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Boulder County ’s Tr ue Independent Voice / FREE / www.boulder weekly.com / December 7 - 13, 2017


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contents NEWS:

Budget deadline for gutting the EPA has arrived by Angela K. Evans

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....................................................................... NEWS:

Trump nixes protections on several Western national monuments, with potentially more to come by Matt Cortina

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....................................................................... BOULDERGANIC:

More harm than good with climate geoengineering by Tim Radford

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....................................................................... BUZZ:

Stephen Batura paints the Mile High City from a time not so long ago by Amanda Moutinho

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....................................................................... OVERTONES:

Long live indie hip hop by Sarah Haas

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....................................................................... ARTS & CULTURE:

An elfing good time — take a trip to Santaland by Gary Zeidner

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Bookcliff Vineyards’ Ulla Merz and John Garlich on building a wine region by Matt Cortina

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departments 5 THE HIGHROAD: Why so many Americans hate Trump’s ‘tax reform’ 6 DANISH PLAN: A modest proposal to end all the sexual tomfoolery in Congress 6 GUEST COLUMN: The need for a cultural shift on gender-based violence 8 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 23 ARTS & CULTURE: Boulder’s holiday musical banquet 27 WORDS: ‘River Crossing’ by June Lucarotti 29 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 38 SCREEN: ‘Coco’ is a warm, sweet, undead spectacle 39 FILM: ‘The Shape of Water’ is an alluring fairy tale 41 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 43 NIBBLES: Curate a craveable gift basket of only-from-Boulder foods 48 DRINK: New in brew: Odell Brewing Co. 53 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 SAVAGE LOVE: What happened? 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: I want you! (to vote for me) 59 CANNABIS CORNER: Canadian MPs vote for legal marijuana Boulder Weekly

December 7 , 2017 3


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staff

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Amanda Moutinho, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley Interns, Sarah Farley, Sydney Worth, Eliza Radeka SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Account Executive, Trevor Garrison Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Advertising Coordinator, Olivia Rolf Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo

December 7, 2017 Volume XXV, Number 18 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2017 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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the

Highroad Why so many Americans hate Trump’s ‘tax reform’ by Jim Hightower

T

he Trump tax plan is not selling well. Indeed, twothirds of the American people oppose it, and only 16 percent believe it would reduce their tax bill. But wait, say Trump and his congressional Trumpeteers, we’re really trying to help you commoners. How? By killing the “death tax,” so when you die your estate can go to your heirs without that inheritance being taxed. As the president so eloquently put it: “To protect millions of small businesses and the American farmer, we are finally ending the crushing, the horrible, the unfair estate tax.” Hooray, Donald is saving us! Actually... no. The great majority of Americans don’t own farms, businesses or big estates of any kind, so that tax doesn’t

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

even apply to us. Also, 99 percent of people who do have farms and businesses are already exempt from the tax, since it only applies to estates worth $5.5 million or more. I realize that Trump prefers grandiose claims over actual facts, but here are a few reality checks showing that his statement is not just a lie... it’s a whopper: This year, a mere twotenths of 1 percent of American families will inherit enough to owe any estate tax. That’s only about 11,000 families — not “millions” as Trump so theatrically proclaimed. As for protecting our nation’s family-farm and small-business estates from taxation, only 80 of those are big enough to be subject to the tax this year. So who, exactly, is Trump “saving” from having to pay some taxes on their multimillion-dollar estates? The richest 0.2 percent of American families — including one named Trump! Killing the estate tax lets a handful of elites — the richest of the richest — escape from paying more than $20 million each that they owe to support the country that has enriched them. And that’s what the Trump plan really is all about. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. December 7 , 2017 5


danish plan A modest proposal to end all the sexual tomfoolery in Congress by Paul Danish

I

have a modest proposal to put an end once and for all to all the sexual tomfoolery going on in Congress and congressional offices. I got the idea after I read about an ad Dana Nessel, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for Michigan’s attorney general, has been airing on the web. She says the way to stop the national epidemic of sexual harassment, bullying and assault is to vote for the candidate who doesn’t have a penis. “Who can you trust most not to show their penis in a professional setting?” Ms. Nessel asks rhetorically in the ad. “That would be the candidate who doesn’t have one.” Well she’s got a point there, but she may not be on to the best strategy for getting elected. That’s because roughly half the voters do have penises and may resent having them turned into a wedge issue. Still Nessel’s ad got me thinking about an alternative approach that would accomplish what she’s after, at least as far as Congress is concerned, and would be even more far-reaching. Here’s how it would work. We would pass an amendment to the Constitution that reads as follows: Section 1: No person with a penis shall be allowed to run for election to or serve in the United States House of Representatives, or to serve on the staff of the House, or serve on the staff of a member. Section 2: No person without a penis shall be allowed to run for election to or serve in the United States Senate, or serve on the staff of the Senate, or serve on the staff of a member. Section 3: Members of the Senate and House shall be elected by the citizens of both sexes residing in the states and districts they represent. Section 4: The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. In other words, only women could run for the House and men for the Senate, but men would still vote for female candidates for representative, and women would still vote for male candidates for senator. This, together with the requirements that Senate and House staffers 6 December 7 , 2017

be the same sex as the members, should dramatically reduce the incidence of grab-ass on Capitol Hill. Still additional measures would be required. For instance, even though the chambers would be segregated by sex, there would always be the danger that some of the senators will have a few too many and try to stage a panty raid on the House side. To preclude this possibility, it will be necessary to provide physical separation between the bodies. Fortunately this can be easily done by building a big, beautiful wall bisecting the Capitol along an east-west axis directly under the dome and extending it to the east and west edges of the Capitol grounds. The Senate and its offices would be north of the wall; the House and its officers would be south of it. In consideration of the aesthetics of the building, and in order to maintain full transparency in public places, the wall could be built out of 30-foot-tall panels of bullet-proof glass. Think of it as a repurposed glass ceiling that neither gender could penetrate. Apart from restoring a measure of decorum to the Congress, there are other public policy goals that would benefit from sexing the Congress. For example, it would correct the unconscionable under-representation of women in Congress that dates from the founding of the republic. Since 1789, there have been 115 Congresses convened under the Constitution, and fewer than 300 women have served in them. No women served in Congress until 1917 when Jeannette Rankin (R-Montana) was elected to the House in the 65th Congress. There are 105 women in the 115th Congress (the current one) — 84 in the House and 21 the Senate; 19.6 percent of the Congress is female, despite the fact that the U.S. population is 51 percent female. But if only women could serve in the House and men in the Senate, the balance of women to men in Congress would be 435 to 100, which would start to correct the historic imbalance. And if women had majority represee DANISH PLAN Page 9

guest column The need for a cultural shift on gender-based violence by Laura Finley, Ph.D.

N

ov. 25th kicked off the annual 16 Days of Activism against Genderbased Violence. At no time has this work been more necessary than now. From rampant sexual harassment to sexual assault, domestic violence and sexual trafficking, women across the globe and in the U.S. face gender-based violence at horrifying rates. I’d like to start with my recent personal experience, although it was definitely not the first time I have experienced it in my 45 years. I share these experiences because while there has been important attention paid lately to men in power abusing women who are their subordinates in the workplace or other realms, it’s essential to remember that “everyday” men also commit these same acts of sexual harassment, abuse and assault. Not because their work position affords them any particular power over a woman but because the general sense that they are entitled to do and act as they please is prevalent in how many boys and men are socialized. Not long ago, I experienced unwanted sexual conduct from someone half my age. He had no social power over me other than the fact that he’s a male in a culture in which some males are taught that things are theirs for the taking. Likewise, on my campus I have been catcalled by boys recently out of high school who feel entitled to yell repulsive

things. A 15-year-old girl I know was harassed by much older men while wearing a caroling costume for a holiday event. This is ubiquitous, so normalized that people are surprised by all the allegations that are emerging. We should not be. Horrified, yes. Outraged, yes. But not surprised. Here is why we should not be surprised: Statistics have long shown the scope of these problems. Studies have found that some one-third of American women experience sexual harassment in the workplace. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nearly one-third of the world’s women have endured physical or sexual intimate partner violence. Domestic violence kills more women worldwide than civil wars. Far more people in America, largely women, have been killed by their partners than were U.S. forces in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, combined. American women are twice as likely to suffer domestic violence as breast cancer. In the U.S., more women are injured from domestic violence than from car accidents, rapes and mugging, combined. A woman in the U.S. is sexually assaulted every 98 seconds, according to the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN). Women and young girls are sold into sexual slavery, not just overseas but on American soil. They are often recruited see GUEST COLUMN Page 9

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This week, in referring to his recent decision to shrink national monuments in Utah and open them up to land and energy developers, President Trump said, “Up until now these lands have been managed by a small group of bureaucrats far away in Washington, D.C.” He conveniently forgot to add that all federal lands are owned by the American people much like our national forests, and we all have access to them, except of course, those lands with energy development leases, where public access is limited due to public safety issues. What he did intentionally, though not mentioned at all, is hand over the land to a small group of energy and land developers who will limit all Americans’ access to these lands. As usual, he twists the truth to his liking of money interests only — not ethics, not freedoms, just money. Similarly, he twisted the truth by rationalizing the crimes of his election advisors as excuses for the Clinton campaign losing, when in fact (supported by two guilty pleas to date) his team was doing whatever they could, even if illegal, to try to win a race they thought they were going to lose. If there was ever a time for revolution, not against our government, but against this single man, it is now. Michael Ortiz/Lafayette

Acting on behalf of that for which we are thankful

This year at Thanksgiving, as I was meditating on the things in my life that I am most thankful for, I had occasion to think especially on the role of our natural environment in my high quality of life. Everything from the high concentration of mountains in my leisuretime activity, to the simple and often taken for granted cleanliness of the air and water I inhale and ingest, contributes to the fantastic lifestyle that Boulder affords me. Our environment was foremost on my mind at Thanksgiving because it has been foremost on my mind for the past few months, ever since I joined a lobbying group in town that calls themselves the Citizens’ Climate Lobby (CCL, for short). I joined CCL in part due to the 2016 election, where I felt disempowered and afraid for the future of our country and our world. The threats posed by climate change are, as Thanksgiving highlights for me, threats to many things that I value. But more than that, they are threats to the valuable natural resources and landscapes that we will pass on to future generations.

The foremost thing that I have learned from my time in CCL, and some wisdom that I very much want to pass on to anyone reading this, is that the most effective way to fight climate change, is, in their estimation (and now in mine as well), the passing of a national carbon pricing policy. What the policy would do is put a reasonable fee on the extraction of any greenhouse gas-emitting elements from the Earth. The effectiveness of the carbon fee approach stems from its being a minimally intrusive intervention. Governments, notoriously bad at picking economic winners, cede that task to the market itself. And, as an added bonus, the central role of the market in the solution to our climate problem piques the interest of many conservatives who are seeking a fiscally responsible approach. The money raised by the carbon fee under CCL’s proposed legislation is returned to tax-payers as a dividend. So this holiday season, let’s not just think hard about what we are thankful for. Let’s act to make sure we can be thankful for it in future years: pick up your phone, call your congressmen, and urge them to support the carbon fee and dividend. Daniel Palken/Boulder

Not so big fish story

As an environmental studies major, I completely agree that stopping the global warming crisis is crucial to the survival of not only humans, but all species on this beautiful planet. I also greatly appreciate the extreme measures Paul Danish (Re: “A very big fish story,” Danish Plan, Aug. 17, 2017) is willing to take to stop climate change. Jill U. Adams states in the Washington Post there has been a “[rise] of 1 degree from just the start of the 20th century” and “air pollution is killing 3.3 million people a year worldwide including 55,000 Americans.” Climate change is by far one of the most important problems that we all must tackle together if we are going to stop it from destroying our planet. While I think we should all work together to stop climate change, “fertilizing the seas with iron,” like Danish describes, is extreme, unsuitable and an unrealistic way to stop climate change. We should be focusing on renewable resources and ocean salinity, instead of trying to drastically change our waters more so then we already have. John Martin’s proposal to add iron into our waters is not tested enough. There must have been a reason that Martin’s proposal was banned. If we

allow iron to be put into our waters, then the algae that grows alongside iron will boom, ultimately affecting other ecosystems. Reed Karaim, who writes for the Washington Post and Smithsonian, says that “we could be losing 150 to 200 species per day.” Do you want more destruction to our already decaying marine ecosystems? By letting algae and phytoplankton over-populate, we would be causing other viable species’ populations to be damaged. I agree that it is a good idea to use iron for “ocean restoration” and to “restore collapsing fisheries by creating plankton pastures for fish to feed on.” However, the reasoning behind Danish’s idea is absurd. Escalating the fish population so that fisheries could start fishing at maximum levels again, even though this has historically lead to endangerment and extinction of many different fish, makes it seem like he’s looking out for fisheries rather than fish. I find it more reasonable to use the iron to repopulate our fish, but keep the regulations in place for fishing. Some believe that gradually withdrawing giant factory ship fleets will restore some of the depleted species to optimal levels. We don’t need to add iron into our waters to restore fish population, we just need to do two things: regulate fisheries and stop ocean acidification. The best way to solve climate change is to use renewable resources such as hydro-, solar and wind power. Oil, gas and coal are still the number one sources of power in the world. While cheap and easy to get, they burn fossil fuels and excrete harmful greenhouse gases and carbon dioxide into the air we breathe. “In one town of Minnesota, [a wind farm] will have the capacity to power 90,000 homes per year.” Imagine if we utilized this wind power all over the globe. “Renewable energy only counts for 8 percent of all of [U.S.] sources of energy,” meaning the remaining 91 percent is exerting harmful gases into the atmosphere. What does this have to do with releasing iron into the oceans? While we focus on taking out CO2 from the atmosphere, we are still continuing to add more CO2 in. Instead, we should be focusing on how to stop putting in harmful chemicals into our air. Renewable resources release virtually no harmful emissions into the atmosphere or the oceans. When it comes to climate change, it will take global support to introduce renewable resources. I hope more people realize the dire need to introduce renewable resources into our energy industries. Emily Herrmann/Boulder Boulder Weekly


GUEST COLUMN from Page 6

from websites like Backpage and Craigslist with promises of lucrative modeling or acting jobs. More than 3,500 sex trafficking cases were reported to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center in 2016, a figure that far underestimates the scope of the problem given that most instances are not reported and a girl can be trafficked multiple times per day. Males in powerful positions are even more able to exploit and demean women and those they see as powerless, as these people fear they will lose their jobs, their reputation and even their lives if they resist or if they tell anyone. This is tremendously clear with the spate of sexual harassment, misconduct and assault allegations being levied against politicians, media moguls and celebrities, including but sadly not limited to Bill Cosby, Bill O’Reilly, Harvey Weinstein, Kevin Spacey, Matt Lauer, Garrison Keillor, Roy Moore, Al Franken and, of course, Donald Trump. What are we to do? The good news is there is a lot that is already happening. New laws are criminalizing revenge

DANISH PLAN from Page 6

sentation in one chamber of Congress, they would have a lot more political clout than if they had minority representation in both chambers. Of course, there would be times when fraternization between senators and congresswomen would be unavoidable — such as when Senate-House conference committees meet to resolve the differences in legislation or when a joint session of Congress is convened for the State of the Union address. Events such as these will have to be chaperoned. The chaperones will be chosen from a pool of private citizens who have the unique skills necessary to ride herd on congressional tomcats and cougars. (Let’s not forget cougars; power can corrupt girls as well as boys.) The National Chaperone corps would consist of the cream of Americanchaperones crop — retired high school teachers who have chaperoned at least a dozen sophomore proms, former NFL referees who know how to deal with excitable boys, and retired military snipers. Two of the latter, one female and one male, could be discreetly deployed in the House Press Gallery (it’s above the speaker’s chair) during the State of the Union. If Senator Franken tried to, uh, reach across the aisle, one of the snipers could dart him. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly

pornography, helping to stop males from sharing provocative photos and imagery as a means of controlling women. Women are speaking out about the harassment, abuse and assault and refusing to be silenced. Legal settlements like the recent one in Seattle when three women who were sold into sexual slavery when they were 13-15 years old were awarded against Backpage. Activists are continuing to strategize and build on the energy and momentum from last years’ women’s marches.

In South Florida, I am fortunate to be able to work with a nonprofit organization, No More Tears, which helps victims of many of these forms of gender-based violence. This unique organization is entirely volunteer-run and provides comprehensive services that allow victims to heal and to build happy and healthy lives. Additional information about No More Tears is available at www.nomoretearsusa.org. I am also co-organizer of the College Brides Walk, a dating and domestic violence awareness campaign that reaches several

thousand high school and college youth. More information can be found at www.collegebrideswalk.com. We know more such organizations are needed nationwide. It is my hope that the increased conversation about these issues is indeed a cultural tipping point. Enough is enough. Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicated by PeaceVoice. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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Budget deadline for gutting the EPA has arrived The only question left is how bad will it be? by Angela K. Evans

W news

hen the Trump administration released its 2018 draft budget for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in May, it was met with wide-ranging criticisms due to its proposed 30 percent funding cuts, a greater percentage loss than any other federal agency. While the EPA administrator Scott Pruitt has repeatedly said the cuts would not affect “core responsibilities” of the agency, many critics see things differently and are relying on Congress to counter the president’s proposed budget. But in the flurry of headlines about the Republican tax bill, health care deadlines and sexual harassment allegations, little attention has been paid to the spending bill. To avoid government shutdowns earlier this year, Congress has made several extensions to the 2017 budget which is now set to expire Dec. 8. It is unclear if there will be yet another short extension to the previous budget. In the meantime, both 10 December 7, 2017

the House and the Senate have proposed budgets that make significant cuts to the agency, although not nearly as drastic as the administration’s. Under the Trump administration’s proposed budget, funding would be slashed from $8.2 billion to approximately $5.7 billion, significantly cutting federal grants to states, funding for regional programs, Superfund site remediation, climate change research, enforcement efforts and the elimination of some 3,800 jobs. Other programs, such as radon detection, lead risk reduction and environmental justice initiatives would be entirely eliminated. The House and Senate proposed cuts of $528 million and $149.5 million respectively aren’t as extreme. Still, these funding shortfalls would have significant repercussions for the agency and its ability to fulfill its mission to protect human health and the environment. Under the congressional budgets, funding to states, regional programs and Superfund site remediation are more or less restored, but at the expense of other areas, including the number of EPA employees, science and technology and the Office of Enforcement. Core programs such as clean air, water and compliance would be cut by 10 percent. Other such programs are at risk of being cut altogether. “At this point, I think everything is on the burner,” says Carol Campbell, who worked as a senior executive at

EPA’s Region 8 office in Denver for decades before retiring in 2011. She now is on the steering committee for Save EPA, one of many volunteer organizations of retired and former EPA employees popping up across the country in response to the Trump administration’s “assault” on the agency. When adjusted for inflation, she says, the proposed congressional budgets are the lowest the agency has seen since 1986. And that’s after years of previous cuts that have left the agency with thin resources. “You have to recognize that the agency has already had a series of cuts during the last two administrations,” says Dan Coursen, who worked in EPA’s office of general counsel for 25 years and is now part of the Environmental Protection Network (EPN). “Basically you’re making a cut in that context, where they have already been cut heavily and the additional cuts just make them less able to do their jobs.” Although the administration’s budget is the most extreme, the general consensus is that after some reconciliation work, a budget closer to that of the congressional appropriations bills will be the final funding for the EPA, causing concern from environmental organizations and former EPA employees alike. Both the House and Senate budgets have language for “restructuring,” including buyouts which could mean a

25 percent reduction in EPA staff, according to EPN analysis. Couple this with a hiring freeze and an 8 percent attrition rate, Coursen says, and workforce reductions are almost a given. “When you restore [funding] but still make a big cut, it ends up being staffing,” Campbell adds. “So we won’t be able to be the gorilla in the closet or the harbinger of good science that we were in the past.” Additionally, the science and technology budget could shrink by 10 percent, and the Senate proposal completely eliminates the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), which tracks and analyzes the health effects of toxic chemicals, and is used by federal and state officials for hazardous waste clean-up, public health emergencies and instances of contaminated water. Without these resources, Campbell and Coursen say, the agency will have a difficult time assessing pollutants and setting safety standards. Funding for clean air programs would also be cut by about 10 percent, including a greenhouse gas reporting program many states use in efforts to monitor air quality and effects of climate change. “It’s a huge resource for states that are actually looking to implement climate policy and a huge give away to industry if they really don’t have to be worried about tracking their greenhouse gas footprint,” says Dan Grossman, national director of state programs, oil Boulder Weekly


and gas at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). This also brings up significant cuts to enforcement and compliance efforts if the EPA’s budget is cut as proposed. In its analysis, EDF says the Senate’s proposal will cut the Office of Enforcement by 10 percent when there are already 50 fewer criminal investigators across the country than The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 requires. This will undoubtedly hinder the EPA’s ability to hold polluters accountable, as well as ensure compliance with air, water and soil quality laws. “These kind of cuts to the enforcement program are really problematic,” Grossman says. “In Colorado, we may be able to fill some of those gaps. But the problem is getting worse, not better. We have increased oil and gas pollution, we have increased pollution from the transportation sector, both of which are causing ozone problems, at the same time there are fewer resources to deal with it. And that’s a huge concern.” While environmental organizations, former EPA employees and others have been critical of the proposed EPA budget cuts, many at the state and federal levels have refrained from making broad speculations about the potential impacts until Congress passes a final budget. “We will be watching closely to see what changes Congress makes, and are hopeful that it will restore funding to important programs that are critical for the protection of public health and the environment,” Mark Salley, communications director at Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) says in an email statement. Still, Colorado relies on approximately $30 million annually from the EPA, about one-third of the funding CDPHE uses to implement and comply with federal laws such as the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Hazardous Waste Program and the Clean Air Act. Salley says a reduction in EPA funding has the potential to impact vital services that ensure public health, such as access to clean drinking water, responding to environmental emergencies like wildfires and flooding, and cleaning up contaminated areas, including some 20 Superfund sites and more than 450 Brownfield sites in the state. Furthermore, funding decreases could impact the federal and state agencies’ ability to enforce air and water quality compliance at industrial facilities and oil and gas operations. EPA Region 8, based in Denver, did not offer comment about how the proposed budgets could affect operations in the region which covers Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming and 27 Boulder Weekly

Tribal Nations, as well as Colorado. In October, President Trump appointed former director of energy policy at Xcel Energy Doug Benevento as regional director. He supports the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord and has said the EPA is shifting away from its focus on climate change in interviews with other media outlets. His office deferred to national EPA headquarters for core priorities of the agency. The administration’s budget “maintains core environmental protections and regulatory

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falls for the foreseeable future, limiting its ability to preserve public health and the environment. “Eventually, you cut away fat, you cut away muscle and you end up with skin and bone. And then you start cutting bone and you’ve got a real problem,” Coursen says. “And that’s kind of the pattern with a lot of what’s going on here. It’s just cutting, cutting, cutting and eventually you make cuts to vital functions and things therefore don’t get done that need to get done.”

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Trump nixes protections on several Western national monuments, with potentially more to come by Matt Cortina

O

n Dec. 4, President Donald Trump announced in Utah that the two-million-acre Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument would be cut in half, and Bears Ears National Monument would be cut 85 percent to just 202,000 acres. It’s the biggest reduction of protected public land in American history. Reaction to Trump’s decision to shrink these two national monuments (with plans to shrink more) has been swift from environmental, indigenous rights and public land advocates across the country who say Grand Staircase-Escalante and Bears Ears are home to myriad geologic, biologic and cultural treasures worthy of protecting. Presidents Clinton and Obama originally protected the sites via the Antiquities Emma Murray Act, which allows the federal government to protect certain areas of civic value from development and other potentially harmful uses. Utah’s Bears Ears is home to millenia-old art and artifacts from indigenous peoples, as well as countless celebrated formations amid its rocky red canyon landscape. Grand Staircase-Escalante is home to a cradle of biodiversity, wherein numerous species have been discovered. However, Grand StaircaseEscalante also sits atop massive coal deposits and the new boundaries open up areas where oil and gas leases can now be executed. The boundaries of Bears Ears, meanwhile, were redrawn to protect small segments of the monument and will now no longer protect areas where uranium mining and oil and gas drilling are highly likely to proceed. Just a day after the shrinking of those monuments were announced, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke said he would be recommending the reduction of four more national monuments: Cascade-Siskiyou in Oregon and California, Gold Butte in Nevada, and two oceanic monuments. The argument Trump and Zinke have made to justify these moves is that the federal government has overreached with the Antiquities Act, which calls for protection of the smallest possible area on lands deemed to be worthy of protection, and that limited budgets would be better utilized elsewhere. “No one values the splendor of Utah more than the people of Utah — and no one knows better how to use it. Families will hike and hunt on land they have known for generations, and they will preserve it for generations to come,” said Trump announcing the decisions. When Trump ordered Zinke earlier this year to review the 27 monuments that were larger than 100,000 acres and signed into protection during the Boulder Weekly

last 25 years, it was largely assumed Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante, given the natural resources on which they sat, would be imperiled, along with several others. Thus, the reaction from advocates for those designations has been unequivocal: this was a move not in the interest of protecting public land, but one to appease special interests. “Stripping protections from these lands is a craven gift to mining and fossil fuel interests. The Trump administration continues to find new ways to transfer as many public resources as it possibly can away from working people and into the bank accounts of its political funders,” said Colorado State Senate Democratic Leader Lucia Guzman in a statement. Chris Saeger, executive director of the Western Values Project, said the resizing recommendations

But it’s not just oil and gas drilling that a monument designation protects lands from: ranching, ATV travel, infrastructure, resource mining, logging and more can all wreak havoc on the sensitive ecosystems found on these lands. And protecting only what’s been found in these monuments limits the ability for historians and researchers to find what is likely to be many more significant cultural, biological and geological sites. “The 1.35 million acres of Bears Ears is a small region within our country. It’s appalling that one could think it’s not worthy of continued protection,” said Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk, vice-chair for Western Leaders Network and former Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Council member, in a statement. “There are over 10,000 archaeological sites documented at Bears Ears. The biggest concern is that there are many undocumented.” Worse yet for those angry about Trump’s monument reductions is that there could be many more to come. The Western Values Project believes Zinke will open up land near “North Dakota’s Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Montana’s Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, and right next to Livingston, Montana, a gateway community just outside of Yellowstone National Park.” To be clear, it’s not just advocacy groups that have expressed concern over the reduction of these national monuments, but polls have shown mixed results. A poll by the Salt Lake Tribune and University of from Zinke to Trump do not provide any Utah found Utahns slightly favored The Trump public benefit. reducing Bears Ears, but rejected administration is reducing the size of “These recommendations make clear the changing Grand StaircaseBears Ears National unprecedented influence of the lobbyists and Escalante’s boundaries. Colorado Monument (above) as well as several College’s State of the Rockies’ special interests that now run the Interior other monuments. January poll found 47 percent of Department, and reveal how far Secretary respondents in favor of keeping Zinke is willing to go to sell out his fellow Bears Ears’ designation and 32 perWesterners for short-term political gain,” cent against it. And of the unprecedented 3 million Saeger said. “This shameful land grab goes against comments filed by members of the public to the President Roosevelt’s legacy, and will rob future genDepartment of the Interior in this case, more than 99 erations of the public land protections that have prepercent expressed opposition to changing the monuserved our Western way of life.” ments’ boundaries, according to a study by Key Log Prolonged protests against the monuments’ resizEconomics, funded by the Wilderness Society. ing from the indigenous community are now coalescRegardless, Mary McGann, vice chair of Utah’s ing into a lawsuit filed against the administration. Grand County Council, argues the future of this land Five tribes (Hopi, Navajo Nation, Ute Mountain Ute isn’t solely up to the discretion of local governments, Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni and Ute Indian) came together people or industries. to file a lawsuit in a U.S. District Court hours after “This land isn’t owned by the people of Utah or a Trump’s announcement, claiming that a president county; it’s owned by everyone in the United States of only has the right under the Antiquities Act to designate national monuments, not modify or revoke mon- America,” she said. “The majority of public comments support Bears Ears. To ignore that is inappropriate ument designations. Earthjustice also filed a lawsuit and a slap in the face to the many who have worked against the administration on behalf of several other hard to create this monument.” environmental groups. December 7, 2017 13


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boulderganic Wikimedia Commons

Though masking sunlight could lessen the severity of some storms, it would stress regions like Africa’s Sahel, imperiling the lives of millions.

G

eo-engineering — the untested technofix that would permit the continued use of fossil fuels — could create more problems than it would solve. By masking sunlight with injections of sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere, nations could perhaps suppress some of the devastating hurricanes and typhoons that in a rapidly warming world threaten cities in the Northern Hemisphere. But they could also scorch the Sahel region of Africa, and threaten millions of lives and livelihoods, according to new research. Geo-engineering is sometimes played as humanity’s have-your-cakeand-eat-it option: humans have already unthinkingly engineered climate change over the last 200 years by profligate combustion of coal, oil and gas that releases ever-growing concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Since ferocious volcanic eruptions have been known to cool the global climate by pumping soot and sulphur dioxide into the upper atmosphere, some reason that scientists and technologists could play the same card, in a calculated fashion. But shortly after one research team showed that, in theory at least, geo-engineering could be made to work (Re: Boulderganic, “Geo-engineering can stop global warming, at least in theory,” Nov. 30), a second group has demonstrated that there would be a huge price to pay. And they call on policymakers to think carefully before testing any unilateral action. “Our results confirm that regional solar geoengineering is a highly risky strategy, which could

More harm than good with climate geo-engineering Study sees dangers in the technofix by Tim Radford

repeatedly looked at the geo-engineering option, and repeatedly conceded that the ideal answer would be to stop burning fossil fuels. And since greenhouse gas emissions have failed to fall, other groups have repeatedly returned to the study to find that such solutions may not work, or that they could create more problems than they solve. Jones and his colleagues report in the journal Nature Communications that they tested the sulphate solution in simulation to find what others have suggested: that in addition to damping global temperature rise, a deliberate darkening of the skies would also suppress hurricane activity in the North Atlantic.

Drought risk simultaneously benefit one region to the detriment of another,” said Anthony Jones, a climate scientist at the University of Exeter, U.K., who led the study. “It is vital that policymakers take solar geo-engineering seriously and act swiftly to install effective regulation.” This is an argument that has continued for more than a decade: in 2006, the Nobel laureate and chemist Paul Crutzen pointed out that, while burning hydrocarbon fuels, humans also released sulphate aerosols that represented a health hazard linked to half a million deaths a year.

Multiple effects If a proportion of this pollution reached the upper atmosphere, it would not only save lives, it would change the reflectivity of the planet, dim solar radiation and contain global warming. Since then, researchers the world over have

But, as others have argued, it would also heighten the likelihood of sustained drought in the Sahel, a region which extends across 14 nations in Africa, from Senegal to Ethiopia. “It is obvious from first principles that stratospheric aerosol geo-engineering deployed in only one hemisphere would lead to huge shifts in tropical climate patterns,” said Peter Irvine, a researcher at Harvard University, commenting on the study. “Deploying stratospheric aerosol geo-engineering in only one hemisphere is pretty certainly a bad idea, and this work helps reinforce that view.” And John Shepherd, an earth system scientist at the University of Southampton in the U.K., said, “This is not a technique that is ready to use in the near future: reducing CO2 emissions and planning our adaptation must remain top priorities for climate policy.” This story originally ran on Climate News Network.

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Stephen Batura

revolving time STEPHEN BATURA PAINTS THE MILE HIGH CITY FROM A TIME NOT SO LONG AGO IT’S HARD TO TIMESTAMP

one of Stephen Batura’s paintings. While the scenes feel familiar — a river, a field or a construction site — there’s an otherworldly quality about them. “My intention is to confuse that issue,” Batura says. “When I’m gone, [my paintings] will be very strange objects. People will doublecheck dates, and they’ll find it tricky to date. That’s what I want, to blur those lines and make the audience deal with the fact that it’s not identified clearly, and what that means.” On view at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art through Jan. 21, River Paintings features more than a decade of Batura’s work. It all started about 15 years ago. At the time, Batura was painting another series depicting train wrecks. During his research of historical photos, he continually came across the work of early-20th-century photographer Charles Lillybridge. Lillybridge worked in Denver from about 1905-1935 using a tripod camera with glass plates. At some point, Lillybridge’s plates were donated to the Colorado Historical Society, which then digitized them. Batura became fascinated by the work, drawn to this large conglomeration of photos that covered a wide range of subject matter.

Around 15 years ago, Stephen Batura discovered a trove of early20th-century photographs of Denver taken by Charles Lillybridge. These photos became the inspiration for Batura’s current BMoCA exhibit River Paintings.

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December 7 , 2017 17


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“There were candids of people. [Lillybridge] took pictures of people in the parks having picnics. He took lots of pictures of houses around “Homeland,” 2016, Acrylic on Birchwood, 6’ his neighborhood, on the outskirts of Denver. x 8.’ He just wandered around taking pictures; they’re very casual,” Batura says. “He’d take a picture of a bush. He took a picture of an empty street with nothing. There’s almost hardly anything in the picture, just the street.” The photos lack a professional quality that makes Batura think Lillybridge was an amatur. That and the fact that many of the photos contain fingerprints and scratches. Also, considering the content matter, the photos don’t seem highly controlled, which was odd for that time period. “It’s kind of a rare thing to find old photographers who aren’t trying to make things like a painting or that aren’t very formal. I really like that quality,” Batura says. In all, the collection contained roughly 1,900 pictures from Lillybridge. In 2001, Batura decided he was going to render something new out of every one of Lillybridge’s images. From the photos, Batura has created drawings, prints and paintings. Yet he still knows little about the man behind his inspiration. “The Historical Society told me that there was just no information on [Lillybridge],” Batura says. “The little bit that there was suggested he was this outsider that didn’t have much contact with people. That was a fascinating part for me too, that he was just this obsessed guy doing it for his own reasons. “He had a family, and he had a little shack by the river,” Batura continues. “I can’t really tell how he lived. I don’t think he made his living from his images. I think he was more than a hobbyist. He was definitely obsessive about recording all these things going on in the outskirts of Denver.” But despite spending so many years working with Lillybridge’s photos, Batura was never particularly interested in the personal details of the photographer or his work. “I tried to make the [work] not be sentimentalized and not pin historical attachment to it. My plan was to not reference history,” he says. None of the people or the places in photos were identified by Lillybridge, and the vague nature of the photos aids the timeless quality of the work. The tree or house Lillybridge photographed could still be found on the outskirts of Denver today. While Batura has identified some of the landmarks in Lillybridge’s photos, Boulder Weekly


he never sought to track down specifics. “The mystery of it was what interested me,” Batura says. Detachment has always been a component in Batura’s work, as in his series on train wrecks, for example. “I wasn’t interested in doing a train wreck that happened last year in New York,” he says. “I liked the fact that I’m looking at something that happened in 1935, and that I don’t have any emotion about it that I might if I knew more about it.” He followed that impulse with his decision to translate Lillybridge’s work into his own. “I think that’s what drew me into using someone else’s life to provide me with imagery — here I am looking at life through someone else’s eye,” Batura says. And even though he draws inspiration from the photos, Batura adds his own artistic quality to the paintings. Because of the nebulous content the photos provided, Batura had freedom to interpret them through his own lens. He used multiple tactics to make the images current and contemporary, most notably by experimenting with color. In “Homeland,” Batura paints a scene in a field of workers building a fence. The color palette alternates between a deep purple and rich yellow — yellow skies and grounds, purple trees and wood planks, the people a mix of the two colors. “I’m trying to suspend the realism and the naturalism of the scene,” he says. “That lets me do things with paint that start to verge on abstraction.” The coloring technique also adds to the dreamy quality of Batura’s paintings; devoid of any concrete context, the pictures whimsically float somewhere in time. “I have been interested in this idea of time revolving,” he says. “You see a face, and it looks like someone you know now, but it’s a photo taken 100 years ago.” By working so closely with Lillybridge’s collection, Batura began to notice the circular nature of time. Some of the houses Lillybridge photographed still exist in Batura’s neighborhood. “I could walk across the street and make a painting of a house that was built the same year he took the picture,” he says. “This recurring theme became something that really fascinated me. “They’re historical,” he continues. “But it’s more about the recurrence of people and their desires and their motivations that keep coming up and [still] seem very relevant to me now.” Batura finished his Lillybridge project last year. In all that time, he’s Boulder Weekly

learned a very simple lesson. “I learned 15 years is a long time,” he says with a laugh. But moreso, Batura gained an appreciation for time and what a lifetime of work really looks like. “The weight of all this material that he spent probably 30 years photographing — that was always in my mind,” he says. “I was kind of living in this guy’s life, however long it took me to get through it. “This is what this guy left behind,” he continues. “And I ’m recreating it for other people to discover in their own way.”

buzz ON THE BILL: Stephen Batura: River Paintings. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Jan. 21.

December 7 , 2017 19


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Boulder Weekly


Indie hip hop is dead (But long live indie hip hop)

A gathering place for...

M

overtones

by Sarah Haas Adam Stanzak

usab, aka Sab the globe, without having Artist, aka Beyond, to sign on the dotted has gone through his line or spend hunfair share of personal dreds of thousands of transformations. He dollars on radio prostarted writing lyrics when he was 9, motion — and in the back then the child of a single moth- process, allowed those er in a poor neighborhood in who were operating Minneapolis. As a teenager he was a underground to finally member of one of the city’s preemisee the light of day.” nent hip hop tribes, the Headshots. The death of the Later he co-founded the indie hip term left a swath of hop label Rhymesayers artists struggling to Entertainment with Sean Daley define themselves, like (Slug), Anthony Davis (Ant) — both Musab and the roster of Atmosphere, who Musab is curat Rhymesayers who rently on tour with — and Brent had, for decades, Sayers (Siddiq). Now he’s 42, living formed their identities in Los Angeles with a wife and five in accordance with the kids. subversive, alternative His newest release is a personal ethos of the scene. Musab recognizes exposé of a man coming to terms with there is still a beating all those versions of himself, speaking heart there, albeit curwith a newfound authority about the rently without a name, something that dying genre of indie hip hop, the lifechanging experience of fatherhood and “owes to the aesthetic of the music, which owes to the process of how you what it means to be a black man in came up with the sound,” he says. today’s America. We might not know what to call it, For the past five years, Musab’s but we know it when we hear it because been telling everyone that indie hip hop is dead. That’s because, he says, it it’s simple — just lyrics laid over infecis a definitional genre. Back in the day, tious beats. The nakedness of the infraindependent musicians got their title structure makes it hard to hide anyby default, by operating outside of the thing behind production and dubbing. commercial landscape and below the Instead the process allows for an mainstream radar. exhibition of the Back then, they had power of simplicity, at ON THE BILL: Atmosphere no choice. its best revealing the — with Musab + Ink Well (MInk), deM atlaS, The In the 1990s inner workings of the Lioness, DJ Keezy. 8 p.m. Musab’s independent rapper. Or, as Musab Thursday, Dec. 7, Ogden label Rhymesayers puts it: Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Tickets are $29.95 in formed in “It’s this almost advance, $35 at the door. Minneapolis as one intangible sonic quali8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 13, of many sprouting up ty that just feels Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. SOLD OUT. around the country. right,” he says. For most of them, the “Underground music hope wasn’t just to, as happens as a part of they say, “own your masters,” but to the natural evolution of the artist as a maintain complete control over their human being.” artistic aesthetic and process. Over More than any of his releases of the time, indie hip hop evolved into a last decade, Musab’s latest album, genre of its very own, but one always Intellectual Property, released from his doomed for extinction. partnership with Ink Well under the name To explain his point, Musab points MInK, has that feeling. It’s smart without to the article, “Underground Hip-Hop being tricky, insightful without being preis Dead — Welcome to the tentious and absolutely vulnerable. Mainstream,” on DJbooth.net, which “It’s funny because it’s good, really says: good, but making the music felt easy,” “The internet age gave ‘indepenhe says. “It was all of the personal work dent’ artists the platform their art that went on behind the scenes that deserves — one where their work could was hard.” easily be broadcast across the entire Musab proceeds to open up about Boulder Weekly

live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com

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growing up with his single mom and aunts in Minneapolis and of all the hard times he went through as an artist and man, trying to do the right things while trying to make ends meet. He talks about the anger that came up along the way. He talks about becoming a family man and learning how to give a better life to his kids. He talks about all the time he spent in anger management and therapy. But mostly he talks about the hard work of coming to look himself in the mirror and learning to do what it takes to become the man that he always wanted to be. “I didn’t have anyone tell me what to do, but I fixed myself, got myself better as a person. And only then was I able to expose it more musically,” he says. “It’s like what Jay Z said in his November interview with the New York Times that, ‘The hardest thing is seeing pain on someone’s face that you caused, and then have to deal with yourself.’ “What he’s saying is what we all go through, I’ll say, as black men, specifically as a part of that community. We have to learn to expose our emotions.” He says this as a parent, but also, importantly, as a once indie artist continuing to make music beyond the passing of his genre. At the heart of both versions of the man is the same authentic, if unnameable quality. It’s as audible in the sound of his music as it is in the tone of his voice when he says: “I always tell my kids that I owe them the truth. Like, out of anything I owe you, I owe you truth.”

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LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 December 7 , 2017 21


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Feat Joey porter (the motet), robert “Sput” SeariGht (Snarky puppy), mononeon (prince), dJ williamS (kdtu), JenniFer hartSwick (trey band), drew SayerS (the motet) & corey Frye (the main Squeeze) w/ cbdb

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JameS brown dance party Feat memberS oF JameS brown’S band, biG GiGantic, the dap kinGS, talib kweli, John leGend, lauryn hill, odeSza, pretty liGhtS, bootSy collinS, Snarky puppy & denver’S michael JackSon all StarS

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JeFF auStin band Saturday January 27

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the expendableS w/ throuGh the rootS & paciFic dub

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the dance party time machine thurSday march 29

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Feat Steve watkinS (allen Stone/Juno what), adam deitch (lettuce/break Science), Garrett SayerS (the motet) & dan Schwindt (kyle hollinGSworth band)

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Feat dave wattS (motet), JaSon hann (Sci), rooSevelt collier, ian neville (dumpStaphunk), chuck JoneS (dopapod), todd StoopS (raq), JanS inGber & camille who?, Gabe mervine (motet) & nick Gerlach w/ biG mean Sound machine

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22 December 7 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


Boulder’s holiday musical banquet serves ‘All Things Bright and Beautiful,’ ‘Fire and Ice’ this season by Peter Alexander

T

Courtesy CU Presents

arts & cu l t u r e

he musical banquet that is the holiday season this year brings us “All Things Bright and Beautiful,” “Holiday Memories,” “Fire and Ice” and Diane Reeves. One staple of the season is The Nutcracker, performed all up and down the Front Range — and pretty much everywhere else, for that matter. Boulder Ballet’s Nutcracker, performed with the Boulder Philharmonic and the Longmont Symphony, has run its course, but there are still opportunities to see the Centennial State Ballet production, presented with full orchestra, Dec. 15–17 in Niwot. Of the purely musical events in the Boulder area, CU’s “Holiday Festival” takes pride of place. The event runs Dec. 8–10 but has long been sold out for all four performances. You might want to start planning now to attend next year’s “Holiday Festival.” Ars Nova Singers and conductor Thomas Edward Morgan team up with guitarist Nicolò Spera to present the most unusual program of the holidays, Dec. 9, 10, 14 and 15. Under the title “Fire and Ice,” the concert will include a number of new works as well as contemporary arrangements of traditional carols. Performance details and ticket information on these holiday events: FIRE AND ICE: CHRISTMAS WITH ARS NOVA 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, Heart of Longmont United Methodist Church, 350 11th Ave., Longmont 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 10, Sgt. Paul Community of Faith, Denver 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Dec. 14 and 15, St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1419 Pine St., Boulder Tickets: arsnovasingers.org

Boulder Weekly

Spera and Ars Nova together will perform Romancero Gitana, a setting of poems by the Spanish poet and playwright Federico García Lorca, composed for guitar and chorus by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. The poems are taken from Garcia Lorca’s cycle Poema del canto jondo (Poems of the deep song), which celebrate the Andalusian gypsy culture and flamenco music. The Latvian composer Eriks Ešenvalds is represented on the program with “Stars,” a remarkable piece for chorus accompanied by the otherworldly sound of tuned glasses. Other contemporary composers on the program include Stephen Paulus, Michael Fink, Andrej Jansons and Alf Houkom. A more traditional holiday program will be presented by jazz vocalist Dianne Reeves, appearing in Macky Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16. Reeves briefly studied music at CU Boulder before she became a touring performer. With 18 albums to her credit from 1987 to the present, she has so far won five Grammy awards. The program for her performance, titled “Christmastime is Here,” has not been announced, except it will include “holiday favorites.”

THE NUTCRACKER CENTENNIAL STATE BALLET 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 15 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 16 1 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17 Tickets: app.arts-people.com/ index.php?actions=4&p=3 DIANE REEVES: CHRISTMAS TIME IS HERE 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 16 Macky Auditorium Tickets: tickets.cupresents.org ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL BOULDER CHORALE, VICKI

The title piece of Boulder Chorale’s holiday concert will be John Rutter’s “All Things Bright and Beautiful.” Featuring 200 singers in six choirs, from children to adults, and guest soloist Sheryl Renee, the performance will be accompanied by piano, harp, percussion and other instrumentalists. In addition to Rutter’s piece, the program will include a Peruvian carol sung in Spanish, “The Color Purple” from the Broadway Show and the traditional African-American folk song “Children, Go Where I Send Thee” with the full adult choir and Bel Canto, the top children’s group. The audience will be invited to join in on traditional carols. This will be the first year for the Longmont Symphony’s new director, Elliot Moore, to lead the annual Candlelight Concert, at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17. The concert, with the Longmont Chorale Singers and soloists, will open with Vivaldi’s Gloria, one of the most popular Baroque choral works. Other classical works will include Ottorino Respighi’s Adoration of the Magi and J.S. Bach’s beloved Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring. The concert will conclude with a collection of holiday carols. A twist on the traditional holiday event is provided by Boulder Symphony, who are billing their “Holiday Memories” program at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 20, as “a dementiafriendly concert.” Intended for those with dementia and their caregivers, the concert will be presented in a “low-sensory setting.” The concert will be free, with a limited number of tickets available.

BURRICHTER, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR, WITH CHAMBER SINGERS, CHILDREN’S CHORALE, AND SHERYL RENEE, GUEST ARTIST VOCALIST 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 16 and 17, First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder. Tickets: app.arts-people.com/ index.php?show=79258 CANDLELIGHT CONCERT LONGMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Elliot Moore, conductor Longmont Chorale Singers and

soloists, Scott Hamline, artistic director 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17, Westview Presbyterian Church, 1500 Hoover St., Longmont Tickets: longmontsymphony.org/ candlelightconcert HOLIDAY MEMORIES A DEMENTIA-FRIENDLY CONCERT Boulder Symphony, Devin Patrick Hughes, artistic director 3 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 20 First Presbyterian Church, 1820 15th St., Boulder Free; reserve tickets bouldersymphony.org

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December 7 , 2017 23


Global performance. World-class entertainment. You have to be here.

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Saturday, Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, tickets starting at $20

cupresents.org ¡ 303-492-8008

24 December 7 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


AdamsVisCom

ON THE BILL: The SantaLand Diaries. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 1400 Curtis St., Denver, www.denvercenter. org, $25 and up. Through Dec. 24.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location THURSDAY DECEMBER 7

CARATROM 8PM THE JAKE LEVENTHAL QUARTET 9PM FRIDAY DECEMBER 8 8PM

An elfing good time — take a trip to SantaLand by Gary Zeidner

F

a rts & c ultu re

orget the alleged War on Christmas. Judging by the Xmas-themed commercials on TV, the Xmas music playing at the mall and the Xmas decorations that popped up on both public and private property on Nov. 1, the real war is on Thanksgiving. If Xmas season starts the day after Halloween, which apparently it now does, then Thanksgiving’s days are numbered, and if Turkey Day’s goose is cooked, we’ll lose our last beachhead holding back Xmas creep. Halloween won’t stand a chance against the festively sinister, red and green tide. It’ll fold faster than First Place at an origami contest, and then it’ll be Xmas time from Independence Day on. That’ll be enough to turn even the Cindy Lou Who-est of yule lovers into grumbling Grinches and bah humbuggers. Oh, the abominable snowmanity! For some, it’s already too late. The thrill is gone. The wonder’s become woebegone. The decided lack of exciting, new holiday entertainment isn’t Boulder Weekly

helping any either. So, if Frosty leaves you cold and you’d rather turn Rudolph into venison than watch him guide the Fat Man’s sleigh one more time, then the Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company has just the Xmas counterprogramming you need to stuff your stocking, The SantaLand Diaries. Based on the essay by David Sedaris, which was, in turn, based on Sedaris’ experience working as an elf in SantaLand at Macy’s in Manhattan, The SantaLand Diaries is a cynically candid, profoundly profane laughgasm. Whether it’s obnoxious parents, spoiled brat kids, spitting Santas or even Cher, no one is safe in this holiday bitch slap. That includes the reluctant elf himself, David, aka Crumpet, a strugglingverging-on-failing actor in his 30s forced to work at SantaLand to keep his head just barely above water. Don’t let the green velvet smock, red and white striped tights and pointy shoes fool you; David’s about as jolly as a junkyard dog, and his chagrin is comic gold. Comic frankincense and myrrh sold separately. Playing David for the third year in a row, Michael Bouchard is supremely confident and comfortable in the role. On opening night he ad-libbed and riffed like the veteran performer he is. “Have you ever been upstaged by a bear?” he deadpanned after a teddy he’d tossed aside landed improbably upright on a bow-topped present delighting

and distracting the audience. Brilliant! Bouchard’s David hearkens (the herald angels...) back to early Robin Williams or, for the younger crowd, Bill Burr. He’s a ball of burning energy, a mile-a-minute dialogue delivery system. He goes supersonic within minutes of the proverbial curtain rising and doesn’t take his foot off the gas until the penultimate, token, feel-good scene. The high intensity, often wild-eyed take on David, presented by Bouchard and obviously endorsed by Director Stephen Weitz, feels very much a piece of the evolution of BETC’s SantaLand. Nine years ago when BETC first brought SantaLand to the Boulder stage, performances were held at the Dairy Center, and David was played by Geoffrey Kent with his uniquely laid back style of drollery. Kent gave way to Matt Zambrano, a Patton Oswalt-ish thespian whose David was wound tighter by half. The production itself underwent a similar change five years ago when BETC partnered with the Denver Center Theatre Company. SantaLand relocated from the Dairy to its current home at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, and it immediately took on a more citified vibe. Along the way, The SantaLand Diaries has become a theatrical holiday tradition on par with A Christmas Carol for theatregoers looking for a different, spicier shot of holiday cheer. Or holiday bashing, depending on who you ask. Seating in the DCPA’s diminutive Jones Theatre is limited and will almost certainly sell out, especially as we get closer to Xmas itself. Grab your tickets now or risk lumps of coal later.

MEREDITH WILDER & ALEXA WILDISH

SATURDAY DECEMBER 9 8PM

ANDREW STURTZ / AYA MAGUIRE / COPPER LEAF SUNDAY DECEMBER 10 8PM

WOMEN IN SONG

MONDAY DECEMBER 11 8PM

KYLE DONOVAN BAND w/SUMMERLAND SUN

TUESDAY DECEMBER 12 8PM

ESPRESSO!

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 13

MONTROPO 8PM JAMES MICHAEL 9PM JOSH MAX 10PM THURSDAY DECEMBER 14

TAYLOR SHAE 8PM HONEYWISE 9PM

FRIDAY DECEMBER 15 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE

Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM December 7 , 2017 25


COMMUNITY HOUSE CONCERTS

Dec

8

Dec

9

Dec

11

Dec

eTown Presents:

eTown Comedy Live!

Featuring comedians Phil Palisoul, ShaNae Ross, John Papaioannou and Jose Macall. Hosted by Cody Spyker!

eTown Presents:

The Barry Shapiro Band & Sean Kelly of The Samples (Solo) Movie Night at eTown Hall

Tim Burton’s

The Nightmare Before Christmas Plus, a food and toy drive

eTown Presents:

Reed Foehl

21 & Kid Reverie (Steve Varney) Plus, special guests

12/16 1/5 1/11 1/22 1/26

Full ConCert: John Craigie and Covenhoven Full ConCert: Steve Poltz radio Show taPing: hot rize & FriendS radio Show taPing: John oateS & lilly hiatt radio Show taPing: dan tyminSki & the SeCret SiSterS eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce St. Boulder, CO 80302 • eTOWN.org

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org

26 December 7 , 2017

AARON WALKER QUARTET: A GYPSY HOLIDAY DECEMBER 16 2 PM & 7:30 PM TICKETS: chautauqua.com 900 BASELINE ROAD • BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

coloradochautauqua

colochautauqua

Boulder Weekly


UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

River Crossing by June Lucarotti This morning, I ran to the edges through the tall grassss rockislands

across

Dec

the

8

against a curtain of summer cicadas

where the tire swing hangs from its wooden rusted nail

eTown Comedy Live

Phil Palisoul, ShaNae Ross, John Papaioannou and Jose Macall Hosted by Cody Spyker!

and whispered to myself, in the trails already etched into my mind…..

y vamos por este lado y luego el otro!

puedo cruzar aca? por aqui, vamos!

children waving their hands comehere!poraquijunevengavamoscomosedice estaaaaaa….?? choclando en cataratas i thought the word was mask we laughed I dreamt I took someone with me that one who has the end of your novel that one where everything make sense that one who ties things up in a way you could have never seen like tying ribbon on a gift and we watch the tiny ants carry large wood on their backs we watch everything en el suelo snake like snake like float like magic the mud and water spiders the fish who don’t have names the living imprints

Full Concert:

Dec

9

The Barry Shapiro Band & Sean Kelly

of The Samples (Solo)

a footstep to wake the sleeping banks of a river

Movie Night at eTown Hall

something different happens when I am in spanish yo soy yo soy yo soy todo

Dec Tim Burton’s

11

I am everything

and owner of nothing visiting a language twirling a tongue

The Nightmare Before Christmas

TOY DRIVE: Collecting new unwrapped presents

the cracks in the surface are not too deep yet the tablas are smooth I went to cruzar el rio this morning and even though it was harder y somos de locos caressed the edges, through the cold rio down to the fount back to full

I kissed each rock with my feet and and my feet wet and smile and my ears blossomed and my heart swelled

and the sweetness of time

expanded too in my chest beyond not enough and my arms stretched with it estirando el tiempo e s t i r

a

n

d

o

we come with these tools I said to a tree root, raiz I said we are born from magic from a wink in the sand and a tiny smile donde nacimos

Full Concert

Reed Foehl 21 Kid Reverie

Dec

& Special Guests

12/16 1/11 1/22 1/5 1/26

Full ConCert: John Craigie and Covenhoven radio Show taping: hot rize & FriendS radio Show taping: John oateS & lilly hiatt Full ConCert: Steve poltz radio Show taping: dan tyminSki & the SeCret SiSterS

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

June Lucarotti, founder of Vola Sessions, teaches social-emotional skills and self-care techniques through yoga, meditation, and creative writing workshops for individuals, families, schools and other organizations throughout Colorado and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org Boulder Weekly

December 7 , 2017 27


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Boulder Weekly


Courtesy of Kevin Smith

ETOWN COMEDY LIVE 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 8, eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Tickets are $10, plus service fees. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies. But enough with the biology lesson because you don’t need science to tell you that it’s gonna be laughs-a-million at the inaugural evening of eTown Comedy Live. Denver’s charming Cody Spyker will set the stage for local comedians Phil Palisoul, ShaNae Ross, John Papaioannou and Jose Macall. This ain’t no amateur hour — Spyker has featured nationally touring comedians such as Amy Schumer, Shane Mauss and David Gboirie on her weekly podcast Ice Cream Social, and Phil Palisoul has made dozens of TV appearances including The Tonight Show, The Late Late Show, two seasons of Last Comic Standing and Comedy Central’s Premium Blend.

PARADE OF LIGHTS 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, Parade will be on Main Street and Coffman Street, between Third and Eighth avenues in Downtown Longmont. Main Street Longmont will light up with more than 60 twinkling floats to cheer the soul and kick off the holiday season on Dec. 9. Come watch this magical parade filled with marching toy soldiers, high school marching bands, ice castles, 12-foot balloons, costumed characters and more. Grab a drink and nosh downtown beforehand and make a night of it. For more information about the parade and the weekend holiday activities, visit the City of Longmont website.

Photograph by Daniel Sharkey @ Brikolage Lab

PAPER BIRD — WITH PATRICK DETHLEF

HOLLYWOOD BABBLE-ON WITH KEVIN SMITH AND RALPH GARMAN. 7 P.M.

SATURDAY, NOV. 9, BOULDER THEATER, 2032 14TH ST., BOULDER. TICKETS ARE $30-$50. see EVENTS Page 30

Boulder Weekly

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland. Tickets are $17 in advance, $20 day-of-show. Hometown darlings Paper Bird are in the midst of writing a new chapter in their story. They’ve introduced vocalist Carleigh Aikins to the group, and a shift in the band’s lineup has phased out electric guitars for a more laid back, folk-tinged sound that harkens back to the band’s earliest days. The group has shared the stage with Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats and The Lumineers. Their most recent, self-titled album was co-produced by John Oates, of Hall and Oates fame.

December 7 , 2017 29


One Thousand Nights at Caffè Sole

Thursday, December 7 Music

December events

Alice In Winterland featuring The All-American Rejects. 6 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver.

Friday Night 12/1

CaraTrom at The Laughing Goat. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder.

Nice Work Jazz Combo

$10 Suggested Cover

Saturday Night 12/2

Scott Martin Quartet $10 Suggested Cover

Friday Night 12/8

Lynn Baker Quartet

$10 Suggested Cover Charge

Saturday Night 12/9

After Midnight

$12 Suggested Cover Charge

Friday Night 12/15

Ginga Brazilian Jazz Night $10 Suggested Cover

Saturday Night 12/16

Sherefe

$12 Suggested Cover

Friday Night 12/22

Chris Daniels Band with Freddi Gowdy new # 1 CD Celebration, BLUES WITH HORNS $12 Suggested Cover

Saturday Night 12/23

Janine Gastineau Christmas Show Voluntary Cover Charge

Friday Night 12/29

Deborah Stafford Swingtet $12 Suggested Cover

Saturday Night 12/30

Mary Russell & Rob Candler Year End Blues Extravaganza

Voluntary Cover Charge

Dinner Service: 6-8:30 All Showtimes: 7-10 637R South Broadway, Boulder, Co. 80305 www.caffesole.com 303-499-2985

30 December 7 , 2017

events

EVENTS from Page 29

Cat Clyde. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. Cisco The Nomad. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Colorado Hebrew Chorale@the Library! 7 p.m. Longmont Public Library, 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont.

CU BOULDER EVENTS Thursday, December 7 Geneva Percival Concert Series. 7:30 p.m. Frasier Meadows, 350 Ponca Place, Boulder. The series is named for Geneva Percival, who was the first resident at Frasier Meadows and donated her 1913 Steinway grand piano to the center, and

Desert Hearts (Mikey Lion, Lee Reynolds, Marbs & Porkchop). 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder.

Randy Rogers Band. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver. The Wilder Variety Hour. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont. Events

generously supported by gifts to the Geneva Percival Fund for Music.

Master’s Student Recital: Neila Wisniewski Getz, soprano.

12th Annual “Rocking in a Winter Winderland” Rock Art Show and Sale. 8 p.m. The Riverside, 1724 Broadway, Boulder.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

The Art of the Video Interview. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder.

Friday, December 8

Art on Tap! Oktoberfest Beer Portrait Night. 6:30 p.m. Rackhouse Pub, 2875 Blake St., Denver. Bingo and Taco Thursday. 7 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Colorado Ballet’s The Nutcracker. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver. Comedy Night at Vision Quest. 8:30 p.m. Vision Quest Brewing, 2510 47th St., Boulder. Holiday Fine Arts Market. 5 p.m. Art Gym Denver, 1460 Leyden St., Denver. Holiday Lights Tour. 6 p.m. Union Station, Wynkoop and 17th streets, Denver. Introduction to 2018 Boulder Arts Commission Grants. 5:30 p.m. Bohemia Boulder, 4919 N. Broadway, Suite 7, Boulder. Jane. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Mountain Kids Story Time. 12 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. The Star Wars Holiday Variety Show. 6 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver. Trivia at Tandoori’s Bar. 6 p.m. Tandori’s Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder.

5 p.m. Visual Arts Complex, CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Join in celebrating the opening of our Fall 2017 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition on view Dec. 9-21. Artists featured: Schuyler DeMarinis, Benjamin Stockman, Matthew Vivirito, Marie Williams.

FRESH: Fall 2017: A CU dance concert

Mokomba Ensemble. 4 p.m. Sweet Spot Cafe, 585 Dillon Road, Louisville.

Purple Squirrel, Rabblefish. 6:30 p.m. St Julien Hotel & Spa, 900 Walnut St., Boulder.

Fall 2017 Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition Opening Reception

Department Colloquium. 3 p.m. Engineering Classroom Wing, Room 245, 1111 Engineering Drive, Boulder. General talks on selected applied mathematics topics. Open to the public.

7:30 p.m. University Theatre, Irey Theatre, 1515 Central Campus Mall, Boulder. Enjoy a potential mix of Hip-Hop, aerial, fusion forms and improvised offerings crafted by undergraduate and graduate dance students.

Saturday, December 9 FRESH: Fall 2017: A CU dance concert

7:30 p.m. University Theatre, Irey Theatre, 1515 Central Campus Mall, Boulder. Enjoy a potential mix of HipHop, aerial, fusion forms and improvised offerings crafted by undergraduate and graduate dance students.

Monday, December 11 Concert Band and Campus Orchestra

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder. The Concert Band, which is open to music majors and non-majors on the CU Boulder campus, maintains an active schedule performing traditional and contemporary works for band. The Campus Orchestra, comprised of music majors and non-music majors, performs a wide range of repertoire from Baroque through contemporary periods in both string and fullorchestra settings.

Faculty Tuesdays: Two Pianos +

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder. This program will feature works for two pianos in combination with other instruments, including Schumann’s unusual Andante and Variations, as well as Bartók’s formidable Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion.

Full Council Meeting

12:15 p.m. University Memorial Center, Room 247, 1669 Euclid Ave., Boulder. Monthly Boulder Campus Staff Council full council meeting. Open to the public. 12:15-2:15 p.m.; every second Wednesday of the month.

Video Production Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder.

Made Liquids & Solids, 1555 S. Hover Road, Longmont.

Write Club Denver: Unholy Night. 6 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver.

Friday Afternoon Concerts and Art Shows featuring Opera Fort Collins. 2:30 p.m. Stewart Auditorium at Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont.

Friday, December 8 Music The Blue Canyon Boys. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons. Cellar West Friday Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 10, Boulder. Chris Dismuke. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. A Classical Christmas. 7:30 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver. David Booker. 6 p.m. Chuburger, 1225 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont.

Funkiphino. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver. Handel’s Messiah. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver. Harmony and Brad. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. Holiday Festival. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Ian Cooke Album Release & Going Away Party. 9 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver. Integral Steps Presents Music & Movement. 1 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette.

Ulyana Horodyskyj: Earth Analogs for Space. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder.

David Burchfield. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont.

Under Milk Wood. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Denver Gay Men’s Chorus: Holiday Concert. 8 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder.

Intuit — with The Alcapones & Masontown. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

Felonius Smith Trio. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Home

see EVENTS Page 32

Viceroy’s House. 4:30 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Weekly

December 7 , 2017 31


events

arts

Stephen Batura

Stephen Batura’s River Paintings presents individual paintings as a long, continuous stream that flows through the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, bringing together disparate images and connecting them with a scrolling-like flow. The work is part of ongoing series in which Batura reinterprets the entirety of photo archive from early 20th century Denver.

Elemental Forms. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2018. Eyes On: Xiaoze Xie. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through July 8. Faculty Exhibition: 2017. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through Dec. 23. Ganesha: The Playful Protector. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through October 2018. Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Jan. 14.

Through Jan. 21.

Center, Polly Addison Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Begins Dec. 8. Through Jan. 21. Lined Out — Ted Larsen. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St. Through Jan. 21.

Legacy — presented by Gallery 1261 and Denver Public Library. Denver Central Library, Level 7, Vida Ellison Gallery, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Dec. 31.

Marginalia — by Joel Swanson. Dairy Arts Center, MacMillan Family Lobby and Hand-Rudy Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Begins Dec. 8. Through Jan. 21.

Less Ephemeral — by Marco Pinter. Dairy Arts

Marking Presence. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Begins Dec. 8.

Past the Tangled Present. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Begins Dec. 8. Through Oct. 28, 2018. Revealing A Mexican Masterpiece: The Virgin of Valvanera. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Feburary 2018. Sinner in Gingham. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St. Through Jan. 21. Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through February 2018.

EVENTS from Page 30

Katie Glassman & Snapshot: Holiday Show. 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Dazzle@Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver.

Throwback Night: Old Man Winters. 11 p.m. The Pop-Up, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder.

Free Legal Clinic. 2 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette.

Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Lee Hill), 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 20, Boulder.

Events Cinderella/Cendrillon. 6 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder.

Friday Night Bazaar: Holiday Edition. 4 p.m. Denver Rock Drill, 1717 E. 39th Ave., Denver.

Longmont Lights. 5 p.m. Roosevelt Park, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. Morgan Saint. 8:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. Say Anything: In Defense Anniversary Tour. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Signs and Signals, The Host Club, Prep Rally, Native Station. 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver. The Strange Parade (Tribute to The Doors), Nibumbu. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont.

Colorado Ballet’s The Nutcracker. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver. ComedySportz. 7:30 p.m. Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave., Denver. Downtown Longmont Holiday Cheer Walking Tour. 5:30 p.m. Sixth Avenue Plaza, 600 Sixth Ave., Longmont. eTown Comedy Live! 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Fate of The Comedy Show. 8 p.m. Los Tacos Famous Taqueria, 600 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

words

Harry Connick Jr’s The Happy Elf. 7:30 p.m. Longmont Performing Arts Center, 513 Main St., Longmont. Holiday Lights Tour. 6 p.m. Union Station, Wynkoop and 17th streets, Denver. Horizons K-8 Holiday Pop-up Shop. 11 a.m. Horizons K8 School, 4545 Sioux Drive, Boulder. Hot Night Snowball Family Friendly Event. 6 p.m. McNichols Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. In Bruges. 8:45 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. see EVENTS Page 34

Courtesy of Boulder Book Store

Thursday, December 7 Holly Gayley — Love Letters from Golok. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. KFG and Marcel “Fable” Price. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Friday, December 8 Phoebe Nix. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Saturday, December 9 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. RSVP at innisfreepoetry.com Monday, December 11 So, You’re a Poet: Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder.

32 December 7 , 2017

Tuesday, December 12 Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Wednesday, December 13 Instruments of Peace. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Holly Gayley will speak about and sign her new book, Love Letters from Golok, on Thursday, Dec. 7 at 7:30 p.m. at Boulder Book Store. The novel chronicles the courtship between two Buddhist tantric masters, Tare Lhamo and Namtrul Rinpoche, and their passion for reinvigorating Buddhism in eastern Tibet during the post-Mao era.

Boulder Weekly


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December 7 , 2017 33


events EVENTS from Page 32

Jane. 4:30 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

theater

Joe Larson. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. 7 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver.

Annie. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Feb. 24. Beau Jest — presented by Cherry Creek Theatre Company. Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Through Dec. 10.

Movies @ Meadows: The Sandlot. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder. New Exhibition Reception. 5 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

RDG Photography

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Arvada Center Main Stage Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Dec. 23.

Under Milk Wood. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Viceroy’s House. 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Music After Midnight Jazz Band. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder. Bonnie and Taylor Sims. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont.

A Christmas Carol. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Dec. 23.

Harry Connick Jr’s The Happy Elf. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. Begins Dec. 8. Through Dec. 17.

Scrooge: Bah Humbug! 6 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont.

Saturday, December 9

Body Of An American. Curious Theatre Company, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Dec. 9.

Eurydice — presented by CU Performing Arts. University of Colorado Boulder Theatre, 261 UCB, Boulder. Through Dec. 10.

Santa’s Big Red Sack. 7:30 p.m. Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave., Denver.

Video Production Certificate Program. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder.

Beauty and the Beast. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse. 747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Feb. 14.

Red. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Jan. 7. For the past eight years, three middle-aged couples have gathered, post-Christmas, at Randall and Dellen’s plush, cozy Vail cabin. Each year their social event includes exchanging white elephant gifts, making their resolutions for the upcoming year and, of course, a few cocktails. But this year, something has changed. Relationships have evolved, some more than others, and an unexpected guest is an all too familiar face. See “Resolutions” at The Edge Theater Company through Dec. 31.

Resolutions. The Edge Theater Company, 1560 Teller St., Lakewood. Through Dec. 31. The SantaLand Diaries. Denver Center Theatre Company, 950 13th St., Denver. Through Dec. 24 Siren Song: A Pirate’s Odyssey. Buntport Theatre, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through May 14, 2018. A Year with Frog and Toad. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Dec. 19.

Cleason-Dunn-Wright. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Denver Pops Orchestra Holiday Concert. 4 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver. Electric Red. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland. eTown Presents: The Barry Shapiro Band & Sean Kelly of The Samples (Solo). 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. An Evening of Turkish Music — with Egemen Kesikli. 10 p.m. The No Name Bar, 1325 Broadway, Boulder. GoGo Lab. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder. Ian Cooke Album Release & Going Away Party. 9 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver. Johnny O Band. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont. Live Music: Deborah Stafford and the State of Affairs. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder.

Colorado Ballet’s The Nutcracker. 1 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver.

Sound Circle Solstice 2017. 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Unity Columbine, 8900 Arapahoe Road, Boulder.

ComedySportz. 7:30 p.m. Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave., Denver.

The Symbols. 8 p.m. The Speakeasy, 301 Main St., Longmont.

The Denver Nickel + Dime Animation Extravaganza. 6:30 p.m. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver.

Three Year Anniversary Bash. 12 p.m. Grossen Bart Brewery, 1125 Delaware Ave., Suite A, Longmont. Tilia Americana. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont. Victor and Penny. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. The Well Intentioned at Skeye Brewing. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont. A World Transformed. 7:30 p.m. Stewart Auditorium at Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont.

Lori’s Cuisine. 3:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Events

The Lutheran Chorale Christmas Concert. 3 p.m. The Sanctuary, Denver, 3101 W. 31st Ave., Denver.

2017 Holiday Hoorah Craft/Vendor Fair. 10 a.m. 17th Avenue Event Center, 478 17th Ave., Longmont.

Paper Bird — with Patrick Dethlefs. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland.

3MCS Stand-Up, Sketch, and Live Comedy. 9 p.m. Blackbird Pub, 305 S. Downing St., Denver.

Pop Night: Dj Goodie. 10 p.m. The Pop-Up, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder. Say Anything. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Shockra. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

34 December 7 , 2017

Sick Puppies. 6:30 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver.

Adobe Premiere Pro Hands-On. 9 a.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder. Christmas Extravaganza. 7 p.m. Hopelight Clinic, 1351 Collyer St., Longmont. Cinderella/Cendrillon. 2 p.m. The Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder.

Denver Vegan Holiday Market. 11 a.m. Louisville Recreation/Senior Center, 900 Via Appia Way, Louisville. The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Dinner Show. 6 p.m. Embassy Suites by Hilton Denver Downtown Convention Center, 1420 Stout St., Denver. Disney On Ice: Follow Your Heart. 11 a.m., 3 p.m., and 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Harry Connick Jr’s The Happy Elf. 7:30 p.m. Longmont Performing Arts Center, 513 Main St., Longmont. Harwood & Woodward: Holiday Magic Show. 6 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera Hosue, 300 Main St., Longmont. Holiday Lights Tour. 6 p.m. Union Station, Wynkoop and 17th streets, Denver. Holiday Festival. 4 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Hollywood Babble-On With Kevin Smith & Ralph Garman. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Weekly


Boulder Weekly

December 7 , 2017 35


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6 p.m. Dec.7, The Riverside, 1724 Broadway, Boulder. Free. Looking for that perfect gift for the music lover in your house? Or maybe you’re the music lover and you’re looking to add a bitchn’ piece of rock ’n’ roll art to that painfully bare wall in your living room. Never fear, because the 12th Annual Rocking in a Winter Wonderland Rock Art Show and Sale is here. The show will feature the rock ’n’ roll photography of self-taught photographer and general badass Lisa Siciliano (whose time as a waitress at the Fox Theatre in its earliest days gave her the chance to meet some rock heroes and hone her craft as a photographer). This event has free live music from The Angle, Isabell’s Random Band, Sixty Minute Men, Augustus and NLP, not to mention the thousands of pieces of art for sale, including rock ’n’ roll calendars, rock ’n’ roll ornaments and all kinds of holiday gifts for the music lover on your list.

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EVENTS from Page 34

Jackalope Indie Artisan Fair. 10 a.m. McNichols Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. Jane. 6 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Joe Larson. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. Local Author Holiday Book Sale. 10 a.m. Ozo Coffee, 1015 Pearl St., Boulder. Lott Of Laughs Drag Show. 8 p.m. Mile High Hamburger Mary’s, 1336 E. 17th Ave., Denver. Navidad Flamenca: A Flamenco Christmas Night. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville.

Christmas Concert. 1 p.m. Westview Presbyterian Church, 1500 Hover St., Longmont. Defunkt Railroad. 4:30 p.m. Left Hand Brewing, 1265 Boston Ave., Longmont. Handel’s Messiah. 7:30 p.m. Saint John’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1350 Washington St., Denver. Holiday Festival. 4 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Mosaic Gospel Choir Concert. 5 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

Revolting Rhymes. 2 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Motones vs Jerseys Opening Night. 6:15 p.m. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

Samba Colorado Brazilian Dance Show. 2 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver.

Open Stage. 5 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyon.

Scrooge: Bah Humbug! 6 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Stand-Up Comedy & Bottomless Margaritas. 8 p.m. Los Tacos Famous Taqueria, 600 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Tiny House Holiday Village. 10 a.m. The Shops at Northfield Stapleton, 8340 Northfield Blvd., Denver. Under Milk Wood. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

36 December 7 , 2017

C.P.E. Bach’s Magnificat. 10:30 a.m. First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder.

The Nutcracker Ballet. 1 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder.

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Viceroy’s House. 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

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Boulder Chorale Holiday Concert. 3:30 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th Street Frontage Road, Boulder.

Wildlife and Winter Hike. 1 p.m. Heil Valley Ranch Open Space, Boulder.

Sound Circle Solstice 2017. 5 p.m. Unity Columbine, 8900 Arapahoe Road, Boulder. Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Yo-Yo Ma with the Colorado Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver. Yolk’n Around. 12 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Events Boulder Comedy Show. 6 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder. Boulder Holiday Gift Festival. 11 a.m. YMCA of Boulder Valley, 2850 Mapleton Ave., Boulder. Colorado Ballet’s The Nutcracker. 1 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver.

Music

Equinox: The Season is Slaying — a Drag Benefit Show. 7 p.m. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver.

Age of Guinevere Choir. 6 p.m. Golden West, 1055 Adams Circle, Boulder.

An Evening with Kevin Smith. 5 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver.

Andrew Wynne. 4 p.m. St. Vrain Cidery, 350 Terry St., Suite 130, Longmont.

Harry Connick Jr’s The Happy Elf. 2 p.m. Longmont Performing Arts Center, 513 Main St., Longmont.

Sunday, December 10

Bluegrass Pick. 12 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Boulder Weekly


events Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder. Holiday Lights Tour. 6 p.m. Union Station, Wynkoop and 17th streets, Denver. Jackalope Indie Artisan Fair. 10 a.m. McNichols Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. Jane. 3:30 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Jay & Silent Bob Get Old. 7:15 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. The Nutcracker Ballet. 1 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver. The Paris Opera. 1 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Our True Nature is Eternal. 2 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville. Outlaw Yoga. 10:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Scrooge: Bah Humbug! 12:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont,. Under Milk Wood. 2:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Monday, December 11 Music Jazz Combos Concert. 7 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette.

Open Stage — Hosted by Danny Shafer. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. Robb Bank$. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Tuesday Tapping and Live Music at Upslope. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 South Flatiron Court, Boulder. Events Broadway Cabaret Dance. 4 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder.

Kids Yoga. 4:15 p.m. Strength in Motion, 5277 Manhattan Circle, Suite 250, Boulder. Open Mic. 6 p.m. Twisted Pine Brewing Company, 3201 Walnut St., Boulder. Spicy Lounge Music and Dancing. 7:30 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder. Taco Tuesday Stand-Up Comedy. 7 p.m. Los Tacos Famous Taqueria, 600 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Open Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Atmosphere: Welcome To Colorado Tour. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Events Dance Classes. 4 p.m. Reverence Academy of Dance, 1370 Miners Drive, Suite 111, Lafayette. An Evening with Kevin Smith. 5 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. Jane. 4:30 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Jay & Silent Bob Get Old. 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. Monday Movie Nights. 6 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder. Movie Night at eTown Hall —Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder. Tuesday, December 12 Music Boulder Timberliners to perform Christmas songs. 7 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th Street Frontage Road, Boulder. Espresso! Swing & Gypsy Jazz. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder. Glee Club Concert. 3 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette,. Holiday Pottery Painting. 5 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Honey Tree. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Lady Gaga. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

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Holiday Lights Tour. 6 p.m. Union Station, Wynkoop and 17th streets, Denver.

Matthew Logan Vasquez (of Delta Spirit). 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver.

Open Mic with Jam and Jiggatones! 6:30 p.m. KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., 364 Main St., Longmont.

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Music

Ben Hammond. 6 p.m. Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder. Danny Shafer. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave, Suite C, Longmont. Evanescence: Synthesis Live With Orchestra. 8 p.m. Paramount Theatre, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver. Jazz Combos Concert. 7 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette. Mmmwhah’s Mmmwhah! Jam. 7 p.m. Alive Studio, 4593 Broadway, Boulder.

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MoJazz Duo. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont. Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder. Üfer. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. Events The Breadwinner. 4:30 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

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Gilbert. 7 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Holiday Lights Tour. 6 p.m. Union Station, Wynkoop and 17th streets, Denver. The Paris Opera. 1 p.m. The Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway Suite 65, Boulder. Trivia in Longmont — with Quizmaster Entertainment. 7 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Video Marketing: Creating Professional Videos on Your Smartphone. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder. Yoga for Kids. 4 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette.

December 7 , 2017 37


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A young boy gets trapped in the Land of the Dead and has to get his ancestor’s blessing to return to life in this resplendently vibrant, blissfully unique Pixar gem packed with endearing melodies and a message about ancestral respect.

D

isney has a record of racial sensitivity rivaled only by emails from loathed uncles with subject lines that start “FW: FW: FW: RE: Obama.” Set against the Mexican holiday Día de Muertos, the fear was that Coco would have all the authenticity of Madelynn’s Halloween costume or Jaxson’s sugar skull decoration that he got at Target. Watching those with firsthand understanding of the cultural material embrace Pixar’s latest film — often describing an exuberant screening experience in theaters packed with Mexican families — means that Coco can be celebrated as a warm, tender hug for people who don’t hate most of their relatives.

The only living boy in Boo York

‘Coco’ is a warm, sweet, undead spectacle by Ryan Syrek More concerned with feel than form, Coco’s plot is as thin as a guitar string. Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) is a young boy who gets trapped in the Land of the Dead and must secure an ancestor’s blessing to return home. Mamá Imelda (Alanna Ubach), Miguel’s great-great-grandmother, will help out, but only if Miguel promises to treat music like the GOP treats science: acknowledge it exists, but fear it and never use it. This doesn’t fly with Miguel, who is involved with music the way Democrats are involved with minority voters: it is essential to his continued existence, even if he hasn’t listened to it enough yet. Miguel befriends Héctor (Gael García Bernal), a kindly dope who is about to disappear from the afterlife because his family has forgotten him. Together with Dante, a rambunctious street pupper with Gene Simmons’ tongue and Richard Simmons’ decorum, the duo try to break into a party by Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt), a legendary actor/singer, in order to find a way for Miguel to both return to life and keep playing music. With resplendently vibrant colors, blissfully unique character designs and endearing melodies, Coco doesn’t say anything new so much as it says something comfortingly familiar on a scale and in a form rarely presented. If you love enough of your family, Coco will tear up them eyes and pull at heartstrings still tied to relatives long shuffled from this mortal coil. If most limbs of your family tree are best unclimbed or lopped off, the repeated refrain of ancestral responsibility may be significantly less catchy. However, Coco does at least offer a mutedly modern resolution that seems to value the ability of dynamic families to accommodate both the deification of the past and the desires of the present. It’s a millennial learning a grandmother’s recipe in an Instagram photo. Easily the best Pixar movie in a half decade, Coco will be beloved by some and enjoyed by all. However, the short that precedes the film, Olaf ’s Frozen Adventure, is an abomination that plays like a lobotomized Rankin and Bass ransom note to fans of the original movie. It wouldn’t be surprising to find that the overlong “short” is actually a coded message from the future warning to reconsider Frozen 2 plans. See Coco with your fam, but maybe show up a half hour after the scheduled start time. This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

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38 December 7, 2017

Boulder Weekly


film An aquatic beauty and the beast

‘The Shape of Water’ is an alluring fairy tale by Michael J. Casey

T

here’s nothing like a good fairy tale, especially one with teeth — and Mexican writON THE BILL: The er/producer/director Guillermo del Toro Shape of Water. Century Theater 1700 29th St., has plenty of teeth to go around. Not to Boulder. Tickets start at mention lovers, monsters and the over$7.65. cinemark.com whelming power stories have to connect. The Shape of Water, del Toro’s latest, is a Beauty and the Beast story set in a sparsely populated, rainsoaked Baltimore during the Cold War. In this dreary world, Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins, simply magnificent) lives more or less happy with everything around her. Esposito — Italian slang for orphan, one of the movie’s recurring themes — lives above an aging movie palace and begins each day like the last: spend five or so minutes masturbating in the tub, boil some eggs for lunch and then head off to work at a super-secret government facility. A bit of backstory: when Esposito was young, her throat was slashed on both sides, leaving her mute. Her next door neighbor, Giles (Richard Jenkins), and her co-worker, Zelda (Octavia Spencer), do the talking for her but, like most who’ve lost their abilities, Esposito has found a way to communicate: her expressive eyes and face. She can sign, but it isn’t really necessary. We need only to consider her face to understand everything about her. Esposito and Zelda work as cleaning ladies in a facility that is perpetually wet The Beauty and — shiny as if the floor was either just mopped or in desthe Beast motif illuminates the rela- perate need of it — spending each day toweling off and tionship between cleaning up whatever spills occur. The spills come tenfold an Amphibian Man and a clean- when Strickland (Michael Shannon), a G-Man with a ing lady. mean streak, shows up with an aquatic merman creature from South America for research purposes. Esposito’s curiosity, and attraction, to the Amphibian Man (played by Doug Jones) sets the Beauty and the Beast motif in motion while del Toro fleshes out his world with side plots of Russian espionage, Giles’ difficulty fitting into Americanhetero conformity and Strickland’s overwhelming need to be a dominant male in a world quickly slipping through his rotten fingers. Remarkably, these side stories do not distract from Esposito and the Amphibian Man’s relationship. They inform the world Esposito and the Amphibian Man are trying to make it in; a world quick to react and slow to understand. Understanding is what makes Esposito and the Amphibian Man’s relationship so tender — a tenderness that develops almost instantly with their first interactions. You can barely believe nary a word is spoken between the two, yet there is an undeniable connection. To borrow a line from Heinrich Zimmer: “The best things in life cannot be told.” That’s what del Toro is driving at: truth not through declaration and proclamation, but through action and compassion; through eggs, sex, water and, most importantly, fantasy. A fantasy that is as present as oxygen to people who live above a movie theater and constantly have the TV on. It’s no wonder that Esposito didn’t bat an eye when she first met the Amphibian Man; she’s been living in a fairy tale her entire life. Boulder Weekly

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Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Breakfast Burrito

Photos by staff

Sancho’s Mexican Restaurant 2850 Iris Ave., Suite H, Boulder; 6545 Gunpark Drive, Suite 280, Boulder, sanchosmexican.com

I Il Giro Pizza

Pizza Colóre 1336 Pearl St., Boulder, pizzacolore.com

P

izza Colóre does pizza right. Stop into the shop on Pearl Street for a slice and you’ll get an oversized, piping hot piece of pizza with the perfect crust-sauce-cheese ratio, and a crispy, sturdy crust that keeps the cheese and toppings in place. Take home a pie and something magical happens; something that happens to really good pies in New Jersey and Connecticut: the crust goes from extra crispy to slightly chewy as the cheese settles into it. Pizza Colóre’s crust does just this, the base still richly flavorful from the oven, but now with scarfable consistency and an integrity that keeps the toppings from sliding off. On the Il Giro pizza, Colóre tops its standard red sauce pizza with prosciutto, roasted red pepper and lightly fried eggplant. The toppings are smartly apportioned, and you’ll find yourself seeking out the crunchy and sweet eggplant bits. The sauce, meanwhile, is all fresh, bright tomato. $12-$16.95.

f you’re coming down from an early morning hike, or ending a bike ride, or just woke up and want to take a nap, Sancho’s massive breakfast burrito is what you need. A lightly toasted, thin tortilla is stuffed with scrambled egg, hashbrowns, cheese, pork green chile and bacon. It’s remarkable that the burrito is able to stay together, but it does, and each bite brings pure, steaming indulgence. The eggs are fresh and fluffy, the hashbrown is shredded and distributed throughout the burrito, giving each bite a crunch. The green chile is dynamite, and the bacon rounds everything out. $4.95

Tofu Bibimbap

Korea House 2750 Glenwood Drive, Suite 4, Boulder

T

here’s really a lot to like about Boulder’s Korea House, it being one of the few establishments dedicated solely to Korean food in Boulder County. The cozy, well-designed space off 28th Street is a nice place to bring friends for a large, sharable meal. If you’re solo, though, try the traditional bibimbap. Glass noodles are piled with scallions, purple cabbage, carrots, pickled radish and tofu (or meat if you choose), with a fried egg on top making everything just a little richer. Pour over what comes off as a thick, mole-like chile sauce, with just a hint of heat, for something extra. $11.50.

Onigiri Set

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nigiri falls somewhere between a sushi hand roll and a sushi burrito. It’s a triangle of sticky rice, with one sheet of nori going underneath and halfway up the sides. Fuji Cafe & Bar’s onigiri are then filled and topped with your choice of mix-ins. Protein options include chicken teriyaki, beef shigure and tuna-mayo. First, the tunamayo is basically a tuna fish sandwich turned into a sushi roll, and it happens to be awesome — salty with a bright Japanese mayo paste. The chicken teriyaki is righteously understated, and the beef shigure is, conversely, packed with salt from soy sauce, sweetness from mirin and spice from ginger. A set comes with perhaps the best miso soup in the state and a side of fresh-steamed edamame. $12.80.

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Susan France

nibbles

Vapor Distillery offers a variety of holiday items to fill your local Boulder shopping basket

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Better than a sweater

Curate a craveable gift basket of only-from-Boulder foods

I

n my other guise as a Lyft driver, I ferry visitors every day around Boulder between hotels and eateries. They come from all over and often have an anticipatory glow about them, although some of that may involve legal cannabis. I always talk to guests about the many local culinary attractions, but many have already been eating in Boulder County for years. They already sip Bhakti Chai, Dale’s Pale Ale and Sleepytime tea and spread Justin’s Almond Butter on Rudi’s Gluten-Free bread. They munch Boulder Chips and have ordered pad Thai at Noodles & Company. Outside of the bubble, Boulder food has a patina of goodness and integrity about it, and tourists are eager to sample it all when they get here. Some local residents take this wealth of gastronomic goodness for granted along with the majestic Flatirons backdrop. Maybe it requires visitors to open our eyes to what’s on the plate in front of us? So, just for the joy of it, why not eat, dine and gift locally this year? Skip the Boulder Weekly

long-distance mail order and support Boulder County businesses that hire your neighbors and pay taxes locally. It also makes sense environmentally. There are hundreds of local eateries, stores and goodies I could mention but here are a few of my favorites to whet your appetite for the holidays. Start by serving a seasonal brunch composed only of local foods.

Holiday breakfast with the family

Whip up free-range eggs and Haystack goat cheese and scramble with Denver-made Epicurean white truffle finishing butter, amazing stuff that upgrades the flavor and aroma of almost everything it touches. On the side, serve salsa from Westminster’s MM Local, which is expanding and changing its name to Farmhand Organics. The handbottled fruits and veggies remain the same along with a traceability sticker showing the farm that grew the produce. Once a year, Boulder Sausage Co.

makes its craveable holiday cranberry orange sausage. Less adventurous diners would love Longmontbased Mulay’s Sausage breakfast links or Denvermade Tender Belly maple bacon. For toast, try the rich brioche loaf from Breadworks Bakery or the excellent white sourdough bread from the new Othermama’s Bakery, 237 Collyer St. in Longmont. (That 1950s-inspired bakery is also baking real fruitcake and cinnamon roll wreaths for the holidays.) On the bread I recommend the house peach-jalepeño preserves from Boulder’s Cured, bacon jam from the Organic Sandwich Co. and gluten-free, dairy-free baklava spread from Longmont’s Baklava Unlimited. (Actually, you don’t really need the bread.) For breakfast beverages, consider Longmont Dairy Farm cinnamon eggnog in a glass bottle. It will remind you why at some point you thought eggnog tasted good. Instead of drip coffee, pour La see NIBBLES Page 44

December 7 , 2017 43


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Susan France

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NIBBLES from Page 43

Folie Grand Reserve: Geisha from Fort Collins’ New Belgium, one of the besttasting beers in the state. This nitrogenbottled dark sour ale made with Panamanian coffee is smooth, floral and perfect for sipping. For a probiotic palate cleanser that isn’t overly sweetened, pour Jamestown-brewed Cliffhouse’s orange raspberry kombucha. For the best cup of hot chocolate ever, start with Boulder’s Cholaca, a vegan, gluten- and dairy-free, 100 percent liquid cacao with no preservatives or emulsifiers. It is liquid chocolate bliss.

In the stockings: Sweets, sips and the gift of goodness

Boulder-made Chocolove’s holiday bars are a gourmet upgrade on the classic Chunky milk chocolate slabs. Chocolove’s Belgian dark chocolate is embedded with pecans, currants, cherries, walnuts, hazelnuts, candied orange peel and ginger. I always look forward to unwrapping the Robin Chocolates holiday truffles collection. The Longmont chocolatier’s annual, adult-oriented treats are neat chocolate boxes filled with everything from candy cane and eggnog to cranberry vodka lime. The absolute winner is the chocolate pecan pie version spiked with Longmont’s Black Canyon Distillery Whiskey, but not overly boozy. It really tastes like pie. For the mixologist on the list, get them Boulder-brewed Cocktailpunk Oak Aromatic Cocktail Bitters made in collaboration with Bryan Dayton of OAK at fourteenth and Boulder’s forthcoming Corrida. Add a bottle of 4-year-old Boulder Bourbon from Vapor Distillery. For the dedicated organic gardener, give some organic Chihuahua blue corn seeds locally grown by singer-songwriter Gregory Alan Isakov. Tins of the seeds that can be planted next spring are available at Moxie Bread Co. and at lineageseeds.com. You can wrap them

with a copy of his recent album, Gregory Alan Isakov with the Colorado Symphony. Donate to Boulder Food Rescue in the name of family and friends. The non-profit collects perishable food and provides just-in-time delivery by bike to housing developments, retirement homes, preschools and food pantries. Mitigate hunger in Boulder County and keep edible food out of the landfill. boulderfoodrescue.org

Local food news

Colorado will begin its latest stint in the national culinary spotlight when a Colorado-focused Season 15 of Top Chef premieres Dec. 7 on Bravo. It was filmed here in May and June with judges including Tom Colicchio and Padma Lakshmi. Competing chefs are Carrie Baird (Bar Dough, Denver) and Brother Luck (Four by Brother Luck, Colorado Springs). ... Le French Café, a new breakfast and lunch café, is open in the Village Shopping Center near Woodgrain Bagels and Rincon Argentino. Agnes and Quentin Garrigou serve crepes, baguette sandwiches, and house-baked macarons, croissants and tarts. ... A Boulder breakfast destination, The Parkway Café, opens for a one-night-only family dinner breakfast 4-8 p.m. Dec. 13. First come, first served biscuits and gravy.

Words to chew on

“The recent ‘revelations’ of rampant harassment in the restaurant industry weren’t exactly a shocker to the women working in it. ... Can we finally redefine, in our collective minds’ eye, what the race, gender or sexual identity of a top chef might be, and take the steps to make that happen?” — Chef Tom Colicchio. John Lehndorff founded The Home for Unwanted Fruitcakes in Boulder. He talks about food at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on Radio Nibbles on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org). Boulder Weekly


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Susan France

Susan France

On the wine frontier

Bookcliff Vineyards’ Ulla Merz and John Garlich on building a wine region by Matt Cortina

B

oulder County’s foremost winemakers knew growing fruit wasn’t easy when they started Bookcliff Vineyards in 1996. Two bad growing years had imperiled the livelihood of a peach farmer in Palisade from whom they were buying land for a vineyard. “The grapes weren’t damaged but there were late frosts and they lost the peach crop,” says Bookcliff co-owner Ulla Merz. “We just had six acres and leased back the original peach orchard to the person we bought it from. I saw him come through and he constantly checked the fruit, whether it had died, and I could see the stress on his face.” John Garlich, Bookcliff co-owner and Merz’s husband, says it’s a unique relationship between grape growers and peach (and apricot and cherry) growers over in Palisade. Because most fruit trees bloom earlier than grapevines, growers need to be more vigilant protecting them from the elements. 46 December 7 , 2017

“Peaches aren’t a slam dunk,” Garlich says. “Peach guys are always envious that we don’t have to get up in the middle of the night and turn on fans [to keep frost off ].” Merz says the peach grower lost three-quarters of his income that year; an opportunity for savvy business people like Merz and Garlich. “That’s when we always bought land was in the spring when they’re all nervous and want to hedge their bets,” Garlich says, half joking. Now, Garlich and Merz own four growing plots in Palisade, having bought the last plot when the harvest tanked in 2013-14 (what goes around, comes around). In those seasons, the

only vineyard that really produced for them was one they rented. It represented a combination of luck, intuition and savvy that has propelled Bookcliff to the top of Colorado’s burgeoning wine scene. Surely they learned some of that business savvy in their previous lives — Merz has a doctorate in computer science and worked for IBM before “retiring” to the vineyard a few years ago. Garlich was a structural engineer, working on such projects as the Denver International Airport and the Colorado Convention Center, before moving to the wine operation fulltime a few years before Merz. Garlich admits they were “lucky” at the beginning. A realtor who helped them pick vineyards in Palisade happened to have a relative who was a member of the USDA extension and had a “secret map,” on which all the good plots of land for growing were listed. Merz, having never purchased vines before, made the rational decision to bring in the highest

community

TABLE

grade vines Ulla Merz and available. And John Garlich of even though Bookcliff Vineyards are leading neither had the Colorado worked on a wine revolution. large agricultural farm, it worked. “We were very lucky,” Garlich says of the first season. “We thought we were geniuses, but the next time we planted, which was the next year, they didn’t do half as well. Little things make a big difference.” Merz and Garlich relied on the help of the ag extension, local farming resources and farmers (whom Merz said were like family in the early days), books and good old fashioned trial and error. It was the culmination of two lives that slowly acquired passions for wine. “Growing up, my family had wine maybe twice a year for the holidays,” Garlich says. “Our neighbors always made wine in their basement. It always intrigued me, the whole process. After graduating and starting work, [Ulla and I] starting enjoying wine a lot and traveling to these regions and kind of caught the bug.” Merz grew up in a small wine-producing region of Germany, though she Boulder Weekly


Susan France

admits the “majority of the wines were unimpressive.” Yet, Merz sees parallels between that region and Colorado’s growing scene. The state has yet to pin down what exactly it grows best — cabernet franc and malbec are early favorites — and there’s only been about three generations of winemakers in Palisade; Garlich and Merz consider themselves of the second generation. But Merz says the culture around Colorado wine still lags behind the quality of the wine, and it’s holding back the industry. “It was important that they were doing well, and we were proud that they had a good harvest,” Merz says of the modest wineries in her hometown. “But that was the only thing that was served when you went into a restaurant ... or the store there. You get indoctrinated from the start, and you’re proud of that industry. It’s not the case here — nobody is proud of Colorado wine.” And yet, the wine is good. Garlich says he brings wines to whichever tastemakers are willing to try it — wine sellers, chefs, media members — and that in blind tastings, Bookcliff ’s offerings are overwhelmingly popular. “We just have to start chipping away at it,” Garlich says. “California back in the day had the same issue. Back in the ’70s I remember Robert Mondavi traveling around with his sons and he’d do the same thing with blind tastings.” Garlich believes Colorado can gain the reputation that California enjoys, even if it doesn’t have the quantity of growing spaces California has. Chipping away at that perception includes hosting dinners with local chefs Bradford Heap, Eric Skokan and Kelly Whitaker at Bookcliff, and putting Bookcliff wines into Salt, Black Cat, Basta and more local restaurants. It really comes back to supporting local businesses, Merz and Garlich say. Merz says more local restaurants simply need to put more Colorado wine on their menus — to give people a chance to taste the state’s offerings by the glass instead of what tends to be bottles priced higher than average due to the company’s limited production abilities. Garlich adds that maybe 10 producers total supply Colorado liquor stores and restaurants with wine — it’s a conglomeration much like the beer industry is now facing. Couple that with the environmental toll of shipping wine overseas, and drinking local wine, even if it’s “all the way from” Palisade, is a beneficial thing to do on multiple fronts, Garlich says. Bookcliff also faces the challenge of operating out of an industrial complex in North Boulder. Common perception of a winery is that there are, you know, Boulder Weekly

vines and rolling hills, not beige storefronts and a laundromat. They’re looking to relocate, possibly slightly east given population trends, but their location and whatever offerings they have in their winery is secondary to what will sustain the Colorado wine industry’s growth. “We’d like to make a mark on the wine world in terms of what can Colorado do,” Garlich says. “That’s our goal: to succeed just by having good wine.”

Merz and Garlich have taken home numerous awards for their Colorado-grown varietals and blends.

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hen they sit down to write the history of Colorado brewing, there better be a whole section devoted to the consistency, quality and innovation that came out of Fort Collins’ Odell Brewing Co. What Doug, Wynne and Corkie Odell have managed since opening their brewery in a converted grain elevator in 1989 is nothing short of magical. Among many firsts over the last 25 years, Odell Brewing was the first packaging craft brewery to open in Fort Collins, making it incredibly easy for Coloradans to indulge in Odell’s large and diverse lineup. Like 90 Shilling, Cutthroat Porter and Isolation Ale, the following four beers can be found in just about any liquor store around town with even a few of them on tap at your local watering hole. Odell’s latest year-round brew, Rupture (available in 12-ounce cans), is an ale made from whole hop flowers, which are ground fresh. Most beer recipes call for pre-ground, pre-packaged hop pellets, and that works perfectly well for most beers but leaves something off the table. Just how freshground coffee has more aromas and flavors than pre-ground packaged coffee, Rupture uses the whole hop flower to extract the greatest amount of aroma possible. The result is a delightfully bright and fresh nose of hops, citrus and pine with a mouth that is soft and mellow. It’s a hoppy beer that doesn’t wear you out with bitterness and burn. New for the winter season: a whiskey

barrel-aged version of the Lugene Chocolate Milk Stout (available in 12-ounce bottles). Aged in Woody Creek rye whiskey barrels for six months, Lugene is dark in the glass with a balsa wood-colored head. The nose is roasted malt and a touch of toffee, with flavors of creamy chocolate, vanilla and booze gently coating the mouth. Most barrelaged stouts come out of the glass ready for a fight and take a little time to mellow and unfold, but not Lugene; this easy sipper is perfect for now. Ten Paces, the latest in Odell’s Cellar Series, is an American-style wild ale made with huckleberries. Bluish-purple in color with a fizzy head composed of tightly carbonated bubbles, Ten Paces is just as much Farmhouse as it is sour, offering the mouth the flavor of tart and juicy huckleberries that fade into clove with a little bit of funk. Like previous Cellar Series offerings, Ten Paces is available in 25-ounce bottles under cork and cage. That appears to be changing with the 2017 release of Friek, the first in the series to be offered in a 12-ounce bottle. Originally debuted in 2010, with a Great American Beer Fest gold medal in 2011, Friek is a beautiful blend of raspberry (framboise) and cherry (kriek) sour ales aged in raw oak barrels. The result is a beautiful and tasty tart cherry pie with a sour lactic backing and an attractive Christmas red color in the glass. Even the standards continue to evolve at Odell; all the more reason to head back for more.

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ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: You may get richer quicker in

2018, Aries — especially if you refuse to sell out. You may accumulate more clout — especially if you treat everyone as your equal and always wield your power responsibly. I bet you will also experience deeper, richer emotions — especially if you avoid people who have low levels of emotional intelligence. Finally, I predict you will get the best sex of your life in the next 12 months — especially if you cultivate the kind of peace of mind in which you’ll feel fine about yourself if you don’t get any sex at all. P.S.: You’d be wise to start working on these projects immediately.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: The members of the fungus family, like mushrooms and molds, lack chlorophyll, so they can’t make food from sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide. To get the energy they need, they “eat” plants. That’s lucky for us. The fungi keep the earth fresh. Without them to decompose fallen leaves, piles of compost would continue to accumulate forever. Some forests would be so choked with dead matter that they couldn’t thrive. I invite you to take your inspiration from the heroic fungi, Taurus. Expedite the decay and dissolution of the worn-out and obsolete parts of your life.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: I’m guessing you have been hungrier

than usual. At times you may have felt voracious, even insatiable. What’s going on? I don’t think this intense yearning is simply about food, although it’s possible your body is trying to compensate for a nutritional deficiency. At the very least, you’re also experiencing a heightened desire to be understood and appreciated. You may be aching for a particular quality of love that you haven’t been able to give or get. Here’s my theory: Your soul is famished for experiences that your ego doesn’t sufficiently value or seek out. If I’m correct, you should meditate on what your soul craves but isn’t getting enough of.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: The brightly colored birds known

as bee-eaters are especially fond of eating bees and wasps. How do they avoid getting stung? They snatch their prey in mid-air and then knock them repeatedly against a tree

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branch until the stinger falls off and the venom is flushed out. In the coming weeks, Cancerian, you could perhaps draw inspiration from the beeeaters’ determination to get what they want. How might you be able to draw nourishment from sources that aren’t entirely benign? How could you extract value from influences that you have be careful with?

astrology

feel for them. 1. “I will make myself eminently teachable through the cultivation of openness and humility.” 2. “I won’t wait around hoping that people will give me what I can give myself.” 3. “I’ll be a Go to RealAstrology.com to check out good sport about the conRob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO sequences of my actions, HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE whether they’re good, bad, HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes or misunderstood.” 4. “As I are also available by phone at walk out of a room where 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. there are many people who know me, I won’t worry about what anyone will say LEO JULY 23-AUG. 22: The coming months will be a ripe about me.” 5. “I will only pray for the things I’m willing to be the answer to.” time to revise and rework your past — to reconfigure the consequences that emerged from what happened once upon SCORPIO a time. I’ll trust you to make the ultimate decisions about the best ways to do that, but here are some suggestions. 1. OCT. 23-NOV. 21: To discuss a problem is not the Revisit a memory that has haunted you, and do a ritual that same as doing something practical to correct it. Many resolves it and brings you peace. 2. Go back and finally do people don’t seem to realize this. They devote a great deal a crucial duty you left unfinished. 3. Return to a dream you of energy to describing and analyzing their difficulties, wandered away from prematurely, and either re-commit and may even imagine possible solutions, but then neglect yourself to it, or else put it to rest for good. to follow through. And so nothing changes. The sad or bad situation persists. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Scorpios are among the least prone to this disability. You VIRGO AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: The astrological omens suggest that specialize in taking action to fulfill your proposed fixes. Just this once, however, I urge you to engage in more inquiry now is a favorable time to deepen your roots and bolster and conversation than usual. Just talking about the problem your foundations and revitalize traditions that have nourcould cure it. ished you. Oddly enough, the current planetary rhythms are also conducive to you and your family and friends playing SAGITTARIUS soccer in the living room with a ball made from rolled-up socks, pretending to be fortune-telling psychics and giving NOV. 22-DEC. 21: As far back as ancient Egypt, Rome, each other past-life readings, and gathering around the and Greece, people staged ceremonies to mark the embarkitchen table to formulate a conspiracy to achieve world kation of a new ship. The intention was to bestow a blessing domination. And no, the two sets of advice I just gave you for the maiden voyage and ever thereafter. Good luck! Safe are not contradictory. travels! Beginning in 18th-century Britain and America, such rituals often featured the smashing of a wine bottle on the ship’s bow. Later, a glass container of champagne LIBRA SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: In accordance with the long-term became standard. In accordance with the current astrological indicators, I suggest that you come up with your own astrological omens, I invite you to make five long-term version of this celebratory gesture. It will soon be time for promises to yourself. They were formulated by the teacher your launch. Shannen Davis. Say them aloud a few times to get a

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: You may feel quite sure that you’ve gotten as tall as you’re ever going to be. But that may not be true. If you were ever going to add another half-inch or more to your height, the near future would be the time for it. You are in the midst of what we in the consciousness industry call a “growth spurt.” The blooming and ripening could occur in other ways, as well. Your hair and fingernails may become longer faster than usual, and even your breasts or penis might undergo spontaneous augmentation. There’s no doubt that new brain cells will propagate at a higher rate, and so will the white blood cells that guard your physical health. Four weeks from now, I bet you’ll be noticeably smarter, wiser, and more robust.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: You come into a delicatessen where you have to take a numbered ticket in order to get waited on. Oops. You draw 37 and the counter clerk has just called out number 17. That means 20 more people will have their turns before you. Damn! You settle in for a tedious vigil, putting down your bag and crossing your arms across your chest. But then what’s this? Two minutes later, the clerk calls out 37. That’s you! You go up to the counter and hand in your number, and amazingly enough, the clerk writes down your order. A few minutes later, you’ve got your food. Maybe it was a mistake, but who cares? All that matters is that your opportunity came earlier than you thought it would. Now apply this vignette as a metaphor for your life in the coming days.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: It’s one of those bizarre times when what feels really good is in close alignment with what’s really good for you, and when taking the course of action that benefits you personally is probably what’s best for everyone else, too. I realize the onslaught of this strange grace may be difficult to believe. But it’s real and true, so don’t waste time questioning it. Relish and indulge in the freedom it offers you. Use it to shush the meddling voice in your head that informs you about what you supposedly SHOULD be doing instead of what you’re actually doing.

December 7 , 2017 53


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Dear Dan: I used to be a fan of your column, Dan, but something happened to you. Maybe it’s stress, the current political climate, or some other issue—I don’t know. I used to look forward to your columns because they were fun, smart, and helpful—but I don’t enjoy what I’m seeing now. If something did happen to you, reach out for help. You’re on the verge of losing a loyal reader. — Reader Enquiring About Dan’s Enervating Responses Dear READER: I’ve been getting letters like yours — what happened to you, Dan, you used to be more fun — at this time of year, every year, for the last 25 years, READER. Maybe I get moody when the weather gets gloomy and that spills into my column annually. And perhaps the current political climate — a rather reserved way to describe the destruction of our democracy — is making my seasonal grumping worse. Another possible factor... I don’t know how long you’ve been reading, READER, but I’ve been writing this column for a long time. And back before the internet came along and ruined everything for everyone, I used to get a lot of how-to/what’s-that questions about sex acts and sex toys. A column explaining butt plugs to readers who

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SAVAGE by Dan Savage

knew nothing about them — and lacked easy access to butt plug info — was as much fun to read as it was to write. But every sex act and every sex toy has its own Wiki page now, which means I don’t get to write fun columns about butt plugs anymore, READER, and you don’t get to read them. Now the questions all revolve around someone being deeply shitty or someone deluding themselves about how deeply shitty they’re being. Columns filled with questions about and from people behaving badly are never going to be as delightsome as those butt plug columns of yore. But thank you for writing in to share your concern, READER, and rest assured that nothing truly terrible has happened to me — besides Trump, of course, but Trump happened to all of us, not just me. Still, I don’t want to lose you as a reader, so I’m going to make an effort to sunny things up a bit over the next few weeks. OK! Let’s see what else came in the mail today! Hopefully something fun!

Love

Dear Dan: A couple of weeks ago, my girlfriend and I were engaging in mutual masturbation when she squirted all over my hand — a large amount — and she was completely mortified. It was the first time it happened for her, and it’s happened several times since. She is upset. I’ve been with a couple of other women in the past who squirted, and I am absolutely fine with it. I love it, in fact! I did my absolute best to reassure her that I think it’s great and there’s nothing to be ashamed of, but she’s really embarrassed every time. The last time, she was close to tears with fears that she’d urinated. My question: There’s so much great writing about female ejaculation around, but rather than bombard my GF — who is the most amazing, incredible person — with links to article upon article, how can I help her feel okay about this? — Sincere Questioner Understands It’s Really Terrific Dear SQUIRT: This one’s pretty good, READER. It’s an old-school, pre-internet Savage Love question.

Sexy and playful — charming, even. Okay, SQUIRT. You can help her feel OK about this by continuing to use your words (“I love this, it’s so hot!”), by sharing those articles with her (she needs to hear from and about other women with her superpower, not just from her boyfriend), and by lapping that shit up. Swallow, SQUIRT. And so what if it is piss? (And many argue it isn’t.) Piss isn’t sterile, as Mike Pesca took time out of his day to explain to me on the Savage Lovecast back when alleged human being Donald Trump’s alleged pee tape was all over the news. (Goddammit. Our current political climate snuck up on me. Sorry about that, READER.) There are a lot more bacteria and whatever else in saliva, and we dump spit into each other’s mouths like it’s maple fucking syrup. If you guys are swapping other fluids regularly, why not swap a little of this one, too? And remember: It’s only been two weeks — it may take her some time to learn to love her new superpower. Maybe watch some X-Men movies (it’s a superpower, not a mutation!), and keep being upbeat and positive about the way your girlfriend’s body works. Good luck! Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter.

December 7 , 2017 55


EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

I want you! (to vote for me)

A

s in any industry, cannabis retailers are eager to catch the attention of shoppers, hoping to sway eyes and dollars toward their products and pockets. Step into any dispensary, especially at this time of year, and you will see the array of products competing for your attention. After all, once you walk into a dispensary, you are the industry’s perfect target customer: cannabis curious, wallet open, poised to buy. And while you certainly expect to see in-store marketing for this, that or the other marijuana brands, you probably didn’t expect to see ads for a political candidate. But, for what is believed to be the first time in the nation’s history, a political candidate will be doing just that. State senate hopeful Alan Kennedy-Schaffer recently signed a contract with GreenScreens to run political ads at the point-of-sale in dispensaries located in Senate District 34. Branding himself a “progressive champion,” Kennedy-Schaffer loudly boasts cannabis consumer rights and industry protections among his platform issues. Also included among them are protections for immigrant and reproductive rights (as an attorney he has sued Donald Trump on both issues, with one win and one verdict still pending). “The state legislature can exist in a bubble and we need to recognize that the cannabis industry is a strong economic engine for our state — just as our legislators have been supportive of the tech industry, we need legislators who will champion the cannabis industry.” Specifically, he seeks to address the banking problem by working to establish a state-chartered banking

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institution and he plans to fight to repeal federal tax section 280E that doesn’t allow cannabis businesses to deduct operating expenses. Generally, he believes it’s important for the state legislature to be more proactive in challenging federal prohibition. Not only does he think these cannabis issues deserve to be touted at the forefront of his campaign, but he thinks cannabis consumers, as a cohesive group, are a relevant and meaningful political demographic. In what is shaping up to be a crowded primary in his district, he thinks the group could make a crucial difference in next year’s November elections. “Cannabis consumers, for the most part, are progressives and understand the federal threat to legalization, but need to be more plugged in to who is running for local office and who is fighting for them,” Kennedy-Schaffer says. “[Advertising on GreenScreens] is an opportunity for my campaign to get our message directly to voters who are likely to believe in what we are fighting for.” When GreenScreens launched two years ago they “only sort of ” knew the political potential of their platform. Having worked as budtenders, the founders were privy to unique problems facing the cannabis industry. Namely, that the industry is up against strict state regulations that require it to advertise only on platforms for which no more than 30 percent of the audience is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21. In light of the restrictions the industry has had to get creative — advertising in the back of free periodicals (like Boulder Weekly you now hold in your hands), by sponsoring highways or events and with in-store

advertising. But that space is crowded, and Ryan Sterling, one of GreenScreen’s founders, hopes their in-store screens will not just catch, but hold the consumers’ attention for partner brands. In so far as GreenScreens is successful in holding attention, they also hopes to offer their platform to dispensaries as a way to manage and expedite the now infamous dispensary line, “a great indicator of success, but one that slows down business.” “It makes sense that cannabis consumers have so many questions and some places really cherish that consultant-like relationship between their bud tenders and the customers,” Sterling says. “But we thought that we might be able to answer some of these questions ahead of time by displaying rules and regulations on the screen, answering common questions, and channeling customer focus toward certain products.” What they didn’t see coming was that the platform would become a lucrative way to target the cannabis consumer as a cohesive demographic beyond the scope the industry. “It’s very curious to me and I can’t wait to see how his ads are received,” Sterling says. “But I wonder if Kennedy-Schaffer will get kick-back back from regulators, saying he can’t be doing in-store advertising. But, I’m willing to take that risk with him because, well, I think it’s a very smart move.” Kennedy-Schaffer, though, isn’t the type to be scared easily, but rather the opposite. Let’s not forget that within the first two weeks of the Trump presidency, he sued him and won. It’s not just that he doesn’t believe in political complacency, but that he doesn’t tolerate it, saying, “We need to change the culture at the state capital. Given that Trump is in the White House and Sessions is the Attorney General, we need state legislators who will proactively protect us from the abuses of the Trump administration and champion progressive values here in Colorado. “Now is not the time to stay out of trouble just so politicians can protect their political careers. Now is the time to stand up for you believe in.”

December 7 , 2017 57


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cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Canadian MPs vote for legal marijuana

T

his is huge! Like 3,854,082 square miles huge. The Canadian House of Commons last week passed a bill to legalize recreational marijuana throughout the world’s second geographically largest country. The bill had been introduced by Canada’s ruling Liberal government last April, and had the active backing of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who as leader of the Liberal Party had made marijuana legalization a major issue during the 2015 campaign that brought the party to power. The vote on the bill was 200 in favor, 82 opposed. The bill now goes to the Canadian Senate, sometimes referred to as The Red Chamber (a reference to its décor, not its political culture). Senate passage is required for it to become law. Passage shouldn’t be taken as a foregone conclusion, because 40 senators are members of an Independent Senators Group that is unaffiliated with the caucuses of any party in the body. The Independent Senators group is the largest caucus in the Senate.

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However, Canadian senators are appointed on the recommendation of the Prime Minister, and Trudeau has appointed 30 so far, all of whom are in the Independent Senators Group. Although the members of the group aren’t bound by party discipline, the Canadian Broadcast Corporation says many members of the group are “faithful backers of Liberal legislation.”

Done deal or not, it’s widely assumed the bill will pass, and Canada’s provincial governments have started preparing regulations for a recreational marijuana industry. Six of the 10 provinces have already come forward with draft frameworks for retail marijuana sales. In Ontario, Quebec and New

Brunswick, sales will be through provincial government-owned entities. The western provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia will allow private retail sales as well. One reason for starting even before the bill is passed is that the bill calls for legalization to kick in nationally on July 1, 2018. Unlike the U.S., where legalization has involved state-to-state trench warfare, Canadian legalization would come to the entire country on the same day. That puts a lot of pressure on provinces not to be laggards. Legal marijuana is expected to generate billions in revenue in Canada. A recent CNN piece on the financial impact quoted an estimate from the Marijuana Business Daily that annual sales for Canada’s recreational marijuana could range “between $2.3 billion and $4.5 billion.” The estimates seem almost laughably conservative. Colorado, with a population of 5.6 million, is expected to generate $1.1 billion in recreational marijuana sales this year. Canada’s

population is 35.6 million, more than six times as large as Colorado’s. Colorado’s sales are driven in part by pot tourism, but Canada can expect some of that from the Lower 48. Especially from New York. Canadian legalization is not only going to draw pot tourists from New York, it’s going to add to the escalating pressure on New York to legalize recreational pot itself. As things now stand, the legislatures in two of New York’s neighbors, New Jersey and Vermont, will probably have legalized marijuana by July 1. A third bordering state, Massachusetts, legalized last year. Add in Canada, and it means that by the Fourth of July, New York will be almost entirely surrounded by neighbors in which recreational pot is legal. That’s going to make the antilegalization posture of New York’s nanny state governor Andrew Cuomo increasingly indefensible. Canadian legalization should also give a boost to the Michigan legalization initiative that will likely be on the ballot this fall. And it will certainly cause the states along the Canadian border who haven’t legalized to start seriously reviewing their pot laws. And psychologically, a Canadian decision to legalize marijuana could have impacts in the U.S. far beyond the border. That’s because a common American stereotype of Canada is that it’s full of prudent, reliable, civicminded, people whose heads are generally screwed on right. And if they legalized pot, then maybe legalization isn’t such a big deal. Eh?

December 7 , 2017 59


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icumi (IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) AN IRREVERENT AND NOT ALWAYS ACCURATE VIEW OF THE WORLD AT THIS POINT, REPUBLICANS ARE TRUMP

For a while we made excuses for Republicans. Hell, we even felt sorry for them having to claim Trump as one of their own and even sit in meetings with the big, orange, racist sexual predator we call President these days. But no more. Republicans gambled and lost. They thought they could make Trump their useful idiot as they schemed to take away our health care and raise taxes on all but the richest among us who would actually be given the money taken from the poor and middle class. But it’s backfired. The problem is that Trump is such a mentally disturbed madman that he may well destroy our democracy and launch World War III before the Republicans can use his signature to pillage the treasury. His destructive powers in the executive branch are simply moving much faster than the greed of Congressional Republicans. Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel will destroy all hope of Israeli/Palestinian peace as well as potentially start a Middle East war. He already has us on the precipice of a nuclear war with North Korea. And let’s not forget he is supporting an alleged child molester for the Senate and stands accused of sexually assaulting a dozen women himself, and has been recorded admitting he likes to sexually assault women. The useful idiot defense for Republicans has run its course. Only the Republicans can remove this mad man from office and instead of impeaching this mentally ill asshole, they have made tax breaks for their campaign donors their highest priority. They now own everything Trump does from this point forward. They must be punished at the polls and removed from office for their selfish lack of action. And after that we must do the same thing to Democrats if and when they make their wealthy donors their top priority.

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Chris F/Wikimedia Commons

MAYBE IT’S THE FOOTBALL TEAM

According to The Great Love Debate, which describes itself as “a nationally touring series of live Town Hall-style forums on love, dating, and relationships,” Denver, Colorado, has been named “America’s Worst City to Find Love.” Our state’s capital barely beat out San Francisco for the dubious honor. In case you are a love-starved Denverite willing to travel to find cupid’s arrow, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has been named “America’s Best City To Find Love” for 2017. Bumper sticker: I (heart symbol) Cheeseheads. The organization says it used a “formula that considered the opinions and demographic data from over 62,000 singles who attended the tour’s live shows in

over 80 North American cities, and the millions who listened to the toprated Great Love Debate with Brian Howie podcast to determine the winners, and in our case, losers. We don’t know why Brian Howie’s podcast listeners didn’t like Denver. Shoot, we don’t even know who Brian Howie is. But we say hang in there, Denver, love is probably just around the corner and if not, try becoming a Packers fan.

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Sometimes the wind spreads happiness

Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Quest Concentrates, Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar, Kaviar, Green Dot, Keef Cola, Indigo Pro

For CO medical marijuana patients only.

Every Day Med Member Deal*

420

$

1 oz. Wax/Shatter

New Med Sign Over Benefits*

25

25

$

$

1/2 oz Flower

3 grams Wax/Shatter

50 - 1 oz Flower

$

25

$

Craft Cannabis

IT’S IN OUR NATURE!

Edible or Topical credit

28th & Iris • www.thefarmco.com

303.440.1323

A

RS IN

Our Denver Office is Now Open! Our New Location is at 1127 Pennsylvania St. Denver, CO 80203 Call our Office to Book an Appointment

YEA

CONCEPTUAL 303-434-5170 francedesigns.com

8

SENIOR PORTRAITS

BEST O F ULDER

*For registered Colorado medical marijuana patients only. Tax Not Included. While Supplies Last. Select strains only. Cannot be combined with other offers/discounts.

ED

BO

845 Walnut Street • TheDandelionCo.com

• ROW VOT

Open until 10 pm everyday

Check out our expanded selection of edibles. 21+

1534 55th St., Boulder 303-444-0861

8a- 6:45p Sun-Tues • 8a- 9:45p Weds-Sat

www.elementsboulder.com

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122

We Provide 100% Compliant, Comprehensive MMJ Evaluations Which Include: – 30 Minute Office Visits – A Body Composition Analysis – Computer Stations to Complete the Online Application in Our Office – Follow-up Services for Further Questions About Treatment Plans

We have 1OOO reviews with a 5 STAR rating!

3000 Center Green Drive, Suite 210, Boulder, CO 80301 | By Appointment Only M-F | Online Appointments Available at www.holoshealth.org or Call 720-273-3568

12 7 17 boulder weekly  
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