it was attracting more normal people,” Coyne says. “It wouldn’t be our typical Flaming Lips, weirdo, freak-flagflying people in the audience. And that part of it was kind of a new experience for us.” While the band has played songs from the album, or the whole album at once, for years, sometimes even projecting images of the great American conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein while doing so, it wasn’t until 2016, at Red Rocks, that they played it backed by a full symphony orchestra. “The Soft Bulletin album, if you give it a listen, there’s portions of the record where there’s clearly a chorus involved, there’s portions of the album where you can hear its horns, and strings and harp,” says Anthony Pierce, chief artistic officer of the Colorado Symphony. “I just knew they (The Flaming Lips) would lend themselves well to this.” The Colorado Symphony has been working with contemporary musicians for years, performing and recording with the likes of Denver’s own DeVotchka and folk icon Gregory Alan Isakov, among others. So when Pierce got longtime Lips manager Scott Booker’s business card, he BOULDER WEEKLY


saw it as an opportunity to create somethe live album is anticipated later this thing spectacular with the band. He year, giving Coyne and the Lips yet enlisted the help of Todd Hagerman from another reason to revisit The Soft Bulletin DeVotchka to write the orchestral charts and play with the Colorado Symphony and the two flew down to the Lips’ home- again, this time with conductor base in Oklahoma City for a day. They Christopher Dragon. met at Academy of Contemporary Music “We would have always been drawn at the University to stuff by GEORGE SALISBURY of Central Stravinsky or Oklahoma, the famous which was piece from founded a 2001: A Space decade ago by Odyssey. Any Booker and the musician hears Lips’ multithose and you instrumentalist go, ‘Oh man, Steven Drozd. that’s just too “We kind of great.’ But it’s just played quite a leap to through the make music like record on the that,” Coyne piano, Steven says. “I think it just laid out all was part of our the chord prodesire to make gressions. He’s emotional music one of these that has that ON THE BILL: The Flaming Lips guys who can get perform ‘The Soft Bulletin’ with kind of impact, that kind of the Colorado Symphony. 7:30 at the keyboard drama to it.” p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, Boettcher and play anything With The Soft Bulletin, Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, he wants. It blows the Lips achieved just coloradosymphony.org/tickets. your mind how that. Not only in its elecphenomenally taltronic orchestration, but ented this guy is,” with Coyne’s lyrics, full of Pierce says. “He scribbled out the haranguish, existential dread and grief, monic progression for each song on a rounded out with the Lips’ quintessential piece of paper ... because I don’t know ethereal optimism. that anyone had really transcribed The “I think it’s saying life is brutal but it’s Soft Bulletin.” also beautiful,” Coyne says. “To be only Hagerman then took that and wrote optimistic and not understand the brutality the music for the Colorado Symphony, and the pain in the world, that doesn’t some 70 members playing music usually really work. And I think that’s what The performed live solely by the seven memSoft Bulletin is saying, that pain, and bers of the Lips, plus the Colorado those dilemmas, and how ugly and how Symphony Chorus, a group of 180 or so unfixable some things are and yet it still volunteer singers from across the state. sings about the sun and things that are “We need to show people new applica- going to work and things that are going to tions of what we can do,” Pierce says. “And make you happy.” Even now, he says, just as much as this is one of the mechanisms to do that.” when the record came out, the band Coyne defers a lot of the success of often runs into people who express deep the show to the expertise of the symphoemotional connection to the songs, prony orchestra musicians. “It’s a lot of intrifound experiences tied to the music. It’s cate, dynamic music and every instruwhat’s brought people to live performancment up there matters,” he says. “I’m not es, whether classical or rock, for hunreally a musician, I’m just making up my dreds of years. own stuff and hoping it works.” In 1969, when Deep Purple and the It rained the night of the 2016 Red Royal Philharmonic collaborated to create Rocks show, as guest conductor Andre their genre-bending spectacle Concerto de Ridder led the symphony through the for Group and Orchestra, British TV later entirety of The Soft Bulletin, plus a few broadcast it as “The Best of Both encores of other Lips hits like “Yoshimi Worlds.” The same sense of fusion Battles The Pink Robots, Pt. 1” and “Do serves The Soft Bulletin well, decades You Realize??” Coyne stood on a tall podium adorned in a robe of lights, beach after it was first released. “It’s mysterious in a wonderful, wonballs bouncing through the crowd, blastderful way,” Coyne says. “It’s a long, ing confetti cannons to finish out the show. The entire night was recorded, and weird, but wonderful thing.” BOULDER WEEKLY

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

25


February 14, 7:30

February 16, 7:30

Broomfield Auditorium

Longmont Museum

Boulder Bach Festival

The Baroque Orchestra and Soloists present a passionate and electrifying program on Valentine’s Day.

SoloiStS: Szilvia Schranz, soprano | Claire McCahan, mezzo-soprano | Guy Fishman, baroque cello Guest artist Nicholas Carthy leads from the harpsichord alongside violinist and BBF music director, Zachary CarrettĂ­n Tickets start at $10

BoulderBachFestival.Org


Ditching the smoke machines

Japanese psych rockers Kikagaku Moyo have come a long way

by Caitlin Rockett

T

POWERLINE AGENCY

he live music scene in Tokyo (but not so much in smaller cities in Japan) works a little differently than it does here in the States. When a band wants to play a socalled “live house” in Tokyo, they essentially have to rent the room and pay for the cost through ticket sales. If sales are under quota, the band picks up the tab — in cash — at the end of the night, usually between $200 and $500. It’s called noruma, and as you can imagine, Japanese musicians have lots of feelings about it. It’s a heavy burden for an up-and-coming band, as the members of Tokyo psych rock outfit Kikagaku Moyo can attest. In an interview with The Japan Times in 2017, drummer and spokesperson Go Kurasawa relayed the band’s shock after an early gig at a traditional venue circa 2013. “After we played, the venue person was like, ‘Oh, you guys did a really good job. That’s gonna be ¥30,000.’ We were like, ‘Fuck, yeah!’ and they were like, ‘No, you have to pay.’” The difficulties didn’t stop there for the five-piece. They found themselves banned from one venue after an attempt at creating a bit of “mystery” led to the local fire department showing up. “That was like our second show and it was at a venue in Koenji,” Kurasawa tells Boulder Weekly. “We were using two smoke machines to cover up the fact that we couldn’t play the songs. At the time we only had one song and all of the other songs were just a heavy jam.” Musical proficiency was never a central concern for the band as it formed loosely in 2012 from a collection of likeminded individuals, led by Kurasawa and guitarist/vocalist Tomo Katsurada. “We started out busking in Tokyo, so it was always a free improv with anyone who happened to be there,” Kurasawa says. “Also, we wanted to have people who don’t play or never played music before but shared similar taste in art, film, et cetera.” The band’s lineup firmed up over the course of a year, eventually including guitarist Daoud Popal and bassist Kotsu Guy, who Kurasawa and Katsurada met

on the streets of Tokyo recording vending machine sounds for a noise project. The lone exception to this free-wheeling group of self-taught rockers is Go’s brother Ryu, who has traveled to India yearly over the course of the last several years to study sitar with the renowned Manilal Nag. (Ryu even takes lessons from Nag via Skype between visits.) Determined to create a space for themselves in Tokyo, Kikagoku Moyo hosted the monthly Tokyo Psych Fest for a year, bringing together a number of underground bands from across Asia, such as Taiwanese alt rockers Scattered Purgatory or Japanese Krautrockers Minami Deutsch. Kikagaku Moyo dug in and shoveled out earthy folk-rock sounds for their eponymous debut record in 2013. The album — initially released via Bandcamp before Greek label Cosmic Eye Records picked it up and ordered up a vinyl pressing — generated enough buzz overseas to score the band a two-week tour of Australia that year, and paved the way for its American debut the following year. Over the course of the past seven years, Kikagaku Moyo — which translates as geometric patterns — has continued to explore the far reaches of the

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

WE ARE BOULDER COUNTY! INDEPENDENT & LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1993 For advertising information call 303.494.5511 www.BoulderWeekly.com

ON THE BILL: Kikagaku Moyo. 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18, Hi-Dive, 7 S. Broadway, Denver. SOLD OUT. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Tickets are $15-$20.

psych rock galaxy via four full-length albums. Their most recent effort, Masana Temples, is their slickest production to date, employing the help of Portuguese guitarist and producer Bruno Pernadas (who Kurasawa cold-emailed after stumbling onto Pernadas’ music online). A jazz musician by education, it’s easy to hear Pernadas’ influence in the delicate xylophone cameo on “Orange Peel.” But even with a brand new sheen, the band stays true to their roots, opening the record with the ineffable wanderings of Ryu Kurasawa’s sitar before descending into the nearly eight-minute psychedelic roundabout that is “Dripping Sun.” In the band’s never-ending effort to steer clear of constraints, they mostly eschew using real language in their songs, opting for made-up language that keeps the band “free,” as Go Kurasawa puts it. And while the band does play shows in their native land, Kikagoku Moyo has built its following on heavy touring through North America and Europe. The band has developed some business acumen over the years, forming a record label, Guruguru Brain, populated by the bands who played Tokyo Psych Fest. In 2017, Go Kurasawa and Tomo Katsurada moved to Amsterdam, where they basically operate as a hub for not only Kikagaku Moyo, but also other bands on Guruguru Brain. And they ditched the smoke machines. FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

27


NEW HORIZONS A fte

rt he

N ew H

of

w fe

Plu

ft cra

to’s

blue sk

y

orizons space

ie w

by

Pl ut o

it l o

o ke

d ba

ck to capture

tu n s s thi

g nin

v

FEBRUARY 22–24, 2019 Saturday, February 23 at 2:00 and 7:30pm Sunday, February 24 at 2:00pm

Dairy ARTS Center, Boulder, TICKETS: www.thedairy.org or 303.444.7328 Boulder Ballet is celebrating the landmark achievements of NASA’s New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt space mission with four special performances, featuring Boulder Ballet company dancers with original music and world-premiere choreography.

Dancer Photo by Amanda Tipton

Friday, February 22 at 7:30pm


25% OFF the purchase of a Big Daddy Club Mug, & get FREE COFFEE REFILLS EVERY MONDAY WITH THE MUG

‘The Baayfalls’ presents a man and a woman selling jewelry on the street in Harlem. Casteel often incorporates words into her paintings as a way to slow viewers down.

Expires 2/28/19

Authentic NYC BAGELS in Colorado GOLDEN on Route 93 303.279.1481 BOULDER at Meadows Shopping Center 303.554.0193

IMAGE COURTESY OF JORDAN CASTEEL AND CASEY KAPLAN

VOTED BEST BAGEL!

LAFAYETTE 489 US Highway 287 303.665.5918 LONGMONT Prospect Village 1940 Ionosphere, Ste. D 303.834.8237

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7 7:00 PM

CLIMATE CHANGE IN OUR BACKYARD THE PLASTIC PROBLEM 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY DAVID BOWIE FRIDAY FEBRUARY 8

To see and be seen

Jordan Casteel hopes to change the culture of viewing art with ‘Returning the Gaze’

by Caitlin Rockett

I

t’s 10 a.m. on a recent Thursday and Jordan Casteel has been up since 5, but she’s fresh, bright-eyed, no signs of fatigue. The Denver-born, now Harlem-based artist could barely sleep the night before, excited about this particular homecoming.

BOULDER WEEKLY

In oversize black-framed glasses and effortlessly cool khaki coveralls, Casteel is every inch an artist physically, but metaphysically she may as well be the Sun, radiating light, drawing people closer to her warmth as she stands in front of the glass doors of the Gallagher Gallery at the Denver Art Museum (DAM). She is home, literally and figuratively. This is Casteel’s first major museum exhibition, Returning the Gaze, a collection of 29 large-scale portraits of the black people who populate her world: friends, family, lovers, strangers she meets on the streets of Harlem (though no one’s a stranger for long with Casteel). Of course she’s excited about seeing the exhibition itself — Casteel spent summer evenings as a child making art at overnight events at DAM in the early ’90s, adding a layer of nostalgia and meaning to this show — but it’s the I

7:00 PM

ON THE BILL: Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18.

BEARS AND AURORA OF ALASKA 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY COLD PLAY 10:30 PM

LIQUID SKY: DARK SIDE OF THE MOON 11:59 PM

LASER QUEEN

people, the subjects of her paintings, that fuel her emotional fire today. “These stories are of me,” she says of her paintings before leading a tour of the exhibit. “All of these people are alive and well, and some of them are arriving soon to see these paintings in person for the first time. “I look forward to you getting to know these people.” Here is the essence of Casteel’s vision as an artist: To capture the human desire to be known, to be understood, to be seen. Returning the Gaze turns the viewer into the viewed — Casteel’s see GAZE Page 30

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9 1:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: WE ARE STARS / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 2:30 PM

STARS AND PLANETS 7:00 PM

INCOMING! 9:00 PM

LIQUID SKY: JOURNEY 10:30 PM

LASER FOO FIGHTERS 11:59 PM

LASER FLOYD: THE WALL SUNDAY FEBRUARY 10 12:00 PM

DOUBLE FEATURE: LIFE OF TREES / PERSEUS & ANDROMEDA 1:30 PM

STARS AND GALAXIES 3:00 PM

INCOMING!

Fiske Planetarium - Regent Drive

(Next to Coors Event Center, main campus CU Boulder)

www.colorado.edu/fiske 303-492-5002 I

29


2/9 WENDY WOO BAND

2/16 LIONEL YOUNG BAND 2/23 HOMESLICE 3/2 ROCKIN’ JAKE 3/9 DEBORAH STAFFORD & THE STATE OF AFFAIRS 2251 KEN PRATT BLVD

LONGMONT CO 80501

720-600-4875

TheWildGameLongmont.com 30

I

COURTESY OF SARGENT’S DAUGHTERS

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CASEY KAPLAN

8:00pm NO COVER

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CASEY KAPLAN

LIVE MUSIC SATURDAYS

GAZE from Page 29

subjects staring sweetly at you as you size them up — exploring what it means to see and been seen, particularly as a person of color in America. Like famed African American artists Charles Alston, Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight before her, Casteel uses portraiture to call attention to black identities. Her earliest works in Returning the Gaze focus on black men, stripping them of their clothes but hiding their genitals. The works allude to the hypersexualization of the male black body, so often portrayed in mainstream culture as simultaneously erotic and terrifying. Casteel presents them as vulnerable, posed in the comfort of their own homes on thrift store-chic floral couches (a phenomenon Casteel attributes to the fact that the men in these early works were theater students at Yale, where Casteel received her master’s in fine art in 2014). There are no black tropes in Casteel’s work, no scary black men or soul brothers, only young men politely returning your gaze. “I felt that the world didn’t see and know them as I see and know them: as my brothers, as my father, as friends, as lovers,” Casteel wrote in an artist’s statement. “I felt I had access to a kind of intimacy that I could give other people access to through painting.” But Casteel’s message with these paintings is layered; her 2014 piece “Galen 2” depicts a strapping young man sitting on a folding chair in a kitchen, the familiar checkered pattern of the floor reflected in the appliances surrounding him. He’s obviously black, and yet he’s not; he’s quite obviously green. “I was thinking about how we approach people with assumptions,” Casteel says. “Black families are so diverse, so what does it mean to be a person of color?” Casteel’s work forces the viewer to slow down, to look again and re-evalu-

PHOTOGRAPH BY TIM NIGHSWANDER/IMAGING4 ART

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

TOP, LEFT TO RIGHT: “Yvonne and James,” 2017 “Benyam,” 2018 “Marcus and Jace,” 2015 LEFT: “Jireh,” 2015 The people in Casteel’s paintings often become her friends.

ate. Text often finds its way into her paintings organically, appearing on walls and signs and T-shirts. In her 2017 piece “The Baayfalls,” a woman and man in Harlem sit by their streetside stand of African jewelry. The woman’s shirt reads, “I am not interested in competing with anyone. I hope we all make it.” The subject of Casteel’s work “Timothy” wears a shirt that simply reads, “Black is beautiful.” For Casteel, these powerful statements on clothing not only give the viewer an inside look at the subject’s personality, they act like shields for the subject, invisibly fighting off negative attitudes and stereotypes about black Americans. Like Alston, Lawrence, Knight and many other iconic black artists, Casteel has found a home for herself in Harlem; she liked “the entrepreneurship” she found there, “how people found space on the street to call their own.” I

In Harlem, Casteel has found space of her own, a respite from the hectic existence she’d lived in other parts of New York City, and a neighborhood bursting with culture and resilience. But there are pieces of her Denver roots spread throughout the exhibit. In “Marcus and Jace,” Casteel offers a glimpse inside her personal life. Marcus Pope, a barber at House of Hair in Denver, has been a friend of the Casteel family for more than a decade. He cut Casteel’s hair just a few days ago, and today, during the preview of the exhibition, he’ll see the piece Casteel painted of him and his son Jace for the first time. “Putting aside Jordan’s skills as an oil painter,” Pope wrote in a statement, “I think her gift is to capture these moments and send a message to the world that even the common Joe at the barbershop, the common barber, the common individual in the community, [at] the bus stop, is worthy of being celebrated.” But Returning the Gaze is about more than just representing black identities; it’s about including them in spaces where they are often absent. Like art galleries. “I hope to change the culture of viewing art,” Casteel says, her voice catching in her throat. “Encouraging people of color to feel welcome in art, seeing yourself represented in an art museum...” She pauses to take a breath and fight back the tears. “It can open doors.” It takes artists like Casteel to open those doors. BOULDER WEEKLY


COLORADO

BUFFALOES

THIS WEEK WOMEN’S BASKETBALL VS

FRIDAY, FEB. 8 7:00PM CU EVENTS CENTER

PLAY4KAY

CUBuffs.com/Play4Kay WOMEN’S BASKETBALL VS

SUNDAY, FEB. 10 1:00PM CU EVENTS CENTER NATIONAL GIRLS AND WOMEN IN SPORTS DAY Pre-game clinic and autograph session at 11:00am CUBuffs.com BOULDER WEEKLY

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

31


WWW.FOXTHEATRE.COM

1135 13TH STREET BOULDER 720.645.2467 just announced

97.3 KBCO PrESEnTS

JJ GrEY & mOFrO

IIvx

K!nDLY, JUST LIKE US, SOrrYnOTSOrrY, DJ rOIT FrI. FEB 8

COmmOnHEarT SaT. FEB 9

BOULDEr WEEKLY & GraTEFUL WEB PrESEnT

DEaD FLOYD

BOULDEr WEEKLY PrESEnTS

SUmmEr CamP

On THE rOaD TOUr ‘19

BLUEPrInT mETrO, KInGFrIDaY, STEEPLanD STrInG BanD, vISUS SaT. FEB 9

PHOUr POInT O FrEE BEFOrE 9Pm! 21+ WED. FEB 13 97.3 KBCO PrESEnTS

rICHarD THOmPSOn ELECTrIC TrIO

THE nOWaK SOCIETY & FInnaLLI EnT. PrESEnT

SOOHan

anna mOrGan, GanGSTErISH

rYLEY WaLKEr

WED. FEB 13 105.5 THE COLOraDO SOUnD & BOULDEr WEEKLY PrESEnT: aLBUm rELEaSE ParTY

DanIEL rODrIGUEz (OF ELEPHanT rEvIvaL)

FrI. FEB 15 BOULDEr WEEKLY PrESEnTS THE BOULDEr THEaTEr mOvIE nIGHT!

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

mImI naJa & JaY COBB anDErSOn (OF FrUITIOn) PErFOrmInG THE mUSIC OF GILLIan WELCH

TICKETS OnLY $5 SaT. FEB 16

Dr. THUnDErSmOKE PrESEnTS

THUr. FEB 14 raDIO 1190, BOULDEr WEEKLY & TErraPIn CarE STaTIOn PrESEnT

THE nExT GEnEraTIOn + BOB TrIBUTE TOUr

GrOUnDaTIOn

anDrEW TUBBY LOvE & amBEr LILY

SPECIaL GUEST BrIDGET LaW & TIErrO LEE

GrEEn BUDDHa

FrI. FEB 22

FrI. FEB 15

TErraPIn CarE STaTIOn PrESEnTS: THE DarK maTTEr TOUr

HErE COmE THE mUmmIES

raDIO 1190 & rOOSTEr PrESEnT

BaYnK

SIxTY mInUTE mEn, EnvY aLO

GOLDEn vESSEL, mCCOY

SaT. FEB 23

SaT. FEB 16

JOSHUa raDIn & LISSIE

BOULDEr WEEKLY PrESEnTS

LILY KErSHaW

KESSEL rUn EP rELEaSE

TUES. mar 5

TUES. FEB 19

mESHELL nDEGEOCELLO

mOm anD DaD, THE CaSInO EFFECT

88.5 KGnU, BOULDEr WEEKLY anD TWIST & SHOUT PrESEnT

WED. mar 6

WEEED, aSHLEY KOETT

WELCOmE TO nIGHT vaLE

KIKaGaKU mOYO

a SPY In THE DESErT

WED. FEB 20

DrEamBOY

rOOSTEr PrESEnTS

FrI. mar 8

LIT LOrDS

BaD SUnS

DUFFY, K!nDLY, SOLaCE, KrOWD KTrL

vISTa KICKS

THUr. FEB 21

SaT. mar 9

raDIO 1190, WESTWOrD anD TWIST & SHOUT PrESEnT

EL TEn ELEvEn

GETTEr PrESEnTS vISCEraL

SUn. FEB 24

103.5 THE FOx PrESEnTS: FEELIn’ aLrIGHT TOUr 2019

COrSICana

SUn. mar 10

WESTWOrD anD TWIST & SHOUT PrESEnT

BETWEEn THE BUrIED anD mE

DavE maSOn GrETCHEn rHODES

TESSEraCT, aSTrOnOID

THUr. mar 14

TUES. FEB 26

THE STEELDrIvErS

97.3 KBCO & BOULDEr WEEKLY PrESEnT

amY raY BanD (OF InDIGO GIrLS) BLaKE BrOWn & THE amErICan DUST CHOIr

SUn. mar 17

LaDYSmITH BLaCK mamBazO

THUr. FEB 28

FrI. mar 22

raDIO 1190, BOULDEr WEEKLY & TErraPIn CarE STaTIOn PrESEnT

mOUnTaIn maGIC TOUr 2019

an aLL-STar TrIBUTE TO aLanIS mOrISSETTE

FT. mEmBErS OF TrEY anaSTaSIO BanD + TUrKUaz + EUFOrQUESTra + SaSHa BrOWn

DJ WILLIamS’ SHOTS FIrED FT. mEmBErS OF KarL DEnSOn’S TInY UnIvErSE, BIG GIGanTIC anD mOrE! FrI. mar 1 97.3 KBCO, BOULDEr WEEKLY & TErraPIn CarE STaTIOn PrESEnT

G. LOvE & SPECIaL SaUCE BEn SParaCO anD THE nEW EFFECT

JUSTIn marTIn, CHrISTIan marTIn SmaLLTOWn DJS FrI. mar 29

anTOnIO SanCHEz & mIGraTIOn WaLTEr GOrra GrOUP SUn. mar 31 DUE TO POPULar DEmanD, EarLY SHOW aDDED! an EvEnInG WITH

DEmETrI marTIn

SaT. mar 2

LaTE SHOW SOLD OUT!

raYLanD BaxTEr

SaT. aPr 6

THUr. mar 7

105.5 THE COLOraDO SOUnD PrESEnTS

THE SUBDUDES

ParTY GUrU PrODUCTIOnS PrESEnTS

LUCa LUSH

FrI. aPr 12

BISHU, BrazEn

JOSEPH

FrI. mar 8 88.5 KGnU PrESEnTS

STEPHEn marLEY aCOUSTIC

HaLEY JOHnSEn SaT. aPr 13 CELEBraTInG THEIr 35TH annIvErSarY - “BaCK WHErE IT aLL BEGan”

SaT. mar 9

CHrIS DanIELS & THE KInGS WITH FrEDDI GOWDY anD FrIEnDS, HazEL mILLEr, KEnnY PaSSarELLI anD STanLEY SHELDOn

ParTY GUrU PrODUCTIOnS PrESEnTS

YHETI

naSTYnaSTY, SFam TUES. mar 12 105.5 THE COLOraDO SOUnD, BOULDEr WEEKLY anD TWIST & SHOUT PrESEnT

JOY WILLIamS (OF THE CIvIL WarS)

TUES. aPr 16 TaKE mE aS I am 2019 TOUr

an EvEnInG WITH

CHrISTOPHEr CrOSS

SPECIaL GUEST anTHOnY Da COSTa FrI. mar 15

SUn. aPr 28

THE SPrInG QUarTET

SaTSanG

JaCK DEJOHnETTE, JOE LOvanO, ESPEranza SPaLDInG & LEO GEnOvESE

zImBIra, THE aLCaPOnES mOn. mar 18 97.3 KBCO PrESEnTS

THUrS. maY 9

WILDEraDO, WHITaCrE

YaCHT rOCK rEvUE

mT. JOY

an EvEnInG WITH

WED. mar 20

Sam EvIan

may 16 ............................................................................................ ELLE KING may 24 ........................................................................................... rIvErsIdE juL 27 .......................................................... jOEy aLEXaNdEr (NEW daTE!) sEp 6 & 7 ................................................................. darK sTar OrCHEsTra NOv 22 ......................... THE LasT WaLTZ rEvIsITEd - 15TH aNNIvErsary

mar 21 .................................................................................. rUBBLEBUCKET mar 22 .................................................................................. marCHFOUrTH mar 23 ..................................................................................... POLICULTUrE mar 27 ............................................. SISTEr SParrOW & THE DIrTY BIrDS mar 28 ........... THE CrEam CHEESE aCCIDEnT + COnSIDEr THE SOUrCE mar 30 ........................................................................................ aYLa nErEO aPr 2 .................................................................................... JULIa mICHaELS aPr 4 ................... rOBErT WaLTEr’S 20TH COnGrESS + EUFOrQUESTra aPr 5 .......................................................................................... Jazz IS PHSH aPr 6 .............................................. FrOnT COUnTrY + THE mIGHTY PInES

SPECIALIZING IN LOCALLY SOURCED SMALL PLATES, FINE WINES BY THE GLASS, MICROBREWS & CRAFT COCKTAILS 2028 14th Street • 303.998.9350

88.5 KGnU, WESTWOrD anD TWIST & SHOUT PrESEnT

CaSS mCCOmBS

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

mar 16 ............................................................................... THE FLOOzIES aPr 20 ..................................................................... ESCOrT - LIvE BanD FrI. FEB 8

THUrS. FEB 7

I

2032 14TH STREET BOULDER 303.786.7030 just announced

aPr 22 ................................................................................................ POLYPHIa maY 18 ............................................................................................... WaLLOWS JUn 1 ........................................................................... THE TESKEY BrOTHErS

32

WWW.BOULDERTHEATER.COM

I

Open During Events

BOULDER WEEKLY


© Meleah Shavon Photography

DANIEL RODRIQUEZ (OF ELEPHANT REVIVAL) ALBUM RELEASE PARTY — with Mimi Naja

and Jay Cobb Anderson (of Fruition) performing the music of Gillian Welch. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Tickets are $15.

Daniel Rodriguez, a founding member and lead songwriter of Colorado transcendental folk band Elephant Revival, turns to his acoustic guitar for memorable, melodic hooks to accompany his poetic and contemplative folk songs.

see EVENTS Page 34

events BACKCOUNTRY FILM FEST AND SNOWBALL 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-0495. It seems only fitting that Wild Bear Nature Center, a nonprofit open year-round that teaches kids about nature, has teamed up with Winter Wildlands Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving winter wildlands, to do some good and have some fun. On Feb. 7, head to the Caribou Room for a fundraising event to benefit Wild Bear and the Winter Wildlands Alliance SNOWSCHOOL, a winter ecology program for kids. There will be live music by The Railsplitters, a silent auction and a showing of feature films from the Backcountry Film Fest. Tickets at wildbear.org/snowball.

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

HEARTBREAK HOTEL: A VALENTINES BURLESQUE SHOW. 8 p.m. Feb. 8-10, Wesley Foundation Chapel, 1290 Folsom, Boulder, boulderburlesque.com Boulder Burlesque invites you to stay at the Heartbreak Hotel as they showcase seven new performers and a select group of favorite advanced dancers in a display of classic burlesque, neo-burlesque, theatrics, heartache, love, follies and plenty of surprises. Come get lost in corridors of desire this Valentine’s Day. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 day of show ($5 off for students). SWAY PHOTOGRAPHY

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

CARMEN SANDIM 7 and 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. MARC DALIO

Over the past few decades, Carmen Sandim’s eclectic musical aesthetics have drawn her in many directions: classical piano studies, jazz composition and performance, film scoring and a long-lasting commitment to improvised music pedagogy. From piano lessons as a little girl in Brazil, to composing for her jazz septet in Denver, Carmen Sandim has found a lifelong adventure and purpose in music. She recently signed a record deal with Ropeadope Records, home of Grammywinning jazz-funk collective Snarky Puppy. You can also witness the live recording of Sandim’s third album on Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. at Mighty Fine Productions in Denver (5235 E 38th Ave.), or catch her on Feb. 7 at Nocturne Jazz and Supper Club (1330 27th St., Denver) at 6:30 and 8 p.m.

I

33


words Thursday, Feb. 7

OMAR KAHEEL GWENDALYNN CARLENE ROEBKE is a third-year student at CU Boulder who happens to be a poet only because they couldn’t find any other way to be. Their upcoming reading, ‘Of Thick Skin and Thin Blood: Learning to Speak with Shadows,’ is their first solo poetry event and promises to be filled with previously unshared poems as well as a healthy serving of their new material. Catch Roebke’s reading at Innisfree on Monday, Feb. 11 at 6 p.m.

JuliAnne Murphy — Dream Job. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Open Improv: Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-443-3934. Jessica Hartung — The Conscious Professional. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Friday, Feb. 8

Mary Robertson — Growing Up Queer. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Saturday, Feb. 9

Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Minor Disturbance Weekly Workshop + Open Mic. 1 p.m. Prodigy Coffeehouse, 3801 E. 40th Ave., Denver.

Sunday, Feb. 10

BAFS Second Sundays Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Courtney Peppernell — Pillow Thoughts II. 5 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Monday, Feb. 11

Mesa de Português. 4 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Book-

Talonya Geary — #goDo: How to Live on Purpose. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

store & Cafe,1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Winter Bookclub Night. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Wednesday, Feb. 13

So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

Tuesday, Feb. 12

Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Gwendalynn Carlene Roebke — Of Thick Skin and Thin Blood: Learning to Speak with Shadows. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Asbury Elementary. 10 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Whitney Scharer — The Age of Light. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Jill Santopolo — More Than Words. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Emma Izquierdo — How to be a Bipolar College Student. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 33

Thursday, February 7

Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Music

A Light Among Many. 8:30 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

African Songs of Life. 7:30 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1419 Pine St., Boulder, 303-219-3005. Bluffett: A Tribute to Jimmy Buffett. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Boulder Drum Circle. 7 p.m. The Root Kava Bar, 1641 28th St., Boulder, 707-599-1908. Boulder Phil Event of Note: Mary Wilson, American Soprano. 7 p.m. The Academy, 970 Aurora Ave., Boulder, 303-938-1920. The Commonheart. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Danger. 11 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Guster. 7 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Hunny, Hockey Dad. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. IIVX. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Jack Cloonan Band featuring Silas Herman and Matt Flaherty Band (Late Set) — with Bones Jugs. 7:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Jantsen and Digital Ethos — with Tvboo, Trixx. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Jon Pickett. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800

34

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Michael Bellmont. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Milo. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Jim Nowak: 20 Years of Transforming Lives in Nepal. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Natasha Leggero. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. More performances at comedyworks.com.

paris_monster. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Out Boulder County Gender Support Group Boulder. 7 p.m. Boulder Pride House, 2132 14th St., Boulder.

Swing Night with Chez Coucou. 8 p.m. The Waterloo, 817 Main St., Louisville, 303-522-6162.

Partner Pattern Line Dancing. 6:30 p.m. Manhattan School of the Arts, 290 Manhattan Drive, Boulder, 720-561-5968.

Take Down The Door. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Shoplifters. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

Turkeyfoot Bluegrass. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Events Birds of Prey Slide Program. 6 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Denver Jewish Film Festival. 5:30 p.m. JCC Mizel Arts And Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver, 303-316-6360. Through Feb. 18. An Evening in Oz Gala. 5:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Trust Machine: The Story of Blockchain. 4:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org. Views & Brews American Landscape Film Series: Valley Uprising. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

Friday, February 8 Music

Jeffersonian Dessert Party. 7 p.m. Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Ave. Boulder 80303, Boulder.

Billy Shaddox. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Jessica Lang Dance. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-7720.

Bud Bronson & The Good Timers. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

I

Cantabile Sings — A Musical Life: Child-

BOULDER WEEKLY


arts All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons.

SUE WALLINGFORD

BOULDER ARTISTS SUE WALLINGFORD AND JOY REDSTONE are professional therapists who use found and discarded objects to create artwork that expresses feelings of loss, trauma and renewal. Their thought-provoking artworks bring a sense of equanimity to life’s struggles and triumphs. Wallingford and Redstone’s works can be seen in ‘Expressions of the Aftermath,’ now showing at Bricolage Gallery in Boulder through Feb. 15.

Ansel Adams: Early works exhibit. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26. Assemblage/Mixed Media/Sculpture — by Michelle Lamb. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through March 1. Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine. Norlin Library, STEAM Gallery, Second floor southwest, 1157 18th St., Boulder. Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit. Creativity in Action — by Kongtrul Jigme Namgyel. Nalanda and Cube galleries, 6287 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through March 15. Don Coen: The Migrant Series. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through May 27. Dinosaurs: Land Of Fire and Ice. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Opens Feb. 9. Through May 12. DIOR: From Paris to the World. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through March 17. Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2019. Expressions of the Aftermath — featuring Joy Redstone and Sue Wallingford. Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, Bricolage Gallery, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder. Through Feb. 15. Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway Boulder. Ongoing exhibit.

hood to Today. 7:30 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder, 720-204-8806. Second performance on Feb. 10. Dave Tamkin, Klone Manor. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Delta Sonics Duo. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Espresso! Gypsy Jazz. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-875-7514. Firehouse. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-777-5840. The Greyboy Allstars. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Gun Street Ghost. 8:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Integral Steps. 1 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303604-2424. JJ Grey & Mofro. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Little Twist. 6 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 720-266-8300. Nice Work Jazz Combo. 5:30 p.m. Hotel Boulderado, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-442-4344. Phil Coulter — with Geraldine Branagan. 7 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Phil Wiggins, George Kilby Jr.. 8 p.m.

BOULDER WEEKLY

Front Range Rising. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change. The Incubation Effect. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Sept. 9. Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Aug. 18. Karen Kitchel: Grasslands. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through April 21. Living with Wolves. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 20. Matthew Pevear: Mastering the Art of French Cooking. BMoCA at Macky, Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado Boulder, 1595 Pleasant St., Unit 104, Boulder. Through May 5. Mixed Media — by Tabitha Aaron. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through March 1.

Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. Roberta Restaino — Giardino Surreale: Recoding Natural History. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through March 2. The Silhouette Project: Stories of Immigrants, Refugees, and Dreamers. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through Feb. 27.

Touch: Breaking the barrier between art and viewer. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through March. 3. Vance Brand: Ambassador of Exploration. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Permanent exhibit. Water Flow: Under the Colorado River. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Through May 26. World War II Diary Transcribed at the Museum. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit.

Laser Queen. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

Public Safety. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Spirited Away. 8:45 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

SubDocta. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Summer Camp: On The Road Tour ’19. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303447-0095. Symphonic Tribute to Comic Con. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Events Burning Man Film Shorts with Q&A. 6 p.m. The Collective, 201 N. Public Road, Lafayette. Comedian Jerry Rocha. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver, 303-3071777. More performances at comedyworks. com. Contrapasso: A Circus Theatre Show. 8:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Film/STILL: The Price Of Everything with Nathaniel Kahn. 7 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 720-354-4880. Heartbreak Hotel: A Valentines Burlesque Show. 8 p.m. Wesley Foundation Chapel, 1290 Folsom, Boulder.

I

Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, benefit, or wedding at Nissi’s – award winning cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting.

www.nissisevents.com

Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday February 7 BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

BLUFFETT

‘A TRIBUTE TO JIMMY BUFFETT’ “Tribute”

Storytellers. Abend Gallery, 1412 Wazee St., Denver. Through Feb. 23.

Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

Strangebyrds. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

A gathering place for... live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks

Visions of Love: A Valentines Wine and Chocolate Tasting Benefit. 6 p.m. Anchor Center for Blind Children, 2550 Roslyn St., Denver, 303-377-9732.

Saturday, February 9 Music

Friday February 8

THAT EIGHTIES BAND “80s Pop/Dance”

Saturday February 9

FUNKIPHINO “Dance/Funk”

Wednesday February 13

BOURBON & BLUES EEF & THE BLUES EXPRESS “Blues” FREE ADMISSION Thursday February 14 VALENTINE’S NIGHT

ROBERT JOHNSON & THE MARK DIAMOND TRIO “Dinner & Dance”

Friday February 15 Ladies Rock The Blues

KERRY PASTINE & THE CRIME SCENE & CASS CLAYTON BAND “Blues/Rock”

Audien. 9 p.m. Temple Nightclub, 1136 Broadway, Denver, 303-309-2144. Ben Hammond. 6 p.m. Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder, 720-885-1234. Born Of Osiris. 6 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Colorado Pops Orchestra presents: Carnival of the Animals Peter and the Wolf. 4 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Gordon Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Colorado Wind Ensemble: A Tribute to John Philip Sousa. 7:30 p.m. King Center, 855 Lawrence Way, Denver, 303-556-2296. Cory M. Wells. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Custom Shop. 10 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-328-8328. see EVENTS Page 36

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Saturday February 16

ROMERO & HALFWAY THERE

‘A TRIBUTE TO BON JOVI’ “Tribute/Rock”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 I

35


theater ON A COLD, CLEAR night in the fictional town of Almost, Maine, residents find themselves falling in and out of love in strange and unexpected ways. This witty and charming play relies on a series of vignettes — and a touch of magic — to explore the joys and perils of romance. Catch ‘Almost, Maine’ through Feb. 10 at CU Boulder’s Loft Theatre.

Alice in Wonderland. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through March 9. Almost, Maine. University Theatre, Loft Theatre, 1515 Central Campus Mall, Boulder. Through Feb. 10. Anna Karenina. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Stage Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through Feb. 24.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7

TAKE DOWN THE DOOR 8PM FRIDAY FEBRUARY 8

DAVE TAMKIN & KLONE MANOR 8PM

Bat Out Of Hell, The Musical. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Buell Theatre, 1350 Curtis St., Denver. Through Feb. 17. Betrayal. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Feb. 17. The Diary of Anne Frank. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humantiies, Black Box Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through May 17. Disenchanted!. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through March 31. Hooded, or Being Black for Dummies. Aurora Fox Arts Center, 9900 E. Colfax Ave., Aurora. Through Feb. 10. Jekyll & Hyde, The Musical. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through April 14.

A Little Night Music — presented by Cherry Creek Theatre Company. Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Through Feb. 17. I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change ­— presented by Equinox Theatre Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through Feb. 16. Lost in Yonkers. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through March 3. Magnets on the Fridge. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Shows the first Wednesday of the month from February-June.

Nunsense. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through March 3. The Wizard of Oz. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through Feb. 10. Xanadu. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Garner Galleria Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through March 31. Young Frankenstein. The Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. Through Feb. 16.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 9

FINN O’SULLIVAN 8PM CORY M. WELLS 9PM JESSE DEVELIS 10PM SUNDAY FEBRUARY 10

LUCAS WOLF 8PM BLOOMING METHOD 9PM MONDAY FEBRUARY 11

THE MARCH DIVIDE 8PM REID ANDERSON 9PM LAUREN JOY 10PM TUESDAY FEBRUARY 12

ESPRESSO! 8PM

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 13

RABBLEFISH 8PM

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 14

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM FRIDAY FEBRUARY 15

BRENNAN MACKEY OF KING CARDINAL

8PM

TYLER SANFORD COALITION 9PM

Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 36

I

EVENTS from Page 35

Dakota Blonde. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

gar Yoga Center of Denver, 770 S. Broadway, Denver.

Insomniac CRUSH. 6 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360.

Dead Floyd. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Sondheim & Lloyd Webber Showcase. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Kids Valentines DIY Gift Making. 1:30 p.m. MoonDance Botanicals, 601 Corona St., Denver, 303-263-7275.

Soohan — with Anna Morgan, Gangsterish. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

South to Cedars. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Dear Jon & the Whale Riders. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Don Chicharrón. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. An Evening With The Nels Cline 4. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Finn O’Sullivan. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Guilty as Charged, Miros. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Jesse DeVelis. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Kiltro, Verses The Inevitable. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Last Year’s Model. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder, 303-530-7423. Lionel Young Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Liquid Sky Journey. 9 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. The Martin Gilmore Trio, Wood Belly. 8 p.m. Rogers Hall, 400 High St., Lyons. Moonlight and Ukuleles. 6:30 p.m. Historic Grant Avenue Community Center, 216 S. Grant St., Denver. Nathan Yip Foundation’s Chinese New Year Party. 5:30 p.m. Grand Hyatt, 1750 Welton St., Denver, 303-817-8400. Sock Hop and Dance Lessons. 7 p.m. Iyen-

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

String Jam featuring Bill Nershi (The String Cheese Incident), Neal Evans (Dopapod), Joel Searls (Genetics), Josh Shilling. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Unwritten Law (Playing The Black Album in Full). 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Events Comedian Jerry Rocha. 7:30 p.m. Denver Improv, 8246 Northfield Ave., Denver, 303-3071777. More performances at comedyworks. com.

Valentine’s Tantra Speed Date. 5:30 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-449-4410. Vintage Valentines Make + Take. 2 p.m. Boulder History Museum, 1206 Euclid Ave., Boulder, 303-449-3464. Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Sunday, February 10 Music

Denver Brass: En Fuego! 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-7720. More performances through Feb. 10.

Blooming Method. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Double Feature: We Are Stars / Perseus & Andromeda. 1 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. More show times at colorado.edu/fiske.

Lyle Lovett, John Hiatt. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Father Daughter Dance. 4:30 p.m. First Pres Boulder, 1820 15th St., Boulder, 303-402-6400. Full STEAM Ahead: Engineering Endeavors with CU Science Discovery. 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Harry Potter Inspired Beer Festival. 5:30 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-832-2383.

I

Lucas Wolf. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Music in the Galleries: The Council. 1 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 720-354-4880. Ophelia’s Sunday Peep Show (Valentines Edition), hosted by Kitty Crimson. 8 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Tyler Thompson. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, see EVENTS Page 38

BOULDER WEEKLY


EVENTS from Page 36

1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

303-800-4647.

Valdez. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Monday Night Belly Dance Classes. 6 p.m. Tribe Nawaar Marketplace & Classes, Boulder, 303-859-5599.

Wah! Healing Concert. 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Events Adam Cayton-Holland. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863. Exhibition on Screen: Young Picasso. 1 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org. Go Club for Kids & Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Joni 75. 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

Monday, February 11 Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623.

how is green farms different? we own the soil to sale approach

OFFERING THE BEST IN TRUE ORGANICS, HYDROPONICS, AND CONSCIENTIOUS GARDEN MANAGEMENT Green Farms Feed & Seed is a grow shop located near the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Louisville, Colorado. We offer a wide variety of organics and hydroponics supplies for every kind of grower. Whether you are growing a small plant under one light, managing a farm with thousands of lights, growing outdoors, or in a greenhouse, we specialize in helping you ensure you get the best out of your grow. We are an elite source for all organic gardening supplies, including all Green Farms Soil company products.

CBD products available Retail & Wholesale (Please contact us to inquire.)

Bring Me The Horizon — with Thrice, Fever 333. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Gang Of Four. 9:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Lauren Joy. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

1387 e south boulder rd, louisville, co • 303-664-9376 38

I

Reid Anderson. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Speed Rack Charity Female Bartending Competition. 6 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772.

Events Mis Pininos/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Brushes and Beverages @ MAIN. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

www.greenfarmsfeedandseed.com • www.greenfarms.co/about-us/

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Toddler Time. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Music CU Symphony Orchestra: February 2019. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423. Denver East High School Honors Choir. Noon. Saint John’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1350 Washington St., Denver, 303-831-7115.

Groovement. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

The March Divide. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

over 40 years of living soil cultivation expertise

STEAM Storytime. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Dylan Scott. 7 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214.

Music

We can fulfill any order from a home grow to a large scale farm!

Reading Buddies. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Tuesday, February 12

Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007.

green farms feed and seed

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Drop In Aerial Foundations. 5:45 p.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E. Sterling Circle, Suite 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272. Graphic Design Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder,

I

TV Girl with Special Guest George Clanton. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Valentine’s Salsa/Bachata Class Potluck Dinner & Dance!! 7:30 p.m. Highlands Masonic Events Center, 3550 Federal Blvd., Denver.

Events All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120; NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Becoming American. 6 p.m. Museum of Boulder at the Tebo Center, 2205 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-449-3464. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Kiwi Practices Empathy. 10:30 a.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. Reynolds Reading Pals. 4:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

BOULDER WEEKLY


CU INFO. THURSDAY, FEB. 7

SUNDAY, FEB. 10

Getting Real with Global Entrepreneurship: Lessons from International Entrepreneurs Who Have Successfully Launched Around the World. 5:30 p.m. Wolf Law, Wittemyer Courtroom, 2450 Kittredge Loop Drive, Boulder.

Takács Quartet: Barber, Rorem, Bartók and Grieg. 4 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder. A second performance takes place on Feb. 11.

Climate Change in our Backyard: The Plastic Problem. 7 p.m. Fiske Planetarium and Science Center, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder. Catapult: A BFA dance concert. 7:30 p.m. University Theatre, Charlotte York Irey Theatre, 1515 Central Campus Mall, Boulder. More dates and times through Feb. 10.

FRIDAY, FEB. 8

Did Adam and Eve Really Exist? The 12th Annual Great Debate. 7 p.m. Cristol Chemistry and Biochemistry, 140, 1606 Central Campus Mall, Boulder.

SATURDAY, FEB. 9

CU Museum Family Day: Timeless Trees, Rooted in Evolution. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), 1035 Broadway, Boulder. Boulder Philharmonic: The Heavenly Life. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

MONDAY, FEB. 11 Guest Master Class: Warren Jones, piano. 4 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder. A second master class takes place at 5 p.m. on Feb. 12. Fundamentals of HPC: Introduction to Bash Shell Scripting. 3 p.m. Norlin Library, E206, 1157 18th St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, FEB. 12 Visiting Artist Lecture: Kathryn Polk. 6:30 p.m. Visual Arts Complex, Art & Art History Building Auditorium 1B20, 1085 18th St., Boulder. CU Symphony Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13 Rocket League (PS4) Video Game Tournament. 6 p.m. University Memorial Center (UMC), The Connection, first floor UMC, 1669 Euclid Ave., Boulder. AIA Lecture Examines Ancient Greek and Roman Sanctuaries. 7 p.m. Hale Science, 270, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder. Heather Mac Donald: The Diversity Delusion. 7 p.m. University Memorial Center (UMC), 235, 1669 Euclid Ave., Boulder.

Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Genesis 2.0. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

Wednesday, February 13 Music

Indigenous Film Series. 6 p.m. Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, 303-370-6000.

Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Richard Thompson Electric Trio. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Events

Backcountry Film Festival. 7 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-4200030. BeeChicas: Native Pollinators! 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Cosmology and Modern Physics. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Galentine’s Pop-Up Bazaar. 6 p.m. Fort Greene, 321 E. 45th Ave., Denver, 814-404-2289. BOULDER WEEKLY

Lafayette Sustainable Film Series: The E-Waste Tragedy. 6:30 p.m. Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-229-1127. Lafayette Sustainable Film Series- Minimalism. 6:30 p.m. Arts Hub, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette, 303-229-1127.

Any Unlimited Car Wash Sign Up! Expires: 2/28/19

Life and Nothing More. 4:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

10UEBW119

Truth, Politics, and the Press: A Panel Discussion. 5:30 p.m. Hale Science, 270, 1350 Pleasant Drive, Boulder.

SPARK! Cultural Programming for People with Memory Loss. 1:30 p.m. Museum of Natural History (Henderson), TreeSpace Gallery, 1035 Broadway, Boulder.

Midday Music Meditation. 12 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Open Movement Collective. 6 p.m. Boulder Shambhala Center, 1345 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-444-0190.

On S Boulder Rd in Louisville just East of the King Soopers Gas station!

Valentine’s Fun (Grades 1-6). 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849.

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Any Exterior Wash!

Only 4 minutes for a clean car! Expires: 2/28/19

3AEBW119

Athearn Lecture: ‘The Other Slavery’— Andrés Reséndez, UC Davis. 5 p.m. Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

I

39


WILLIAM THOMAS HORTON VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Thursday February 7

JanTsen & digiTal eThos w/ Tvboo & Trixx

Friday February 8

ThriFTworks

w/ goopsTeppa, supersillyus & ThoughT process

saTurday February 9

The greyboy allsTars w/ dJ greyboy

Thursday February 7

grass For ThaT ass presenTs

Jack cloonan band

FeaT silas herman & maTT FlaherTy band (laTe seT) w/ bones Jugs

Friday February 8

greyboy allsTars w/ mike dillon band

saTurday February 9

Jeremy garreTT (The inFamous sTringdusTers) & Friends

comeThazine - b2 Tour

FeaT bill nershi (sTring cheese incidenT), neal evans (dopapod), Joel searls (geneTics) & Josh shilling w/ Jeremy garreTT (solo / live looping) & ghosT Town driFTers

Friday February 15

The winTer Throwdown

wednesday February 13

w/ maTT ox, TnT Tez, swizzy J, kyTae & lil saTanaa

The caliFornia honeydrops saTurday February 16

groundaTion

w/ a-mac & The heighT, policulTure

sunday February 17

aqueous & big someThing wednesday February 20 re:search

nighTmares on wax

(dJ seT) w/ 5am, since Juleye, mikey Thunder & Jordan polovina

Thursday February 21

phab6 (paul hoFFman & anders beck oF greensky bluegrass)

sunday February 10

FeaT delirious nebula, runaway cigars, violeT’s gun, manxome Foe, hellocenTral, kaepora, los hiTos, The rainbow TreaTmenT, aTom JeTTy & The weird

Tuesday February 12

shwayze

W/ SCrogginSALLdAy, J.o.B., Troy good & benny bugz

wednesday February 13

lee “scraTch” perry & subaTomic sound sysTem Thursday February 14

wsmF5p: Formula 5 celebraTes

The music oF widespread panic

w/ phour poinT o (phish TribuTe) & Tangled senses music

Friday February 15

The indie Jam 500

FeaT members oF cycles, Tiger parTy, mama magnolia, magic beans, oTher worlds exTended versions oF your FavoriTe indie rock songs w/ cris Jacobs band & rush hour Train

saTurday February 16

FeaT Jay cobb anderson, Tyler Thompson, andrew alTman & holly bowling w/ The drunken hearTs

hoT buTTered rum & granT Farm

Friday February 22

sockeye

maddy o’neal & Freddy Todd

w/ megan hamilTon & ginger perry

saTurday February 23

deTroiT love: carl craig & moodymann sunday February 24

rino rocks ouT! FeaT Thumpin’

Tuesday February 26

w/ 300 days

sunday February 17 FeaT greg garrison, alwyn robinson & erik deuTsch oF leFTover salmon

Tuesday February 19

FaT Tuesdays

TribuTe To nola Funk, soul, r & b w/ Jeremy salken (big giganTic), kim dawson (pimps oF JoyTime), casey russell (magic beans), will Trask (greaT american Taxi), clark smiTh (dynohunTer) & sean dandurand w/ The iceman special

Thursday February 21

grass For ThaT ass presenTs w/ upsTaTe & acousTic mining company

w/ biTTy mclean

FeaT erik oF Trampled by TurTles w/ woodbelly

Friday February 22

lazylighTning420

wednesday February 27

saTurday February 23

w/ bbno$ & Tiiiiiiiiiip

w/ sTillhouse Junkies, Jackie & The rackeT

yung gravy Friday march 1

norTh mississippi allsTars

love cannon

Tuesday February 26

The Funk sessions

acTion bronson

w/ shira elias (Turkuaz) FeaT Jeremy salken (big giganTic), borahm lee (break science/preTTy lighTs live), dJ williams (kdTu/shoTs Fired), dan aFricano (John brown’s body) & parris Fleming (The moTeT)

wednesday march 6

grass For ThaT ass presenTs

saTurday march 2

w/ meyhem lauren

mike sTud

w/ TJ mizell & 4Thehomies

Thursday march 7

lil mosey

Thursday February 28

wood & wire

w/ pick & howl, Jimi miTTens

Friday march 1

all sTar TribuTe To alanis morisseTTe

yheTi

w/ nasTynasTy & sFam

FeaT JenniFer harTswick (Trey anasTaTio band), shira elias, sammi gareTT, mikey carubba, Taylor shell (Turkuaz), mike Tallman (euForquesTra) & sasha brown

saTurday march 9

wednesday march 6

w/ kemba & pell

Friday march 15

w/ liquid bloom dJ seT (amani oF desserT dwellers), mikey Thunder & Jordan polovina

w/ ballyhoo! & kash’d ouT

grass For ThaT ass presenTs

Friday march 8

brassTracks The expendables saTurday march 16

keller williams’ peTTygrass FeaT The hillbenders

wednesday march 20

Tobe nwigwe Friday march 22

andre nickaTina saTurday march 23

phuTureprimiTive

w/ planTrae, edamame & mumukshu

re: search

Thursday march 7

The grass is dead w/ kind counTry

Friday march 8

ThaT i guy

saTurday march 9

parT & parcel and amoramora monday march 11

Jay criTch

wednesday march 13

Since the age of 12 Derek Brown has been writing songs, short stories and poems. He gets his inspiration from traveling all over the U.S. and talking with all types of people. He now resides in Broomfield.

re: search

dynohunTer

w/ lyFTd, aaron bordas, mikey Thunder & Jordan polovina

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

I

Painful it is. Painful and exciting at the same time. The goodbyes, the hello’s, the new, the past, the forgotten, the never can forget. “Goodbye” can be the hardest word to say. “See you soon” is always a maybe. Life leads us in so many ways as well as emotions. Change is what you make it. Life is what you make it. One road leads to many more ahead as the road behind you crumbles and blows away to the past. The excitement and fears come rushing as the future arrives so fast. All that lies ahead of you is forever learning more. Never forgetting the emotions that nurtured you before.

blueTech

TexT cervanTes To 91944 For TickeT giveaways, drink specials, discounTed TickeT promoTions & more

40

by Derek Brown

Town mounTain

reggae Tuesdays

sly & robbie & The Taxi gang

Moving Here From There

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Boulder Weekly accepts poetry and flash fiction submissions at poetry@boulderweekly.com. Submissions must be 450 words/45 lines or less and be accompanied by a one sentence bio of the author. I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Big emotions in small packages

2019 Oscar-nominated short films to play area art houses

by Michael J. Casey

A

ll the best movies elicit our emotions — Roger Ebert famously called these movies “empathy machines” — but there is a fine line between an emotion earned and an emotion provoked. Movies that hopscotch across this line are what many dub “Oscar-bait” and the 2019 nominees are no exception, particularly in the short film categories: animation, documentary and live action. Take the five up for Best Animated Short Film: Animal Behavior, Bao, Late Afternoon, One Small Step and Weekends. Four marinate in melancholy — the one that doesn’t is also the lone dud — specifically about the loss of time between parent and child. The best of the bunch, Bao, is Pixar’s offering and very quickly, and playfully, establishes the pain a mother feels when their child grows up and heads off into the world. The reverse happens in Late Afternoon, an Irish short full of wispy lines illustrating the threads of memory the main character, an aging mother, desperately holds on to as they fray before her very eyes while trying to recall the daughter standing before her. Both shorts play the audience like a piano, but they work because they elicit heartfelt emotions. The five nominated for Best Documentary — Black Sheep, End Game, Lifeboat, A Night at the Garden and PERIOD. END OF SENTENCE — aim for the same but don’t always get there. Of the five, Night at the Garden bubbles up feelings of appall and fury with footage from Feb. 20, 1939, the night the German American Bund (German Americans promoting the rise of the Nazi Party) held a rally of 20,000 at Madison Square Garden. Director Marshall Curry allows the footage to speak for itself rather than provide commentary — an effective trick because it reminds us that this country has more than flirted with anti-Semitism. But it’s also a dirty trick because Curry provides so little context that there is nothing to complicate our emotions. Then there are the Best Live Action nominees — Detainment, Fauve, Marguerite, Madre and Skin — a group of films so bleak they ought to come with a Surgeon General warning. The standout here is Detainment, which also happens to be the darkest of the lot, partly because it is based on a true event — the abduction and murder of a 2-year-old by two 10-year-olds — and partly because of what the short withholds. Working from a script based on the actual audio recordings from the 1993 police interrogations, Detained wrenches the truth out of the gnarled fingers of abject evil. Thankfully, director Vincent Lambe spares the audience from visually reconstructing the sordid details of the crime, but the mind reels without them. Lambe’s goal seems to want to focus the audience’s attention less on the act, and more on the young boys who perpetrated it (and the parents who sit dumbfounded beside them) and wonder what could have ever led them to this moment. If there is an answer, it is not an easy one. That makes the truth of it all the more devastating.

ON THE BILL: 2019 Oscar-Nominated Short Films. International Film Series, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado Ave., Boulder, University of Colorado Boulder, internationalfilmseries.com. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, thedairy.org. Landmark Mayan, 110 Broadway, Denver, landmarktheatres.com/denver.

Happy Hour 3:00pm-6:00pm

EVERYDAY $6 BBQ SLIDERS $6 FRIED PICKLES $8 CHOPPED BRISKET NACHOS $7 SMOKED WINGS $1 OFF ALL DRAFTS $3 TECATE, UTICA CLUB, 16OZ PBR $1 OFF FROZEN & ROCKS MARGARITAS $6 DEEP EDDY MULES $3 WELL DRINKS / $5 HOUSE WINES

We Cater!

VOTED BEST BBQ

Book your Party Food Today! Call John

720-630-1221 701 B Main St., Louisville, CO • 720-583-1789 • Catering call: 720-630-1221

www.lulus-bbq.com BOULDER WEEKLY

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

41


42

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


Hamarrano Crunch Roll

95a Bistro & Sushi 1381 Forest Park Circle, Lafayette, 95abistroandsushi.com

W

Coconut-citrus fish taco

Verde 640 Main St., Louisville, www.verdeboulder.com/louisville

V

erde’s Louisville location is expansive, with large windows filling the restaurant with natural light even on these winter days. Served with a bit of tropical flare, the fish tacos were just PHOTOS BY STAFF as bright. The light and airy meat is perfectly grilled (not fried!), placed in a corn tortilla atop a dollop of guacamole and drizzled with roasted garlicjalapeño crema that adds just a little bit of bite. A garnish of crisp cabbage gives each bite a bit of crunch, while the toasted coconut sprinkled on top adds a bit of sweetness. $4.75.

alk through the doors of 95a Bistro & Sushi in Lafayette on any night of the week, and you’ll immediately be drawn in by the robust crowd of beer sippers and sushi eaters having a good time in the bar and dining room. There’s plenty of things to order on 95a’s menu, but we recently picked off the specialty sushi roll menu and were blown away by the hamarrano crunch roll. Tempura Serrano peppers, asparagus and avocado are rolled and topped with hamachi, yuzu aioli, chive and crispy garlic sticks. The hamachi is buttery, the asparagus is earthy, the yuzu aioli is bright and the tempura peppers provide great texture. $16.

Primo Pizza

Martino’s Pizzeria 1389 Forest Park Circle, Lafayette, martinos-pizzeria. com

Y

ou’ll be tempted by all the pizza options at Lafayette’s Martino’s Pizzeria, but for our money, it’s hard to pass up what the shop calls its most popular pizza: the primo. The primo is loaded with Martino’s natural Italian sausage, freshly chopped mushrooms, onion, green peppers and pepperoni. All that is served on a thin, sturdy crust. It’s a supreme pizza worth seeking out — the fresh ingredients and the flavorful tomato sauce elevate it above others. $18-$26.

Grilled red trout

Duo Restaurant 2413 W. 32nd Ave., Denver, duorestaurants.com

B

efore we discuss the mouthwateringly delicious food at Duo Restaurant in Denver’s Highlands neighborhood, we need to discuss the eatery’s heartwarming business model, which implements a 2 percent “kitchen livable wage” surcharge to the bill in order to make sure that kitchen staff and waitstaff are paid equally for their time and effort. Other eateries take note! Now that that’s out of the way, we can focus on the food, specifically the grilled red trout. Piled high with squash caponata (a variation on the Sicilian dish, composed of onions, tomatoes, olives, pine nuts, capers and vinegar, usually served as a side dish), roasted cabbage and a creamy, earthy sage béarnaise, it was impossible to stop eating the tender, juicy fish. $25.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday BOULDER WEEKLY

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

2016

I

43


Happy Hour ALL Day Tuesday and Wednesday $3 select appetizers, $3 Domestics, $4 crafts, house wine and house liquor

Come. Sit. Stay.

Half off ‘House Favorite’ entrees every Tuesday and Wednesday night 9pm-Close

1346 Pearl Street • Boulder, CO • 303-440-3355 • www.thelazydog.com Kitchen Hours: Monday – Thursday 11:30am - 8pm • Friday 11:30am - 10pm • Saturday 10am - 10pm • Sunday 10am - 8pm

44

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

BOULDER WEEKLY


BABY KALE? KIDS SUFFER AS

HIPSTER PARENTS NAME THEM AFTER TRENDY FOODS

by John Lehndorff

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

I

am so over kale. I’m weary of it in smoothies. I don’t like the leafy green vegetable (and former garnish) as a juice. Kale — in its chewy adult and baby forms — has jumped the shark and is in too many salads and saute dishes. There are dozens, if not hundreds of other leafy veggies that taste better and deserve being discovered. However, that is not why I am opposed to “Kale” being used as a name. I just think it’s a bad idea to inflict a weird name on a baby that will plague them for their entire life. I didn’t realize that naming children after vegetables was a thing until I saw a release from BabyCenter.com noting that “more new parents are choosing baby names that reflect their love of healthy foods.” Apparently trendy, fast-rising girls’ names in 2018 included Kale, Kiwi, Maple, Clementine, Saffron, Rosemary and, for boys, Sage. Surprisingly, “Turmeric” doesn’t appear to be on the list. For one thing, people won’t pronounce “Kale” “KayLee.” It will be “Kail,” and probably with a slight drawl. Heaven help young Kale if she is seen scarfing down Twinkies and Coke.

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I do not know how common this trend is in Boulder County, but I do know that naming your progeny after a seedless citrus fruit won’t make them grow up the healthy, fit and wholesome. In my case, being named after Saint John did not make me mature into a holy man. Names like these tend not to hold up well over the decades. Just ask the now-grownups who were named “Moonbeam” by hippie parents in the late 1960s. There have been studies over the years that gauged the negative impact odd naming can have on school grades, careers, earning potential and quality of life. There are exceptions like NBA star Kobe Bryant who was named after a steakhouse that served fat-marbled Kobe beef. (Don’t get cocky about your “normal” name. In 1954 “John” was the No. 4 boys name is the U.S, according to Social Security Administration. By 2017, John had fallen to 27th place.) By the way, Colorado’s top baby names in 2017 were, for girls, Emma, Olivia, Charlotte, Evelyn and Isabella, and for boys: Liam, Oliver, William, Noah and Benjamin. Olivia and Oliver are fruit-derived names but I don’t automatically think about Kalamatas or extra virgin oil. Your name is all about your parents, not you. Giving a kid a one-of-a-kind name is OK as long as you think about the long-term implications and are aware that some names have unpleasant meanings in other cultures. I love the taste of licorice-y anise seeds in see NIBBLES Page 46

I

45


NIBBLES from Page 45

certain foods and beverages, but you would have to be bold to name your boy “Anise,” as suggested by one online source. It ignores a cardinal naming principle: Make sure the name can’t be turned into an insult and used for bullying. Imagine what the other kids at school would do with a name like “Anise.” Please don’t name your child after the alcoholic beverage you consumed the night COURTESY OF DAZED AND CONFUZED

like: “So, Absinthe, how would you handle a project like this?” So, maybe skip “Quinoa” and “Chai” and go with “Rosemary” or “Madeleine” if you want your child to be thought of as edible. These food-centric birth certificate names are a different bowl of beans from our favorite food-related terms of endearment including “Honey,” “Sugar Pie” and “Sweetie.” Those are personal, not permanent. My son’s mom and I finally named him “Hans” a week after he was born after lengthy and hilarious deliberations. The name turned out to be unusual but at least easy to spell. The problem is that the only people named “Hans” in popular culture are actors playing German terrorists in films. However, we all feel it is a definite improvement over his in-utero nickname: “Bubba.”

THE QUARTER CENTURY CLUB

they were conceived. A co-worker told me his parents originally named him “Yeager.” I said: “Like the famous test pilot, Chuck Yeager?” He said: “No, ‘Jäger,’ like Jägermeister” — the 70-proof liqueur. They wisely changed their minds at the last minute. Avoid female happy hour monikers like “Merlot” and “Syrah.” One rule of child-naming is that you must imagine your daughter at a job interview confronted with questions

Thank You for Voting for Us!

The Jan. 31 Nibbles column chronicled how Boulder dined in the mid-‘90s. Continuing our flashback, here are some of the Boulder restaurants that have been open at least since about 1994: Flagstaff House, Jax Fish House, The Med, Gondolier, Boulder Cork, Greenbriar Inn, Carelli’s, Chez Thuy, Chautauqua Dining Hall, Sushi Zanmai, Ras Kassa’s, Zolo Grill, Falafel King, Village Coffee Shop, Walnut Café, Dot’s Diner, Lucile’s Creole Cafe, Trident Cafe, The Sink, Salvaggio’s, Rio Grande, Mustard’s Last Stand, Brewing Market and The Pub on Wilderness (Boulder Beer).

LOCAL FOOD NEWS

Tip Top Pie Shop is open at 105 N.

Family Owned and Operated, Making Every Pizza with Love!

3060 Pearl Pkwy #112, Boulder • (303) 442-4949 I

TASTE OF THE WEEK

CBD is the buzzword du jour now that hemp has been legalized. THC’s non-psychoactive cannabinoid cousin has proven effective for inflammation, anxiety and pain but has mainly been available as a supplement or a topical. Now it’s starting to pop up on menus. One of the tastiest examples is available at Dazed and Confuzed, a noteworthy artisan doughnut shop in Aurora’s Stanley Marketplace. The shop offers a yeasted doughnut with a great berry glaze infused with 20 mg of full-spectrum (whole plant) hemp-derived CBD extract. Its striking garnish is a whole candied fresh hemp leaf.

WORDS TO CHEW ON

“Why should there be hunger and privation in any land, in any city, at any table when man has the resources and the scientific know-how to provide all mankind with the basic necessities of life?” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

John Lehndorff is hosts Radio Nibbles on KGNU. Listen to podcasts: news.kgnu. org/category/radio-nibbles.

Best Pizza Slice Best Pizzaria

People tell us it’s Real New York Pizza!

46

Public Road in Lafayette selling savory, hand-held New Zealand-style pies. … Uturn BBQ and Brewery has closed at 599 Crossing Drive, Lafayette. Lark Spot, a new eatery from the Larkburger folks, will open there. Larkburger is closing some locations and re-branding others as Lark Spot with an expanded menu. … The 38th annual Chocolate Lovers’ Fling to benefit Safehouse featuring treats from chocolatiers, chocolate martinis, dinner, a cake walk and an ice cream bar is Feb. 9 at the Omni Interlocken Hotel. safehousealliance.org/ events.

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

• NO.1 Grade Organic Coffee Beans • Roastery Cafe • Hand Crafted Coffee • Flower Tea • Smoothies • Blueberry, Green Tea, Mint Choco, Sweet Potato latte and other flavoured latte Hours: Mon-Fri 7AM-6PM Sat & Sun 10AM-5PM

3040 28th St. Boulder.CO 80301 • 720-389-5522 • www.GabeeCoffee.com I

BOULDER WEEKLY


LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

February is All About Amore: Cupid's Combo Wine Dinner February 1 – 28

15

VOTED BOULDER’S BEST THAI

LUNCH: Mon-Fri 11am-4pm DINNER: Mon-Fri 4-10pm Sat 12-10pm • Sun 5-10pm

1600 Broadway, Boulder 303-447-0273 • khow-thai.com

YEARS IN A ROW!

$120 per couple, $60 per person Includes a four-course meal and a select bottle of wine.

Restaurant & Bar

boulder’s favorite

The month of February is the month of love at The Melting pot of Louisville. Cupid set up his combo with a four-course meal and a bottle of wine starting at only $120 per couple. Mention “Cupid's Combo” when making your reservation. Restrictions may apply. Not valid on February 14, 2019.

tibetan cuisine HOURS: Mon - Fri: 11am - 10pm • Sat - Sun: 12pm - 10pm

4479 N. Broadway • Boulder, CO 80304 720-459-8336 www.LittleTibetRestaurant.com

TRADITIONAL VIETNAMESE PHO HOUSE

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED (303) 666-7777 732 MAIN STREET, LOUISVILLE ,CO 80027 MELTINGPOT.COM BOULDER WEEKLY

I

• PHO • BOULDER PHO SOUP • GRILLED NOODLE BOWLS • GRILLED RICE PLATES • SALAD DISHES • HOUSE SPECIALTIES • VIETNAMESE WRAPS • WINE, BEERS & SAKE

Hours: Mon - Sun 10:30am-9pm 2855 28th Street, Boulder, CO 80301 • 303-449-0350 DINE IN - TAKE OUT • www.boulderpho.eat24hour.com FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

47


TURN UP THE FLAVOR!

Front Range Food for Front Range Families Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

Colorado Green Chili Sauce & Salsa Plan Your Dinner Party at Morning Glory Cafe for 2 to 200 People!

LOCALLY SOURCED & HAND CRAFTED! Vegan & Gluten Free

Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Brinner!

BOTTOMLESS WINE WEDNESDAYS 4-8pm MORNINGGLORYCAFE | 1377 FOREST PARK CIRCLE, LAFAYETTE | 303.604.6351

Available At

www.cosdiner.com

Happy New Year!

Fresh Authentic New York Pizza 2 Slices of Cheese & Soda........................$6.99

plus tax

2 Slices of Pepperoni or Sausage & Soda ..........................................$7.99 plus tax Extra Toppings $1.50/12” • $2.50/16”

Ask About Pizza of the Day!

We Deliver in Boulder

1647 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO • 720-328-2324 www.BrooklynPizzaBoulder.com 48

i

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

i

Boulder Weekly


SUSAN FRANCE

Always in style

Grossen Bart’s Taylor Wise and Walter Bourque on beer and beards

by Matt Cortina

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

SUSAN FRANCE

t takes effort to grow a grossen bart. That’s German for big beard. It takes commitment. Humility. It’ll itch, and look terrible for a while. You’ll have to be OK with spurning potential employers and lovers. People will say, “Growing a beard, huh?” and it’ll sound like “You should stop growing that beard. It looks bad. You look bad.” But if you can see the forest for the trees — the rogue wisps and bare splotches for what will one day become a well-integrated, full, incredible grossen bart — you can cast aside all naysayers and grow a chin forest that rivals the likes of Whitman, Darwin and Rasputin. Taylor Wise has made such a journey. His grossen bart is comprised of carefully tended-to straw hairs, matted, stretched and groomed like colonial thread into a plump hammock of dark hair. As it turns out, the qualities it took to grow that big beard are the same it took to grow Grossen Bart, his aptly named Longmont brewery. I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

Wise spent years finding odd jobs to make ends meet — from aviation repair to painting houses to insurance sales — “found out, it’s not the greatest thing on the planet,” he says. But now he’s found his footing (and his calling) running a brewery. It’s the culmination of years of trying to work for himself, whether he realized it along the way or not. “Actually, that’s a good way to put it,” Wise says when I offer that theory to him. “My grandfather had a furniture business. My dad grew up around it. I’d do some work there, but I guess it never stood out until later the freedom that they had. It doesn’t mean they were never there; until he was dead [my grandfather] worked there every day.” But from a young age, working alongside his father and grandfather, Wise saw the benefits of being a free agent in the world — doing what you love, making your own hours, going on vacations, etc., etc. Now, in his own brewery, he’s beginning to realize all those benefits firsthand. “I don’t think of it as I wake up, ‘Fuck, I gotta go to work.’ I don’t ever think of that. You find that thing you love TAYLOR WISE pours beer from the Grossen Bart taps in the brewery’s Longmont taproom.

see GROSSEN BART Page 50

I

49


GROSSEN BART from Page 49

to do and it’s not really work anymore,” Wise says. Grossen Bart has always been a labor of love. Wise moved to Colorado from Arizona in 2011, and hooked up with a homebrewer in Frederick, where they got a license to brew out of a residential garage and sell about a barrel a week into two or three nearby restaurants. Partners came and went, but the drive to brew beer stayed with Wise, and a few years later, he found a spot way off Main Street in Longmont, tucked behind a grocery store to make his own.

When it came time to hire a head brewer, he couldn’t have found a better person than Walter Bourque, who had weed-whacked his own way through a career. A microbiology major, Bourque saw the writing on the wall in the research field when his father got laid off after 15 years as a researcher. “It kind of hit me there was no job security so I wanted to find a field that did have that, and that was alcohol,” Bourque says. “When times are good, people are drinking. When times are bad, people are drinking more.”

Bourque got his start brewing professionally — he had been homebrewing for a while — for a small brewery in the high desert of Eastern Oregon before moving to Colorado to work for Fort Collins Brewery. He went to Europe to work for a brewery chain there before coming back to Colorado and meeting Wise. What appealed to him about the opportunity at what would become Grossen Bart was the freedom to create — to have misses and splotches and wispy offshoots in the overall process of brewing great, unique beer.

The BEST East Indian Food this side of New Delhi

COME CELEBRATE

OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY ON TUESDAY, MARCH 5TH!

Dinner: 5BOEPPSJ

Monday - Thursday: 5pm-9:30pm Friday & Saturday: 5pm-10pm Sunday: 5pm-9pm

Lunch Buffet:

Everyday from 11:30pm - 2:30pm

619 S. Broadway • Boulder, CO 80305 Table Mesa Shopping Center 303-543-7339 • TandooriGrillBoulder.com 50

I

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

“I got to do whatever I wanted,” Bourque says. “There was no excuse not to make good beer. Ingredients, cost, whatever; whatever you do, make sure it doesn’t suck.” That freedom has allowed Wise and Bourque to develop exciting beer creations. They have a selection of aged barleywines that currently goes back four years. They have an oat wine — brewed like barleywine, but with oat — aged in barrels for four years that tastes like a luscious raisin reduction. There’s an oatmeal stout made with toasted oats, which give it a baked cookie essence. They put sweet aji Amarillo chilies on a brown ale. And, Bourque says, they’re getting ready to brew a “baseball beer,” a lager made with malted sunflower seeds aged over unfinished Louisville Slugger maplewood baseball bats. It all aligns with Groseen Bart’s unique approach to brewing — to make beer that feels familiar but tastes different from everything else. “I’m not one to throw the left side of the spice cabinet in a beer,” Bourque says. “You’re just taking a hike, you’re not doing a 14er here,” Wise adds. All this creation can be sampled inside Grossen Bart’s cozy taproom, which Wise designed, painted and renovated by hand. The idea was to create an environment that didn’t feel sterile; one that allowed people to let their hair, or beard, down and relax. “I didn’t want that whole nice, shiny, over-the-top, ‘maybe I shouldn’t touch this’ feel,” Wise says. “I want people to come in here and feel like they’re in their backyard, dude den, man cave, whatever you call it... she shed. I want people to come and hang out as long as they want.” So far, Bourque’s creations and Wise’s hospitality have worked. Wise says if you taste a Grossen Bart beer anywhere (from a can or a tap), it’s likely no older than a month old. In only a few years, they’ve brewed about 80 different beers, with plenty more on the horizon — Bourke says the brewery’s first Baltic Porter is up next, and he’s constantly experimenting with new ingredients, collaborations, methods and innovations, like adding lager yeast to ales, and vice versa. Still, Wise is proud that the flagship beers (something he says is going out of style) that Grossen Bart brewed when it first launched taste the same today as they did back then. Consistency, like a high-quality grossen bart, never goes out of style, and that, more than the unique creations Bourque and Wise develop, is what’s driving Grossen Bart to succeed. BOULDER WEEKLY


New in brew: Sours, sessions and stouts Catching up with cans from New Image and Boulder Beer

by Michael J. Casey

F

or those of you who participated in “Dry January,” welcome back to flavor country. Beer’s been brewing while you were away; here’s a few you ought to check out. Located down in Olde Town Arvada, New Image Brewing — easily one of best new breweries around — has a line of kombucha-inspired sour ales they call “Dyad,” and they are well worth the trip. Fresh, tart, funky and relatively strong, Dyad comes in an array of fruit variants — Strawberry Lemonade, Piña Rita, Blackberries and Cream, etc. — and most clock in around 7.5 percent alcohol by volume, quite a bit more than your average kombucha or sour. Their latest, Cran Cherry Crumble Dyad, pushes the fruit and funk to a whole new level of pastry creation. Brewed with lactose, cranberries, cherries, vanilla and cinnamon, Cran Cherry Crumble sports a turbid peach color, a tart cherry nose and a sweet, bubbly and chewy mouth that delivers precisely what the name promises. You could serve it with dessert, but this beer practically is dessert. Boulder Beer Company — Courtesy of Boulder Beer Colorado’s first craft brewery — continues their rollout of new can art with an old staple: Hazed & Infused. But, there’s a twist: when this dry-hopped ale hit taps back in 2001 as a pilot brew, it came to customers as an amber ale, the staple of the Colorado brewing scene. Then, in 2014, Hazed & Infused became just Hazed, a hoppy session ale. Though nothing in the recipe changed, customer tastes did, and amber ales were pushed from the limelight in favor of hoppier India pale ales. Now, Boulder Beer has brought back the full name but tweaked the recipe to produce a dry-hopped pale ale with a four-hop blend of Nugget, Glacier, Simcoe and Centennial hops. Golden in color with a good deal of glowing haze, Hazed & Infused 2.0 sports a thick, rocky head of foam crackling with carbonation. Hops highlight the nose and the mouth while the malt plays backup to the pine, citrus and spice dominating the brew. It’s a refreshing and enjoyable beer, the kind that plays nicely with deep-fried vegetables or syrupy sweet brunches. But for those who crave a little more heft in their brew, Boulder Beer has also released Spaceman, a honey-hued double IPA that highlights full-body malt (Pale, Caramel, Wheat) alongside a potent combination of Simcoe, Mosaic, Amarillo and Centennial hops. Trouble sleeping? Down it with a heaping bowl of macaroni and cheese and you’ll be out in no time. Need to wake up? Boulder Beer just released their January–February seasonal: Irish Blessing Oak-Aged Coffee Stout. Dark in color with a thick, foamy head reminiscent of a latte, Irish Blessing has OZO coffee on the nose, OZO coffee in the mouth and plenty of that roasty, toasty stout goodness that has come to define Boulder County in February. Yes, Stout Month is here; more on those delicious dark brews next week. BOULDER WEEKLY

I

WEEKLY EVENTS Tuesday 5pm–9pm Prime Rib Night Wednesday 3pm–close $5 Burgers Night You can have a small draft beer addition for $5 more. We Also have a $9 Veggie Burger deal featuring the Beyond Meat Burger Thursday Ladies Night $5 specialty cocktails(change every week), 3$ house red/white/rose wines, $1-off draughts beers. Live music Featuring Andy Eppler and accompanied by other musicians Every Evening we feature 2 for $40. 2 specialty entrees (change daily) and comes with two drinks (small draught beer, house wines, or well cocktail) $40 a couple.

1111 Francis Street, Suite A, Longmont, CO 80501 • 303-647-3755

www.longmontpublichouse.com

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

51


peara p A e r o t S In

LETTUCE DEALS

nce!

$95 OZ

All Stores • All Strains • All Month!

! i ng . r e w s n A s t U e & a sk t h e m a n y t h t e L , k s A u e. Yo t uc able in stor be r s o f L e t

availa th memb e b i w l t l i u w o g s r e n t Come ha ho w p o s m s p y l e 4 o n t a t S m f p o n , 2 u 3rd 2 y r a A l im i t e d r u r b e F

Saturday, eF Bud Depot, Lyons CO at T h .com k n u f e c u t t www.le

Recreational Special

Wax & SHATTER

$20 g

**Rec Stores ONLY. Select Strains. Expires 2/28/19.

LYONS

SEE LETTUCE LIVE @ the Stanley HOTEL in Estes Park 2/22 & 2/23!

Medinical Special

Apothecary Extracts

LIVE

RESIN

$25

***Med Stores ONLY. Expires 2/28/19.

BOULDER

*Expires 2/28/19.


HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

The Health Center is now hiring Full Time Budtenders at our Boulder location! Applicants must have a MED Badge; Key or Support. Prior industry experience not required, but definitely a plus. If you are a team player and are interested in working for a well respected company please send your resume and a copy of your MED Badge to boulderemployment@ thchealth.com. This position is for immediate hire.

Sushi Zanami, located just one block north of The Pearl St. Mall is hiring Sushi Chefs. We are a fast paced, high volume sushi restaurant that has been in business since 1985. For this position you must be able to work days, nights and weekends. Being fluent in Japanese is a plus but not necessary. Must have at least 2 years of prior sushi chef experience or equivalent kitchen experience. To be considered for this position please stop by our location to fill out an application and or drop off your resume. If you are located outside of the Boulder area please send a cover letter and your resume to sushizanmai22@yahoo.com.

Reach over 98,000 Boulder Weekly readers by advertising in Boulder Marketplace! 303-494-5511 ext.113 Email: jelkins@ boulderweekly.com

CASH

FOR YOUR VEHICLE!

CASH for your 4x4 QUAD, 4 Wheeler, or Side by Side!

CASH for your 4x4 or SUV CASH for your Sportbike or Motorcycle.

Photonic Light therapy jade Hot Stone Acoustic Resonance

LOCAL SAME DAY PICKUP!

CALL OR TEXT NOW! 303-578-8024

Call 720.253.4710 All credit cards accepted No text messages

OPEN 7

days a week

All Natural Massage

• Hot Oil Massage • Relaxing Massage

California Blonde

BOULDER WEEKLY

• Shower & Sauna • All New Staff

5290 Arapahoe Ave #A, Boulder Past Foothills, 2 traffic lights on right side.

720.565.6854

Open 7 days a week • Hours: 9:30am-10:00pm Visa & Mastercard accepted

Host An Aura Party!

Now Accepting Preferred clientele No Texts

YOUR PHOTO WILL BE

I

Nora Keahon L.M.T/L.E 2595 Spruce St, Boulder • 503-536-5131 (Cell) divineresonance.com • nora@divineresonance.com (email) Text Cell Number For Quick Response!

Advertise in Maximum Wellness...IT WORKS! Call 303-494-5511 ext.113 or Email: jelkins@boulderweekly.com

$49/hr with this ad

Belle Star will come and take ten or more auras, read the photos and interpret the colors.

720-364-0840

* Gift with booking a session – 2 week sample jar Gemapothica Venusian Beauty Balm

BEST SKIN CARE

3070 28TH ST., STE D. BOULDER CO 80301 thedrumshopboulder.com

PamPering relief nY StYle

Spagyric Plant Alchemy and gemstone infused organic skin care

1 hour $100 1 hour and 30 min $135

Our New Location! 303.402.0122

INDULGE & UNWIND

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

DIVINE RESONANCE NOW OFFERS Gemapothica’s AstroBotanical Alchemy Skin Therapy

CASH for your KTM, YZ, or CRF, 2006 or newer.

Stressed Out? Think Massage!

Massage and Skin Care

FREE!

T-Shirt Quilts, Memorial Quilts Custom Designed Quilts

Quilts by

970-667-9149 epenkava@msn.com

www.belleStar.net • Labellestar12@gmail.com • 303-249-6958 FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

53


I DO NOT OFFER YOU AN EASY WAY TO HEAL YOUR BODY.

Own your health. Find your happiness. A happy, healthy lifestyle is radically accessible with CBD.

I DO OFFER YOU AN ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN WAY. Charley Cropley, Naturopathic Doctor

303.442.6161 ••••• charleycropley.com

B O U L D E R ' S P R E M IE R E CBD

Visit us in store or order online today. bluebirdbotanicals.com Mon-Fri 9:15am-5pm (720) 726-5132

500 S. Arthur Ave. St. 300 Louisville, CO 80027

RESTORE RELAX RECOVER

S P E C I A LT Y S TO RE CBD Tinctures - Topicals - Edibles - Vapes & More. Our full spectrum hemp oil supplements and botanicals are made from USDA certified organic hemp grown in Colorado. Every ingredient in our tinctures and topicals is organic and carefully selected to support healing and wellbeing for body and mind.

Visit our new retail location at

2425 Canyon Blvd., Unit D, Boulder, CO 80302

GET 30%OFF

Valentine's Now Through on Code up Co th wi y Da

VDAY30

54

i

for our full line of products visit: M O O N M O T H E R H E M P. C O M These products are not for use by or sale to persons under the age of 18. Consult with a physician before use if you have a serious medical condition or use prescription medications. The statements and products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

i

Boulder Weekly


ARIES

LIBRA

adventure since the 19th century, but there are still many peaks around the world that no one has ever ascended. They include the 24,591-fot-high Muchu Chhish in Pakistan, 23,691-foot Karjiang South in Tibet, and 12,600-foot Sauyr Zhotasy on the border of China and Kazakhstan. If there are any Aries mountaineers reading this horoscope who have been dreaming about conquering an unclimbed peak, 2019 will be a great time to do it, and now would be a perfect moment to plan or launch your quest. As for the rest of you Aries, what’s your personal equivalent of reaching the top of an unclimbed peak?

Glover uses the name of Childish Gambino when he performs his music. How did he select that alias? He used an online random name generator created by the rap group Wu-Tang Clan. I tried the same generator and got “Fearless Warlock” as my new moniker. You might want to try it yourself, Libra. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to add layers to your identity and expand your persona and mutate your self-image. The generator is here: tinyurl. com/yournewname. (P.S.: If you don’t like the first one you’re offered, keep trying until you get one you like.)

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Climbing mountains has been a popular

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Eminem’s song “Lose Yourself” was a fea-

tured track in the movie 8 Mile, and it won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2003. The creator himself was not present at the Oscar ceremony to accept his award, however. He was so convinced his song would lose that he stayed home. At the moment that presenter Barbra Streisand announced Eminem’s triumph, he was asleep in front of the TV with his daughter, who was watching cartoons. In contrast to him, I hope you will be fully available and on the scene for the recognition or acknowledgment that should be coming your way sometime soon.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: While enjoying its leisure time, the per-

egrine falcon glides around at 50 miles per hour. But when it’s motivated by the desire to eat, it may swoop and dart at a velocity of 220 miles per hour. Amazing! In accordance with your astrological omens, Gemini, I propose that we make the peregrine falcon your spirit creature for the next three weeks. I suspect you will have extraordinary speed and agility and focus whenever you’re hunting for exactly what you want. So here’s a crucial question: what exactly do you want?

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: Now and then the sun shines and rain

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Multitalented Libran singer and actor Donald

SCORPIO

Mundi” sold for $450 million in 2017. Just 12 years earlier, an art collector had bought it for $10,000. Why did its value increase so extravagantly? Because in 2005, no one was sure it was an authentic da Vinci painting. It was damaged and had been covered with other layers of paint that hid the original image. After extensive efforts at restoration, the truth about it emerged. I foresee the possibility of a comparable, if less dramatic, development in your life during the next ten months, Scorpio. Your work to rehabilitate or renovate an underestimated resource could bring big dividends.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: We can behold colors because of specialized cells in our eyes called cones. Most of us have three types of cones, but a few rare people have four. This enables them to see far more hues than the rest of us. Are you a tetrachromat, a person with super-vision? Whether you are or not, I suspect you will have extra powerful perceptual capacities in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will be able to see more than you usually do. The world will seem brighter and deeper and more vivid. I urge you to deploy your temporary superpower to maximum advantage.

LEO

AQUARIUS

tasks. One is when you’re attending to a detail that’s not in service to a higher purpose; the other is when you’re attending to a detail that is a crucial step in the process of fulfilling an important goal. An example of the first might be when you try in vain to scour a permanent stain on a part of the kitchen counter that no one ever sees. An example of the second is when you download an update for an existing piece of software so your computer works better and you can raise your efficiency levels as you pursue a pet project. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to keep this distinction in mind as you focus on the minor, boring little tasks that are crucial steps in the process of eventually fulfilling an important goal.

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Can you sit on your own head? Not many

people can. It requires great flexibility. Before comedian Robin Williams was famous, he spontaneously did just that when he auditioned for the role of the extraterrestrial immigrant Mork, the hero of the TV sitcom Mork and Mindy. The casting director was impressed with Williams’ odd but amusing gesture, and hired him immediately. If you’re presented with an opportunity sometime soon, I encourage you to be inspired by the comedian’s ingenuity. What might you do to cinch your audition, to make a splashy first impression, to convince interested parties that you’re the right person?

VIRGO

PISCES

scrapers in Mexico City. When workers finished its construction in 2003, it was one of the world’s most earthquake-proof buildings, designed to hold steady during an 8.5-level temblor. Over the course of 2019, Virgo, I’d love to see you erect the metaphorical equivalent of that unshakable structure in your own life. The astrological omens suggest that doing so is quite possible. And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to launch that project or intensify your efforts to manifest it.

us, “Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by assho--s.” That’s wise counsel for you to keep in mind during the next three weeks. Let me add a few corollaries. First, stave off any temptation you might have to believe that others know what’s good for you better than you do. Second, figure out what everyone thinks of you and aggressively liberate yourself from their opinions. Third, if anyone even hints at not giving you the respect you deserve, banish them for at least three weeks.

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Torre Mayor is one of the tallest sky-

BOULDER WEEKLY

The Unique Boutique Dispensary We have GREAT SPECIALS to offer new members who sign up with us

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: There are two kinds of minor, boring little

company revealed that in 43 percent of all couples, neither partner has an accurate knowledge of how much money the other partner earns. Meanwhile, research by the National Institute of Health concludes that among heterosexual couples, 36 percent of husbands misperceive how frequently their wives have orgasms. I bring this to your attention in order to sharpen your focus on how crucial it is to communicate clearly with your closest allies. I mean, it’s rarely a good idea to be ignorant about what’s going on with those close to you, but it’ll be an especially bad idea during the next six weeks.

Boulder Grown

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Leonardo da Vinci’s painting “Salvator

falls at the same time. The meteorological name for the phenomenon is “sunshower,” but folklore provides other terms. Hawaiians may call it “liquid sunshine” or “ghost rain.” Speakers of the Tangkhul language in India imagine it as “the wedding of a human and spirit.” Some Russians refer to it as “mushroom rain,” since it’s thought to encourage the growth of mushrooms. Whatever you might prefer to call it, Cancerian, I suspect that the foreseeable future will bring you delightful paradoxes in a similar vein. And in my opinion, that will be very lucky for you, since you’ll be in the right frame of mind and spirit to thrive amidst just such situations.

JULY 23-AUG. 22: A study by the Fidelity financial services

Boulder Owned

$99 FLOWER OUNCES IN BOTH THE MEDICAL AND RECREATIONAL ROOMS!

Daily Specials • Ounce Specials Every Day • Great Assortment of Concentrates and Edibles Medical & Recreational Services in One Place

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Twitter wit Notorious Debi Hope advises

I

HOURS Mon-Sat 9am-9pm • Sun 10am-5pm 1750 30th Street, Suite 7 • 720.379.6046 www.boulderbotanics.com FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

55


79 Mix &

$

Match

Ounces ALL TOP ShELF buDS. NO STrAIN rESTrIcTIONS. ONE TIEr PrIcING

Pick Any Daily Deal

Nuhi SuGAr WAX 4G FOr $

50

8.00

$

KIEF GrAMS

5.00

$

PrE-rOLLS 1/2 OZ. FLOWEr & 4g Nuhi SuGAr WAX FOr $

85

ALL SALES VALID FEb. 7 - FEb. 10

Our

flower

Our

quality

yOur

low Prices

Rec 21+ Happy Hours Mon-Sat 8am-9am & Sun 9am-10am & 8pm-9pm 7 days a week! Mon - Sat: 8am - 9:50pm • Sun: 9am - 9:50pm

537 Canyon Blvd. Boulder, CO 720-532-8664 • www.thchealth.com


PRE-GRAND OPENING Dear Dan: Can I still be considered sex-positive if I personally do not have sex? I’ve never had sex or masturbated—all my life, any type of sexual stimulation has been very painful and I’ve been unable to experience orgasm. I simply get a migraine and feel mildly nauseated instead. I am not looking for a possible solution, as I long ago accepted my fate and consequently avoid sex, such as by maintaining only sexless relationships. My question is simply whether I can still be considered sex-positive if I do not enjoy or engage in sexual activity? —Personally Loathes Unpleasant Sex Dear PLUS: I consider myself cunnilingus-positive, PLUS, despite the fact that I could not personally enjoy (and therefore have never engaged in) that particular sexual activity. While I don’t think it would cause me physical pain, I would not be able to experience orgasm myself (through simultaneous self-stimulation) while performing cunnilingus, and my cunnilingus partner would be highly unlikely to experience orgasm, either (due to my ineptness). If I can nevertheless consider myself cunnilingus-positive under the circumstances — if I can consider myself a cunnilingus advocate — you can consider yourself sex-positive. Dear Dan: About twice a week, my wife gets up from the dinner table to have a shit. She won’t make the smallest effort to adjust the timing so we can finish our dinner conversation. She can’t even wait for a natural break in the conversation. She will stand up and leave the room when I am making a point. Am I rightfully upset or do I just have to get over it? When I say something, she tells me it’s unavoidable. —Decidedly Upset Man Petitions Savage

Dear Dan: My boyfriend goes to pieces whenever I am the least bit critical. I’m not a scold, and small things don’t bother me. But when he does something thoughtless and I bring it to his attention, he starts beating up on himself and insists that I hate him and I’m going to leave him. He makes a scene that’s out of proportion to the topic at hand, and I wind up having to comfort and reassure him. I’m not sure how to handle this. —Boyfriend Always Wailing Loudly Dear BAWL: Someone who leaps to YOU HATE ME! YOU HATE ME! when their partner wants to constructively process the tiniest conflict is being a manipulative shit, BAWL. Your boyfriend goes right to the self-lacerating (and fake) meltdown so that you’ll hesitate to initiate a discussion about a conflict or — god forbid — really confront him about som his actions. And as the parent of any toddler can tell you, tantrums continue so long as tantrums work. Dear Dan: I’m a well-adjusted gay man in my early 40s, but I’ve never found a way to openly enjoy my fetish. I love white socks and sneakers. The most erotic thing I’ve ever seen is a cute guy at a party asking if he could take his high-tops off to relax in his socks. I’ve been in a couple of long-term relationships, but I’ve never been honest about this fetish with anyone. I’ve thought a lot about why stocking feet turn me on so much, and I think it must have something to do with the fact that if you are close to someone and they want to spend time with you, they are more likely to take their shoes off to relax around you. I’m not sure what to do. —Loves Socks And Sneaks

Dear DUMPS: “Let her have her poop,” said Zach Noe Towers, a comedian in Los Angeles who just walked into the cafe where I was writing this week’s column. “His Miss Pooper isn’t going to change her ways.” I would only add this: Absent some other evidence — aural or olfactory — you can’t know for sure that your wife actually left the room to take a shit. She could be in the bathroom scrolling through Twitter or checking her Instagram DMs. In other words: taking a break from your shit, DUMPS, not shitting herself.

Dear LSAS: I have to assume you’re out of the closet — you can’t be a “welladjusted gay man” and a closet case — which means at some point in your life, LSAS, you sat your mom down and told her you put dicks in your mouth. Telling your next boyfriend you have a thing for socks and sneakers can’t be anywhere near as scary, can it? (There are tons of kinky guys all over Twitter and Instagram who are very open about their fetishes, LSAS. Create an anonymous, kink-specific account for yourself and follow a bunch of kinksters. You need some role/sole models!) Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

+

Twin Peaks DISPENSARY

medical and recreational

NEW

CANNABIS SUPERSTORE IN LONGMONT

39 OUNCE SHAKE $35 1/2 OUNCE FLOWER GRAMS WAX / $ $ 20 FOR 5 PRE-ROLLS 49 4SHATTER $ PRE-ROLL WITH $25 PURCHASE 1 $

Open 8am - 10pm Monday - Sunday 900 S. Hover St. #A, Longmont, CO • 720-892-5969 Intersection of Hover and Nelson in Twin Peaks Mall

www.twinpeaksdispensary.com

DAILY MONDAYS $

7.00

1G strain specific joints

20% OFF

Kaviar Cones & Blunts TUESDAYS

SPECIALS THURSDAYS

20% OFF select edibles FRIDAYS

20% OFF

all flower and shake

20% OFF

merchandise, glass and smoking accessories

WEDNESDAYS

SUNDAYS

20% OFF concentrates & vapes

20% OFF all CBD products

Join our rewards program for extra discounts! 2043 16th St, Boulder, CO 720-389-5726 • villagegreenboulder.com

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

57


Magic mushrooms coming soon? by Sidni West

L

MUSHROOM OBSERVER

BOULDER WEEKLY

ast year, I wrote about how Denver could become the first U.S. city to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms and now it looks like it might actually be happening. On Feb. 1, the Denver Elections Division announced that Decriminalize Denver, the group dedicated to creating a state-level framework for the measure, gathered the 4,726 signatures required to place their initiative on the ballot for the May 7, 2019 municipal election. According to Decriminalize Denver, the group collected 8,524. Denver Elections verified 5,559. Denver voters also decriminalized weed years before the state took the same step in 2012. The current measure, containing language based on a 2007 effort that decriminalized recreational cannabis in Denver, would not outright legalize hallucinogenic mushrooms, which contain psilocybin (sy-loh-SY’-bin) as an active ingredient, but it would make the use and possession of psilocybin by people above age 21 the city’s “lowest law enforcement priority” and “prohibit the city from spending resources to impose criminal penalties.” Decriminalize Denver, a grassroots volunteer group comprised of about 50 people, has four months to fundraise, execute a multi-faceted education campaign, and solidify endorsements and organizational collaborations. Like pot, psilocybin is a Schedule I drug, a category for substances with no known medical benefit. While the measure would not change the drug’s classification, it would impact how city officials view psilocybin and law enforcement would no longer be able to prosecute cases related to psilocybin if the measure passes in May. Many Americans have shifted their opinions on cannabis in recent years, and scientists are now reassessing the effects of

I

psychedelics. A growing number of recent studies have shown that psilocybin could help reduce anxiety in people with cancer and could be used as a treatment for anxiety, depression and alcoholism. Earlier this year, researchers at Johns Hopkins University made headlines when they said psilocybin should instead be labeled a Schedule IV drug, a category that includes Xanax and prescription sleeping pills. They also noted that the use of psilocybin should still be strictly controlled, since people with psychotic disorders and those who take high doses are at risk. Combined use with alcohol or taking them in unfamiliar settings can also put people at risk for a bad trip, which can include anxiety, panic and short-lived confusion. While there is always a risk to putting substances in your body, magic mushrooms are one of the safest of all the drugs people take recreationally. According to the Global Drug Survey, of the more than 12,000 people who reported taking psilocybin hallucinogenic mushrooms in 2016, just 0.2 percent of them needed emergency medical treatment, a rate at least five times lower than that for MDMA, LSD and cocaine. Even bad trips can have positive outcomes. Two professors at Johns Hopkins surveyed almost 2,000 individuals about their single most psychologically difficult or challenging experience with magic mushrooms. Of that group, 2.7 percent received medical help and 7.6 percent sought treatment for enduring psychological symptoms. Nevertheless 84 percent of those surveyed said they benefited from the experience. It could take at least five years for the Food and Drug Administration to reclassify psilocybin because it would need to undergo a series of tests. Denverites may not be the only ones voting on psilocybin decriminalization in the near future. An effort to change the laws is also underway in the Pacific northwest, but it goes a step further toward legalization. A group of activists in Oregon are preparing a measure for the 2020 ballot that would allow adults to use psilocybin if they receive approval from a doctor and participate in at least one session of physician-supervised consumption. If the measure passes, the state would allow hallucinogenic mushrooms to be manufactured for medical use under a license.

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

I

59


Two U.S. Senators on pot by Paul Danish

U

.S. Senators Dick Durban (D-IL) The book has also generated plenty and Richard Burr (R-NC) staged of robust push-back. Vox reviewer a Dumb and Dumber act last German Lopez investigated and found week over why marijuana should Berenson cherry-picked the studies he stay illegal. used, in some cases misrepresented their They might have been better off if findings, and ignored studies reaching they had inhaled before popping off. opposite conclusions. Lopez called the According to the Marijuana Moment book “Reefer Madness 2.0.” website, Durban, who is also the Senate Michael Liszewski, of the cannabisMinority Whip, said criminalizing marijuafocused lobbying firm The Enact Group, na and subjecting users to WIKIMEDIA COMMONS punative treatment for consuming marijuana is “extreme,” but “now we’ve got to take care that we don’t go to the other extreme,” by legalizing marijuana, which he claimed can lead to “an increase in traffic accidents.” More sinister, he also claimed that “certain mental health conditions seem to be more prevalent in those states” that have legalized pot — like, you know, Colorado. Durban recommended reading a New Yorker article, which was said if Durban “took a comprehensive based on the anti-pot legalization book look at the data, he’d realize that crime Tell Your Children: The Truth About and teen use typically fall with legalizaMarijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence tion.” by Alex Berenson. “Reports of increases of marijuana The book has generated a lot of buzz being associated with traffic accidents among pot prohibitionist dead-enders. have more to do with data collection Sample passage: “The black tide of psyaround marijuana post-legalization, as chosis and the red tide of violence are evidencd by highway fatalities generally rising together on a green wave, slow holding steady,” he said. “These are and steady and certain.” things Senator Durbin would know if he

BOULDER WEEKLY

I

took a harder look at the facts.” While Liszewski was lamenting Senator Durbin’s limited reading list, North Carolina’s Senator Richard Burr took to the Senate floor to promulgate a bizarre conspiracy theory — that the Food and Drug Administration’s move to ban menthol cigarettes was the, uh, gateway act in a scheme to eventually legalize marijuana at the federal level. Canada first banned menthol cigarettes as a way of deterring juveniles from smoking, he said, and then, Bam! the next thing you knew it legalized pot. Burr characterized this as “a bait-and-switch” move, and he suspects the FDA may be contemplating doing the same thing. “This is eerily similar to Canada a few years ago when they banned menthol products,” Burr said. “How did they follow that up? This year, they legalized cannabis. Maybe that is the route we are on.” He said that what the FDA is proposing to do “to a legal consumer product” (tobacco) stands in contrast to it “beginning to review products that were derived from cannabis — oils and other things that they could safely approve for use in the United States.” “Well, Mr. Commissioner, you are only fueling my fears that you are follow-

FEBRUARY 7, 2019

ing the roadmap Canada followed — that this is all a bait-and-switch situation.” You can’t make this stuff up. Cannabis has “the same combustible concerns we have with tobacco products,” he said, the only difference being that tobacco is legal in federal law and pot isn’t. Actually, that’s not quite accurate. Dr. Donald Tashkin of UCLA spent a lifetime trying to prove that marijuana causes lung cancer (because marijuana contains more cancer-causing tars than tobacco), but eventually announced that he could find no link. A number of studies in recent years have found evidence that marijuana may actually slow or prevent a number of types of cancer. (Google marijuana and cancer for more on this.) As for tobacco, the link between smoking tobacco cigarettes and cancer is about as much a matter of “settled science” as anything can be. North Carolina is the country’s largest producer of tobacco, so maybe it’s not surprising that Burr is exercised by the prospect of the FDA banning a popular tobacco product and legalizing a potential competitor. But fortunately there is a way that tobacco use can be restricted without threatening the livelihoods of thousands of Senator Burr’s constituents, one that’s been used extensively in a number of foreign countries, in fact. It’s called crop substitution.

I

61


Snow? We See Trichomes. We take a slightly altered view of the seasons. At Drift, you’ll find a rich assortment of flower dripping with trichomes. Many strains are

so attractive it’s almost a shame to grind them. And none of them ever test below 20%*. Cheese, Pine, Diesel, Citrus—you’ll find exactly what you’re looking for from our select group of artisan growers from the western slope to the eastern plains and, of course, Boulder.

CONCENTRATES, EDIBLES & MORE

FLOWER

DUTCH GIRL CARAMEL WAFFLE COOKIES, 100MG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20 ESCAPE ARTISTS DISSOLVING STRIPS, 100MG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20 KOALA MILK CHOCOLATE BARS, 100MG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13 KUSH MASTERS WAX & SHATTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20/G, $70/4G, $120/8G RIPPLE FAST-ACTING DISTILLATE POWDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24 TASTEBUDZ STRAIN SPECIFIC GUMMIES, 100MG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18 EVOLAB BLUEBERRY CARTRIDGES, 500MG DISTILLATE OIL IN MOUTH-WATERING BLUEBERRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30 CBX BOTANICAL DISPOSABLE VAPES, 250MG MEDITATE - SAGE/THYME/PASSION FLOWER: 13.68%THC, 21.38% CBD, 22.82% CBN AMPLIFY - GREEN TEA/GINSENG: 35.99%THC, 38.23% CBD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32 WANA DISPOSABLE VAPES, 300MG PREMIUM DISTILLATE OIL WITH BLENDED STRAIN TERPENES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32

HARLEQUIN (COLOMBIAN GOLD LINEAGE) 7% CBD, 3.5% THC* . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ

NEW AT DRIFT

$79/OZ

KOOL AID (PURPLE TRAINWRECK X VOODOO) 20.8% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ MANDARIN COOKIES (GSC FORUM CUT X MANDARIN SUNSET) 21.71% . . . . . . $22/8TH, $75/HALF, $139/OZ GOLDEN GOAT (ISLAND SWEET SKUNK X ROMULAN) 25% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28/8TH, $99/HALF, $179/OZ LEMON HASH SOUR DIESEL (SUPER LEMON HAZE X SOUR DIESEL) 28.87% . . . $28/8TH, $99/HALF, $179/OZ LOST TRIBE (KOSHER KUSH X THE TRUTH) 25.32% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28/8TH, $99/HALF, $179/OZ CHEMMY JONES (CASEY JONES X CHEMDAWG D) 32.11% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34/8TH, $125/HALF, $224/OZ GLUEBALL ((CHEM #4 OG X THE WHITE) X GG #4) 33.64% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34/8TH, $125/HALF, $224/OZ QUATTRO KUSH (707 HEADBAND X TRIANGLE KUSH X SFV OG) 30.72% . . . . . $34/8TH, $125/HALF, $224/OZ SUPER LEMON HAZE (LEMON SKUNK X SUPER SILVER HAZE) 31.89% . . . . . . . $34/8TH, $125/HALF, $224/OZ

A ROTATION OF INDOOR-GROWN LARGE NUG FLOWER AND POPCORN. FOUR STRAINS ALWAYS ABOVE 20%. $89 FROM 11AM-8PM, MON-SAT.

Where the Bud Tenders Shop.

1750 30TH ST. | BOULDER, CO | 720.612.4382 | MON – SUN: 9:00AM – 9:45PM SEE OUR DAILY MENU AT LEAFLY.COM/DISPENSARY-INFO/DRIFT-CANNABIX *Every strain at Drift tests above 20% except high-CBD flower like Harlequin. All prices pre-tax.


9


last word $79 MIX AND MATCH OUNCES ALL TOP SHELF BUDS, NO STRAIN RESTRICTIONS.

1/2 OZ. FLOWER AND 4G NUHI SUGAR WAX FOR $85 4G NUHI SUGAR WAX FOR $50 KIEF GRAMS FOR $8

2019 Honda Civic LX Hatchback CVT 1.9% Financing

$

VALID FEBRUARY 7 - FEBRUARY 10

219/mo.

537 Canyon Blvd. Boulder, CO • 720-532-8664 • www.thchealth.com

Lease Special W.A.C. AHFC 1.9% x 36mo. Or $219/ mo. Lease 36mo/ 12kmi/yr. $2199 + $479 DH + taxes Ends 2/28

Let us

CATER

Your next function or event!

Call 303-443-0596

303-772-2900

2426 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO www.kalitagrill.com

See our full-page ad across from Cannabis Corner.

Consciously-Grown, Natural Flower & Extracts: Award-Winning since 2009 All Joints Rolled Daily with Fresh-Ground Elite Nug

Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

www.boulderwc.com 5420 Arapahoe, Unit F, Boulder

Strain of the Week*† 20% off all quantities. *Not to be combined with other discounts. While supplies last. Some exclusions apply.

“Weed Between the Lines” on pageDOWNLOAD 59. THE

See Ad on PG 55

TERRAPIN APP, ORDER AHEAD, SKIP THE WAIT!

Cleanest Artisan Cannabis & Extracts

FOR SPECIALS ON

OUNCES and CONCENTRATES & EDIBLES HOURS 9AM-9PM MON-SAT, 10AM-5PM SUN 1750 30th Street, Suite 7, Boulder

720.379.6046

*See ad on PG 55 for restrictions.

BEST OF BOULDER

Practical legal advice for anyone interested in legalized marijuana and vigorous defense of all criminal charges.

Naturally-grown award winning flower since 2009

Featuring Long Stem Top-Cola Bouquets for Valentine’s Day! Reserve your favorite Signature BWC strain today! (Last day to sign up: Feb. 11)

Now open til 8p Thurs, 9p Fri & Sat, 6p Sun, 7p Mon-Wed

Taste for yourself Ask about our 30 day free trial 303-604-3000 www.eldoradosprings.com

Call (303) 499-3040 or visit: www.marijuanalawscolorado.com www.gardlawfirm.com

Buy 1 Get 1 Half Off O.pen 1/2 g cartridges

Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! Craft, Concentrate Supply Co., Hummingbird, The Lab, Viola Extracts, Keef Cola, Indigo Pro

Save Time, Order Online! Same day pickup. Order 24/7.

Craft Cannabis

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com 303.440.1323

5420 Arapahoe • Unit F • 303.442.2565 • www.boulderwc.com

Voted Best Law Firm by COLORADO DAILY and BOULDER WEEKLY Voted one of Colorado’s top cannabis attorneys in 5280 MAGAZINE

Get $29 grams of The Farm-sourced Craft Wax or 4 grams for $93

†For available strains and full menu visit thefarmco.com/shop

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

“STRONG LEGAL ASSISTANCE” BOULDER DAILY CAMERA

chill pills

NEW LOW PRICES on our Craft Cannabis!† 1/2 oz. as low as $85 Ounces as low as $140 Early Bird & Night Owl Specials* Receive 15% off your entire purchase 8-10am Mon-Fri, 9-10am Sat 8-9:45pm Mon-Sun

www.terrapincarestation.com See our ad below

Buy 1 Get 1

Voted Boulder’s Best Recreational Dispensary 2015-2018! Open 8am Mon-Fri, 9am Sat, 11am Sun, until 9:45 pm everyday.

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122

$81/8ths

Boulder County sun-grown flower

Terms and conditions may apply. See store for details. Offers expire 2.28.19.

OPEN DAILY 10-10

Profile for Boulder Weekly

2.7.19 Boulder Weekly  

2.7.19 Boulder Weekly