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Boulder County ’s Tr ue Independent Voice / FREE / www.boulder weekly.com / November 9 - 15, 2017

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contents NEWS:

Oil and gas emissions contribute to unsafe ozone levels along Front Range, study finds by Matt Cortina

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....................................................................... FEATURE:

Greg Campbell’s tribute to a fallen friend becomes an award-winning documentary by Angela K. Evans

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....................................................................... BOULDERGANIC:

Photographer James Balog captures glaciers, before they’re gone by Amanda Moutinho

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....................................................................... ADVENTURE:

The National Park Service proposes increasing entrance fees at select parks by Emma Murray

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....................................................................... BUZZ:

The individual perceptions in ‘NeoCubism’ by Amanda Moutinho

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....................................................................... OVERTONES:

Bassist Victor Wooten on the secret to greatness by Sarah Haas

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....................................................................... COMMUNITY TABLE:

Passport’s Roy and Kat Brown on the global trip that inspired their food truck’s menu by Matt Cortina

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departments 5 THE HIGHROAD: Why are we giving corporate welfare to Amazon? 6 DANISH PLAN: Russia, social media and Cold War 2.0 6 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 27 ARTS & CULTURE: An unusual head scratcher from the DCPA Theater Company 29 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 37 WORDS: “Understandable” by Jack Collom 39 FILM: Four to see from the second weekend of the Denver Film Festival 41 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week 43 NIBBLES: The ethics of ‘ethnic’ 49 DRINK: Left Hand’s Nitro Fest comes to Longmont 53 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 SAVAGE LOVE: Daddies 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Five years of Amendment 64 59 CANNABIS CORNER: Feds bust drug dealer who hates pot 61 IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world Boulder Weekly

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staff

commentary

Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Amanda Moutinho, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley Interns, Sarah Farley, Sydney Worth, Eliza Radeka SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Account Executive, Trevor Garrison Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Advertising Coordinator, Olivia Rolf Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo Cover: Courtesy of Hondros film November 9, 2017 Volume XXV, Number 14 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2017 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

Boulder Weekly

the

Highroad Why are we giving corporate welfare to Amazon? by Jim Hightower

I

sn’t it funny that right-wing politicians across the country piously rant against giving a few bucks worth of jobless benefits to the needy, then turn around and shove billions of our tax dollars into corporate welfare for the greedy? You’re right — it’s not funny, but here we go again. We’re presently witnessing the most disgusting spectacle yet of the politico-corporate cabal extracting money from the People’s wallets to enrich themselves. Amazon.com, the $136-billiona-year internet colossus, has haughtily initiated a sleazy, selfserving public bidding war over where it will locate its new corporate headquarters. The city and state that offer the

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

most bribe money to this private enterprise will be “The Winner.” Über-rich Amazon doesn’t need and certainly doesn’t deserve any public handout, but officials in 238 cities have prostrated themselves in front of this Amazonian welfare queen in embarrassing bids to win her nod. Amazon’s arrogant executives even sent out a list of basic benefits they expect every applicant to deliver, including a “business-friendly environment and tax structure,” free land, a subsidy to reduce its operational costs, tax breaks, relocation grants for executives and workforce, reduced utility bills, and... oh yeah, also give us first-rate schools and an educated labor pool. As one analyst of Amazon’s bribery scheme noted, “these incentives aren’t free. There’s no fairy godmother paying for them.” The typical result of corporate giveaways is that they cost the public more than we get back. By demanding such corporate spoils, Amazon brands itself a common thief, not only taking our money, but also stealing our trust in the fairness of the system and widening inequality in our society. To help stop this corruption, go to GoodJobsFirst.org. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. November 9 , 2017 5


danish plan Russia, social media and Cold War 2.0 by Paul Danish

A

bout Russia using social media to meddle in the election — and undermine and disrupt American democracy and the American social fabric generally — maybe we shouldn’t get too holy about it. Ever hear of The Voice of America? Or Radio Free Europe? Or the United States Information Agency? And they were just the most high profile parts of American efforts to go after the Soviet Union ideologically and politically. There were scads of others, both overt and clandestine. Were we “meddling” in Soviet affairs, trying to destabilize the regime and tear up the Soviet social fabric? Damn straight we were — even as they were trying to do the same to us, and not just with radio broadcasts, propaganda and cutout organizations. There was a war going on — the Cold War, which included a lot of little hot wars, revolutions, coups and crises — and the media war made a difference in its outcome. The Soviets used to howl their heads off about our meddling in their internal affairs, even while mounting a massive info-war of their own. In the end, we won the Cold War’s hearts-and-minds battle because we had a better appreciation of the cultural dimensions of the Cold War. So while Radio Moscow broadcast polemics, the Voice of America broadcast jazz and rock and roll. (The late Willis Conover, who for more than 40 years hosted the VOA’s scrupulously non-political Jazz Hour, had an estimated 30 million listeners behind the Iron Curtain.) The U.S. government pretty much lost interest in its anti-Soviet information campaigns after the Soviet Union fell apart, out of a mistaken belief that the Cold War was over. Well it wasn’t, as is now becoming clear. Info-wars just moved to the internet. The Russians are waging Cold War 2.0 today, only they’ve taken the information/propaganda part of it to a whole new level by shifting the battlefield to social media. And this time they aren’t ignoring the cultural and sociological dimensions of the struggle. Putin would probably tell you that 6 November 9 , 2017

turn-about is fair play. And he would have a point there. But the more important point is that he caught us napping. We chose to ignore the emergence of Cold War 2.0. We failed even to recognize the information/disinformation/propaganda dimensions of it, let alone do anything about it. Thanks to our inattentiveness, the Russians have a substantial head-start on the social media front. Their use of social media demonstrates much deeper insight into the American psyche and a much more sophisticated understanding of American politics, culture and the American political and cultural fault lines than the Soviets ever had — and than a lot of Americans have today, for that matter. It’s obvious that it’s having some effect. The U.S. is more polarized than it has been in decades. It’s picking at its racial scabs. Every fault line is being driven wider and deeper. Whatever you think of the Russian meddle, you have to credit the breathtaking scope and sheer virtuosity of it. It was, and is, a Tchaikovsky symphony of meddling. So, to borrow a phrase from Lenin: What’s to be done? That’s easy. To borrow a phrase from Sarah Palin: Don’t retreat, re-load. Two can play at this game. There is nothing in the laws of man, God, or nature that says the United States cannot play by Russian rules, set up its own troll farms, identify and exploit Russian fault lines, deploy data analytics, hack Russian databases, identify and target aggrieved groups, and so on. If Putin wants to restart the Cold War, tell him “game on” and get on with it. But that isn’t enough. Americans, even well-educated ones, are appallingly ignorant of American political history, of the fundamental structure and organization of federal, state and local governments, of how the country’s political institutions work both in theory and in practice, and so on. That’s a big part of the reason why Russia’s social media war has been so effective. see DANISH PLAN Page 7

letters CU history incomplete

Paul Danish’s recent feature article, “CU’s roots: Tales of the founders,” flounders [Re: News, Oct. 26, 2017]. At the beginning of this article, Mr. Danish assumed that Boulder’s first residents were part of the gold rush of the mid 1800s. This is incorrect. Mr. Danish forgot about the earliest peoples of the Boulder Valley, including the Southern Arapahoe tribe. Kristen Marshall/Boulder

Russian misdirection

If you are in the business of manipulating people, no matter how rich you are, you still need to be efficient in your use of resources. You want to have all the television stations you own, all the newspapers you control, and all the bloggers you employ saying the same thing. It needs to be a simple message which your servants repeat over and over again, pounding it into people’s heads. The message needs to serve corporate profitability and also increase corporate power. “The Russians are a threat” is such a message. It serves four functions. First, as long as the media is screaming about how bad the Russians are, it is nearly impossible to take joint action to deal with climate change. The valuable message about how we will all need to work together to avoid environmental disaster is effectively drowned out. This supports the profitability of the oil, coal and chemical industries, all of whom have absolutely no interest in spending even a few dollars to help the environment. Second, claiming that “the Russians are a threat” continues the divide and conquer policy of the military-industrial complex, thus insuring that their enormous profits will keep

rolling in. It plays on people’s fear. Fear is a well-proven tactic to bring people under control. Third, claiming that the Russians are a threat distracts public attention from the persistent Bernie Sanders movement and their messages about peace and the environment. The Bernie Sanders movement is a challenge to the corporate ruling class structure of this country. The corporate ruling class has this country’s politicians securely in their grip and have no intention of letting go. Fourth, alleging that the Russians are a threat distracts people from the November 2016 election disaster. The early polls showed clearly that Bernie Sanders could have beaten Donald Trump. In spite of that, the corrupt old party hacks at the Democratic National Committee repeatedly sabotaged Bernie Sanders campaign throughout 2016. The DNC supported Hillary because she had the big corporate money behind her. The DNC’s actions cost them the election. Is it true that the Russians are a threat? No, it is only a corporate lie, but whether a statement is true or not is irrelevant in Washington and Wall Street these days as long as it increases corporate profits. George Newell/Boulder

On climate change

I’m wondering if climate change, in a more concrete sense, has perhaps truly insinuated itself into the consciousness of even a few hundred more people, as it has into their eyes and lungs this past summer. The wildfire experience so evident in the blood-red see LETTERS Page 7

Boulder Weekly


LETTERS from Page 6

sunsets should help promote a wake-up call for those who can manage to lift their noses away from the iPhone. Unfortunately, the calamity we face is real, even if it hasn’t struck some of upside the head. Blinking, wishing or pulling the old ostrich trick won’t change anything. This year, we found ourselves between two major hurricanes, with our low-lying citizens (physically, not socially) hopefully able to at least cringe and, hopefully, duck and swim. We can no longer dismiss the dichotomous catastrophes of fire

and water so easily, if we are awake. I can easily visualize the deniers acting as fire detail at Pearl Harbor on that “day of infamy.” See them joking about those bombs and torpedoes (”fake”’ news?), deriding any who call for action or plead for a response. Any response to our climate crisis that comes too late is worth zip. There is no “day late, dollar short.” There is only “sorry, snake eyes.” It will not matter if humans are part of the cause(s). And only we humans can soften the blow. Meanwhile, we simply must

acknowledge the limits to our capacity to aid and recover from the blows a ruined atmosphere is already dishing out. How many $160 billion rescue packages can there be? Gregory Iwan/Longmont

Trump unhinged

Sigmund Freud is not the most popular voice of reason in today’s psycho-chemical approach to controlling mental illness but it is undeniable that his psychosexual theories of sublimation and extension of elemental sexual anxiety can be applied to America’s fascina-

tion with guns, dating even back to the passage of the Second Amendment and the taming of the frontier, essentially Mother Earth. Applied to Donald Trump, with his succession of trophy wives, his long red ties, his sexual braggadocio, his quest for adulation, and fascination with wealth and glamour, Freud’s insights shine a light on his concern about the size of his hands. It is more than a bit disconcerting that those same hands do command America’s military might and that his finger hovers above the nuclear trigger. Robert Porath/Boulder

DANISH PLAN from Page 6

What the country really needs is a massive remedial course in civics. Think of it as boot camp for Cold War 2.0. Americans also need to re-learn some old civic and political virtues — like civil discourse, the importance of the loyal opposition and the art of political negotiation. They also need to learn to recognize the techniques of political manipulation and how to immunize themselves against them — like how cynicism is used as a corrupt substitute for understanding. Or how a passionate few can sway the inattentive and the undecided many. Or how fear of the unknown and “the other” is used to sway opinion. One reason the American republic has been as successful as it has been is that early on we figured out that widespread illiteracy was fundamentally incompatible with democracy. Today the problem is political, cultural and computer illiteracy. So will the Cold War ever end? Don’t hold your breath. When it comes to the game of nations, to borrow a phrase from Robert Earl Kean: The road goes on forever and the party never ends. The more interesting question is how it will play out in the age of the internet. What sets Cold War 2.0 apart isn’t just social media and data analytics. In the age of the internet, everyone can play, not just governments. Maybe this round will end with individual Americans and Russians slugging it out on social media without too much government prompting. Which would give a new dimension of meaning to the phrase “people’s war”. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. Boulder Weekly

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news

Oil and gas emissions contribute to unsafe ozone levels along Front Range, study finds by Matt Cortina Courtesy of CIRES

O

n any given day, emissions from oil and gas activity in Colorado can make a big enough contribution to groundlevel ozone levels that it pushes the region out of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health standards. That’s according to a study led by the University of Colorado Boulder Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) researchers published on Nov. 3 in the journal Elementa. Data for the study was culled from research conducted during the summer of 2014 near oil and gas operations in Greeley. “Our biggest takeaway was that on individual days out in Greeley, out in the gas field, oil and gas can contribute up to 20 to 30 parts per billion [ppb] to ozone production, which is a significant amount,” says Lucy Cheadle, who led the

8 November 9, 2017

work as a CIRES research associate working in the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. The EPA limit is currently 75 ppb per day. The study found that there is about 45 to 55 ppb of ozone present in the air on an average summer day along the Front Range, due to a variety of sources. Thus, a 20 to 30 ppb spike in ozone could push it over the limit. In the course of 14 days, ozone levels exceeded the 75 ppb limit once, the study found. That’s important because ozone builds and dissipates every day, and so looking at its peaks might be more useful for regulators than looking at the average, which Cheadle says most studies have typically done. “Say you take the average contribution of oil and gas. It might be lower than what we found. It might be whatever percent it is, or some study found 3 ppb on average, which you look at it and the oil and gas industry is like, ‘Sweet, 3 ppb.’ “But the EPA doesn’t regulate

Top: An Aerodyne mobile lab collected data for the study. Bottom: Average ethane, carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone measured by the mobile laboratory in the northern Front Range during the three case study drives. Aug. 3 showed more influence of urban emissions (indicated by high CO levels), but also oil and gas emissions (high ethane levels), on ozone production. Average ozone at the Greeley site is included to estimate peak ozone in the drive area on Aug. 3. Aug. 13 showed a major contribution from oil and gas emissions (ethane levels well above regional background), with low urban emissions (CO levels), to a high ozone day.

Boulder Weekly


news on an average basis, so if you have four or five days where [ozone] is really high and oil and gas is the significant contributor, which we found on one day out of a 14-day period, that is still an important thing to regulate.” Ozone is created by the combination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (oil and gas’s main contribution), nitrogen oxides (the general population’s contribution, typically via cars) and sunlight. Ozone tends to dissipate by a day’s end because sunlight goes away, and nitrogen oxide can oversaturate the mixture. VOCs also come from agriculture, typically in the form of methane. What all this means is that on any given day there are a ton of variables that determine how much ozone will be created. And the weather not only plays a role in ozone production via how much sunlight there is; wind patterns can both help create ozone and transport it throughout the region. The health effects of ground-level ozone vary from person to person, but it’s invisible and can lead to respiratory attacks. Generally speaking it’s not good to be exposed to levels over the EPA limit. “The way the EPA makes their regulations is they do a lot of research on the human health impacts,” Cheadle says. “So they make what seem like weird rules based on ... what is the most harmful to humans. I think ozone is especially [harmful] for sensitive populations, so if you’re older, or a kid, or you have asthma, you’re more likely to get harm from it, but it’s not good for you on one day to be exposed to it.” Ozone has an impact on crops and other vegetation as well. Cheadle says ozone is tangentially impacted by climate change — ozone is highly correlated to temperature and as days get hotter, there is potential to create more harmful ozone. Another recent study, this one led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), culled from the data collected in 2014 and found that oil and gas and motor vehicles are the main contributors to ozone along the Front Range, and that ozone frequently is carried to high mountain climates. The data for that study and the NOAA/CIRES study was conducted via “aircraft, balloons, mobile laboratories and other ground-based facilities to characterize emissions from many possible sources.” That allowed research teams to parse out VOCs so they could say with more certainty when oil and gas emissions Boulder Weekly

were impacting ozone levels. For instance, if ethane was present in the air, which “we know is mostly emitted form oil and gas here,” Cheadle says, researchers could appropriately pin the culprit. The northern Front Range has long had a problem with ozone levels, with a steady increase in the maximum ozone levels in and around Denver over the

last few decades. And, every community along the Front Range from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins received an F in the American Lung Association recent annual air quality report because of ground-level ozone. Too, the NOAA/ CIRES study found that it’s not only in metro areas where harmful ozone levels are being detected — rural areas near

Greeley (and near oil and gas operations) also experienced high levels. New EPA standards that would cap safe ozone levels at 70 ppb were passed in 2015, but the Trump administration’s EPA could stall enforcement of the new level. Regardless, it’s unlikely the Front Range will be able to meet those standards until at least 2020.

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feature

Hondros Greg Campbell’s tribute to a fallen friend becomes award-winning documentary by Angela K. Evans Greg Campbell

Chris Hondros in Sierra Leone in 2001.

P

hoto journalists seldom become the subject of the story. The expectation is that they will be objective observers, remaining hidden behind the camera, bearing witness to what’s happening around them, whether at home or the far reaches of the world. Until his death in Libya in 2011, photojournalist Chris Hondros was true to his craft. The Pulitzer-Prize finalist, Getty Images photographer had spent more than a decade capturing the world’s conflicts in photos, illuminating lives torn apart by war and the horrific moments too often lost in a morass of statistics and geopolitics. But this weekend, filmgoers attending the Denver Film Festival can see the life of Chris Hondros play out in front of the camera. Thanks to Greg Campbell — Hondros’ best friend and former editor at Boulder Weekly — there is now an award winning documentary on the life and lasting influence of Hondros. “We shook the bushes to find any footage of him,” says Campbell, journalist, author and director of the new documentary Hondros. “I considered doing a book about Chris’ life, but because he was a photographer it just made obvious sense that I would do a film.” Although this is Campbell’s directorial debut, it’s not the first time he’s seen Hondros in front of his camera. He used to film his childhood friend on a Super 8 back home in Fayetteville, North Carolina. “I was running around with my little 10 November 9, 2017

brother doing these boneheaded action movies and my little brother was tired of having to be the protagonist,” Campbell says. “I needed someone else to be the leading man and Chris immediately struck me as a swashbuckling kinda guy even at age 14. My first impression of him was that he was really confident, even beyond his years.” The pair met in freshman English class, “bonding instantly,” perhaps because they were both recent transplants, Campbell from Pennsylvania and Hondros from New York. They often skipped school together, driven by a mutual “insatiable curiosity” about the world around them. “We had this Ferris Bueller kind of attitude about life is moving fast, go out there and seize the day kind of stuff,” Campbell says. It’s an attitude that led them both to study journalism in college — Campbell attending University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Hondros working for the school newspaper at North Carolina State. “This is exactly what we wanted out of life: you get to go ask questions of people with whatever randomly pops into your head to satisfy your curiosity,” Campbell says. The pair made business cards that read “Greg Campbell and Chris Hondros writer/ photographer team” and set out to cover the 1992 presidential election. “We didn’t have an assignment. We were just handing out these business cards, we’re interviewing people, he’s taking pictures,” Campbell says. “We never did anything with

it, we never wrote a story but it sure laid the groundwork.” Later that year Bill Clinton was elected and the pair traveled to Washington D.C. for their first real assignment to cover the inauguration for Hondros’ student paper. After that, Campbell moved to Boulder where he worked for Boulder Weekly first as a reporter and eventually as editor. Hondros went on to get his master’s from Ohio State and then worked as a photographer for local papers in Ohio and North Carolina. It was Campbell who first got into conflict reporting in 1996. The story is somewhat legendary around the BW newsroom: The war in the Balkans was coming to an end and Campbell wanted to cover the reunification of Sarajevo. So the hat was passed around the office and Campbell spent more than a month in the war zone interviewing everyone from locals to NATO commanders alongside journalists from major news outlets like CNN, the New York Times, U.S. News and the Wall Street Journal. “It was really overwhelming. I didn’t know what I was doing,” Campbell says. “These guys took me under their wing and made sure I didn’t step on landmines.” Five weeks and four cover stories later, Campbell flew back to the states where Hondros met him at the airport. “He picked my brain asking me how I did it,” Campbell remembers. “I really infected Chris with this enthusiasm to go do it. When Kosovo began a few years later, he was off to the races.” Boulder Weekly


Chris Hondros/Courtesy of Hondros film

Hondros went to the front lines of the conflict, documenting mass funerals, the rise of the Kosovo Liberation Army and Serbian refugees. “Chris immediately found his stride,” Campbell says. “That was what he was meant to do in life.” Hondros and Campbell worked together some in Kosovo, also in Sierra Leone in early 2001. “It’s the whole teamwork thing, the boys are back, it’s the Campbell/Hondros writer/photographer team doing our thing,” Campbell says. Then planes flew into the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 11. “The minute 9/11 happened, he was out the door and never looked back,” Campbell continues. “He was in Pakistan in the days after 9/11; in Afghanistan; he was with the first vanguard of photographers that went into Iraq. He just kept going back, over and over again.” His photos changed the way people understood wars and conflicts around the world. Hondros often asked Campbell to join him, but he mostly refused, focusing on local and national journalism in the U.S., a young family, writing books and eventually starting a new business, The Fort Collins Weekly with current BW editor Joel Dyer. “This period of [Hondros’] life, basically from 2001 onward, he had some very formative experiences that, because I didn’t go with him, I couldn’t understand the scope of what they were like,” Campbell says. “And this is where part of my understanding of who he was as a person eluded me. I didn’t even realize how much it had eluded me until he was completely gone and I took on the task of reconstructing his life and representing his legacy on screen.” The two were last together in Benghazi, Libya, in the days before Hondros was killed. A few weeks before, out of the blue, Hondros had sent a text with a one-word question: “Libya?” This time, Campbell agreed. The childhood friends were together again, and Campbell was able to see how his friend had changed. “When I first went to Bosnia, the seasoned guys Boulder Weekly

were helping me out,” Campbell says. “And then when I’m now in Libya, the seasoned guys are helping me out and Chris is one of the seasoned guys.” The two covered international criminal court investigations about war crimes and spent hours trying to escape a hospital caught in the middle of a firefight between rebels and government forces as the sun was setting. After two weeks Campbell headed home, while Hondros and other photojournalists talked about heading to Misurata. “The people that I was with were doing it for the utmost noble reasons in our profession,” Campbell says. “And the reasons were to be a witness to what was going on.” The city was completely besieged and the only way in or out was a 20-hour boat ride. But these photographers weren’t thrillseekers, Campbell says. “Chris and the other people were far more sober about the risks and what they were getting into,” Campbell says. “There’s a bit of fatalistic resolve.” On April 20, 2011, a group of photographers including Hondros and Tim Heatherington covered an intense firefight spilling from houses into the streets. Later that day, the group decided to go back out and see if anything was happening. While walking down a street, a rocket-propelled grenade suddenly exploded in the middle of the group. Hetherington was hit in the leg and eventually bled to death. Hondros died a few hours later of severe brain trauma. “I was thunderstruck when Chris got killed. I couldn’t believe it,” Campbell says. “I say that with a good degree of embarrassment. ... I was there, I got shelled, I got shot at just like everybody else. But you’re under this ridiculous impression that somehow because you’re there to observe it all, you’re going to be protected. It’s so not true. It’s demonstrably, obvi-

ously not true.” That morning, Campbell started writing at 7 a.m., noticing he had an unanswered email from Hondros that had come in a few days earlier. It was a long thread of exchanges between the friends, and Hondros last message said he was headed to Misurata. Campbell wrote back, “be careful.” Not long after, a Twitter alert flashed This photo from Liberia on Campbell’s comin 2003 became one of puter screen — the driving forces behind the something along the documentary Hondros. lines of “#Libya Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington killed in Misurata.” “It didn’t compute at all,” Campbell says. “It was one of those things that come up and then it slowly fades off and I was like, ‘Did I just fucking hallucinate that?’” It was hard to get information, but soon Campbell got the call, confirming that Hondros was gone. The rest of the day — and year really — was a blur as Campbell was overcome by the grief of losing his childhood friend. But the fog eventually began to wear off, and Campbell, along with videographer Mike Shum, started thinking about making a documentary to honor Hondros. The idea started as a short film that would follow Campbell as he traveled to Liberia and other war zones to meet the subjects of some of Hondros’ most famous images. In 2003, while covering the civil war in Liberia, Hondros had photographed Liberian government commander Joseph Duo jumping in the air on a bridge, celebrating having just shot a rocket-propelled grenade into rebel forces. Shortly after Hondros’ death, Duo reached out to Campbell via Facebook. It turns out Hondros had been paying for Duo’s school tuition for years, following his progress on surprise stopovers in Liberia. “Let’s go to Liberia and have you meet Joseph for See HONDROS Page 12

November 9, 2017 11


feature

Nicole Tung

HONDROS from Page 11

the first time,” Shum suggested to Campbell. “What a weird intersection that you guys have this one person in common.” This seed of an idea quickly snowballed into the project that became Hondros. “It would be me searching for those bits and pieces of my friend through the experiences of folks that he encountered in photographs and the places that were important to him,” Campbell says. Campbell knew that Hondros sometimes kept up with the people he had met and photographed under extraordinary circumstances. He wanted to capture those stories. “On paper when you’re learning about this craft, you’re told that you’re just a machine and you’re there just to record everything that happens,” Campbell says. “You’re in it for all of 10 seconds and you realize how absurd that entire construct is. ON THE BILL: Hondros. ... We’re humans, we’re not Denver Film Festival, Sie Film Center, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., machines. It’s hard to look away Denver. 4:30 p.m. Friday, from a little girl covered in the blood Nov. 10, 11:30 a.m. of her parents.” Saturday, Nov. 11, 4:30 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 12. Not only did Campbell go to Liberia to find Duo, (who just recently ran for local office in Monrovia, Liberia’s capital) he also traveled to Iraq for the film in search of Samar Hassan, the little girl in an emotionally charged 2005 photograph by Hondros taken after her family was killed by U.S. soldiers at a surprise checkpoint. As Campbell called around his journalist friends trying to track her down, he heard that actress Jamie Lee Curtis was also looking for the girl. Turns out Curtis, a serious amateur photographer, felt a strong connection to Hondros’ work and was trying to learn more about his subjects as well. She eventually got involved in Campbell’s project in “a roundabout way [that] speaks to Chris’ heart that he put into his work,” Campbell says. Campbell got Curtis’ email and dropped her a 12 November 9, 2017

note. Curtis responded within Childhood friends five minutes, he says. Greg Campbell and “She was really Chris Hondros in Libya in 2011, weeks moved by the photo before Hondros was (of Samar) and the killed. story behind it,” he says. “She was our mentor, sort of our shepherd through the processes of Hollywood.” She’s also co-executive producer of the film, along with her godson Jake Gyllenhaal and others. With this support, Campbell was able to take the film beyond “a tribute to my fallen friend” and into an award-winning documentary coming to Netflix in March. Campbell finished Hondros a year ago, saving the final edits on the closing scene for the last day — the scene where his friend is killed. “We’ve got to do it,” Campbell remembers telling final editor and co-writer Jenny Golden. “We’ve got to put him to rest.” Making the film didn’t necessarily teach Campbell anything new about his childhood friend. Rather, it reinforced what he always knew; Hondros was relatable to everyone one he encountered, memorable to anyone he came in contact with, even if he rarely came out from behind the camera. “Whether you were a child soldier or a U.S. soldier, he could find common ground,” Campbell says. “And that was always reflected in his photographs. You rarely needed an explanation of what was going on in the photos. You didn’t need to read the captions or anything because he caught some sort of thread of humanity that connects the viewer and the subject. Especially in a polarized climate, which he was usually shooting in, to be able to look at the photographs and recognize a little of yourself in what you’re seeing on the screen or the page is a remarkable accomplishment. “And Chris was able to do that over and over and over again.” Boulder Weekly


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future that will be affected by what’s expressed in those changes. The future also may not see a lot of these features.” Now showing through Dec. 23 at the McNichols Civic Center Building in Denver Ice: Portraits of Vanishing Glaciers displays the photography of Balog from around the world. It also features work from Balog’s 2012 documentary Chasing Ice that follows him on his journey to capture these glaciers before they’re gone. Balog always had an interest in science but not in being a scientist. He chose photography instead and became an environmental photographer in the early 1980s. He spent a large part of his career photographing wildlife, covering topics like endangered species and hunting. He became increasingly aware of the reality of climate change through

Photographer James Balog captures glaciers, before they’re gone by Amanda Moutinho

F

or almost 15 years, James Balog has dedicated his time to photographing glaciers. He’s chronicled major change — common occurrences like miles of retreating ice and height decreases equivalent to the Empire State Building. In that regard, his photos serve as a document for past, present and future. “It’s about the past in that those glaciers are accumulative structures that come to us from the past,” he says. “It’s about the present in the sense of what the landscapes are doing on their own and what we’re doing to the landscapes right now. And it’s about the future, the

James Balog

his work, and began to look for a story to tell. Ice made the perfect vehicle, but he ran into a problem. “For the life of me I couldn’t figure out an interesting way of talking about ice,” he says. “It would turn into a really boring story about penguins and polar bears.” He let the idea sit on the shelf for a few years until, in 2004, he was invited to shoot a story on climate change for The New Yorker. He flew to Iceland and quickly realized the country’s glaciers evocatively spoke to the decay caused by global warming. Looking back on it now, Balog had no idea he’d still be photographing glaciers so many years later. At first, he says, he thought he would shoot the initial story. He then received another assignment for National Geographic. Then he decided to place a few timelapse cameras on glaciers, then a few more. “And at that point I thought it would be three summers and two winters, and that’s as far as I could imagine,” he says. Part of the spark that ignited

Balog photographed the Bridge Glacier in Brisith Columbia (above) in 2009 and again in 2012. Comparing the photographs reveals a significant ice retreat during that time.

Balog’s passion was witnessing dramatic change so rapidly. “I was so stunned by the speed of the change I was seeing,” he says. “I realized, ‘Boy, I have to get cameras out right now, as fast as possible, not miss a year and get going because this is huge.” That happened between December of 2006 and March of 2007, which is when Balog officially started Extreme Ice Survey (EIS). Based in Boulder, EIS catalogs the effects of climate change on glacial ice by using video and photography, time-lapse and conventional. The Survey has multiple cameras located all over the world including Greenland, Iceland, Alaska and the Rocky Mountains. EIS is one of the most expansive studies of glaciers using See ICE Page 18

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ground-based, real-time photography. “I’m very In the past, he’s likened glacier phoconscious of There is both tography to portraiture. He says he tries the fact that beauty and tragto evoke the individuality of the landthe project is edy in Balog’s photography scape, capturing character and personality. bringing evias evident by Many of Balog’s photos are emodence in comthis photo from Finland. tional. Watching these glaciers fade prehensible away is hard to stomach. time. At times “It can be quite painful and hauntI’ve thought of ing. At the same time, it can be quite this as almost like forensic evidence,” beautiful and awe inspiring, because he says. “We’re going to a site and we’re you realize you’re in the middle of hiscollecting visual evidence that’s groundtory,” Balog says. “To see history ed in scientific knowledge of what hapunfolding in front of your eyes is a pens and what it means. And we’re powerful thing. Most people go along bringing that evidence back to the jury in their normal time frame, in their of the public and saying, ‘Here. It’s ordinary human lives pretty obvious to me and they don’t think what’s happening, but about their position in you take a look.’” ON THE BILL: ICE: Portraits of Vanishing history. But watching Over the past decade, Glaciers. Boettcher this stuff happen, you EIS and Balog’s work Cultural Pavilion, 2nd Floor, McNichols Civic definitely think about has helped to raise pubCenter Building, 144 W. it.” lic awareness of the Colfax Ave., Denver. Through Dec. 23. Since the beginning severity of climate of his career in photogchange, but Balog wishes raphy, Balog’s core to see more political theme has been to capture the collision change to protect the environment. For between humans and nature. now, he’ll continue to work. “With a subject like this, that was “I was feeling much more hopeful a one of my initial motivations, of this year ago,” he says. “I walk a razor’s edge being perhaps one of the biggest colli- now between hope and despair. I will sions of our times,” he says. “I think myself to stay hopeful, but we have a it’s historic and important, and I’m disaster in the political leadership in Washington at a lot of different levels. trying to bring it to some creative I’m not sure what’s going to happen light.” but what keeps me hopeful is there Over the years, his goals for the project have remained the same: to cel- remains a lot of visionaries and creative imaginative people who are bending ebrate the landscapes, to reveal change, the arc of history. ... All I can do is and to communicate the meaning and what I can do.” importance of that change. Balog’s next project is a documentaWhile his photos are beautiful, they ry called The Human Element, out next serve a powerful purpose. They present year. The film looks at how earth, air, irrefutable evidence that these glaciers fire and water are being changed by are changing. His photoset from the people and at the same time how peoBridge Glacier in British Columbia ple are being impacted by the changes captures the ice in 2009 and then in they’ve contributed to in the natural 2012, where the glacier retreats signifienvironment. cantly and the lake at its base grows. Boulder Weekly


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The National Park Service proposes increasing entrance fees at select parks by Emma Murray

F

or a bit of perspective, Congressman Jared Polis says, “For the price of Trump’s proposed border wall ($20 billion), we could make all the national parks free for everyone. And take care of all [its] deferred maintenance.” But seeing as the Trump Administration’s track record continues to link degrading environmental policies one after another, the National Park Service (NPS) can’t hedge its bets on a $20 billion bonus. In fact, at the end of October, the federal government voted to cut 10.4 percent off the NPS’s 2018 budget. This leaves the NPS high and dry, considering the backlog of maintenance needed in national parks currently adds up to about $11 billion, while the annual budget has now shriveled to $2.6 billion. 20 November 9, 2017

As clear as it is that federal funding and advocacy is waning, the upward surge of public interest tells another side of the story. More people than ever are enjoying national parks, monuments, recreation areas and memorials across the country. And why wouldn’t we? We own these lands, after all. Last year, the fourth most visited park, Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), welcomed a record 4.5 million visitors into its protected arena. According to Kyle Patterson, RMNP’s spokesperson, “Our visitation has increased 40 percent in the past four years,” but “our base budget” — the amount appropriated from Congress — “has remained flat for the past 10 years.” Theresa Pierno, president and CEO of the National Parks Conservation Association, the leading

voice in safeguarding national parks, recently wrote, “This budget undermines our national parks to an alarming degree. ... It shortchanges the need for better maintenance and repair of parks, and cuts more than a thousand rangers out of our parks. ... This is not the legacy we should leave behind for our children and grandchildren.” In response to the budget cut, the near-constant influx of visitors (2016 was the third year in a row to set a NPS visitation record) and persistent infrastructure issues, the NPS has proposed restructuring its entrance fees, increasing the amount visitors will have to pay during peak season to access 17 highly visited national parks, including RMNP. If this proposal passes as the next link in the Trump administration’s chain of policies, visitors will pay $70 per private, non-commercial vehicle, $50 per motorcycle and $30 per person without a car just to set foot in certain national parks. The annual “America the Beautiful” pass, which provides free entrance to all parks for a year, will remain $80. The new fee structure would affect Acadia, Arches, Bryce Canyon, Canyonlands, Denali, Glacier, Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, Joshua Tree,

Rocky Mountain National Park is included on the list of parks that could see entrance fees double or triple, if the proposal is implemented.

Mount Rainier, Olympic, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite and Zion national parks. According to the NPS, this would “generate badly needed revenue for improvements to the aging infrastructure of national parks. This includes roads, bridges, campgrounds, waterlines, bathrooms and other visitor services.” U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, calling the budget cuts “balanced,” sees the proposal as an essential move toward the future of U.S. public lands: “Targeted fee increases ... will help ensure that [the parks] are protected and preserved in perpetuity and that visitors enjoy a world-class experience that mirrors the amazing destinations they are visiting. ... We need to have the vision to look at the future of our parks and take action in order to ensure that our grandkids’ grandkids will have the same if not better experience than we have today. Shoring up Boulder Weekly


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Expires 12/15/17 our parks’ aging infrastructure will do that.” But Congressman Polis, whose jurisdiction includes Estes Park and RMNP, sees the proposal a bit differently. “This is a direct attempt to cut people off from our public lands,” he says. His skepticism rises, in part, from the numbers: the potential revenue increase via the proposal is estimated at $70 million (a 34-percent increase over the $200 million entrance fees collected in 2016), according to the NPS. When considering the federal government is planning to cut many more millions from next year’s budget, it’s hard to see how adding $70 million will make more than a minimal dent in the $11 billion receipt that shoring up aging infrastructure would yield. “30 dollars to 70 is an enormous increase,” says Polis. “It puts [visiting one of those national parks] out of the price range for a day of fun for families working with $12-15 per hour wages.” Last week he told CBS, “funding [for public lands] should fall on Congress, not families. ... We all want access to our public lands. This is Colorado for heaven’s sake.” Laurie Tewksbury, chief operating officer of the Outdoor Women’s Alliance, is also wary of how increased entrance fees might disproportionately affect visitors, both current outdoor enthusiasts and those of the future. “With so many people using the parks now and how busy they are, it makes sense that they need the money to maintain [the parks] for future users and to keep it sustainable for more people to enjoy longer,” she says. Boulder Weekly

But in adding more weight to the financial burden on visitors, “We’re [going to be] limiting who has access,” Tewksbury says. “There are long term effects that we might not be able to see today about who will ultimately be able to enjoy the parks.” The Outdoor Women’s Alliance’s goal “is to get more people outside who don’t already spend time outdoors,” she says. “It’s very clear this is going to impact specific communities greatly.” Then she adds, “It’s seems very clear that [this proposal] is not the exact right solution. But what is the right solution?” Polis has a potential answer: “It’s simple: don’t cut funding.” Tewksbury also recommends limiting the number of users in the parks using some sort of permit system, “like the Grand Canyon where you try every year to raft there,” as an example for a way to implement a more fair system for population control and mitigating future overuse. “Or, I’m curious to think if there’s a way — it’d be a feat — to give back by helping maintain the parks rather than increasing fees. This could be more give-back days [where visitors might contribute to maintenance or sustainability initiatives] instead of increasing fees... “Clearly we have a challenge on hand.” The National Park Service is taking public comment on the proposed fee structure proposal through Nov. 23. The public can comment online at http://tinyurl.com/PDN-parkfeehike or by mailing written comments to National Park Service, Recreation Fee Program, 1849 C St. NW, Mail Stop: 2346, Washington, DC 20240.

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BUZZ

All photos by Susan France

No trut h

The individual perceptions in ‘Neo-Cubism’

by Amanda Moutinho Boulder Weekly

See NEO-CUBISM Page 24

November 9 , 2017 23


All photos by Susan France

NEO-CUBISM from Page 23

T

he paintings of William Stoehr are clearly faces. Some have two eyes, a nose and a mouth. Yet upon further inspection, one eye might be pointing one direction, while the other points the opposite way. A nose might be too small compared to the other facial features, or one side of a mouth doesn’t match the other. Some paintings feature a face within a face, sometimes within even more faces. But overall, they’re still faces. Stoehr just gives the essentials, and the rest is up to the viewer. It’s a technique indicative of cubism, Stohr’s chosen style of painting. “I love this concept of the mind assembling the image,” Stoehr says. “Cubists give you cues to help you do that — not giving you the finished piece, but rather engaging you in the completion of the piece. I’ve given you all these ideas for you to pull them back how you want them.” In Neo-Cubism: A New Perspective, showing through Dec. 3 at the Dairy Arts Center, Stoehr’s work hangs alongside the sculptures of Roger Reutimann. In the show, the two Boulder-based artists question reality by using abstraction, specifically cubism, to explore the multiplicity of truth. One of the main characteristics of cubism is featuring multiple perspec24 November 9 , 2017

“Cubism is a movement that was mostly for painters,” Reutimann says. “There is some sculpture but it was something developed by painters like Picasso. The idea was also to have multiple viewpoints on a 2-D surface. So [instead of doing that], one angle [of my sculpture] reveals the figure on a 3-dimensional piece of art. So it’s like the reverse cubism.” While Stoehr focuses on faces, Reutimann sculpts the entire human body. His pieces, simplistic and painted completely in white, are far from realistic renditions of a person. They moreso give an angular representation of the human form. The two artists are drawn together by their use of line. “When you look at their pieces in person,” says Dairy Curator tives on a canvas. And Rebecca Cuscaden, “you see while Stoehr works how their figures, which are Top: “Perception #8” by Roger directly with this idea, created by line and disrupted Reutimann Reutimann’s art turns by line, are very similar. They Bottom: “Irene” by William Stoehr this traditional aspect use line to really show how Previous page: on its head. With his your vision and what you per“Destiny 16” by William Stoehr series, named ceive can be shifted based on “Perception,” how they choose to use line. “It really changes your sense Reutimann plays with of perception,” she says. “When you’re the idea of viewpoint. Standing in walking around Roger’s sculptures, front of one of his sculptures, a clear each viewpoint is drastically different. human figure emerges, but with a few You can tell it’s a figure but your steps to the left or right the silhouette notion of what it is and what you’re disappears and the figure becomes looking at really changes as you circle completely abstract. Boulder Weekly


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Reutimann and Stoehr challenge perception and truth in their joint exhibit NeoCubism.

the work because of how he divides his figure. And similarly when you’re looking at Bill’s paintings, if you were to cover one eye or hold your hand up to cover a portion of the painting, it looks like a very different painting.” The core linkage between both Reutimann and Stoehr is their exploration of perception. “The idea is the perception we have of the world is individual for each of us,” Reutimann says. “Although we have words to depict the world as it is the same hardware. We have eyes and rather than as it seems,” reads the ears, and they all work the same. But joint artist statement. “When viewing the brain is what is different — our their works one may notice that the imprints, our upbringing, how our sculptures and paintings unexpectedly brain has been conditioned. shift from playful to poignant, realis“To me it’s fascinating to think, if tic to abstract, or stationary to moving you have one object and as the fragmented peryou have 10 people spectives, naturalistic ON THE BILL: Neodescribe it, you get 10 cues, and misaligned Cubism: A New different descriptions of planes engage the viewPerspective — by Roger it,” he continues. “I tried er. This allows the Reutimann and William Stoehr. McMahon to turn that into sculppaintings and sculpGallery, Dairy Arts Center, ture.” tures, previously consid2590 Walnut St., Boulder. With his work, ered illusions of reality, Through Dec. 3. Reutimann wants to to take on a reality of show there is no “right” the viewer’s making.” answer or definitive conThat reality, of clusion. course, isn’t straightforward, and it var“There is no truth. There’s only ies from person to person. As there are perception of truth,” he says. “The many sides to an individual, Stoehr and truth can be different for everyone.” Reutimann capture the many layers of the human experience. Both artists It’s an essential philosophy behind invite the viewer to discover their own cubism, and Stoehr says the style has truth; with each individual bringing its own special way of observing the their own background to a piece, the world. He references artist David resulting interpretations are varied and Hockney who deduced that cubism isn’t about abstract art, it’s about reality. endless. “When I paint someone, it’s a blank “[In Neo-Cubism, the artists] aim to achieve what seminal Cubists face,” Stoehr says. “But what I’ve termed essential reality, or in other learned is that people are projecting Boulder Weekly

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by Sarah Haas

B

Steve Parke

y all That’s because for accounts, his parents, creativity Victor was but a necessary Wooten is a part of what had to be great musidone. His father fought cian. He’s won five in the Korean War, Grammy’s, been named “you know, back in the one of the top 10 basstime when they still ists of all time by fought hand-to-hand,” Rolling Stone and is the enduring unfathomable only person to be violence only to return named “Bassist of the home to a country that Year” more than once wasn’t just unsupportby Bass Player magaive of the war, but that zine. His biography is was being torn apart by full of such accolades, the racial politics runbuilding a strong case ning much deeper than for an appraisal of the color of his skin. greatness. His sense of pride But according to never wavered. Wooten there is no such thing as great nor is there such thing Meanwhile, his mother was at home, taking care of the as right because there is no such thing as wrong, whether it be household, her primary role. Amid poverty, her creativity an errant key or a misplaced note. In Wooten’s version of the came in turning a bare refrigerator into dinner for 15, in makworld, right or wrong needn’t apply because it’s ing a mason jar of water enough to quench a family’s thirst all part of finding “the groove.” and always as a casual philosopher who framed her family’s For those familiar with Wooten’s work, upbringing in lots of deep conversation and big questions. whether as founding bassist of Béla Fleck and “In making do with the lot they had been given, my parthe Flecktones, solo or with trios, the groove is ents had to be creative and productive, always,” Wooten says. a familiar sensation. It’s a feeling that’s as obvi“I never knew we were poor growing up, but like my mom ous in his early work as it is on his latest album said, ‘God always came through.’” with the Victor Wooten Trio, TRYPNOTYX, an Whatever the form of Wooten’s own faith, it is just as verelectric infused jazz-funk album and his first in itable as his mother’s. But rather than God or church, he five years. points to a broader spirituality as his guide. Wooten doesn’t subscribe to tenets, but to a way of asking questions, naturally Whether you’re a musician or a listener, you guiding his art away from hard-nosed rights and wrongs and know the groove by feeling it, and Wooten’s toward a journey of inquisition as the final destination. greatness comes from his ability to find it, It was inevitable that he would become a pulling it like a bunny out of a music educator. For the better part of his hat. But, where a magician ON THE BILL: The Victor career he’s been teaching, and since 2000 he’s hides his trick with spectacles, Wooten Trio. Doors: 7:30 been hosting music camps out of his school, Wooten shares his would-be p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, with sessions named things like “How to secrets with the world because, Nederland. thecaribouPlay Well with Others” or “Jamming.” It’s he says, there’s nothing secret room.com not a traditional approach to education but, or special about great music. in helping students find the groove, it fills a For Wooten his greatness big and important void in traditional music (or as he calls it his “spideytheory. sense”) comes from a methodology instilled in When asked how many students he’s taught over the him by his parents, one of working with what years, Wooten just laughs — i.e. there’s been too many to you’ve got, believing your success already exists and asking question after question, not in search count, especially if you include the thousands who have read his 2006 music education book, The Music Lesson: A Spiritual of an answer but in curiosity of elusive universal truths. Search for Growth Through Music. Wooten grew up one of five boys in his family, living in The book is written as a novel à la Carlos Castaneda, a poverty just off the military bases that employed his father. He became a bass player because he had to; his literal band of story written as a conversation between Wooten and several imaginary characters that serve to bring his internal dialectic brothers needed one and he fit the bill. From the first day he to life through external dialogue. In effect, it breaks down the picked up his instrument he thought of himself as a capable barrier between Wooten and his audience and lets them in on musician, the words of his mother running through his head: the secret to his greatness. “You are already successful, the rest of the world just doesn’t “Mistakes,” he writes, “are just things we didn’t mean to know it yet.” play. It doesn’t mean they are wrong. Some of the best music I “Our parents were more concerned with who we were as ever played started out as a mistake. Mistakes usually throw us people than with what we made of ourselves,” Wooten says. “They wanted to develop five good, generous and honest boys, off because the note comes out before we think about it. We can’t avoid making mistakes, but we can get comfortable with and if they did that they knew that whatever else we did them, especially if we practice making them.” would be just fine.”

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‘Mistakes are just things we didn’t mean to play’ Victor Wooten on the secret to greatness

Boulder Weekly


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arts & cult ur e

ith a little bastardization, Einstein’s most famous equation, E=mc2, sums up the Denver Center for the Performing Arts Theatre Company’s latest, Smart People, with elegant precision. If “E” is “Every (almost) other DCPA Theater Company show I’ve ever seen,” and “m” is “magnificent., and “c” is “celebrated,” then E=mc2 is the mathematical expression of Smart People. With the fewest of exceptions, literally every DCPA Theatre Company performance I’ve been privileged to attend over a vast number of years has been outstanding. The Denver Center in general, and its resident theater company in particular, exceeds expectations as a matter of course. Which explains why I was completely nonplussed and considerably disappointed walking out of the intermittently amusing, fatally underwhelming and, frankly, not as intelligent as it thinks by half, Smart People. How did this happen? The characters are certainly smart enough. Valerie Johnston, MFA (Tatiana Williams) is a gifted actress with a quick mind and barbed tongue. Jackson Moore, MD ( Jason Veasey) not only puts in grueling hours at the hospital where he is on staff but also operates a clinic focusing on lower income Boulder Weekly

patients. Brian White, one academic and two PhD (Timothy personal traits to ON THE BILL: Smart McCracken) is a define her character. People. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 1400 Harvard neuroscientist Chen rises above this Curtis St., Denver. Through whose career is devoted facile characterization Nov. 19. Tickets: $30 and to abolishing racism by with a strong, dediup. denvercenter.org. empirically proving its cated portrayal. biological underpinDirector and nings. Ginny Yang, DCPA Theatre PhD (Esther Chen), also at Harvard, is Company Associate Artistic Director a tenured psychologist who balances Nataki Garrett and her crew show their time between research and practice smarts through clarity of directing and duties primarily focused on the margin- top notch production values. The alization of certain races, in particular Ricketson Theatre’s stage is divided into Asian women. two levels which allows all four actors to The four actors clearly possess the appear on the relatively small stage and acumen to bring their erudite characters interact fluidly both concurrently and to life. Playing an actress within the consecutively. The entire back wall of play, Williams is asked to jump from the stage is a screen upon which myriad one character to the next throughout a images are projected during the course series of auditions while simultaneously of the play. At times those images maintaining a cogent hold on her role as directly elaborate on specific action Valerie, and she not only succeeds at onstage. At other times, especially when that but makes Valerie the most organi- coupled with the overtly modern and cally credible of Smart People’s leads. high-minded electronica score, the Veasey’s challenge is no less. As Jackson, imagery on display serves to amplify a driven African American doctor with mood, tone and setting. a chip or two on his shoulder, Veasey With all that perspicacity in evimust bring passion and conviction to dence, let’s dumb things down for a secthe part without crossing the line into a ond and ask, “What the fuck went parody of the “angry black man,” and he wrong?” For me, the blame must fall manages that balancing act with seemsquarely on the head of playwright ingly little effort. Lydia R. Diamond. Smart People is a In on-the-nose name and in actual play explicitly about race that doesn’t purpose, White is the “White guy” in seem to have anything interesting to say Smart People. He is the embodiment on the topic. It’s a comedy that earns of the entitled, white, male patriarchy only a handful of laughs. It’s a character that his entire professional life is study whose characters are sketches at devoted to vanquishing. Given best and ciphers at worst. Perhaps its White’s acerbic, aggressive demeanor, deadliest flaw is that it presents as a McCracken has a tough row to hoe series of only vaguely connected presenting him as a sympathetic char- vignettes with no dramatic through line. Smart People is the rarest of misses acter, but he manages to do so. Chen from the hit machine that is the DCPA faces nearly as difficult a challenge Theatre Company. with Yang, who is given essentially

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All-Beethoven Conducted by Brett Mitchell

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban™ In Concert

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DEC 1-3 FRI-SAT 7:30 SUN 1:00

JAN 5-6 FRI-SAT 7:30

Brett Mitchell, conductor Jeffrey Kahane, piano

Colorado Symphony Chorus, Mary Louise Burke, associate director

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Brett Mitchell, conductor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director

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Yo-Yo Ma with the Colorado Symphony DEC 10 SUN 7:30

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Christopher Dragon, conductor John Sipher, trombone Julie Duncan Thornton, piccolo

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Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons

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A Colorado Christmas ■

Brett Mitchell, conductor Angelo Xiang Yu, violin

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DEC 15-17 FRI 7:30 SAT 2:30 & 6:00 SUN 1:00 ■

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Christopher Dragon, conductor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director Colorado Children’s Chorale, Deborah DeSantis, artistic director

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Boulder Weekly


Courtesy of Hard Working Americans

HARD WORKING AMERICANS featuring Todd Snider, Dave

Schools (Widespread Panic), Duane Trucks (Widespread Panic), Chad Staehly (Great American Taxi), Daniel Sproul (Rose Hill Drive) and Jesse Aycock — with Jerry Joseph. 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 14, Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. see EVENTS Page 30

TICKETS $35

NITRO FEST AERIAL STREET VIEW Nov. 10, 11, 12, 17 and 18, The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Frequent Flyers and Block 1750 combine aerial dance with modern break dancing to put on a show at the Dairy Arts Center. With music from Chimney Choir and 15 dancers showing off their skills, this Alex Milewski rehearsing with Frequent artistic display is Flyers’ dancers sure to be unique. The group will perform at various times from Nov. 10-18. Details and tickets can be found at thedairy.org. —Sarah Farley Courtesy of Frequent Flyers® Aerial Dance

Boulder Weekly

6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 11, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. The world’s one and only nitro-exclusive beer festival is back for its fourth year. Nitro Fest features 44 different nitrogrenated brews made in the U.S., the U.K., China and Korea. As you sip smooth brew you’ll enjoy acrobatic circus performances and music from the band LOTUS. Costumes are encouraged. Proceeds from the event will go to the Left Hand Brewing Foundation, which works to support community nonprofits. Tickets start at $75 and can be found at lefthandnitro.com. —Sarah Farley Susan France

HIRIE — WITH NATTALI RIZE, PROJECT 432: THE WOMAN COMES FIRST FALL TOUR. 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Jamey Jet It’s a night of girl power at the Fox on Nov. 15. Pop reggae outfit HIRIE, fronted by Patricia Jetton, teams up with Australian-born social activist Nattali Rize for the Woman Comes First tour. The tour is named after a song the two artists collaborated on, and comes on the heels of HIRIE’s uplifting 2016 album release Wandering Soul. Tickets can be found at foxtheatre.com for $16-$18. —Sarah Farley

November 9 , 2017 29


events

EVENTS from Page 29

Thursday, November 9 Music Bill Taylor. 5 p.m. Sancho’s Authentic Mexican Restaurant, 6545 Gunpark Drive, Boulder. Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder. Boulder Solo Concert by Pianist Tamir Hendelman: Porter, Monk and Dizzy Tribute. 8 p.m. Boulder Piano Gallery, 3111 Walnut St., Boulder Cabinet + Billy Strings. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location

An Intimate Evening with Yanni: Piano and Intimate Conversation. 8 p.m. Buell Theatre, 1350 Curtis St., Denver.

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 9

Kevin Dooley & Friends. 6 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont.

MARC SMITH 8PM STUBBORN SON 9PM FRIDAY NOVEMBER 10

LEESAANN 8PM LEAH OSBORNE 9:30PM SATURDAY NOVEMBER 11 8PM

THE INDIE BOULDERQUERQUE SONGWRITING GROUP SUNDAY NOVEMBER 12

SUTHERLIN 8PM LOVELY BUDZ 9PM

MONDAY NOVEMBER 13 8PM “SO YOU’RE A POET” PRESENTS

OPEN POETRY READING

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 14 8PM

ESPRESSO!

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 15 8PM

JAZZETRY NIGHT! FEAT. VON DISCO

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16 8PM

BRAZIL NIGHT

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17 8PM

THE CONSTELLATION COLLECTIVE

Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 30 November 9 , 2017

John Statz, Paul Kimbiris, Hayward Williams. 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver.

LISTEN/HEAR 101 — Decoding Classical & Baroque, Broken Down. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver. SAVOR Showcase by RAW Artists Denver. 7 p.m. The Church, 1160 Lincoln St., Denver. Spafford. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Xanadu, Jr. 7 p.m. The Arts Hub Theatre, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette. Events After Love. 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Annual Meeting and Membership Celebration. 5 p.m. Plaza Convention Center, 1850 Industrial Circle, Longmont. Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show and Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Celebrating Life in Recovery. 7 p.m. Twin Peaks Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 9696 Paschal Drive, Louisville. The CU International Film Series Presents: The Road. 7:30 p.m. Muezinger Auditorium, CU Boulder, 1905 Colorado Ave., Boulder. Dina. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Reel Rock 12. 7:30 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver. Synergy Dance Collective. 7 p.m. Nevei Kodesh, 1925 Glenwood Drive, Boulder. Thanksgiving Food Drive. 9 a.m. Discover Health and Wellness Denver, 1231 S. Parker Road, Suite 100, Denver. Think & Drink with the Extinct: Jurassic Park Screening. 7 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Warren Miller’s Line of Decent. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Friday, November 10 Music Aerial Street View. 8 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. AudioMedz in Longmont. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Cantabile presents “Knowledge & Enlightenment.” 7:30 p.m. Stewart Auditorium at Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. Carmen Sandim Quartet. 7:30 p.m. King Center Recital Hall, 855 Lawrence Way, Denver. Cellar West Friday Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 10, Boulder. Crescendo 2017: The Joy Continues. 6 p.m. Cen-

CU BOULDER EVENTS Thursday, Nov. 9 Learning in Informal Settings.

Senior Student Recital: Andrew Iannuccillo, oboe.

Guest Master Class: Madeleine Mitchell, violin.

Lecture: Visceral Attachments: Secessionism, Populism, and the Excess of Democracy.

Senior Student Recital: Trevor Jargon, jazz bass.

StoryTalk.

3:30 p.m. CU Museum (Henderson Building), 1030 Broadway, Boulder. Seating is limited.

4 p.m. McKenna Languages, 1505 Pleasant St., Boulder.

Concert Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble II. 7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Friday, Nov. 10 Early Music Ensemble.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Senior Student Recital: Lane Melott, tenor.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Saturday, Nov. 11 Senior Student Recital: Keith Harnhart, classical guitar. 1 p.m. Boulder Pine Street Church, 1237 Pine St., Boulder.

Sunday, Nov. 12 Ekstrand Competition Finals.

2 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

4:30 p.m. Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

4:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, Room 1B03B, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

University Choir and University Singers: Songs of Love and Loss. 7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Monday, Nov. 13 Guest Master Class: Rita Sloan, piano.

4 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Chamber Brass.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Junior Student Recital: William Bond, clarinet.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Tuesday, Nov. 14 “Essentially a Mother:” Professor Jennifer S. Hendricks Lecture 5:30 p.m. Wolf Law, 2450 Kittredge Loop Road, Boulder.

ter for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette. David Booker Duo. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. Defunkt Railroad. 7 p.m. SKEYE Brewing, 900 S. Hover St., Suite D, Longmont. Desert Dwellers, Quixotic. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Disaster! 7:30 p.m. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Fireside Chat — with John Lockley. 6 p.m. Rainbow Medicine Circle, 1005 Apple Valley Road, Lyons.

6 p.m. Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

7 p.m. Eaton Humanities, Room 1B80, 1610 Pleasant St., Boulder.

Faculty Tuesdays: ClimateKeys.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Wednesday, Nov. 15 Oppidium cadavera: Assessing the Impact of Ancient Urbanism on Modern Europe and Beyond.

7 p.m. CU Museum (Henderson Building), Paleontology Hall, 1030 Broadway, Boulder.

Doctoral Student Recital: Jose Leon, trombone 7: 30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Junior Student Recital: Elisabeth Murphy, cello

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199), 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Symphonic Band: Tribute to the American Spirit. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

Nice Work Jazz Combo. 5 p.m. Hotel Boulderado, 2115 13th St., Boulder. Opening Exhibition & Live Music — Janelle DeBray & Veronique Van Pelt. 5 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont. Paradise Theatre & Dreamboat Annie. 7 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Purple Squirrel Trio. 9 p.m. License No. 1, 2115 13th St., Boulder.

Foxfeather. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons.

Trance Blues Festival Pre-Show (C.J. Chenier, Damon Fowler, Taz Niederauer). 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder.

Gypsy Jazz Review. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder.

Xanadu, Jr. 7 p.m. The Arts Hub Theatre, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette.

Integral Steps Presents Music & Movement. 1 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette.

You Knew Me When. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Jacob Banks. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Live Music. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company, 1501 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 20, Boulder. Lori’s Cuisine. 3:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Events After Love. 1:45 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

see EVENTS Page 32

Boulder Weekly


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BOULDER BALLET and BOULDER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA with the Boulder Children’s Chorale

Macky Auditorium, CU Boulder Fri Nov. 24 at 2PM | Sat Nov. 25 at 2PM & 7PM | Sun Nov. 26 at 2PM

Tickets: 303.449.1343 www.BoulderPhil.org/nutcracker Photography by Eli Akerstein Boulder Weekly

November 9 , 2017 31


events

EVENTS from Page 30

Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show and Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show Reception. 6 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Dina. 4 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Movies @ Meadows: Moana. 4 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder. Reel Rock 12. 7:30 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver.

Medea. 7 p.m. Denver’s Dangerous Theatre, 2620 W. Second Ave., Suite 1, Denver.

Giraffage. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

Movie Night: Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens. 6 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont.

Jackson Cloud Band. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont.

Nitro Fest. 6 p.m. Roosevelt Park, 700 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. Santa’s Wonderland. 10 a.m. Bass Pro Shops, 7970 Northfield Blvd., Denver. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder.

Kishi Bashi. 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Open Stage. 5 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons. Outlaw Yoga at Bootstrap Brewing. 10:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Warren Miller’s Line of Decent. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

theater

Saturday, November 11 Music Aerial Street View. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Beau Jest — presented by Cherry Creek Theatre Company. Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Through Dec. 10.

Boulder Chamber Orchestra Presents “Idyllic Mendelssohn.” 7:30 p.m. Boulder Seventh Day Adventist Church, 345 Mapleton Ave., Boulder. Desert Dwellers — with SuperSillyus, Moon Frog. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

The Rape of the Sabine Women — presented by Local Theater Company. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Nov. 19.

Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder.

Return to the Twilight Zone, a Parody — presented by Theater Company of Lafayette. The Mary Miller Theater, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. Through November 18.

Indie Boulderquerque Songwriting Group. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder.

Rock of Ages. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Nov. 11.

Jockamo. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Longmont Symphony: The American Frontier. 7:30 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont.

Body Of An American. Curious Theatre Company, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Dec. 9. A Doll House — A play by Henrik Ibsen. University of Colorado Boulder Theatre, 261 UCB, Boulder. Through Nov. 12.

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Francis and the Wolf. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder.

Live Music: Mike Stack. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder.

Boulder. Through Nov. 12

Siren Song: A Pirate’s Odyssey. Buntport Theatre, 717 Lipan St., Denver, 720-9461388. Through May 14, 2018. The lives of four Harvard intellectuals collide over race, sexual politics and arrogance in Smart People. No matter how hard they research, question and confront the issue, their own problems make it difficult to face the facts. See BW’s review on page 27.

Meadow Mountain. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons.

Becky’s New Car. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. Through Nov. 19.

Old’s Cool Rock. 11:30 a.m. Boulder Elks Lodge, 3975 28th St., Boulder.

Smart People. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Ricketson Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through Nov. 19. The Snowy Day. Conservatory Theatre, Denver Performing Arts Complex, 1345 Champa St., Denver. Through Nov. 18. A Year with Frog and Toad. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Dec. 19.

Birds of North America — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. Dairy Arts Center, Grace Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St.,

Rat’s WoodShack BBQ. 3 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Sutherlin. 5 p.m. Down Space, 820 Main St., Louisville. Trance Blues Festival. 10 a.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder.

Silent Movies: Soldier Man and A Charlie Chaplin Film. 7:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville.

Portland Modern Country Act Sutherlin Performing in Support of Debut LP. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder. Sunday Worship. 8 p.m. Mountain View United Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Place, Boulder.

Events

Starlight Market — A Holiday Pop-Up Shop for Families. 10 a.m. Skylight, 833 Santa Fe Drive, Denver.

2017 Boulder Balkan Bash. 5:30 p.m. Avalon Ballroom, 6185 Arapahoe Road, Boulder.

Urban Holiday Market. 11 a.m. Skyline Park, 16th Street Mall and Arapahoe St., Denver.

After Love. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Warren Miller’s Line of Decent. 3 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Boulder Mountain Handmade Market. 10 a.m. Boulder Elks Lodge, 3975 28th St., Boulder.

Sunday, November 12

Yolk’n Around. 12 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Music

Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show & Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont.

Events

Aerial Street View. 2 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Beau Jest. 2 p.m. Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver.

Bluegrass Pick. 12 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Boulder Comedy Show. 6 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder.

Boulder Chamber Singers Go. 3 p.m. Louisville Art Center, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville.

Boulder Mountain Handmade Market. 10 a.m. Boulder Elks Lodge, 3975 28th St., Boulder.

Broadway Boomers Concert. 3 p.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette.

see EVENTS Page 34

Wash Park & Ladies of the ’80s. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Xanadu, Jr. 2:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. The Arts Hub Theatre, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette.

Denver Film Festival. 12 a.m. Sie FilmCenter, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Denver Mac and Cheese Beerfest. 7 p.m. Vinyl Events Center, 1082 Broadway, Denver. Dina. 5:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

32 November 9 , 2017

Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Xanadu, Jr. 2:30 p.m. The Arts Hub Theatre, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette.

Boulder Weekly


Friday November 10

The PaNcakes & booze arT show saTurday November 11

PerPeTual Groove w/ skydyed & moNTu

Thursday November 16

shakewell & Nobide w/ chewy&bach & ParTyGoers

Friday November 17

everyoNe orchesTra FeaT claude colemaN Jr (weeN), michael Travis (sci), chuck Garvery (moe.), Joel cummiNs (umPhrey’s mcGee) mike remPel (loTus),

Thursday November 9 Grass For ThaT ass PreseNTs

The moves collecTive w/ heNry & The iNvisibles, moderN whiskey markeT

Friday November 10

homemade sPaceshiP

w/ FuNksTaTik, TruFeelz, PaNdasaywhaT & kiNGlooP3y

saTurday November 11

2Nd aNNual corduroy classic

FeaT aNders beck w/ scoTT hachey & casey russell (The maGic beaNs), emily clark (PassiNG FaNcy) & members oF emiNeNce eNsemble & TeNTh mouNTaiN divisioN

Tuesday November 14

The eleGaNT Plums

zdeNek Gubb (Twiddle),

w/ morsel & muscular housecaT

Josh schwarTz & shira elias (Turkuaz)

Thursday November 16 Grass For ThaT ass PreseNTs

& maTT bricker (euForquesTra) w/ rasTasaurus

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suNday November 19

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azTroGrizz & deoN wilsoN

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saTurday december 2

draGoN smoke FeaT roberT mercurio & sTaNToN moore (GalacTic), ivaN Neville (dumPsTaPhuNk) & eric liNdell w/ GreeN is beauTiFul – TribuTe To blue NoTe GuiTarisT GraNT GreeN FeaT eddie roberTs (New masTersouNds) & alaN evaNs (soulive)

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Boulder Weekly

November 9 , 2017 33


events A gathering place for...

arts

live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks

Artistry And Craftsmanship: Ruskin Pottery, Enamels, and Buttons. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19.

Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com

Britain’s Golden Age. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19.

BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, benefit, or wedding at Nissi’s – award winning cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting.

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Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday Nov 9th

A Benefit for Rocky Mountain Music Relief ft.

CISCO KIDS

“A Tribute to the band, War” FREE ADMISSION/Donations Accepted

Friday Nov 10th SPONSORED BY BOULDER WEEKLY

KELLI SAID

“80s Dance Party”

Susan France

Neo-Cubism: A New Perspective, now showing at the Dairy Arts Center, is an examination of perspective, perception and reality. Local artists Roger Reutimann and William Stoehr explore cubist themes in their works in order to get closer to what seminal cubists called “essential reality.” See more on page 23.

Canaletto: Masterwork Restored. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19. Common Ground. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 12. Depth & Detail: Carved Bamboo from China, Japan & Korea. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19. Elemental Forms. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2018. Faculty Exhibition: 2017. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through Dec. 23. From The Fire: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics from the Robert and Lisa Kessler Collection. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19.

Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19.

rary Art, 1750 13th St. Through Nov. 17.

Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Jan. 14.

Revealing A Mexican Masterpiece: The Virgin of Valvanera. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Feb. 2018.

Legacy —presented by Gallery 1261 and Denver Public Library. Denver Central Library, Level 7, Vida Ellison Gallery, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Dec. 31.

River Paintings Curated by Courtney Stell —Stephen Batura. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St.. Through Nov. 17. Sinner in Gingham. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St.. Through Jan. 21.

Lined Out — Ted Larsen. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St. Through Jan. 21.

Glitterati: Portraits & Jewelry from Colonial Latin America. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Nov. 19.

Neo-Cubism: A New Perspective — by Roger Reutimann & William Stoehr. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Dec. 3.

Grand Gestures: Dance, Drama, Masquerade. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave.

Out of India: Drawings and Photographs — Sherry Wiggins. Boulder Museum of Contempo-

Spiritual Dimensions. Dairy Arts Center, Polly Addison Gallery, MacMillan Family Lobby, and Hand-Rudy Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Dec. 3. Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through February 2018.

Saturday Nov 11th

FUNKIPHINO “Funk”

Tuesday Nov 14th

FACE

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BOURBON & BLUES WITH THE DELTA SONICS FREE ADMISSION

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SATISFACTION “Rolling Stones Tribute”

Friday / Saturday Nov 17th & 18th

THE LONG RUN “Eagles Tribute”

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SPINPHONY ELECTRIC STRINGS “Classical Pop Fusion”

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WINE & JAZZ WITH NELSON RANGELL “Contemporary Jazz”

Friday Nov 24th

THUMPIN’ “Dance / R&B”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

EVENTS from Page 32

Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show and Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. The Man in the White Suit. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Mmmwhah’s Sunday Art Workshop: Mandala Making. 4 p.m. Silver Sage, 1650 Yellow Pine Ave., Boulder. Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema Color + Sound. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Warren Miller’s Line of Decent. 2 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Monday, November 13

Xanadu, Jr. 6 p.m. The Arts Hub Theatre, 420 Courtney Way, Lafayette.

Music

Events

Amy Grant. 7:30 p.m. Bellco Theatre, 700 14th St., Denver.

Black & Blu — Comedy/Variety Show. 7 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 W. 38th Ave., Denver.

Bluegrass Pickers. 7 p.m. West Flanders Brewing, 1125 Pearl St., Boulder. Movment Mondays. 7:30 p.m. The Riverside, 1724 Broadway, Boulder. Open Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Blood Sweat and Beer — Documentary Showing. 6:30 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder.

Wylie Jones. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. see EVENTS Page 36

words

Wikimedia Commons/KCBalletMedia

Thursday, November 9

Hannah Lackoff. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Christia Madacsi Hoffman — Intent. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Saturday, November 11 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. RSVP to innisfreepoetry@gmail. com.

So, You’re a Poet: Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder. Tuesday, November 14

Monday, November 13

Helen Thorpe — The Newcomers. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

The Nobel Lecture Series Fall 2017 November Lecture. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

The Nutcracker Storytime with Boulder Ballet. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Join ballerinas from the Boulder Ballet Company on Saturday, Nov. 11 for a special storytime reading of The Nutcracker.

Wednesday, November 15 Jackson Crawford — The Saga of the Volsungs. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Lizzy Plotkin. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 34 November 9 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


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November 9 , 2017 35


events Boulder Weekly staff pick VOTED BEST BBQ

Hunger and Democracy: A Place at the Table film screening

Happy Hour

2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 11, St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 3700 Baseline Road, Boulder. Free.

3PM-6PM EVERYDAY

About 42.2 million Americans are food insecure. These are people who must often skip meals, eat less than normal, buy cheap and unhealthy options, or feed their children but not themselves. 45.5 million Americans currently rely on the Supplemental Assistance Program (formerly food stamps), which helps people feed their families. IMDb/Magnolia Pictures Many of the families who suffer from hunger and poverty live in areas where healthy, unprocessed food is not available or too expensive. The Women Voters of Boulder County want to open up the conversation about hunger and poverty with a screening and discussion of the film A Place at the Table, on Nov. 11. From the producers of Food, Inc., this 2012 documentary follows three Americans as they constantly struggle to find their next meal. The film also shows solutions to food insecurity in the United States and asks the public to decide the fate of our country’s hunger crisis. With 41,000 food insecure people living in Boulder County, this event is a great way to become educated about our country’s hunger crisis while understanding the implications for our own community. Return on Nov. 18 at 2:30 p.m. for a policy discussion about hunger in Boulder County with a panel of experts. —Eliza Radeka

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EVENTS from Page 34

Movie Night: Rogue One — A Star Wars Story. 7 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Secrets and Lies. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder. Tuesday, November 14 Music Andrea Taylor and Nate Dodge. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Bluegrass Jam. 6:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Boulder Phishin. 7 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway, Boulder. Espresso! Swing & Gypsy Jazz. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder.

FROM THE DIVIDE TO YOUR DOOR!

Hard Working Americans. 8 p.m. The Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Movie Night at eTown Hall – Stop Making Sense (Talking Heads). 6 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Tuesday Tapping and Live Music at Upslope. 6 p.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder. Events Broadway Cabaret Dance. 4 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder. International Film Series presents: Time to Die. 7:30 p.m. Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado Ave., Boulder.

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Major! 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Spicy Lounge Music and Dancing. 7:30 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder. Wednesday, November 15 Music

SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@boulderweekly.com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 Firest Ave., Suite C, Longmont. eTown Presents: Crystal Bowersox. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder. Hirie with Nattali Rize. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. MoJazz Duo. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont. Reggae Night. 9 p.m. Boulder House, 1109 Walnut St., Boulder. Ryan Wilcox. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Events 78/52: The Shower Scene. 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Lucky. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Mmmwhah’s Mmm: Music and Movement Meditation. 7 p.m. Alive Studio, 4593 Broadway, Boulder. A Rising Tide: Youth Scuba Diving Adventure. 6:30 p.m. Ocean First, 3015 Bluff St., Boulder.

Action Bronson — Blue Chips 7000 Tour. 8:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema Color + Sound. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Cut Copy. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Tap Dance Lessons. 7:15 p.m. Viriditas Studio, 4939 N. Broadway, Suite 65, Boulder.

Boulder Weekly


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Understandable by Jack Collom

Uppermost in almost anybody’s mind these days (Not to impute Platonic shape to space) Desire (as if it were a thing) will blaze Entre nous anew, prognosticating lace. Replace it. Better yet, reply. Take pen, then Slice its feather lengthwise. Do not wince; The barbules are OK. They won’t want then And now conflated (nor will we). But still Prince Northernmost can’t fly, due to the ice. “Destroy! Destroy!” He crackles an open-ended cry As crisp as cusp of “noumenon” and “nice” Because he’s fairly reached convergence on the fly. Look! The days of space do blaze like lace Embracing many circles, in any case.

Jack Collom (1931-2017) was a noted Boulder poet, who taught at Naropa University, where, in 1989, he offered what is believed to be the first ecology literature course in the United States. He authored 23 books and his nature writings and essays have been published worldwide. From the 1970s he taught in poets-in-the-schools programs throughout the U.S. and abroad. He was one of the great advocates for teaching poetry beyond the confines of the college classroom. Among his many prestigious honors are two National Endowment for the Arts Poetry Fellowships, the Colorado Book Award and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. “Understandable” from Collom’s book Burst Fivey and the Eggdroppers, Monkey Puzzle Press, 2013, is reprinted with permission from Jennifer Heath.

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Boulder Weekly


film

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• Acoustic & Electric Guitars • Ukuleles, Banjos & Mandolins • Band & Orchestra Rentals • Lessons & Workshops • Books & Accessories

Four to see from the second weekend of DFF by Michael J. Casey

B

ack for a second weekend, the 40th annual Denver Film Festival offers plenON THE BILL: 40th ty for moviegoers looking for something Annual Denver Film Festival. Through Nov. 12 old and something new. From the masMultiple locations terpieces of yesteryear — Withnail and I denverfilmfest.denver(Nov. 9), Under Childhood: The Films of Stan film.org Brakhage and Jane Wodening (Nov. 12), Breaking the Waves (Nov. 12) — to the future classics of tomorrow, DFF is the moviegoers’ place to be. “Doing the same thing day in and day out is tough, but that’s what you’ve got to do to make it work.” So sayeth Osamu Tomita, one of Japan’s greatest ramen chefs, a man who has slung noodles across his counter six days a week for the past ten years. On his days off, Wednesdays usually, Tomita travels around Tokyo sampling other ramen bowls, three typically, considering what each offers and what each lacks. He is a man of process and devotion, and documentarian Koki Shigeno captures Tomita’s pursuit of perfection and satisfaction with salivating precision in Ramen Heads (Nov. 9). Satisfying is the best way to describe the works of South Korean filmmaker Hong Sang-soo, who has two films at the fest: The Day After and On the Beach Alone at Night (Nov. 10-11). The latter centers on Young-hee (Kim Minhee), a popular actress who pushes against the patriarchy, stating simply, “I want to live in a way that suits me.” I, Tonya is the Shot in black and white and relying on social pyroclosing film at this year’s Dentechnics rather than physical explosions, On the Beach is ver Film Festival. a premier example of what engaging dialogue and simple camera compositions can achieve. There is nothing simple about Thirst Street (Nov. 10-11), but it just wouldn’t be DFF without a movie from Nathan Silver. Much like Hong, Silver has been refining his cinematic skills, finding a new gear in visual storytelling. Set in Paris, one lit by sleazy neon and photographed through hazy lenses, Thirst Street follows Gina (Lindsay Burdge) as she recovers from her husband’s suicide, falls in love with a nightclub bartender (Damien Bonnard) and is consumed by romantic obsession. Obsession doesn’t even begin to describe the life and times of figure skater Tonya Harding. Directed with delicious zeal by Craig Gillespie, I, Tonya (Nov. 11) draws from the confessional and completely contradictory first-person accounts of Harding’s rise to infamy — from her lower-class upbringing in Portland, Oregon, to her public demise at the 1994 Lillehammer Olympics. Everyone knows Harding’s relationship to Nancy Kerrigan but I, Tonya tells a much different story: one of class, a domineering mother (Allison Janney, simply spectacular) and the cyclical nature of abuse. And, as Harding (exquisitely played by Margot Robbie) points out, the American audience was just as complicit in that abuse: “I was loved for a minute, then I was hated. Then I became a punch line. It was like being abused all over again. And you were all my attackers.” I, Tonya is this year’s closing night film, one that will surely be remembered by the time the 80th Denver Film Festival rolls around. Boulder Weekly

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Nov

11

Nov

14

Nov

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Nov

Workshop and Performance:

Tranceblues Festival & Jam Workshop

Evening Performance with Otis Taylor the Visiting Artists & Select Participants.

Movie Night at eTown Hall

Stop Making Sense Pre-show Talking Heads Karaoke! Post-show Q & A with Producer, Sandy McLeod

eTown Presents:

Crystal Bowersox Singer-Songwriter and American Idol Runner-Up

eTown Presents:

The Real Deal Starring Texas Legends

16 Reverend Horton Heat & Dale Watson

Nov 18 Nov 29 dEc 3 dEc 9 12/11

iEmpathizE prEsENts: thE Empathy aNd impact BENEfit full coNcErt: Joshua davis suNday fuNday with maJi safi Group! full coNcErt: thE Barry shapiro BaNd moviE NiGht: tim BurtoN’s thE NiGhtmarE BEforE christmas

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Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org November 9 , 2017 39


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Boulder Weekly


Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Photos by staff

Truffle Burger

Larkburger 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, larkburger.com

A

Éclair

Old Fashioned Bavarian Bakery 613 Frontage Road, Longmont, 303-678-1014

I

Wisconsin Beef Melt

Mike O’Shays Restaurant & Ale House 512 Main St., Longmont mikeoshays.com

M

ike O’Shays has been a Longmont staple since 1981, and founder Mike Shea himself served us our food on a recent lunch outing, when the place was packed full. With everything from seafood to Irish fare on the menu it was hard to choose, but we went with the Wisconsin beef melt, intrigued by the tiger sauce — a mayonnaise and horseradish mixture. Slow roasted top-round roast beef is piled high with sautéed onions and mushrooms, held in place by melted Swiss cheese in between slices of lightly toasted marble rye. The tiger sauce was served on the side and we couldn’t help smothering each bite with the spicy horseradish mixture that burned the sinuses — in the best way possible — ever so slightly. $11.99.

n a world of cronuts and artisan cupcakes, the traditional ethnic bakery serves a vital purpose: providing classic pastries with no frills and big flavor. Longmont’s Old Fashioned Bavarian Bakery doles out a selection of European baked goods, and their éclair is something to marvel at. Two long choux dough wafers manage to feel air-light in the hand and butter rich on the tongue. It’s filled with an eggy custard, which is powerfully sweet and rich. All together, it makes for an understandably decadent bite. The dough, topped with a thin layer of chocolate, is crispy and retains structural integrity, while the filling is something worth striving for on each bite. $2.

h, Larkburger. Colorado’s answer to the Five Guys vs. In-N-Out vs. Shake Shack debate. Now, we might be the only ones inserting Larkburger into the conversation, but, objectively, it stacks up against those burger titans. It starts with a whopping black angus beef patty. The cooks in back seer it perfectly, and it’s just so thick and juicy that it shames other, thinner burger styles. The truffle burger, in addition to the traditional burger toppings, adds a truffle aioli, which is, importantly, not too overpowering. It smells stronger of truffle than it tastes, and it adds the ideal amount of umami — just enough to indulge but not enough to make you sick. With a chewy, glossy bun and a side of shoestring fries, we’d like to submit Larkburger into the next dumb debate you have with your East/West Coast friends about burgers. $7.69.

Empanadas

Rincon Argentino 2525 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, rinconargentinoboulder.com

I

f you haven’t yet sipped yerba mate and chowed down on empanadas at Boulder’s Rincon Argentina then, seriously, what are you doing? Their stuffed hand pies are expertly crafted, robustly flavored treats. They come in a variety of traditional Argentinean styles, with various combinations of meat, cheese, vegetables and herbs. The “tradicional” is packed with chopped steak, onions, red bell pepper, green olives and spices. The steak is tender, and the green olives and onions perk up each bite. The “criolla” empanada is a star, with powerfully spicy ground beef, sweet caramelized onions, robust olives and a tasteful application of spices. And the “hongos” — crimini, shitake and oyster mushrooms — is earthy, funky and a solid change of pace. Served beside cool salsa verde and garlicky chimichurri, it’s easy to pack away three and want many more. $3.65 each.

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Boulder Weekly


ethics ‘ethnic’ The

of

Stroll your cart down the Caucasian foods aisle

C

an you tell me which aisle has the Anglo foods?” I asked the clerk at a Boulder supermarket information desk. “I want to cook some Caucasian food for my family tonight. We want to enjoy the familiar flavors, aromas and brands of food from our native culture,” I said. The clerk wrinkled her nose at me and said,

shopping in Boulder has to ask that question. The whole supermarket is filled with “Caucasian” food. Nobody ever says: “Let’s go grab a cheap meal at that Caucasian place on 28th Street.” There are no cookbook shelves labelled “Anglo” at Barnes & Noble. What is true is that you’ll find an “Ethnic Foods” aisle or maybe “Global Flavors” or “International Fare” at Boulder supermarkets and natural food stores. There you will find the Asian essentials like toasted sesame oil, Indian curries and Middle Eastern ingredients like couscous. Usually there is a quasi-religious separation between the “Jewish” food, including matzoh and short candles, and the larger “Latino/Hispanic/Mexican” shelves with dried chilies and tall Catholic-themed candles. What does putting the word “ethnic” in front of “restaurant,” “market” or “recipe” really mean? “Ethnic” is food eaten by people who

nibbles BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

“I’ll have to check with my manager.” That’s how my totally imaginary supermarket conversation went. In real life, nobody Boulder Weekly

may not look like “us.” Their skin may be darker. Their names might be less Anglo. “Ethnic” means we expect lots of food that costs less. You won’t find French, Dutch, English or real Italian food and ingredients in that part of the store. More likely you’ll need to visit the “Gourmet Foods” area or the general vicinity of the upscale cheeses. Gourmet foods are expensive and in small portions. What you won’t typically find in the ethnic food aisle are hot dogs, spaghetti or even bagels shelved with the white bread and pita pockets. Successful waves of immigrants arrived at the shores of Ellis Island with exotic fare that initially was found in certain communities in small stores. Eventually, certain foods, like the current favorite, hummus, get homogenized in the U.S. food blender and come out just “food” and part of the American menu. At local “ethnic food stores,” the items on see NIBBLES Page 44

November 9 , 2017 43


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the shelf are usually organized by country except for rice, which everyone buys. H Mart, the huge Asian supermarket in Broomfield, has an aisle offering “Korean Snack, American Snack, Euro Snack, Chinese Snack.” Ethnic is in the eye of the beholder. Our collective cultural chutzpah is so severe that we sell Starbucks espresso to Italians, McDonald’s French fries to the French and Taco Bell burritos to Mexicans in Mexico. Our cringeworthy mispronunciations and inappropriate use of chopsticks are legendary among “ethnic” people. We do such bizarre things to foreign dishes when we Americanize them — see “sweet and sour pork” — that the original cultures now consider them “ethnic” foods from America. On U.S. restaurant menus you still see “Oriental Dressing” on an “Asian Salad.” What nation do these Asians and Orientals hail from? Either way, the American-devised salad includes mandarin orange segments and crispy fried noodles. Whether by immigration or invasion, the process has gone on for thousands of years around the globe. Critics have harshly criticized white chefs and food experts who have made a living from other cultures’ food, but Oklahoma-born chef Rick Bayless has done the most to introduce most of America to real regional Mexican dishes through his eateries, books and TV shows. Anglo writer Diana Kennedy is among the best known experts on regional Mexican (non-Taco Bell) fare. Are we better or worse off for their efforts? Surveys show that U.S. consumers — especially millennials — are rapidly developing a taste for tikka masala, poblano chilies, fish sauce and lapsang souchong tea. Other less familiar dishes and ingredients like galangal, mole negro and mammee may be next to show up on non-ethnic menus. Increasingly popular Muslim-approved “Halal” meats are showing up next to Jewish-approved “Kosher” meats in meat counters. Is it appreciation or cultural appropriation and exploitation? Our appetite for culinary assimilation remains unabated. I can certainly be accused of international dabbling, but what better way is there to bridge cultural and religious divides than through food and breaking bread? (Send your comments to nibbles@ boulderweekly.com

On the Boulder menu, circa 1914 “Japanese Salad: Cut large selected

bananas in halves crosswise and cut section from skins leaving the cases in good shape. Remove bananas, cut in slices then cut slices in cubes. To cubes, add an equal quantity of canned pears and marinate with a French dressing. Fill skin with mixture, arrange each on a lettuce leaf, and garnish with three slices of banana overlapping each other. Nut on top.” — From The Hostess (A practical and useful book of menus and receipts especially arranged for afternoon and evening parties),” published in 1914 by Eva Tanner, 1309 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

Local food news

The Pupusa Festival Saturday, Nov. 11 at the Village Exchange in Aurora offers a taste of El Salvadoran cuisine including diverse pupusas with salsa and curtido, a spicy cabbage slaw. ... Aloy Thai Cuisine in Boulder and Denver will be featured on Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives at 7 p.m. on Nov. 17. ... The Post Brewing Company is now open at 2027 13th St. in the space formerly home to Shine, Las Oasis, Boulder Draft House and Redfish. ... Boulder’s Oasis Brewing, one of the first craft brewers in the area, will be reborn in an old church at 3257 N. Lowell Blvd. in Denver next spring serving classics like Oasis Red Scarab Ale.

Taste of the week

I was pleased to rediscover Denver’s Taste of Thailand at its new location, 2120 Broadway, and thrilled to find the fare as excellent and exciting as it was years ago when I reviewed it for the Rocky Mountain News. The Flu Shot Soup is still invigorating and the menu includes specials using Pueblo chilies and Palisade peaches. I loved the grilled northern Thai sausage lettuce wraps with strips of jalapeno, ginger and red onion with a sweet dipping sauce, as well as the spicy yum salad with salmon.

Words to chew on

“In Denver 10 years ago, people weren’t quite ready for squid guts and different types of chicken such as skin and heart. They said they wanted to have it, but when you offered it, they wouldn’t order it. We did the market research. People said they were ready, but they weren’t.” — Yasu Kizaki, owner of Denver’s Sushi Den in Nation’s Restaurant News. John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles, 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org). Podcasts: kgnu.org/category/radio-nibbles Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Weekly


All photos by Susan France

Around the world in 800 dishes

Passport’s Roy and Kat Brown on the global trip that inspired their food truck’s menu by Matt Cortina

R

oy and Kat Brown had an interesting honeymoon. Instead of lounging on some exotic beach or viewing fine art in Europe’s storied museums, the Browns quit their jobs and went on an indefinite trip around the globe. They had no deadline to return nor any real accommodations booked. But they did have a hefty chunk of savings. And they had one credo that would guide them through the world: eat everything. Nearly 100 cities, 30 countries and eight and a half months later, the Browns returned to Boulder with memories of hundreds of dishes they’d eaten from Thailand to Iceland.

community

TABLE They almost didn’t make it back. “We were pretty confident we were going to come back,” Roy says. “But we fell in love with a couple spots, and there were just times when we were trying to figure out how to move to Thailand. It’s just not easy ... but we definitely flirted with the idea for a while.” Luckily for us, they returned, and shortly thereafter launched the Passport food truck with the mission of sharing the dishes they tried elsewhere with the Colorado community — if they couldn’t live abroad, they’d bring the fruits of the world to the Front Range. Like most love stories, the couple’s relationship began hands-deep in fish. Roy was training Kat, who had just finished culinary school, on the fish station at Flagstaff House. Kat, as it turned out, would pick up Roy at the bottom of the hill every day and drive him up to the restaurant. Sparks flew somewhere within this arrangement, and when Roy moved onto The Kitchen a year later, Kat followed a couple months after. And right before they got married, they quit the restaurant and prepared for their wedding and honeymoon. In bizarre, meaningless symmetry, the Brown’s culinary trip around the globe began hands-deep in Boulder Weekly

fish, too — a trip to see the best that the food world has to offer can’t really start in a better place than Tokyo’s iconic Tsukiji fish market. “We got there at four in the morning only to discover that that’s actually too late,” Roy says. So what, they missed the big entertaining auction of fresh seafood. What they got instead, on only day two of the trip, was one of the highlights of their journey — a steaming bowl of ramen on a frigid January day, loaded with pork and rich broth. It was the start of what became a common theme throughout their trip: no matter the circumstances, good food can salvage most situations. Like the time in Thailand when the two and a couple of friends sat on a covered raft in the middle of a lake during a downpour, but ate and drank throughout the afternoon. Kat remembers a mashed papaya and carrot salad with a fish sauce so fresh that whole fish heads were hanging out of the sauce’s jar. Or when, later in the trip, they realized that to drive north to south through Croatia means you have to drive 20 miles through Bosnia.

“This is so bad, but we got to the border and From their food they’re like, ‘You need truck, Roy and Kat Brown serve a your passport.’ And we’re global menu inlike, ‘Where are we?’” spired by their epic worldwide trip. Kat says. “I didn’t want to ask the guy, ‘Where are we,’ so we looked at the sticker when we left and said, ‘Oh, we’re in Bosnia.’ We stopped and had lunch,’” Roy says. The wrong turns on trips tend to make the best memories. And sometimes the things you do intentionally make for bad outcomes. Sometimes that involves eating guts at a restaurant in Lyon, France. “I had a five-organ stew,” Kat says. “Hearts and brains and kidney and liver and something else. Normally I’m OK with [offal] one by one, but when it’s a whole thing... mentally for me, I couldn’t eat that much innards.” see PASSPORT Page 48

November 9 , 2017 47


PASSPORT from Page 47

“The capper for me was I had tripe. The husband-wife So it was tripe in a team says their truck’s kitchen is cream mustard sauce larger than most and the flavor was brick and mortar kitchens. amazing, but it was wrapped in another piece of tripe, and you’d cut it open and the intestines would pour out of it. Again, the flavor was amazing, but I could do about three bites and it was quite literally, ‘I’m eating intestines as they’re coming out of more intestines.’

The server was like, ‘Can I get you anything else?’ and I said, ‘No, you did it perfectly. I chose that.’” Viewing food as an opportunity for adventure is something both Roy and Kat grew up with. Roy’s family had a rule where each person had to cook dinner one day a week. Slowly that grew to five days a week when his sister went off to college and Roy tired of his father’s “horrible” cooking, providing Roy the chance to test the boundaries of his culinary skills. Kat had an aunt who went to culinary school, so she’d teach Kat and her relatives how to make any dish they chose — fittingly, Kat often chose “the weirdest, most outrageous thing from a different country and she’d teach us how to do it.” In order to pull off such adventures as adults, the Browns had to have some core foundation that enabled them to adapt to new, sometimes stressful situations on the fly. It’s likely something Roy and Kat learned to do in the kitchen. And now their travels abroad have likely prepared them for the new stressors of operating a business and working in a mobile kitchen together. “We work better together than apart,” Kat says. “That sounds super cheesy, but we work really well together, you know. I think just like normal people we do argue in the kitchen but that’s just because it’s a kitchen and that’s what you do.” “We spend 90 percent of every single day together,” Roy says. “Not sick of each other at all,” Kat adds. “There’s definitely days where one’s pissed off at the other and it may follow into work, but for the most part work is work. We may yell at each other in the heat of the moment trying to get things done, but we have a standing rule that that doesn’t carry over,” Roy says. “Home is home. Work is work,” Kat says. Already after three months in business, Passport is profitable. The menu, true to the couple’s mission, spans the globe with dishes ranging from langos, a Hungarian fried bread and meat pie, to plaa lat phrik, a Thai red snapper and jasmine rice dish, to Indian pani puri, a light fried snack with flavorful chutney. The menu changes daily, and the Browns source their food from local farms, groceries and ethnic markets. But what doesn’t change is the motivation for Roy and Kat to keep Restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other offer. Minimum of four paying customers to bringing a world of food to Boulder receive this offer. Restrictions may apply. Valid only at the Louisville, CO location. Valid via a humble truck. Eat there enough, November 1 -30, 2017. and it’ll be like you were on the trip with them. RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

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Boulder Weekly


drink

COLORADO’S FIRST CRAFT BREWERY

Coming to Town: Left Hand’s Nitro Fest Not just another beer festival by Michael J. Casey

R

ON TAP: Left Hand

Brewing’s Fourth Annual esidents of the Centennial State certainNitro Fest. Saturday, Nov. ly are lucky: 300 days of sunshine, 11 from 6-10 p.m. at romantic spring and falls, and more beer Roosevelt Park in Longmont. Tickets start at festivals than you can shake a stick at. $75; visit lefthandnitro. Some are big, some are small, but few com/nitro-fest for more are like Left Hand Brewing Co.’s annual celebradetails. tion of nitrogenated beers: Nitro Fest. “Our closing event is by far our sexiest event of the year,” says Left Hand’s Community and Events Manager Joshua Goldberg. Back for a fourth year and featuring a costume contest, circus acts, music by Lotus and beer from over 40 breweries — including breweries from Japan, China and South Korea — Nitro Fest isn’t just the world’s only nitro-exclusive beer festival, it’s also one of the most creative beer fests around. “What we’re doing is creating a new experience,” Goldberg told Boulder Weekly at last year’s Nitro Fest. “We’re Susan France creating not just another beer fest, we’re creating a whole experience that starts with the glass when it’s handed to you, is conveyed in the beer, is conveyed in the music, is conveyed in the aerial circus performances going on, is conveyed in every step of the way.” Left Hand’s relationship with nitrogenated beers goes back roughly 10 years, when they started offering their Milk Stout Nitro on draft. In 2011, Left Hand stuck that stout in a bottle, and recently they worked with the Ball Corporation to develop a widget that would allow them to can their Milk Stout Nitro. With these innovations, Left Hand has been leading the nitro beer charge, with Nitro Fest at the nexus. “Nitro education and nitro exposure are really where Nitro Fest shines,” Goldberg explains, pointing out that many of the breweries attending Nitro Fest don’t often infuse nitrogen into their beers. “Some maybe dabble with it in their tasting room but never go out to market with it,” Goldberg continues. “We’re breaking down the walls of their tasting room and bringing them to Longmont.” Take Epic’s Brainless Raspberries Belgian Style Ale, which can commonly be found in bottles and on draft with the standard carbonation. Served on nitro, Brainless rounds out and softens, the sourness of the raspberry candied. Same for Liquid Mechanics’ Peanut Butter Porter; an interesting and experimental beer suddenly transforms into a full-blown dessert thanks to the nitrogen. And it doesn’t stop at dessert; nitro turns Jim’s English Bitter from Sanitas into the perfect aperitif; 4 Noses’ Cinnamon Stout Crunch into a full-bodied, malty breakfast; and Freemont’s English Barleywine aged in Heaven Hill bourbon barrels into something to be sipped slowly beside a winter fire. From barleywines to bitters, from Colorado to Japan, Nitro Fest is anything but the same old, same old. “If you’re expecting 70 IPAs, Nitro Fest isn’t the right event for you,” Goldberg says. “But if you’re looking for fun, wild interpretations of nitro beers, along with this magical circus music experience, then it is worth the trip.”

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astrology

either of you feels bereft. 4. Write messages to your Future Self or Past Self. 5. Communicate with animals.

ARIES

CANCER

Guillen got engaged to be married when they were both 15 years old. But they kept delaying a more complete unification for 67 years. At last, when they were 82, they celebrated their wedding and pledged their vows to each other. Are there comparable situations in your life, Aries? The coming months will be a favorable time to make deeper commitments. At least some of your reasons for harboring ambivalence will become irrelevant. You’ll grow in your ability to thrive on the creative challenges that come from intriguing collaborations and highly focused togetherness.

“Things to say when in love,” according to Zimbabwe poet Tapiwa Mugabe: “I will put the LIBRA galaxy in your hair. Your Go to RealAstrology.com to check out SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: The kisses are a mouthful of Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO drive for absolute perfecfirewater. I have never seen HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE tion could undermine your a more beautiful horizon HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes ability to create what’s very than when you close your are also available by phone at good and just right. Please eyes. I have never seen a 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. don’t make that mistake more beautiful dawn than in the coming weeks. when you open your eyes.” I Likewise, refrain from hope these words inspire you to improvise further outpourdemanding utter purity, pristine precision, or immaculate ings of adoration. You’re in a phase when expressing your virtue. To learn the lessons you need to know and launch the sweet reverence and tender respect for the people you care trends you can capitalize on in 2018, all that’s necessary is to about will boost you physical health, your emotional wealth, give your best. You don’t have to hit the bull’s eye with every and your spiritual resiience. arrow you shoot — or even *any* arrow you shoot. Simply hitting the target will be fine in the early going. LEO

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Adriana Martinez and Octavio

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I had pimples when I was a teenager. They’re gone now, although I still have a few pockmarks on my face as souvenirs. In retrospect, I feel gratitude for them. They ensured that in my early years of dating and seeking romance, I would never be able to attract women solely on the basis of my physical appearance. I was compelled to cultivate a wide variety of masculine wiles. I swear that at least half of my motivation to get smarter and become a good listener came from my desire for love. Do you have comparable stories to tell, Taurus? Now is an excellent time to give thanks for what once may have seemed to be a liability or problem.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: The next two weeks will be one of the

best times ever to ask provocative, probing questions. In fact, I invite you to be as curious and receptive as you’ve been since you were four years old. When you talk with people, express curiosity more often than you make assertions. Be focused on finding out what you’ve been missing, what you’ve been numb to. When you wake up each morning, use a felt-tip marker to draw a question mark on your forearm. To get you in the mood for this fun project, here are sample queries from poet Pablo Neruda’s Book of Questions: “Who ordered me to tear down the doors of my own pride? Did I finally find myself in the place where they lost me? Whom can I ask what I came to make happen in this world? Is it true our desires must be watered with dew? What did the rubies say standing before the juice of the pomegranates?”

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JUNE

21-JULY

22:

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Are you working on solving the right

problem? Or are you being distracted by a lesser dilemma, perhaps consumed in dealing with an issue that’s mostly irrelevant to your long-term goals? I honestly don’t know the answers to those questions, but I am quite sure it’s important that you meditate on them. Everything good that can unfold for you in 2018 will require you to focus on what matters most -- and not get sidetracked by peripheral issues or vague wishes. Now is an excellent time to set your unshakable intentions.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Every one of us experiences loneli-

ness. We all go through periods when we feel isolated and misunderstood and unappreciated. That’s the bad news, Virgo. The good news is that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to make loneliness less of a problem. I urge you to brainstorm and meditate about how to do that. Here are some crazy ideas to get you started. 1. Nurture ongoing connections with the spirits of beloved people who have died. 2. Imagine having conversations with your guardian angel or spirit guide. 3. Make a deal with a “partner in loneliness”: a person you pray or sing with whenever

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Remember the time, all those years

ago, when the angels appeared to you on the playground and showed you how and why to kiss the sky? I predict that a comparable visitation will arrive soon. And do you recall the dreamy sequence in adolescence when you first plumbed the sublime mysteries of sex? You’re as ripe as you were then, primed to unlock more of nature’s wild secrets. Maybe at no other time in many years, in fact, have you been in quite so favorable a position to explore paradise right here on earth.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: As a courtesy to your mental health, I minimize your exposure to meaningless trivia. In fact, I generally try to keep you focused instead on enlightening explorations. But in this horoscope, in accordance with astrological omens, I’m giving you a temporary, short-term license to go slumming. What shenanigans is your ex up to lately, anyway? Would your old friend the bankrupt coke addict like to party with you? Just for laughs, should you revisit the dead-end fantasy that always makes you crazy? There is a good possibility that exposing yourself to bad

influences like those I just named could have a tonic effect on you, Sagittarius. You might get so thoroughly disgusted by them that you’ll never again allow them to corrupt your devotion to the righteous groove, to the path with heart.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: In the coming months it will be crucial

to carefully monitor the effects you’re having on the world. Your personal actions will rarely be merely personal; they may have consequences for people you don’t know as well as those you’re close to. The ripples you send out in all directions won’t always look dramatic, but you shouldn’t let that delude you about the influence you’re having. If I had to give 2018 a title with you in mind, it might be “The Year of Maximum Social Impact.” And it all starts soon.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: The punk ethic is rebellious. It trans-

gresses conventional wisdom through “a cynical absurdity that’s redeemed by being hilarious.” So says author Brian Doherty. In the hippie approach, on the other hand, the prevailing belief is “love is all you need.” It seeks a “manic togetherness and all-encompassing acceptance that are all sweet and no sour — inspiring but also soft and gelatinous.” Ah, but what happens when punk and hippie merge? Doherty says that each moderates the extreme of the other, yielding a tough-minded lust for life that’s both skeptical and celebratory. I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because the punk-plus-hippie blend is a perfect attitude for you to cultivate in the coming weeks.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: I’m falling in love with the way

you have been falling in love with exciting possibilities that you once thought were impossible. Oh, baby. Please go further. Thrilling chills surge through me whenever you get that ravenous glint in your mind’s eye. I can almost hear you thinking, “Maybe those dreams aren’t so impossible, after all. Maybe I can heal myself and change myself enough to pursue them in earnest. Maybe I can learn success strategies that were previously beyond my power to imagine.”

November 9 , 2017 53


Dear Dan: I’m a 31-year-old gay man who looks 45. Most men interested in me are surprisingly up-front about expressing their desire to include a father-son element. Even men older than me call me “daddy” unprompted. I try not to be judgmental, but this repulses me. People who are into other forms of out-of-the-mainstream sex approach their kinks respectfully and establish mutual interest and obtain consent in advance. Why aren’t I given the same consideration when it comes to incest role-play? © Rachel Robinson And where does this come from? Were all these men molested by their fathers? — Desperately Avoiding Discussing Disgusting Incest Dear Daddi: Whoa, DADDI. Just as gay men who call themselves or their partners “boy” don’t mean “minor” and aren’t fantasizing about child rape, gay men who call themselves or their partners “daddy” don’t mean “biological father” and aren’t fantasizing about father-son incest. Daddy is an honorific that eroticizes a perceived age and/or experience gap; it’s about authority and sexual dominance, not paternity and incestuous deviance. If being called “daddy” turns you off, you should say

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SAVAGE by Dan Savage

Love

so, and your partners should immediately knock that “daddy” shit off. But you shouldn’t assume every gay guy who calls you “daddy” is into incest and/or was molested by his bio dad, because 99.999 percent of the time that’s just not going to be true. Think about it this way, DADDI: When a straight woman calls her man “baby,” no one thinks, “OMG! She’s into raping babies!” When a straight guy says he picked up a “hot girl,” no one thinks he’s talking about a sexy fourth grader. When Vice President Mike Pence calls his wife “mommy,” no one thinks… well, Pence might be a bad example. (That man is clearly a freak.) But my point still stands: Pet names— used casually or during sex—aren’t to be taken literally.

attractive but also very high maintenance. (She has OCD.) I pay her $300 per anal sex event; I help with bills, food, etc.; and I spend every weekend with her. I probably spend $15,000 a year on her. I’m happy most of the time (the sex is great), but does this arrangement sound fair? — Daddy Asking Dan

Dear Dan: I have a sugar baby who is a mature post-op trans woman. She is very

Dear Dan: I’m a 30-year-old woman who has always been more attracted to older

Dear Dan: Divide the money you’re spending annually ($15,000) by the number of weeks in the year (52), DAD, and your anal-sex-event-packed weekends are only costing you $288.46 a pop. Seeing as most sex workers charge 10 to 20 times as much for a full weekend, I’d say you aren’t spending too much. (If this arrangement is unfair to anyone, DAD, it’s unfair to your sugar baby.) Now, if you’re only pulling in 30K a year, spending half your pretax wages on a sugar baby is unsustainable. But if that 15K represents a small percentage of your annual income, DAD, you should give your sugar baby a raise.

men. I was with a guy last year who liked to be called “Daddy,” which was hard because he was six years younger. But now I’m secretly sleeping with someone who’s 34 years older than me. It’s not just sex—we have so much in common and we’re falling in love. I don’t know how long I can handle being a secret, but I don’t know if I can come out of hiding because of the age difference. He’s not as ashamed and would be more open if I wanted to be. Thoughts? — Ashamed Sex Has All My Emotional Damage Dear Ashamed: You haven’t been with This Old Dad long enough to determine if you have a future together, ASHAMED, so you can kick the coming-out can down the road another six months. If it turns out you two are emotionally compatible as well as sexually compatible, and you decide to make a life together, then you’ll have to go public. And if you find yourself worrying about being judged due to the age difference, just think of all the homos out there who went public despite their partners’ genital similarities. If we could stare down disapproving family members and small-town prudes, ASHAMED, so can you. On the Lovecast, sex and weed with David Schmader!: savagelovecast.com. Send questions to mail @savagelove.net

November 9 , 2017 55


EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

Five years of Amendment 64

O

n Monday, Nov. 6, hundreds of showed me a picture of a bust of an illegal grow in Colorado’s cannabis A-listers (and Pueblo, near where she lived, and looked sincerely worbeyond) filtered into Denver’s Ritzried as she wondered about how all of it would affect Carlton hotel. In came cannabis law- the children. yers Brian Vicente and Christian But, rather than detracting from the commemoraSederberg, gubernatorial candidate Tom Tancredo, tive event, the protest almost served to complete it. The state congressman Jonathan Singer, powerhouse passing of Amendment 64 and the legalizations that industry leaders like Pepe Breton and Wanda James, have come since owe to an age-old story of confronting lobbyists like Mason and overcoming numerSarah Haas Tvert and Rob Kampia, ous and vociferous critand on and on. ics. The night laid out The invitation to the like a living history of Marijuana Policy Project how various campaigns (MPP)-sponsored party and groups were able to had said business casual, do just that, to assuage but most looked fancier fear, or redirect it toward than that, dressed to dine logic or, if not that, then on steak under the ballat least to drive home the room’s crystal chandetalking points most likely to sway the minds of liers. They were, after all, voters. there to celebrate an At the event, Rob important anniversary — Kampia, MPP founder, it had been five years to Rob Kampia, MPP founder, speaks at the Ritz-Carlton on recounted his story of the day since Colorado Monday night. being in jail for cultivavoters said “yes” to tion, way back in 1989. On Nov. 9 of that year he Amendment 64 and changed the state’s constitution to allow for the personal use and regulated cultivation and watched the news as the Berlin Wall fell and, listening to the commentators talk about freedom, he recounted sale of adult-use marijuana. how poignantly he saw the cage around him, how ironAlso there to commemorate the event was a sparse band of protestors from Denver’s Marijuana ic his incarceration suddenly felt. For him, MPP was a Accountability Organization (not to be confused with project in pursuit of freedom but, when it came time to Smart Approaches to Marijuana’s Marijuana launch the organization’s first legalization campaigns, Accountability Project), greeting attendees with freedom just didn’t sell. hearty chants of, “Where’s your conscious?” followed What he realized is that each and every one of us by pleas to “think of the children!” had our reasons to be for or against marijuana, but When I went to talk to the group, Dr. Karen when a friend asked him if he cared why marijuana Randall was eager to field my questions and tell me was legalized, Kampia replied, “No.” about all the ways legalization hasn’t been a success, “I care that it’s legalized, no matter the reason, as a list that includes what the group sees as correlated long as it’s reasonable and ethical,” he told the crowd. increases in homelessness, opioid and meth use, vioThe event offered a rare visualization of the stakelence, environmental hazards and metal illness. She holder networks that created the landscape of legal can-

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nabis, from lobbies to politics to industry, and as speakers and panelists took the stage, the breadth of the spectrum of motivations was elucidated. But also evident was how the motivations have evolved. Prior to recreational legalization, legal marijuana started with medical justifications, starting with patient’s rights and branching out naturally to home cultivation and then to state-sanctioned caregivers, which became medical dispensaries. From there legalization became an organized effort to label legal marijuana as “safer;” safer than alcohol and safer than an unregulated market. Of course, there were other reasons Coloradans chose to legalize, notably social justice concerns and arguments for the government’s fiscal responsibility. But no matter how affective these arguments, emotionally or rationally, they don’t do much to change the minds of anti-legalization or middle-of-the-road voters. Interestingly and unexpectedly, it is the children that the protestors told attendees to think about that have proven most effective in launching new legalization efforts, especially medical, across the country. Republicans once staunchly opposed to legalization are reaching across the aisle to bring medical programs to children with epilepsy. And once these programs are in place, these legislators are much more likely to reach across the aisle again. “I remember when we first started this, we never would have let a kid anywhere near a microphone to advocate for legal marijuana,” Kampia said in his speech. “But now, it’s moms that are bringing kids to the mics... and it’s working. But while kids (and vets) might be winning it now, it might not be our favorite argument in the future.” He didn’t say or hint at what the argument might become, but the subtle undercurrent to the MPP anniversary celebration was a return to social justice and fiscal responsibility. As the organization sets its eyes on paving the road to the repeal of federal prohibition, it seems the “why” is starting to matter as much as the “how.”

November 9 , 2017 57


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cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Feds bust drug dealer who hates pot

J

ohn N. Kapoor is a drug dealer. He deals in opiods, the drugs that are currently killing more than 100 Americans a day. He also opposes legalizing marijuana — and gave half a million dollars to the campaign that defeated a marijuana legalization initiative in Arizona last year. Kapoor, 74, isn’t your run-of-the-mill street dealer, or even your run-ofSusan France the-mill South Asian opium lord. Not even close. When the feds caught up with him a couple weeks ago, he promptly posted a $1 million bail bond without batting an eyelash. Drug dealing has been very good to him. Now for the rest of the story. Kapoor is the founder and majority owner of Chandler, Arizona-based Insys Therapeutics Inc. On October 26 he was arrested in Phoenix and charged “with leading a nationwide conspiracy to profit by using bribes and fraud to cause the illegal distribution of a fentanyl spray intended for cancer patients,” according to a press release put out by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts. The charges filed against him and six other former Insys executives include RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Practices Act) conspiracy, conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, and conspiracy to violate the Anti-Kickback Law, the release said. The group “conspired to bribe practitioners in

Boulder Weekly

various states, many of whom operated pain clinics, in order to get them to prescribe a fentanyl-based pain medication,” the release said. The medication, called “Subsys,” is “a powerful narcotic intended to treat cancer patients suffering intense breakthrough pain,” it added. “In exchange for bribes and kickbacks, the practioners wrote large numbers of prescriptions for patients, most of whom were not diagnosed with cancer.” Subsys is a fentanyl preparation administered in spray form. It was approved by the FDA in 2012. In order to get doctors to prescribe it, the Insys executives created a speaker program intended to raise awareness of the benefits of fentanyl at “educational lunches and dinners.” They paid docs who wrote fentanyl prescriptions to lecture about fentanyl’s use at the events. According to the indictment, Alec Burlakoff, Insys’ southeast regional sales manager, at one point told sales reps that “the key to sales was using the speaker program to pay practioners to prescribe fentanyl spray.” Burlakoff told one sales rep in a text obtained by the government that the practitioners “don’t need to be good speakers, they need to write a lot of (prescriptions).” According to the Phoenix New Times, Insys “even made a video featuring a sales rep dressed as a giant

fentanyl spray bottle, rapping and dancing to a song that pushed the idea of getting doctors to prescribe high doses” of Subsys. The indictment also alleges that Kapoor and the others “conspired to mislead and defraud health insurance providers who were reluctant to approve payment for the drug when it was prescribed for non-cancer patients.” They did this by setting up a “reimbursement unit” that was dedicated to obtaining prior authorization directly from insurers and pharmacy benefit managers. Harold H. Shaw, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Boston Field Division, said, “The allegations of selling a highly addictive opioid cancer-pain drug to patients who did not have cancer make them no better than street-level drug dealers.” The conspiracy charges under RICO can result in a 20-year prison sentence and fines of up to twice the amount of money the defendants made from the conspiracy. Ditto for the conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud. In other words, Kapoor and his pals are in a heap of trouble. Well, it couldn’t happen to a nicer guy. Under Kapoor, Insys Therapeutics donated $500,000 to Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy, a group leading the fight against Arizona Proposition 205, a marijuana legalization measure similar to Colorado’s, which was narrowly defeated last year (48.7 percent yes, 51.3 percent no). Kapoor’s opposition to Prop 205 doesn’t appear to have been motivated by reefer madness; it was more likely a business decision. It turns out Insys had developed a drug called Syndros, based on a synthetic form of THC that would have faced competition from legal marijuana if Prop 205 had passed. It’s inconceivable that Kapoor didn’t know the dangers associated with fentanyl and the absence of similar dangers associated with marijuana. So Special Agent Shaw is wrong when he says he’s no better than a street-level drug dealer. He’s much worse.

November 9 , 2017 59


icumi

Courtesy of Evan Ravitz

(IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) AN IRREVERENT AND NOT ALWAYS ACCURATE VIEW OF THE WORLD BUREAUCRACY BEATER AWARD This one is for real. BW hereby awards Evan Ravitz with its first annual Bureaucracy Beater Award. To understand why, just look at the three photos above and then read Evan’s letter to the Boulder City Council, which we have included herewith. Good on ya, Evan. Evan’s letter: “After waiting 11 days for the city to fix the permanent puddle/ice dam right at the main intersection of the Broadway Bike Path and the Boulder Creek Path, I borrowed a shovel and dug a ditch to empty the puddle into the Creek in 45 minutes. Since then the city has covered the ditch with rounded stones, probably an improvement, as my ditch was filling with autumn leaves, which could dam it up. But I don’t know if this will work for more than one winter. Sediment from the surroundings will fill it in. Anyway, it works for a small snowfall like last night’s. I’m attaching a photo from this morning, a photo from about 3 weeks ago before I fixed it, and a photo of the ditch right after I dug it, parallel to the shovel. I reported three other permanent puddles/ice dams on the Creek Path between the high school and Folsom St. back in January. As far as I know none of these have been fixed. I bet all four problems date from the 2013 flood. The fact that no one apparently reported them, shows few people use the paths in winter or think it’s worth trying to get the city to do anything. Evan Ravitz, guide, photographer, writer, editor. Ex-not-so-tightrope artist. Direct democracy promoter since 1989. The improbable takes a bit longer...”

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