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SUPPORTING AND CONNECTING DIVERSE COMMUNITIES THROUGH COFFEE

news:

Looming lease sales cast shadow over Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge by Will Brendza

boulderganic:

New public lands legislation passes the House, dividing Colorado’s Congressional members along party lines by Emma Athena

buzz:

A solo show of the impressionist Claude Monet at the Denver Art Museum by Amanda Moutinho

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Boulder’s Bowregard picks a path toward bluegrass spotlight by John Lehndorff

arts & culture:

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nibbles:

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community table:

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Meet the Ivalas Quartet by Peter Alexander

Restaurant Week is a chance to find your next favorite eatery by John Lehndorff

Boulder’s main food pantry back in service and seeking holiday donations by Matt Cortina

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Danish Plan: No, TABOR does not make it harder to raise taxes Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Film: Picks for the second weekend of the Denver Film Festival Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: New in brew: Spon and IPA rule the Range Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: The Man Show Weed Between the Lines: A rose by any other name Cannabis Corner: South Dakota likely to vote on pot initiatives

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Publisher, Fran Zankowski Editor, Joel Dyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Cover photo, Will Brendza November 7, 2019 Volume XXVII, Number 12 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

No, TABOR does not make it harder to raise taxes By Paul Danish

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n trying to explain the sound ass-kicking Colorado voters administered to Prop CC, the Denver Post’s Alex Burness offered the following reflection: “For Democrats, it was a chance to finally put a dent in TABOR, which significantly hampers the ability of Colorado governments to raise money because it requires voter support for any tax hike. Voters have been loathe to pass new statewide taxes since TABOR passed 27 years ago.” No argument with the part about Democrats seeing Prop CC ­— the ballot proposal that would have gutted the Taxpayer Bill of Rights’ (TABOR) tax refund provisions — as a step toward getting rid of TABOR. That I

much is self-evident. But the suggestion that TABOR “significantly hampers the ability of Colorado governments to raise money because it requires voter support for any tax hike” is another matter. TABOR does not hamper the ability of local governments by requiring voter support for new taxes and extensions of old ones. Quite the opposite, in fact. I haven’t checked these numbers lately, but in the 10 or 15 elections that followed the passage of TABOR in 1992, 50% of municipal, county and school district tax increases that were put to a vote of the people were approved. Chances are that success rate isn’t much different today. The truth is, voters are much more likely to vote for tax increases than elected officials. That’s because voters decide on new taxes in the privacy of a voting booth (or their homes in the case of a mail-in ballot election), while elected officials decide on new taxes by voting in public. see DANISH PLAN Page 6

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NOVEMBER 7, 2019

DANISH PLAN from Page 5

And voters don’t have to run for re-election after choosing to raise taxes. Elected officials do. One reason attempts to mess with TABOR like Prop CC keep flopping is that TABOR isn’t just about taxes. It is also about control and power sharing. TABOR gives ordinary citizens a role in the exercise of one of government’s core powers — the power of the purse. The “Never TABOR” gang wants to take that power from them. As a result most people see proposals like Prop CC as a power grab as well as a tax increase. (Prop CC supporters argue that the proposal isn’t a tax increase but just an authorization for government to keep any annual revenue increase above the amount TABOR allows it to keep. It’s a lawyer’s argument; it’s legally true, but the practical effect is a tax increase. If you don’t think so, try this thought experiment: If the federal government decided to keep your excess income tax withholding instead of refunding it to you, would you consider that a tax increase?) Burness has a point when he says Colorado voters have been loath to pass new statewide taxes in the TABOR era — and the question of control may have something to do with it. Voters may feel they have more control over a tax increase for, say, their local school district than they do over a statewide tax increase of the same size for “education.” So they go with the local tax and say no to the state one. What the voters have really been loath to do at the state level was

approve new taxes for education. Prop CC was the fourth failed attempt in recent years to get the voters to increase taxes for the schools. One of the first questions voters ask themselves when deciding how to vote on a tax hike is “Will the new taxes do what they are intended to do?” — which is to improve educational outcomes for Colorado students? Prop CC supporters seemed to assume that more money for K-12 education will by definition improve outcomes and that everyone knew this. So they made no attempt to show voters how the added revenue would improve the schools. But the three previous smackdowns of school tax hikes suggest the voters have a lot of misgivings about the way the schools are doing their job and about whether teachers merit a pay increase. And about whether throwing more money at the schools will make a difference. In the case of higher education, which is where a third of the Prop CC money was supposed to go, there are real questions about the worth of a university degree going forward and about whether the product is over-priced. Another question voters ask themselves before voting on tax hikes is “Can I afford it?” That probably wasn’t much of an issue with Prop CC; the issue probably wasn’t so much, “Can I afford it,” as, “Is it worth it?” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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Regarding John Lendorff ’s article, “The final stage” about Jeff Austin (Re: Buzz, Oct. 31, 2019), if the goal was to bring together quotes from music industry professionals prior to the Nov. 4 event benefiting Jeff ’s family, Chuck Morris’s quote should’ve been left out. To summarize, Mr. Morris thinks Jeff Austin’s legacy was that he wanted the spotlight, and well, things just didn’t work out for him. Imagine Jeff Austin’s wife and children reading this quote after his tragic death. Did the editor think this was a good tribute to him? Also, “If You’re Ever In Oklahoma” is not an original Yonder Mountain String Band song. And was it appropriate to include a picture of Yonder Mountain String Band and not just Jeff? Jeff hadn’t been in YMSB for five years prior to his death. Jeff Austin lived a lot of his adult life in Nederland. This article in the Boulder Weekly could have better memorialized him. Leah Franks/Louisville

What about the children

When I hear our current president say “he died like a dog... crying and whimpering... with his children,” I want to throw up. I’m guessing he was saying that Baghdadi was attempting to use his children as a shield, but either way, if in fact “the target” was in a cave, what sort of negotiation was attempted to save the lives of children? Put another way, what did the children do? The alleged benefits of targeted assassinations are fraudulent; a child is not luggage; those children weren’t Baghdadi’s carry-on bags. Children aren’t “presumed innocent,” they are innocent precisely because they are children. Forget Trump, is there anyone in office or in the media who might — on behalf of dead children — ask further questions? Rob Smoke/Boulder

Open letter to GEO

As a Boulder resident subject to the expenditure of taxpayer funds spent negotiating illicit practices of your ankle detention program and BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

its affect on those subjected to your product resulting in oppression, abuse, pain, separating children from parents, sequestering your clients from legal representation, discrimination against LGBTQ individuals and now cutting off communication with the public protesting that very treatment, I have a novel idea. How about I, as an invested party in the community, notify you that a letter on behalf of the City of Boulder complaining about these practices is in process to be drafted. A lot of City money will be spent doing this in times of high-expense housing, demand for services and underfunded maintenance programs and capital improvements in multiple departments throughout the City. These expenses were outlined on first reading of the budget recently. Instead of causing this personal expense diversion from essential City services, how about coming clean unprovoked and answering some of these concerns preemptively? I, for one, would think better of you for doing the right thing rather than having you react to a letter the City Council will be drafting to you, and depending on your response following it, a potential resolution against such behavior. It just so happens that the City’s expense attending to this will only increase the very demand for the services you provide, which are certainly a drain on resources in times of the need to address climate change. Alternatively, how about considering an approach that will improve your company’s status? Lynn Segal/Boulder

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Drilling in an Arctic Eden

Looming lease sales cast shadow over Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

photos and story by Will Brendza

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utside my nylon cocoon, a highpitched buzz pulsed: enemies at the gates. Enemies that would devour me alive given the chance. I was holed up in my two-person expedition tent on the Alaskan Arctic tundra, making every excuse not to go outside — to avoid facing the parasitic insect horde that hovered in wait. Not that I wanted to stay inside that tent. I wanted nothing more than to crawl outside, to stretch my legs and explore the wild region I’d been camping in and flying over for the better part of a month. I wanted to roam the ancient lands, to hunt for buried mammoth tusks and lost eagle feathers. But, for several days it had either been raining steadily or, when the drizzle did abate, swarming with thick clouds of mosquitoes (which might be mistaken at first glance for small bats). These were not uncommon conditions for this part of the world. But they had put a damper on my ability, and incentive, to break free and explore. Besides, there were monsters out there — some that wanted more than a small drink of blood — and I was unarmed. I was several links down in the food chain and except for the tens of thousands of dollars of camera gear that I’d been left to “guard” and a half-empty can of bear mace, my solitary encampment in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) was defenseless. Alaska’s ANWR is unlike any BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

other place on Earth. Depending on where you get your news, it might sometimes be framed as a wasteland, as an empty, swampy, lifeless place that’s only value is in the fossil fuels buried beneath it. But nothing could be further from the truth. More than mosquitoes, the ANWR is home to grizzly and polar bears, gray wolves, dall sheep, muskoxen, Arctic foxes, birds of prey, a few (very sparse and isolated) local native settlements and, of course, the massive caribou herds that dominate the land. The part of the ANWR I was in is known as the “North Slope,” the “1002 Area” or “America’s Serengeti.” It’s a grassy rolling tundra corridor broken only by braided rivers running north from the Brooks Mountains across the coastal plains and into the Arctic Ocean, at the northeasternmost point of the 49th state. There are no roads in the ANWR, as wheeled vehicles are forI

bidden. There are no trails except those carved by animals. There are no towns or cities for hundreds of miles. It’s a wilderness in the true sense of the word — one that is crucial to many different species today, as it has been for tens of thousands of years. Conservationists, environmentalists and nature enthusiasts have been fighting to protect this area from fossil fuel interests ever since oil and gas were discovered here in the early 1960s. For a long time, it seemed like a fight that they were winning; a fight that could ultimately be won. But things have changed — and not in the interest of the ANWR or the animals who call it home. Now, in the twilight of the fossil fuel era, as climate change intensifies all around us, this Arctic Eden has been opened up to be sold off; to be drilled, defiled and exploited at the hands of oil and natural gas companies. • • • • I was there in 2016, just months NOVEMBER 7, 2019

before the last presidential election, waiting in my tent for my employer, Florian Schultz (a documentary filmmaker and photographer) and Jake, our bush pilot (whose last name I never quite caught), to return and pick me up. I’d been stranded. We were supposed to be filming a massive caribou migration. But the problem our three-man team had encountered after venturing deep into the ANWR was one of weight. We had too much of it. Between three fully grown men and another 150-plus pounds of camera gear, Jake’s nimble, but very light, two-seat single-engine Super Cub bush plane could not safely fly everyone and everything all at once. So, we developed an (admittedly flawed) system: Florian and Jake would go scouting, carrying minimal camera gear. When they found some caribou action, Jake would drop Florian off with minimal equipment, take off again, come back and pick me up with the rest of the gear. Then he’d shuttle me over, and Florian and I would get down to business. When the caribou had passed us, we would rinse and repeat. Except several days ago (Two? Three? Five? Hard to tell in the land of the never-setting sun) these pregnant gray clouds had rolled in and settled down low, right on top of me. Which, as any bush pilot will tell you, is no-fly weather. So I was stuck. Jake could not reach me, and Florian could not reach his gear. It was a predicament for us all. see ARCTIC Page 10

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ARCTIC from Page 9

We’d been out working on Florian’s film The Refuge for several weeks, filming bears and scattered caribou groups. But we hadn’t found the fabled Porcupine Herd, a family of some 218,000 antlered beasts that would be thundering through the 1002 Area any day, traversing frigid rivers, storming over mountainsides, outrunning bears and wolves (sometimes), getting eaten alive by mosquitoes, grazing, drinking and migrating, always, in a 1,500-mile clockwise circle — a never-ending diaspora that has been in motion since the Ice Age. At the time, things were looking very hopeful for the ANWR. President Obama had used some of Florians’ footage in a campaign ad in an attempt to federally designate the region a wilderness area. This designation would’ve made it nearly impossible for oil and gas developers to worm their fingers into that precious landscape. But that wilderness designation never came to pass. Not long after my time in the ANWR was over and I had returned to the lower 48, America had elected a new president, one who would undo decades of conservation progress with a tax bill that would open up the ANWR to be leased off, block by block, to corporate interests. In what politicians call “progrowth tax legislation,” the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 is the largest overhaul of tax code in three decades. It reduces corporate income tax rates by 14%, shifts income tax brackets for the middle class, places an expiration date on many tax benefits intended to help individuals and families, and, of course, includes a seemingly random provision to open the 1002 Area of the ANWR for oil and gas development. That provision requires “not fewer than two lease sales area-wide under the oil and gas program” — each of which must be a minimum of 400,000 acres. That’s 800,000 acres (minimum) out of the 1,563,500 acres that comprise the 1002 Area. Which, besides being allegedly saturated with oil, also happens to be an extremely rich and sensitive ecosystem; one that’s now fair game for fossil fuel companies. In September, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released 10

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its final Environmental Impact Statement for the “Coastal Plain Oil and Gas Leasing Program.” And, according to Molly Block, the press secretary for the Department of the Interior (DOI), the first land lease sale is intended to take place before the end of 2019. “Of all the threats [the ANWR] has been under ever since they found oil at Prudhoe Bay (just west of ANWR), this is probably the most serious situation,” says Francis Mauer, a retired wildlife biologist and the Alaska chapter representative for Wilderness Watch. “If this [development] happens on our watch, it

Two days later, on Dec. 22, 2017 President Trump endorsed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. With a flourish of his presidential pen the ANWR was suddenly more vulnerable than it had been in 60 years. “It just sets us further back,” Mauer says. He points out that the oil and gas program at Prudhoe Bay, which began in the 1960s directly adjacent to the ANWR, has never been reduced in size or scale. It has only ever expanded. The same could play out in the coastal plains, in the 1002 Area. And for what? Mauer asks. Realistically, the cumulative addi-

would be a colossal tragedy for that land and our relationship with Nature in general.” Mauer has been on the forefront of the fight to protect the ANWR for most of his adult life, and earlier this year, I called him to hear his thoughts on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. “It broke my heart,” he says, matter of factly. “Literally, to tell you the truth.” The night before Congress gathered to vote on the Tax Act that assembled this leasing scheme, Mauer developed an atrial fibrillation. Mauer’s heart quite literally shuddered at the prospect that the place he had worked so hard to protect might be desecrated at long last for oil and gas.

tional oil production from the ANWR is projected to be between 1.9 and 4.3 billion barrels of oil, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That would account for 0.4 to 1.2% of world oil consumption by 2030. As for the wildlife and natural ecosystem, Joe Balash, Trump’s appointed assistant secretary for land and minerals management at DOI, remains adamant that environmentalists and conservationists need not worry. In an interview with E&E News, Balash said that he believes drilling in the ANWR can easily be done without affecting animal populations like caribou herds: “[W]hat we know from decades of experience dealing with caribou on the North Slope is that infrastructure

in and of itself is not harmful, it does not disrupt or effect caribou behavior except during their calving period,” Balash said in the interview. Mauer, however, has a different take. Could the oil and gas operations actually proceed without affecting caribou herd migrations? “Absolutely not,” he says. The caribou herd on the North Slope that Balash referenced is the Central Arctic Herd. Mauer explains that the Central Arctic Herd is much smaller than the Porcupine Herd. And because they are located farther west, closer to Prudhoe Bay, they have a lot more open space to work themselves around the oil and gas operations. The Porcupine Herd, on the other hand, is 10 times larger and has to squeeze through that narrow corridor of tundra between the Arctic Ocean and Brooks Mountains — the very place I was camped: the 1002 Area. Mauer says if an oil field goes up in the middle of the 1002 Area (and all the roads, pipelines and infrastructure that come with it) the caribou will be displaced — they will flee from all that activity — to the south, towards the Brooks Mountains. There, Mauer says, the predator density is significantly higher and the animals will be exposed to a serious new pressure; one that the Porcupine Herd has never known. Oil and gas operations will throw a wrench into a delicately evolved system. It has the potential to be utterly devastating, Mauer says, which will affect all the native settlements and villages in the ANWR — all the people who rely on these caribou as a primary source of food. And that’s only to speak of the effects of fossil fuel development in the 1002 Area itself, but in fact, it will affect a far greater area. The migratory birds that fly to the ANWR to nest come from six different continents, and many of them play vital roles in other ecosystems around the globe; the caribou who migrate through the ANWR spill into Canada; and many of the hunting grounds for the ANWR’s wolves and bears extend well into the Yukon. It’s a natural network that flows out well beyond the borders of the 1002 Area, beyond the ANWR and beyond Alaska at large. It’s a vast sys-

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

NOVEMBER 7, 2019


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tem and one that we don’t yet fully understand. To Mauer and many other environmentalists, disrupting that for natural resource extraction seems both irresponsible and wantonly destructive. According to a new report on fragmentation from the Center for American Progress (CAP), only 12% of U.S. lands are permanently protected from development. What’s more, between 2001 and 2017 the U.S. lost a football field’s worth of natural area to development every 30 seconds. Although the report focuses on the lower 48 states, it documents how, since 2001, the U.S. has an additional 24 million acres of roads, pipelines, parking lots, oil fields and other human infrastructure leading to greater habitat fragmentation, which “has severe consequences for the movement and survival of wildlife and the provision of clean water.” Matt Lee-Ashley a senior director of environmental strategy and communications for CAP, as well as one of the reports’ authors, points out that Trump has made hostility toward conservation a staple of his administration. Abolishing the legal defenses of places like Bears Ears and the ANWR for oil and gas development, is his modus operandi. “Protections that the public assumed were in place are being rolled back. The Trump administration is essentially challenging the very idea that conservation is important to the United States,” Lee-Ashley says. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

“Which is troubling.” To add salt to the wound, Trump admitted at a GOP conference in February 2018 that, originally, he had no personal interest in opening up the ANWR for this kind of exploitation. It wasn’t until a friend “who’s in that world and in that business” explained to him that this was something Republicans had been trying to do for decades that he decided to append it. “After that I said, ‘Oh, make sure that’s in the [tax] bill,’” Trump recalled in the February 2018 speech. So, into the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act the ANWR went, and soon the DOI is hoping to move forward with its first land lease sale. • • • • That bleak prospect couldn’t have been further from my mind as I sat in my Arctic solitaire, prisoner to the clouds of mosquitoes. I was warm, I had food and I was generally safe. But I was getting bored waiting out there. And, more than boredom, I was starting to get a sense of what it might be like to become totally, batshit delusional. Every so often, far-off in the distance, I’d hear something that sounded just like the Super Cub plane. So far, though, these had just been tricks of a hopeful mind. So far, the “planes” I’d thought I heard had just been auditory hallucinations — nothing more. see ARCTIC Page 12

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ARCTIC from Page 11

But this time, the noise I heard out there sounded different. This time the noise I heard as I lay there silently was distinguishable from the insect drone. It was familiar and mechanical. I jerked upright. I sat perfectly still. I closed my eyes tightly, cocked my head and focused, just there, on the faint horizon of sound. Was that actually the Super Cub, this time? I exploded into action, threw on my clothes, unzipped the tent door, and rushed outside into the eager throng of mosquitoes, swimming through them like beaded door curtains. A grizzly sow and cub lumbered past some 50 yards away. I scanned the skies. The clouds were finally breaking. And beyond the mosquitoes’ buzz, there was definitely another sound: the hum of an engine. I stood staring in the direction I thought it came from, my assailants penetrating my fleece hoodie, sucking my blood through my gloves, crawling under my bandana to get at my neck. Then the kite-like, orange and gray Super Cub burst through a cloud and into view. It was Jake. And he was hauling ass. The plane circled me once, then descended, its big donut tires touching the tundra, bouncing once, touching down again and braking to a hard stop beside me. The bears bolted. I started packing things up, hastily. From the way Jake had landed, I could tell something big was happening.

He jumped out of the plane, the engine left idling. “Hey stranger! You ready to get out of here?” I laughed, pulling my bandana down. “You bet. But these mosquitoes are going to miss me.” “Well let’s go. We found the herd.” Without time to pack everything,

I just grabbed the drones and climbed in, dropping into the back seat and popping on the headset. Jake jumped in behind me, closed the door, flipped a switch and AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell” blasted over the headphones. “Let’s do this,” he said, more to himself than to me. We took off, and I watched my tiny encampment shrink below us, thousands of dollars of gear and all of my stuff left to the mosquitoes. It would be just fine. “Sorry about the wait, man. Those clouds,” Jake explained.

We flew southeast, toward the Brooks Mountains. The weather seemed to break before us and soon, we were flying under a blue and nearly cloudless Arctic sky. The clouds had literally just been socked in on top of my camp. Below us, marching like an army across the land, were thousands of caribou, plowing through cobalt rivers and over the mossy rolling plains. Jake put the cub down on a mostly flat strip of tundra, right beside a frantic camouflage-cloaked figure: Florian. I hopped out and immediately started assembling the drones. “Let’s go, let’s go!” Florian shouted at me in his German accent. “They’re passing us quickly we need to move!” In no time the first drone was beeping at me, ready to fly. I passed Florian the camera’s remote control, gripped my own (which controlled the drone itself ) and caught his eyes for the first time in several days. “How’d it go out there?” he asked, a smile spreading across his face. “I had to sell your gear.” He laughed: “I hope you got a good price.” Then we got down to business. For the next 90 minutes we flew drones over the largest-moving mass of live animals I’ve ever seen. We captured caribou mothers helping their young across rivers, we watched as a mother grizzly bear and her two cubs charged from their hiding position, chasing caribou like a deadly

game of playground tag. The antlered beasts swarmed all around us as we filmed, walked past almost within reach. It was an eternal golden hour. Every shot had the perfect lighting, every scene was packed with color and incredible vistas. When the drones ran out of batteries, we switched over to cameras, and filmed through the daylit night and well into the early morning. I can’t shake the sense of loss I feel now, looking back on that moment. The very land I was standing on then, filming with Florian, stands today to be plowed and paved over, excavated, drilled and developed, invaded with vehicles and construction equipment, oil workers and engineers. That system will be disrupted forever, irreparably. Those caribou might never walk the same path again. It’s a prospect that would cost this country far more than any oil or gas operation could ever produce: a pristine wilderness; a source of true natural beauty; a pivotal ecosystem. These are things that cannot be rebuilt or recreated once they’re destroyed. Still, despite that looming land lease sale and the prospect of oil and gas development in the ANWR, Mauer maintains his sense of hope. “Maybe I’m overly optimistic or idealistic that the Refuge could still be saved, even at the 11th hour as it is right now, and function in a very valuable way: as a catalyst for the turning point that needs to be made,” Mauer says. “But, it makes a lot of sense to me, that we could save this place and it could serve as a symbolic gesture on our part to find better ways to exist on this planet.”

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he day before debating the most impactful public lands bill in recent Colorado history, Rep. Joe Neguse received a call with special news from his wife, Andrea, who holds down the family fort in Lafayette while he’s at work in the nation’s capitol: their oneyear-old daughter, Natalie, had taken her first steps. The following day, as Neguse introduced the bill — known as the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Economy (CORE) Act, which increases levels of protection for approximately 400,000 acres of Colorado’s public land — he relayed the happy news to his colleagues in the House of Representatives, saying: “I cannot wait to go back to Colorado and to be able to hike with my daughter in the iconic public lands that are protected under this bill.” A few hours later, when the House passed the CORE Act with a 227-182 vote, it was the first time in more than 10 years that a piece of Colorado-specific public lands legislation had been approved. It has received much applause, and much scorn. Neguse introduced the CORE Act in January 2019 at the same time Sen. Michael Bennet introduced it to the Senate. The concepts in the bill have passed through the hands of many diverse groups over the last 10 years. They’ve been debated by business, political, agricultural, mineral rights and conservation stakeholders across the state. The bill’s current form combines parts of four previously introduced bills, which all provide some form of additional protections for public lands in and around Summit County, the San Juan Mountains, and the Western Slope’s Thompson Divide and Curecanti National Recreation Area. Altogether, the CORE Act reclasBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

sifies about 73,000 acres of public land as wilderness and nearly 80,000 acres as recreation and conservation management areas. It also keeps approximately 200,000 acres free from future oil and gas development on the Thompson Divide, and establishes the first-ever formal boundary around Curecanti National Recreation Area along the Gunnison River. According to the Outdoor Industry Association, the state’s outdoor recreation economy already generates $28 billion in consumer spending and $9.7 billion in wages and salaries, which adds up to roughly 229,000 jobs and $2 billion in state and local tax revenue. Adding more protection to public lands, they argue, only deepens Colorado’s long-term economic outlook. But not all Coloradans celebrated the CORE Act’s passage. All three of Colorado’s Republican representatives voted against the bill, including Rep. Scott Tipton, whose congressional district contains both the Thompson Divide and Curecanti National Recreation Area. In Tipton’s Oct. 31 House speech, he stated that he and a number of his constituents had been omitted from important conversations. “More outreach needs to happen, negotiations need to take place, and compromises need to be made,” he said. Despite Tipton’s claims that the CORE Act doesn’t adequately incorporate most Western Slope opinions, I

a poll of voters in Tipton’s district a month before the vote, conducted by New Bridge Strategy, found otherwise. The majority of Voters from both major parties (85% of Republicans, 93% of Democrats) agree public lands help the Colorado economy. To address lingering concerns, Tipton proposed 10 amendments to the CORE Act, three of which were debated on the floor, with two eventually included in the bill: a measure that protects grazing rights on the Thompson Divide, and another that protects local water rights in the proposed Curecanti National Recreation Area. “It is my hope,” he concluded, “that continued outreach occurs to include the ideas of all of Western Colorado. I stand ready to work with them.” The next step for the CORE Act is the Republican-controlled Senate, where Sen. Cory Gardner is at odds with Bennet, who has had no luck in bringing about a vote. Wary of the already-divided House, Gardner has not pledged support for the bill, and at a campaign rally in Minturn in August, he stated concerns of his own he’d like to see addressed. Even if this Colorado bill moves through the Senate without unified state support, the federal administration has already made their views on the CORE Act clear. In an Oct. 28 statement, the White House condemns the proposed “land restrictions,” declaring the president’s “advisors would recommend that he veto it.” Neguse isn’t giving into defeat. “Ultimately this bill is about protecting our most pristine and treasured places for generations long after we’re gone,” he told the House. “That’s the essence of our service: leaving a better world for those who come next.” NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Claude Monet, ‘Waterlilies and Japanese Bridge,’ 1899; Claude Monet, ‘Boulevard Capucines (Boulevard des Capucines),’ 18731874; Claude Monet, ‘Under the Poplars (Sous les Peupliers),’ 1887; Claude Monet in Giverny, 1908

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Faces of nature

of cerulean and rose. “Like many impressionists, Monet understood color,” says Angelica Daneo, chief curator at the Denver Art Museum (DAM). “Famously, their shadows were not black, they were purple. They had color in them, because a shadow isn’t really black. That sort of understanding of what colors really look like in nature, rather than what they should be like, was very important for the impressionist. Monet shows that understanding, and it’s very clear in the snow paintings ... he actually saw color in them, and he was able to convey all the nuances and different tonalities you can find.”

A solo show of the impressionist Claude Monet at the Denver Art Museum

by Amanda Moutinho

D

uring a snowy day, if you look outside the window, all you may see is a smattering of white flakes coating the landscape. But for Claude Monet, a snowy day provided delicate shades of pink, purple, blue, gray and more. The painter pushed beyond preset notions of color to find the hues beyond white. In “The House in the Snow,” cottages sit among a pile up of peach-tinted snow. In “Coming into Giverny in Winter,” a snow-covered path is rendered in streaks

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The resulting dreamy paintings move past a photo-realistic image of a snowy day to evoke the layers within the scene. Monet exaggerates the color and light to provide a richer interpretation of the landscape, thereby infusing the image with emotion and grace. Monet’s treatment of color is just one of the elements explored in the Denver Art Museum’s latest show Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature, now showing through Feb. 2. The exhibit features more than 120 paintings by the French impressionist and looks at the man behind the work. As the name suggests, the show uses nature to analyze Monet’s style and commitment to painting. He spent a career meticulously capturing various landscapes, and through that delivered a varied repertoire that MONET from Page 18

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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MONET from Page 17

helped spur an entire genre of art. Monet was an integral part of the rising impressionist movement in the 18th century. Truth of Nature outlines some of the early attributes of the movement, such as leaving the studio to paint in nature, applying looser and softer brush strokes, moving away from draftsmanship and using a vibrant color palette. Monet showed at the first impressionist exhibits, Daneo says, and his painting of a bustling Parisian street “Boulevard des Capucines,” which is featured in the DAM show, was one of the paintings used to coin the term impressionism. Paris was an integral piece of the impressionist movement, as a city in transition, modernization leading to urban renewal. The impressionist style lends itself graciously to depicting the movement of the city. In “Boulevard des Capucines,” groups of people dominate the scene. And while some details emerge — balloons, a hat, a scarf — the painting is loosely rendered, capturing the vibration of the city. This aesthetic continued in all of Monet’s work, infusing life into his scenes. While the DAM has shown many impressionist exhibitions, Daneo says Truth of Nature is the first solo show the museum has presented just on Monet. And while many exhibitions have focused on Monet’s work in specific areas, the curators of the latest show wanted to expand the view and look at the various locations where he worked. “More than any impressionist, he really traveled extensively,” Daneo says. “Not just along the Seine, but from London to Venice, from Norway to Belle

Île off the coast of CLAUDE MONET, ‘Path in the Wheat Brittany [in northFields at Pourville eastern France]. (Chemin dans les blés à Pourville),’ So, this was some1882 thing quite striking when you pause. The other impressionists tend to stay close to Paris or the outskirts or along the Seine. So, this search for different natures is what really struck us.” The variety of locations showcases Monet’s range. Aside from his trademark paintings, Truth of Nature features less well-known subjects like the fog of London, palm trees off the coast of Italy and rock formations in Normandy. The artist wanted to stretch himself and find new landscapes to paint. In doing this, Monet looked to capture more than just the surface appearance. “Through reading his letters, it’s clear he has an engagement with place and with the nature that manifests itself in that place,” Daneo says. “I found numerous times where he would use language such as, ‘I still have to grasp the spirit of this place,’ or, ‘Now I really finally found the tone of this place.’ “So, there’s this recurring motif of wanting to get to the essence of a particular locale,” she continues. “And he chose such different moods of nature, from the very bright and very sunny Mediterranean to the sinister and tragic like his works from Belle Île.” Impressionists were recognized for their lush, colorful and bright paintings. But Monet didn’t want to be pigeonholed. “In one of the letters, his art dealer, and I’m paraphrasing, said, ‘What are

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you doing there? You are a man of the sun!’ And he retorted to his wife, ‘They’re going to bore me with the sun, one must do everything.’ He really had this ability to challenge himself and to not just focus on one aspect of nature,” Daneo says. For Monet, it wasn’t enough to just paint a tree or a cliff once. He tasked himself with studying locations. He went back at different times of day, during different seasons, striving to paint every facet of an object. “I love this quote, when he was in Belle Île he said, ‘To really paint the sea one must look at it from the same spot every day at different times of day to understand its ways.’ He was a great observer,” Daneo says. And even though most of his works depict landscapes, Monet was not a passive painter. He was precise and intentional with what he selected, and he would get frustrated if he wasn’t able to execute his vision. He knew what he wanted to paint and would search for compositions that he favored, such as a town reflected in water or a specific type of tree like the poplar. Monet’s emblematic water lilies gave the artist full control over his subject. An avid gardener, Monet planted water lilies from around the world in his pond at Giverny, where he spent the last 40 years of his life. Here he was able to fully commit to rendering the space in the way he saw it. He combined his passions and created the work he’d be most known for. “This is an interesting symbiosis of artist and subject, which isn’t encountered often, where the artist created his BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

own subject. He CLAUDE MONET, ‘Fishing Boats planted it, and then (Bateaux de peche),’ he painted it,” 1883 Daneo says. “There’s an intimate connection, almost an ultimate merging of artist and subject in these water lilies.” Monet died in 1926 at the age of 86, which was a feat for that era. In his last letters, Monet spoke of plans for a new studio he was constructing — he had no plans of slowing down. Though Monet dedicated his time to painting specific subjects repeatedly, his work never feels stale. With his passion and determination, he seemed near obsessed with translating nature onto the canvas. And as nature is constantly changing, Monet tried to keep up. “[His paintings] don’t look tired. There’s always a genuine aspect of themselves. This was something he wanted to do, and he gave his whole self to them,” Daneo says. “Even in his series, it’s not a repetition. It’s an intentional exploration of a subject through different canvases that he showed together. But he always pushed himself forward. ... I think this continuous pushing himself to seek, you can argue, for the truth of nature is something that is very inspiring and maybe a lesson that can be picked up nowadays.” As impossible as it is to capture the many faces of nature, Monet dedicated his life to achieving the insurmountable task. And to show for his effort, he ended his career with a large repertoire of paintings celebrating nature in all its glory. I

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Grass, no jam

Boulder’s Bowregard picks a path toward bluegrass spotlight

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

D

obroist Jason Konrad describes standing onstage at the 2019 Telluride Bluegrass Festival for the first time as a “surreal experience.” Boulder’s Bowregard had entered the prestigious band contest at the very last minute. They gathered around a single microphone and unleashed haunting harmonies, sparkling instrumental breaks and an urgent and propulsive rhythmic drive. Colleen Heine and bassist ON THE BILL: “We just wanted to Zachary Smith arrived from Bowregard with be finalists and get to Charlie Rose Band. Savannah, Georgia. “They proplay on that stage,” Nov. 15, Fox Theatre, vided us with these instant 1135 13th St., Boulder. Konrad says. “I thought perfect harmonies,” he says. foxtheatre.com maybe we’d get second “It’s a good mix. Me and Max place, but then they are into Tony Rice, Punch announced that we won. Brothers and Strength in It was one of those moments in your life Numbers. James and Colleen are deep you know you’ll count down on your into the old-timey world and they do death bed as one of the greatest.” square dances.” Past contest winners, like the Dixie But Bowregard isn’t your typical jamChicks, Greensky Bluegrass, The grass Boulder band. “There really aren’t Hillbenders and Trout Steak Revival, that many working traditional-leaning have used the win as a launch pad. The bluegrass bands in the area,” Konrad members of Bowregard were thrilled, but says. there was one little catch, Konrad says. “The biggest thing that sets us apart “This is really a baby band. We had is energy. We are really dynamic only officially been a band for a few onstage. I can tell when things are jelling months,” he says. “We were still figuring because we’re moving and careening off things out like how to move together one another musically. The crowd feeds onstage doing harmonies.” off that, and we feed off them,” he says. That June evening at midnight, Konrad has traveled a highly unlikely Bowregard — pronounced like “bow that path toward twangy success on the fiddle” — played in the Town Park camp- Dobro (or resophonic slide guitar), an ground. “We thought it was just going to instrument he’s only been playing for be some picking, but a couple hundred eight years. He took home top honors in people showed up,” Konrad says. the Rockygrass 2016 Dobro contest. The band formed around guitarist Konrad’s Dobro heroes start with Jerry and lead vocalist Max Kabat and banjo Douglas and include Rob Ickes, Mike player James Armington. Kabat has writ- Witcher, Andy Hall (of Infamous String ten the majority of the songs so far. Dusters) and his longtime teacher, “He’s got a great voice that connects Lyons-based Sally Van Meter. with audiences,” Konrad says. “I’m working to forget the technical Armington plays both Scruggs-style stuff I know and just play. I want to bluegrass and traditional clawhammer sound like myself,” Konrad says. banjo. “James is a bundle of energy In his other life, the Harvard graduonstage, and he’s in demand as a playate is an attorney with a Boulder law er, especially, for his clawhammer work,” firm concentrating on intellectual properKonrad says. ty rights. He clerked at the U.S. Court of Bowregard jelled when fiddler Appeals 10th Circuit, but before becomBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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DANIEL HERMAN

ing a lawyer, Konrad had a separate successful career as a recording engineer, producer and professional guitarist. That background is coming in handy in November as the young Bowregard band heads into the studio at Boulder’s eTown. Bowregard is working up original songs and new instrumentals featuring the band’s distinctive, percolating dance floor drive. Producing some of the cuts so far is Nick Forster, a member of the neo-traditional Hot Rize, the first Boulder bluegrass band to develop a national following. “We respect bluegrass, but we don’t want to be replicating old music. Bluegrass doesn’t stand still and is always evolving,” Konrad says. “We like to reimagine songs the audience might be familiar with. We took Ola Belle Reed’s ‘High on a Mountain Top,’ which Hot Rize did, and reharmonized the song in a completely new way,” he says. Bowregard will be testing out their new material at the band’s biggest show so far Nov. 15 at the Fox Theatre. “We didn’t want to do it by ourselves so we’re co-billed with the Charlie Rose Band (from Elephant Revival),” Konrad says. Following the release of Bowregard’s first full-length album early in 2020, the band will play Feb. 15 at Denver’s Midwinter Bluegrass Festival and on Feb. 22 at Winter Wondergrass in Steamboat Springs with Greensky Bluegrass, Billy Strings and the Travelin’ McCourys. But the big date circled in everyone’s calendar is June 19. That’s when Bowregard takes the main stage at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival as a bona fide big deal, performing an entire set of their own music. “Last year vaulted us into everyone’s awareness. This time when we show up, we’ll be a little more seasoned,” Konrad says. He adds that the band members are not quitting their day jobs just yet. NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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he Ivalas Quartet only recently arrived in Colorado, but if you follow classical music you will be hearing about them soon. That’s because they are the new graduate string quartet-in-residence at the University of Colorado College of Music, studying with the Takács Quartet. And they are very good — but don’t take my word for it. They will play their first full concert program in Boulder at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 18, at St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church. The performance is free and open to the public. Their program fits the standard format for student recitals — or, for that matter, most professional string quartet concerts: A classical period quartet (in this case, Haydn’s Quartet in D major, op. 71 no. 2); a 19th century quartet (Beethoven’s String Quartet in E minor, op. 59 no. 2, the “Second Razumovksy” Quartet); and one work that is more recent or less known (the First String Quartet by 20th century American composer George Walker). This program was chosen by the members of the quartet, with guidance from the Takács Quartet. The Ivalas Quartet submitted a list of pieces that they wanted to play during their first year on campus, and the Takács then suggested several program combinations from that list. “We really liked this program,” NOVEMBER 7, 2019

ON THE BILL: IVALAS

Reuben Kebede, one of the Ivalas Quartet’s violinists, says. “It usually works well when you juxtapose some more traditional pieces with something that people haven’t heard. We’re really excited about it, and the Walker is the piece that isn’t played often.” Of course, the Ivalas Quartet had played together well before their CU auditions. They first got together when they were students at the University of Michigan. The name doesn’t actually mean anything; it’s a word they made up, but everyone liked the sound. It has the added advantage that the quartet is almost the only result in Google searches for “Ivalas.” During their years at Michigan, the Ivalas played a number of concerts and attended workshops with other professional quartets. Coming to the end of their studies, they decided that they wanted to stay together and pursue a professional career in chamber music. They looked into several advanced programs for string quartets, including the CU graduate residency with the Takács. In the end they applied for three where they had auditions. Anita Dumar, the Ivalas’ other violinist, explains: “This program (at CU) was recommended to us, and what was really interesting about this audition, versus some of the others, was that the process included a period of coaching with them, after they heard us. We

were able to see how they work with us and they were able to see how we work with them.” “We hadn’t met Takács before,” Kebede says. “They were really great people, and we enjoyed it. We ended up liking CU and decided to come (here).” The Takács generally has anywhere from 10 to 15 applications for the graduate string quartet-in-residence, so the selection process is rigorous. Takács first violinist Ed Dusinberre writes by email while preparing for a tour, “We’re looking for whether a group has a distinctive voice, something to say. We want to feel a passionate level of commitment from everyone in the group. Part of the audition process involves us

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

QUARTET — Reuben Kebede and Anita Dumar, violin; Aimée McAnulty, viola; Pedro Sánchez, cello Haydn: String Quartet in D major, op. 71 no. 2 George Walker: String Quartet No. 1 Beethoven: String Quartet in E minor, op. 59 no. 2 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18, St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church, 2425 Colorado Ave., Boulder. Free and open to the public.


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giving feedback and seeing how they respond: the capacity for growth is at least as important as the level of playing. “The Ivalas is a dynamic, charismatic group. The passion for what they do was obvious as soon as they started their audition.” As graduate quartet-in-residence, the Ivalas follow other groups that have become familiar to Boulder audiences and successfully launched their careers, including the Orava, Tesla and Altius quartets. “It’s wonderful for us to see how well (those) previous groups from our program have managed that challenging transition from student to professional quartet,” Dusinberre writes. The membership of the Ivalas is the definition of diversity. Kebede is of mixed Danish/German and Ethiopian heritage and grew up in Des Moines, Iowa; the other violinist, Dumar, has American and French-Caribbean/ African ancestors and grew up in Pennsylvania and Oklahoma. Cellist Pedro Sánchez is Venezuelan, and first learned cello in that country’s famed “El Sistema” music program. Violist Aimée McAnulty is from Southern California, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

but her mother is from Argentina, where she still has relatives. As members of the graduate string quartet-in-residence, they receive both individual lessons on their instruments and coaching sessions as a group with the members of the Takács Quartet. It is the coaching sessions, which range from discussion of broad generalities of quartet performance to details of interpretation, that the most important work occurs to transform a very good student quartet into an ensemble ready for a high-level professional career. Dusinberre explains that “the CU program gives a group a chance to get to grips with their artistic goals, temperaments, how to balance individual expression and unity of musical interpretation. We help groups to think about their unique qualities and how they might position themselves in a community and build an audience.” In a recent coaching session with Takács second violinist Harumi Rhodes, I

there was a lot of attention to the interpretive details. When they played the first movement of the Walker Quartet, she suggested that they make the long notes sound “smokier.” In another passage she asked them to try making shared motive “coquettish.” The differences were extremely subtle, and at the same time they transformed the passages in question. The “coquettish” passage suddenly became more vibrant, to the delight of Rhodes and the four players. With the first official concert of their residency coming up, you might think that the members of the Ivalas Quartet may find it intimidating to play before a group as knowledgeable and eminent as the Takács. “Of course, it is a little bit,” Kebede admits. “But they’re all such wonderful people. When I go to a coaching, I think, ‘They’re going to listen to this, and they’re going to help us make it better.’ We’re so lucky to be able to study with them. “We love Boulder. We look forward to being here another year after this. It’s just a great honor.” NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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OLIVE AND WEST

JACKSON EMMER. 7 P.M. THURSDAY, NOV. 7, THE MUSE PERFORMANCE SPACE, 200 E. SOUTH BOULDER ROAD, LAFAYETTE, 720-352-4327. From Carbondale, Jackson Emmer has a reputation as a songwriter on the outskirts of country music, blending humor with heartache, tradition with exploration. Rolling Stone named him one of the “10 New Country Artists You Need to Know” in 2018 after his sophomore release Jukebox. “A talented wordsmith with a way around a traditional country arrangement,” they said. Find out for yourself at Lafayette’s The Muse. Emmer’s band includes Colorado’s Chris Goplerund on drums and Eric Thorin on upright bass. Tickets are $15.

see EVENTS Page 26 IAN ANDERSON

45TH ANNUAL LONGMONT TURKEY TROT 10K AND 2 MILE RACE. 9 A.M. SATURDAY, NOV. 9, ALTONA MIDDLE SCHOOL, 4600 CLOVER BASIN DRIVE, LONGMONT, 303-774-4694.

WARREN MILLER’S ‘TIMELESS.’ MULTIPLE SHOWINGS, NOV. 7-10, BOULDER THEATER, 2032 14TH ST., BOULDER. WARRENMILLER. COM MUCH OF THE WORLD has changed since Warren Miller started making ski films in 1949, but the passion of snowriders across the globe has stayed the same. In celebration of 70 years of ski cinematography, see his latest, Warren Miller’s Timeless, screening all weekend at Boulder Theater. Shot on location in British Columbia, France, Austria, Switzerland, Colorado and Jackson Hole, Timeless features a cast of fresh faces, including Olympic skier Jaelin Kauf and World Cup racer Erin Mielzynski, alongside industry veterans Glen Plake and Rob DesLauries. Other athletes will be at Boulder Theater, including Caite Zeliff, Connery Lundin, Jim Ryan and Cooper Branham. The times may be changing but see how the joys of winter are eternal with Warren Miller’s 70th film.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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IT’S THAT TIME of year, when October morphs into November, and our jack-o’-lanterns are replaced with turkeys. That means it’s also time for Longmont Turkey Trot. Now in its 45th year, the annual 10K and 2 mile race boasts one of the most scenic and fastest courses around. And the 10K course also has a wheel chair division. All proceeds benefit the City of Longmont Youth Scholarship Fund. Be in line by 8:15 to register, or better yet register before you get there. Entry fees range from $22-$26. Find out more at longmontcolorado.gov.

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

OTIS TAYLOR’S TRANCE BLUES FESTIVAL AND JAM WORKSHOP. 10 A.M. SATURDAY, NOV. 9, ETOWN HALL, 1535 SPRUCE ST., BOULDER, ETOWN.ORG. WANT TO PLAY with a legend? Join international blues artist Otis Taylor in his home town for the extraordinary Trance Blues Jam Festival. Unlike traditional music festivals where the audience is mostly passive, you are the rock star at the Trance Blues Jam Festival (TBJF). The TBJF encourages active participation and is designed for players of all types, all ages and all ability levels to join in. Workshops with Taylor and other visiting musicians run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Evening performance starts at 7 p.m. For more information visit etown.org. I

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arts COURTESY STACY STEERS

Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder: ‘Grounded’ featuring: Sonja Hinrichsen, Kathleen Probst, & ReCalling Re/ Call, through Dec. 1. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver: ‘Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature,’ through Feb. 2; ‘Shantell Martin: Words and Lines,’ through Jan. 31; ‘Eyes On: Erika Harrsch,’ Hamilton Building, through Nov. 17; ‘Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz,’ through Nov. 17; ‘The Light Show,’ through May 2020; ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through January 2020; Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont: ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit; ‘Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture,’ through Jan. 5.

NOV 14 | EXPLORER SERIES USING ARCHAEOLOGY FOR CONSERVATION IN THE PERUVIAN ANDES

‘STACEY STEERS: EDGE OF ALCHEMY,’ exhibit is on display at Denver’s Museum of Contemporary Art, 1485 Delgany St., Denver through April 5.

NOV 16 | CONCERT BLUE CANYON BOYS

11/13

11/22

EATING AND DRINKING AT CHAUTAUQUA: A CULINARY HISTORY [FREE!] FOOD THERAPY WITH GABI MOSKOWITZ

12/4

ROB ICKES & TREY HENSLEY

12/6

MARIKA ANTHONYSHAW [FORMERLY OF ARCADE FIRE]: ACCOUNTABLE ACTIVISM: A NEW FORM OF POWER

12/11

ELLEN KINGMAN FISHER: HILL’S GOLD

12/12

LIVING THE RIGHTEOUS SLACKLIFE

12/19

SHEL

12/19

BIFF GORE: HOLIDAY SOUL

FOR TICKETS & full

events calendar, visit:

chautauqua.com

coloradochautauqua @colo_chautauqua

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Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Wild: Buffalo in Boulder,’ through Jan. 12; ‘Archive 75: Multilayered Stories Told Through a Boulder Lens,’ through January; ‘Boulder Through the Decades,’ through Dec. 2.

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA), 1750 13th St., Boulder: Adriana Corral: ‘Unearthed/Desenterrado;’ Gretchen Marie Schaefer: ‘Folding and Thrusting,’ through Jan. 19.

Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver: ‘Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation,’ through April 5; ‘Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler: Flora,’ through April 5; ‘Stacey Steers: Edge of Alchemy,’ through April 5.

BMoCA at Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., University of Colorado Boulder: ‘Helen Zughaib: Stories My Father Told Me,’ through Nov. 24;

University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder: ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June 2020; ‘Art Elements: Materials, Motive and Meaning,’ through Dec. 21.

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Street Wise,’ Canyon Gallery, through Dec. 1; NCAR Traveling Climate Exhibit: ‘Real People, Real Climate, Real Changes,’ through Nov. 14; ‘Design Trail,’ Arapahoe Ramp, through Dec. 15.

University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Feathers and Flora,’ Henderson Building, through Jan. 31; ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

Bricolage Gallery, Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder: ‘Found In Translation: Assemblages by Grace Kisa,’ through Nov. 23.

EVENTS from Page 25

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7

Events

Music

Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show and Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont.

Chris and Ollie. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Concert Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble ll. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Cowboy Poetry & Song with Gary McMahan. 7:15 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Finn O’Sullivan. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Joe Teichman. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

900 BASELINE ROAD BOULDER CO | 303.440.7666

MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31, 2020. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/event/monumental.

Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada: ‘Colorado Abstract +10: A History and a Survey,’ through Nov. 17.

Jackson Emmer. 7 p.m. Muse Performance Space, 200 E. South Boulder Road, Lafayette, 650-799-5379.

Mark your calendars for a weekend of holiday festivities including outdoor ice skating, carriage rides, FREE holiday lighting ceremony and more!

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons: ‘40 years/40 artifacts’; ‘All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons’; ‘Lyons Newspapers: A History,’ Swift/Smith/Bohn Family’; ‘125 Years of Distinctive Cameras’; ‘Tiny Stories: Art of the Dollhouse’; ‘The Flood of 2013’; ‘Native American Artifacts,’ and more.

Playback Improvisational Theater meets Marta! 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-2064. Policulture, Dubbest, & Fists of the Proletariat. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 720-490-8734. South for Winter. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568. DIY Sound Synthesizer. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Front deRanged Improve Comedy Show!! 7:30 p.m. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont, 303-682-9980. Give Me Liberty. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. 2132 14th St., Boulder. ‘Play Therapy’: A new play by Oliver Gerland. 7:30 p.m. University Theatre, Boulder, 303-492-8181. Thursday Cinema Local Filmmakers’ Showcase ‘Mondo Hollywood’. 6 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Warren Miller’s ‘Timeless,’ presented by Volkswagen. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Through Nov. 10

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8 Music AJ Fullerton. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Cary Morin. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Dominick Antonelli. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Dragonflies. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Fall Music Series. 7 p.m. Georgia Boys BBQ, 250 Third Ave., Longmont, 720-9994099. Felonious Smith Trio. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Funkiphino at Nissis. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Jayme Stone ‘A Wake.’ 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Kloud. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Maddy O’Neal. The Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver, 720-577-6884. Mister Tim original live-looping music. 7 p.m. La Vita Bella Cafe, 471 Main St., Longmont, 720-365-3080. My Blue Sky (Allman Brothers Tribute) & Forever Man (Eric Clapton Tribute). 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Ravin’ Wolf. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-931-5856. The Roots. 8 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Scott Von. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Tasting Room Open. 4 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Trance Blues Festival Acoustic Kickoff. 7 p.m. The Post Brewing Co., 2027 13th St., Boulder, 303-593-2066. Events Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show, Sale and Reception. 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. Jack Box Games. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Jews Out West. 4:30 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 Music Frank Moore. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Gasoline Lollipops (Unleaded). 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Guerrilla Fanfare. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339. HomeSlice. 8 p.m. The Wild Game Entertainment Experience, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 720-600-4875. Houndmouth. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Jackson Cloud Odyssey at Bootstrap Brewing. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Longmont Symphony: Beethoven Cycle. 7:30 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-772-5796. Ray LaMontagne. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Steve Poltz w/ Rainbow Girls. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637. Trance Blues Festival Workshop & Concert. 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. eTown, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

FILMS KINO LORBER When Avatar shattered box-office records in 2009, many attributed the movie’s success to 3D’s profitability. And not just because viewers were intrigued, but because tickets cost more. But after a decade of blockbusters and kids movies cynically presented in 3D as a means to monetize, the goose that laid the golden egg is dead. Now, 3D is relegated to a handful of movies that seek to use the technology with invention and creativity. Enter China’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night, one of the best films of 2019. The final shot runs a full 58 minutes and is in glorious 3D. CU’s IFS and Program Council will present the movie — possibly the only time it’ll show on the Front Range in 3D — Nov. 7, and tickets cost nothing. —MJC BOULDER: Boedecker Theatre, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-444-7328. ‘Aquarela,’ Nov. 13-16. ‘Fantastic Fungi,’ Nov. 5-10. ‘First Love,’ 8:45 p.m, Friday, Nov. 8. ‘Give Me Liberty,’ Nov. 6-9. ‘Loro,’ Nov. 13-16. ‘Öngtupqa,’ 7 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 13. ‘The Push,’ 7 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 10. Sans Souci Festival of Dance in Cinema: “Ecstacy, Illusion, Wonder,” 1 p.m., Nov. 10 & 13. ‘Two Spirits,’ 6 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 10. ‘The Woman Who Loves Giraffes,’ 4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 10. Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., 303-444-0583. ‘Arctic Dogs’ The Addams Family’ ‘The Current War’ ‘Doctor Sleep’ ‘The Godfather: Part II,’ Nov. 10, 12, 13 ‘Harriet’ ‘Joker’ ‘Jojo Rabbit’ ‘Last Christmas’ ‘The Lighthouse’ ‘Midway’ ‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil’ ‘Motherless Brooklyn’ ‘Parasite’ ‘Playing With Fire’ ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ ‘Zombieland: Double Tap’

Events 45th Annual Longmont Turkey Trot 10K & 2Mile. 9 a.m. Altona Middle School, 4600 Clover Basin Drive, Longmont. Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show and Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Community Karaoke. 7:30 p.m. Cannon Mine Coffee, 210 South Public Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0625. Hands-on Workshop with Taiko Chandler. 1:30 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

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International Film Series, University of Colorado Boulder, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado Ave., 303-492-8662. ‘Long Day’s Journey Into Night,’ 7 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 7, CHEM 140. ‘Milford Graves Full Mantis,’ 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13. DENVER: The Bug Theater, 3654 Navajo St., 303-477-5977. ‘Dosed,’ 6:35 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 9. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., 720-420-0030. ‘Dynamic Medium,’ 8 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 7. Sie Film Center, 2510 E. Colfax Ave., 303-595-3456. The Denver Film Festival, Oct. 31-Nov. 10. LONGMONT: Regal Village at the Peaks 12, 1230 S. Hover Road, 844-462-7342. ‘The Addams Family’ ‘Doctor Sleep’ ‘Harriet’ ‘Joker’ ‘Last Christmas’ ‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil’ ‘Midway’ ‘Motherless Brooklyn’ ‘Playing With Fire’ ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ LOUISVILLE: Regal Cinebarre Boulder, 1164 W. Dillon Road, 844-462-7342. ‘Abominable’ ‘Arctic Dogs’ ‘Doctor Sleep’ ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘Harriet’ ‘Joker’ ‘Last Christmas’ ‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil’ ‘Midway’ ‘Motherless Brooklyn ‘Playing With Fire’ ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ NEDERLAND: Backdoor Theater, 243 W. Fourth St., 303-258-0188. ‘Judy’

PEO Holiday Bazaar. 9 a.m. Mountain View United Methodist Church, 355 Ponca Place, Boulder, 720-938-0307. Stand Up Comedy Showcase at Endo Brewing. 8 p.m. Endo brewing, 2755 Dagny Way, Ste. 101, Lafayette, 720-442-8052.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10 Music Crick Wooder. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Grupo Chegando Lá & Francisco Marques. 1 p.m. MOJO Taqueria, Boulder. Lauren Joy. 10 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. see EVENTS Page 28

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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EVENTS from Page 27

Live eTown Radio Show Taping with Valerie June & Mick Flannery. 6 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

THE TATTERED COVER BOOKSTORE WILL BE HOSTING AUTHOR LISA JEWELL to discuss and sign her book ‘The Family Upstairs.’ 3 p.m. Tattered Cover, 2526 E. Colfax Avenue, Denver.

Maudlyn Monroe (by slp). 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Mozart Symphony No. 40. 1 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

SUNDAY, NOV. 10

Pile. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Lisa Jewell —The Family Upstairs. 3 p.m., Tattered Cover, 2526 E. Colfax Avenue, Denver.

Post Malone — Runaway Tour. 8 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

TUESDAY, NOV. 12 Maurice Isserman — The Winter Army: The World War II Odyssey of the 10th Mountain Division, America’s Elite Alpine Warriors. 7:30 p.m., Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074.

ProgFest 2019. 4 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Reflections on the Taj Mahal — A Tribute to Flutist Paul Horn. 6 p.m. Wesley Fellowship Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-527-0770.

THURSDAY, NOV. 7

Tesla Quartet. 4 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, University of Colorado Boulder, 1020 8th St., Boulder.

Marissa Meyer — Supernova (Renegades #3). 7 p.m., Tattered Cover, 2526 E. Colfax Avenue, Denver.

Trace Jory. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Kelli & Peter Bronski —No Gluten, No Problem Pizza: 75+ Recipes for Every Craving — From Thin Crust to Deep Dish, New York to Naples. 7:30 p.m., Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St. ,Boulder, 303-447-2074.

Events BAFS ‘Second Sundays’ Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863. Boulder Environmental Nature Outdoors Film Festival: The Push. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Boulder Potters’ Guild Fall Show and Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13 Isa Mazzei — Camgirl. 7:30pm. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-447-2074. Write Your Life in Poetry — 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Faculty Tuesdays: Beethoven Anniversary Preview. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Thompson Jazz Combos: November 11. 7:30 p.m. Old Main Chapel, 1600 Pleasant St., Boulder.

Jordan Mackampa. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666.

Music

Events

Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

Abbigale Dawn / Hazel Rehnn. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Boulder Star Lighting Festival. 5:30 p.m. University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder.

Open Mic w/ Andy Eppler at Grossen Bart. 6 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060.

Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623.

The Breathing of the Earth. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Renée Fleming: Music and the Mind. 12 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Hippo Campus. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Go in Peace! Documentary Screening and Panel Discussion. 6 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

Events

JoAnna James. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Maluma 11:11 World Tour. 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Pendulum New Music Ensemble. . University of Colorado Boulder, Regent Drive at Broadway, Boulder. Public Talk: Christopher Wolff: J.S. Bach’s Keyboard Partitas 1. 2 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

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Kayann Short — And the Earth Gives Again: Readings for a Season of Gratitude. 7 p.m. Inkberry Books, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot.

Open Poetry Reading — hosted by Tou Wanimi, 7 p.m., Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Tesla Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, University of Colorado Boulder, 1020 8th St., Boulder.

Double Feature We Are Stars/ Perseus & Andromeda. 12 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

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FRIDAY, NOV. 8

Ellen Pierce — delivers a one of a kind performance of inspired lyrics, chants and visualizations. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Public Talk: Christopher Wolff: J.S. Bach’s Keyboard Partitas 2. 3:30 p.m. Imig Music Building,University of Colorado Boulder, 1020 8th St., Boulder. 303-492-6352. NOVEMBER 7, 2019

Prosecuting Evil: The Extraordinary World of Ben Ferencz. 2 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 720-749-2531. Up Down Circus Youth Circus Classes. 4 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 Music Ashlei Priest. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Caleb Miller. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

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Anime Club. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Eric Andre. 7:30 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Ongtupqa. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. see EVENTS Page 30

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


MONKTON GUITARS The new “local guitar store” in Broomfield

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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CU THEATER & DANCE presents ‘Play Therapy,’ a new play by Oliver Gerland which won the 2018-19 New Play Festival.

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Play Therapy — presented by CU Theatre & Dance. Acting Studio, University of Colorado Boulder Theatre & Dance, Room C240, Boulder. Through Nov. 10 The Rembrandt Room — Buntport Theatre, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through Nov. 9.

Shovelers Needed Trident Commercial Snow Removal Reliably serving Boulder County since 1987

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The Addams Family. Jesters Dinner Theater, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Dec. 1 and Jan. 3-26 A Doll’s House/A Doll’s House Part 2. Denver Center Theatre Company, Ricketson Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Nov. 24. Flame Broiled (or the ugly play). — presented by Local Theater Company. Dairy Arts Center, Carsen Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Nov. 17. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Nov. 17. The Importance of Being Earnest. Coal Creek Theater, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville. Through Nov. 9.

Mamma Mia! BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Feb. 22. Mrs. Warren’s Profession — presented by Germinal Stage. The John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Nov. 9. The Necromancer’s Stone. The BITSY Stage. 1137 S. Huron St., Denver. Through Nov. 23. Pippin. Theater Company of Lafayette, 300 E. Simpson St., Lafayette. Through Nov. 9. The Realistic Joneses — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theater Company. Diary Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Nov. 17. Man Up: A Musical — presented by Arête Theatrics. Theater O, 5311 Western Ave., Suite 120, Boulder. Through Nov. 10. Looped. Vintage Theatre Productions, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Dec. 15. The Thanksgiving Play. Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Dec. 15. The Phantom of the Opera. Denver Center for the Performing Arts Buell Theater, 1350 Curtis St., Denver. Through Nov. 17.

EVENTS from Page 28

Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303441-3100.

Wylie. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Events.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13

Opera Brown Bag: First look at ‘It’s a Wonderful Life,’ 12 p.m. Imig Music Building, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Bourbon & Blues with the Delta Sonics. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Early Music Ensemble: Music of the German Baroque. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Mono. 7 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

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NOVEMBER 7, 2019

Community Night. 9 p.m. The Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver, 303-578-0079. Cosmology and Modern Physics. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Grey Haven’s Philosophy presents: Blade Runner 2019, a celebration! 6 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-2064.

Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Grossen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-491-3165.

Heritage Lecture Series: Eating and Drinking at Chautauqua: A Culinary History. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Open Mic Hosted by Silent Bear. 7 p.m. Tandoori Grill, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-543-7339.

Mountaintop. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Rabblefish. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

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BTAB @ Main. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

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Write Your Life in Poetry. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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FREE! www.belleStar.net Labellestar12@gmail.com 303-249-6958

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he 42nd Denver Film Festival (DFF) concludes Nov. 10, ON THE BILL: but there are still plenty of movies to see. Here are 42nd Denver Film Festival. three not to be missed. Through Nov. 10. Directed by Matthew Rankin, The Twentieth Multiple locations. Century (Nov. 8) is one-half quirky bio-pic about the rise Denverfilmfestival. denverfilm.org of Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, and one-half spoof of King and the notion that a bio-pic can be a truth delivery device. Shot entirely on stylized, off-kilter sets — looking like leftovers from The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Pee-Wee’s Playhouse — and with a gender-bending approach to casting a la Monty Python, The Twentieth Century looks at the waning years of the 1800s and the dissent between Canada’s two political parties. The one in power is imperialistic and miserable; the challenger wants to pull out of foreign wars and embrace kindness and compassion. It’s absurd, comic and blunt in regards to gender and class, life and death. You won’t know what hit you. Moving south and to the modern-day, Premature (Nov. 10) is set among the streets, parks and apartments of Harlem, New York. Seventeen-year-old Ayanne (Zora Howard, who co-wrote the movie with director Rashaad Ernest Green) has hopes and dreams, but they all hit a sizeable bump in the road when she meets and falls for Isaiah (Joshua Boone). The romance of Premature starts typical — even hewing toward ’90s Cinemax after dark — but when Ayanne learns an unsavory truth about Isaiah, their soft-focus love turns harsh, raw and cold. How quickly the sheen of love can be stripped. But Premature’s best moments come not from the relationship of Ayanne and Isaiah, but of Ayanne and her friends — a rowdy group who talk too loud, drink too much and party too hard. As the movie’s signature song suggests: We were too young to act so old. Premature is honest and true, and between Howard and Green, it creates hope for future collaborations. But there is little hope in Ken Loach’s Sorry We Missed You (Nov. 9), a movie that strikes both the most distressing and resonate chord of DFF. Set in present-day London, Sorry We Missed You follows a working-class family, the Turners, as they try to keep their head above water financially and emotionally in the freelance and gig economy. Sorry We Missed You is a harrowing look at what it takes to survive in a world that has little interest in seeing you succeed. Loach’s films have long advocated for the working class, but they seem worse off today than ever before. Sorry We Missed You reflects that. There is nothing glamorous, stylish or attractive about this world. And why should there be? The characters don’t want any part of it either. Watching the final shot of the movie calls to mind one of Kurt Vonnegut’s signature aphorisms: “Life is no way to treat an animal.” The Turners deserve better. So do Ayanne and her friends and all those Canadians who refuse to enslave Africans. It’ll take more than just watching a few movies, but you got to start somewhere.

‘Life is no way to treat an animal.’

Picks for the second weekend of the Denver Film Festival

by Michael J. Casey

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

(720) 322-3166

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2750 Glenwood Dr #7 Boulder, Co 80304 Behind Pizza Hut & Shell gas station

Fast, Secure, Professional SINCE 1987, DBC HAS HELPED CUT DOWN ON POLLUTION AND TRAFFIC ALONG THE FRONT RANGE WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM | WWW.DBCOURIERS.COM/QUICKQUOTE | (303) 571-5719

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EAST COUNTY’S BEST KEPT SECRET! Only 12 miles from Boulder

5 7 8 B r i g g s S t re e t E r i e, C O 8 0 5 1 6 303.828.1392 www.24carrotbistro.com

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BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 2 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF PHOTOS BY STAFF

Tropic Like It’s Hot

Chicken and Biscuit

Jungle 2018 10th St., Boulder, jungletiki.com

Colorado Fried Chicken Co. food truck Mobile, Boulder County, colroadofriedchicken.com

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ungle, Boulder’s new tiki bar brought to you by the team at Arcana, has one of the best rum lists, well, anywhere, and a menu of classic and original cocktails so enticing you’ll start planning what drink you’re going to try next time. The atmosphere inside is lively and contemporary, without feeling too hip, and the décor — from the rattan loungers to the hanging jungle plants to the tropical tiki glasses — effects the feeling of a fun escape. As do the cocktails, including the Tropic Like It’s Hot, a mixture of Oaxacan rum, mezcal, cactus fruit, ancho chili and a dried slice of sour orange that’s lit on fire, extinguished by the drinker and dropped into the cocktail. It’s smoky, citrusy and pleasantly bitter on the finish — and of course the parrot tiki glass doesn’t make it actually taste better... but it also doesn’t hurt. Pair it with yam fries, a Jamaican beef patty or some stellar confit chicken wings. $12.

Pit BBQ Sandwich

Lulu’s BBQ 701, Unit B, Main St., Louisville. lulus-bbq.com

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here’s nothing quite like a simple pulled pork sandwich. Meat and bun. That’s it. So simple, yet so good. At Lulu’s BBQ, the Pit BBQ Sandwich comes with your choice of meat (we went with the classic pulled pork) served on a homemade bun, and either chips or coleslaw (we had both). Five ounces of delectable meat arrive on a fluffy bun with an ample serving of chips and crisp, light coleslaw. We went for Lulu’s Zesty Mustard barbecue sauce, but you can add as little or as much of the others: Sweet and Mild or Smokin’ Hot. “Or not,” as the menu says, “It’s your meat.” $13.

he Colorado Fried Chicken Co. food truck does a lot of things well, but we’d like to highlight two in particular: succulent, crispy chicken and smoky, flavorpacked, moist biscuits. The chicken you’d expect — it’s in the name, after all, which the well-spiced, thin-crusted and tender chicken lives up to. The biscuit, however, is a pleasant surprise if you’ve been burned before in the Centennial State. It’s not dry, it’s slightly creamy, and it’s got a crispy, billowy top. But what makes it exceptional is the irresistible flavor of meats cooked on cast-iron imbued into every bite. Check menu for latest prices.

Black and Blue Tuna

Morning Glory Cafe 1377 Forest Park Circle, Unit 101, Lafayette, morningglorycafe.org

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sk the waitstaff if something is gluten-free at the Morning Glory Cafe and you’ll get an interesting answer with a sheepish smile. “Yes, everything on the menu is gluten-free unless you specifically ask for gluten to be added.” Good to know. With that assurance, we chose the Black and Blue Tuna. A perfectly cooked and ample piece of tuna sits atop fresh mashed potatoes sprinkled with blue cheese and surrounded by a large serving of mingled sautéed veggies that included spinach, shiitake mushrooms and onions. This dish is perfect in every way and guaranteed to fill up even that little space you were trying to leave for dessert. $21.

WEEKLY EVENTS

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Tuesday 5pm–9pm Prime Rib Night Wednesday 3pm–close $5 Burgers Night You can have a small draft beer addition for $5 more. We Also have a $9 Veggie Burger deal featuring the Beyond Meat Burger Thursday Ladies Night $5 specialty cocktails (change every week), $3 house red/white/ rose wines, $1-off draughts beers. Love Football? Watch the games with us. Full Sunday Ticket College and NFL games available. Drink and Wing specials during games. High School Sports Burger Battle Start Soon! 1111 Francis Street, Suite A, Longmont, CO 80501 • 303-647-3755 www.longmontpublichouse.com

BOULDER WEEKLY

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When we say we still serve Grandma’s recipes we mean it! LUNCH & DINNER • DINE-IN • CARRY OUT • CATERING • LARGE PARTIES

Gondolier Longmont 1217 South Main St. • 720-442-0061

Gondolier Boulder 4800 Baseline Rd. • 303-443-5015

Take Out & Delivery Available at Both Locations

gondolieritalianeatery.com

Welcome

TO GONDOLIER ITALIAN EATERY Where Going Out Feels Like Coming Home

November 8-16, 2019 Starts Tomorrow! Make reservations at one our our 42 participating restaurants. BOULDER Arcana Avery Brewing Co. Basta Boulder Chophouse & Tavern Boulder Cork BRU Café Aion Centro Mexican Kitchen Chautauqua Dining Hall Dagabi Tapas Bar Element Bistro The Greenbriar Inn Jax Fish House & Oyster Bar

Jill’s Restaurant & Bistro Leaf North End at 4580 Oak at Fourteenth Osaka’s Restaurant Pepper the Noshery The Post Brewing Co. Riffs Urban Fare River and Woods Salt Sforno Trattoria Romana Shine Restaurant & Potion Bar Steakhouse No.316 Under the Sun Eatery & Pizzeria

Vero Wood Fired Pizza West End Tavern West Flanders Brewing Co. Zolo Grill

LONGMONT

LAFAYETTE

Lyons Fork

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LYONS

Acreage by Stem Ciders Teocalli Cocina

LOUISVILLE 740 Front The Empire Lounge & Restaurant The Melting Pot Parma Trattoria & Mozzarella Bar Via Toscana Zucca Italian Ristorante

view menus at firstbiteboulder.com #firstbite2019 34

Bin 46 Restaurant + Craft Bar Sugarbeet

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firstbiteboco

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


The Restaurant Rut

SUSAN FRANCE

BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

RESTAURANT WEEK IS A CHANCE TO FIND YOUR NEXT FAVORITE EATERY

A QUICK QUIZ:

How many local restaurants do you dine at regularly? Honestly, like more than once a year? If you are normal, you can count those places on one hand and when you go, you order the same bunch of dishes. We are creatures of culinary comfort, and I’m as guilty as anybody else of getting stuck in a rut. But a good deal can tempt me out of it. First Bite, Boulder County’s annual restaurant week, is designed to overcome your objections and get you to try a new eatery or a classic restaurant that’s been around forever. From November 8-16, more than 50 eateries in Louisville, Lafayette, Boulder, Lyons, Lafayette and Longmont offer multi-course prix-fixe menus for either $29 or $49 per-person. You know exactly what you are going to spend — be sure to add a 20% tip — and you can see the menus online: firstbiteboulder.com/restaurants. There are multiple choices for each course. If I was dining at Cafe Aion during First Bite I know exactly what I’d order. I’d start with pumpkin and chorizo croquettas with romesco sauce and slaw. For an entrée, I’d love me some lamb shoulder with couscous and roasted root vegetables. I’d top off the evening with apple cider churros and dipping chocolate. At Leaf Vegetarian Restaurant, my first course would be roasted beet and goat cheese arancini — crunchy rice balls. I’m intrigued by huitlacoche-portobello enchiladas with roasted asparagus puree and black rice as an entrée, and tiramisu with espresso-infused pound cake, almond “mascarpone” and cocoa as a finale. Jax Fish House adds a fourth course so my lineup card would have to feature Emersum oysters, Caesar salad, blackened catfish with fried collard greens, poblano cheddar grits and see NIBBLES Page 36

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NIBBLES from Page 35

flourless chocolate cake. Louisville’s Via Toscana ups the ante with five courses. I could enjoy an amusebouche, sip some zuppa ribollita and tuck into gnocchi tossed in brown butter, sage, gorgonzola and almonds. My main event would be a New York strip with gremolata, roasted cauliflower with arugula, prosciutto and truffled aioli. Finally, cannoli with chocolate chip-ricotta filling. The range of choices (including gluten-free and vegetarian options) and cuisines is wide at 740 Front, Arcana, Basta, Boulder Cork, Greenbriar Inn, Jill’s Restaurant, River and Woods, Sugarbeet, Vero Wood Fired Pizza and Zolo Grill. It’s an opportunity to try newer places that have a buzz such as Osaka’s, Teocalli Cocina, Steakhouse No. 316, Pepper and the revamped Empire Lounge in Louisville. In its 14th year, First Bite has tweaked the familiar prix multi-course format to also include special dining events. Longmont’s Bin 46 is staging cocktail parties that include passed appetizers with bubbly and unlimited tastes of two dozen dishes with a cocktail. Chef Eric Lee has put together a cool-sounding interactive experience at Acreage Ciderhouse in Lafayette. First Bite guests get a cellar tour, a full familystyle dinner with cider pairings in the barrel room, and a warm dessert around a bonfire in the garden. Husbands and other partners should plan on babysitting on Nov. 11 for First Bite’s debut Mom’s Night Out. Parma Trattoria & Mozzarella Bar, OAK at fourteenth, Under the Sun, North End at 4580 and other eateries will host unique maternal meetups featuring food and conversation. My advice is don’t wait to make reservations. The hot spots tend to sell out quickly.

Free Range Food for Front Range Families Voted East County’s BEST Gluten Free Menu

This is the World Famous Buddha Bowl! Cashew Gravy! Black Rice! Steamed fresh veggies! “Shake and Bake” Tofu!

Open at 7:30 Every Day for Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner!

BOTTOMLESS WINE WEDNESDAYS 4-8pm MORNINGGLORYCAFE | 1377 FOREST PARK CIRCLE, LAFAYETTE | 303.604.6351

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Ensemble Red Blend. Other winners from the judging include Bonacquisti 2018 Tempranillo, Colterris 2017 Petit Verdot, Plum Creek 2016 Cabernet Franc, Qutori Wines 2017 Syrah, Red Fox Cellars 2017 Nebbiolo and The Storm Cellar’s 2018 Dry Riesling and 2018 Riesling. Changeof-pace vintages are Carlson Cherry Wine, Vino Salida Vino Vermouth di Salida Rosso and Whitewater Hill 2018 Moscato. Tickets: historycolorado.org LOCAL FOOD NEWS Ska Street Brewstillery will open in the former Fate Brewing location, 1600 38th St. in Boulder, next year. The collaboration between Durango’s Ska Brewing and Palisade’s equally award-winning Peach Street Distillers features a Caribbean eatery, brewery, micro-distillery and live music spot. ... If you love the band The Roots, you’ll applaud the four-course local root vegetable-centric menu Acorn is serving before the band’s Denver show. The menu features bacon cornbread with rutabaga butter, yam dumplings, baby carrots with trout roe, sunchokes with green farro, beet pot au feu and for dessert, parsnip with sabayon, caramelized white chocolate and almond meringue. Questlove would approve. ... Make a cash donation or fill a bag with peanut butter, tuna and non-perishable food at King Soopers stores in Boulder and Louisville during Community Food Share’s Thanksgiving Let’s Bag Hunger food drive. TASTE OF THE WEEK Forget all your Beyond Impossible fake meat burgers and sausages and sample a singularly wonderful vegetarian entrée, the mushroom and ale pie at Lafayette’s Tip Top Pies shack. The bakery’s rich buttery, flaky pastry is wrapped around a thick, toothsome stack of mushroom slices simmered in an ale-enhanced gravy. It’s got a ton of umami-rich appeal that makes for a satisfying meal in a New Zealand-style crust.

TASTE THE STATE’S STELLAR WINES If you only attend one wine event this fall, I’d choose Colorado Uncorked. The gathering Nov. 15 at Denver’s History Colorado Center is a one-time chance to taste all the wines in the 2019 Colorado Governor’s Cup Collection. These 14 wines made from Colorado grapes (or other fruits) were blind-judged as the best the state has produced this year. Colorado Uncorked pairs the wines with small plates prepared by notable local chefs. If you don’t attend, consider saving this list to use when you are facing shelves of local wine but don’t know which ones are good. Two wines on the list are from Boulder’s BookCliff Vineyards, the 2016 Graciano and 2016

John Lehndorff is the former dining critic of the Rocky Mountain News. He hosts Radio Nibbles 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (streaming at kgnu.org).

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

WORDS TO CHEW ON “It drives me nuts that our food specialists insist on giving us the same number of chocolate, vanilla and butterscotch puddings, when the laws of physics dictate that chocolate will disappear much faster. No one gets a vanilla craving in space (or on Earth).” ― Astronaut Scott Kelly


New in brew: Spon and IPA rule the Range

Packages from Primitive, Ska, Oskar Blues, Finkle & Garf

by Michael J. Casey

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hen Longmont’s Primitive Beer opened last year, all of its offerings were available either on cask or in a box and bag. In a word: un-carbonated. But with its first bottle release this past October, Primitive Beer has bubbles; among them, its award-winning ShibbleShabble — MICHAEL J. CASEY a 2-year-old spontaneous (spon) ale brewed with 100% locally sourced Colorado ingredients: malted Genie barley, raw Antero wheat and aged Willamette hops. Packaged in a 25-ounce Champagne bottle with sloping shoulders and kept under a cork and cap, ShibbleShabble pops with effervescence. It pours out a hazy gold and kicks up a saison-like head that quickly settles into a tight sheen of foam. The aroma is resinous, vinous and slightly herbal. The flavor is subtle sourness with a touch of citric acid, lemongrass and a tinge of peppercorn. The hops and malt are secondary to style, which zigs and zags in the glass with a surprise at every turn. It’s like a Spanish Cava, only better. Primitive makes some of the oddest, funkiest and best beers in Boulder County, even if they’re not the most ubiquitous. Everywhere else, the eversturdy IPA still reigns supreme, and Colorado brewers are still pushing the envelope with hop usage and style permutations. And with Durango’s Ska Brewing Co. slated to join Boulder County in early 2020 — they are partnering with Peach Street Distillers to open Boulder’s first “brewstillery” at the former Fate facility on Arapahoe — now’s BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

the time to acquaint yourself with the brewery’s latest, The Hazy IPA. Pouring a turbid yellow with a nose loaded with stone fruit, a creamy mouth and popping hops, Ska’s Hazy IPA avoids the common pitfalls of chlorophyll and green yeast for a beer that won’t blow out your palate with saturation. No stranger to the hazy, Boulderbased Finkel & Garf’s latest collaboration is with Molly’s Spirits in Wheat Ridge: Molly’s IPA, a beer for the modern hop lover. Brewed with Huell Melon, Barbe Rouge and El Dorado, Molly’s IPA pops with papaya, lychee and a touch of honeydew. And at 5.7% alcohol by volume, Molly’s IPA won’t knock you down after two. Oskar Blues Brewery has a new hazy, this one aimed at lifestyle drinkers: One-y Hazy IPA. Clocking in at 100 calories per can, One-y is fruit-forward hops, light on sweetness and much more palatable than the bitter bombs of some session IPAs. One-y may not replace your go-to IPA, but if you’re looking to cut calories, it’ll do the trick. And if IPA is your thing, then the most intriguing package hitting shelves at your better liquor stores is CANarchy Craft Brewery Collective’s Coast to Coast IPA Mixed Pack: Expatriate, Three Weavers Brewing Company, California; Can-O-Bliss, Oskar Blues, Colorado; IPA, Deep Ellum Brewing Co., Texas; and Jai Alai, Cigar City Brewing, Florida. From West Coast bitterness to East Coast juice — with a stopover at pungent and dank — CANarchy’s mixed pack is a beery cross-country journey without leaving your couch. I

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COURTESY EFAA

The giving season

Boulder’s main food pantry back in service and seeking holiday donations after water damage ruined supplies and forced a major rebuild

by Matt Cortina 38

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When Halloween passes and we push our clocks back for daylight saving time, many of us turn our attentions to the holiday season. Lest we forget, the grocery stores starting stocking shelves with candy canes on Nov. 1. For many, the holiday season is special because of the food that accompanies it, from turkey and stuffing, to enchiladas, brisket and lamb roasts; from eggnog and glögg to abundant sweets, no matter the holiday. Because food helps us celebrate, it’s great timing that Emergency Family Assistance Association (EFAA) has refurbished and reopened its food pantry after a faulty sprinkler system went off and ruined it in July, along with some of the organization’s emergency shelter units and other facilities.

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

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BOULDER WEEKLY


Paela by Chef Miguel

“When you’re out today shopping, if you want to get one extra of everything and drop it of here, we’d appreciate it.” — Julie Van Domelen, executive director of Emergency Family Assistance Association EFAA Last year, EFAA served food to 1,304 families in Boulder County during November and December. This year, it’s accepting donations so hundreds of local low-income and food-insecure families may enjoy the same food traditions we all anticipate every year. “It’s almost unimaginable not to have the food pantry open during the holidays,” says EFAA Executive Director Julie Van Domelen. “We do turkeys, we do all kinds of food drives around the holidays. There are greater needs around this time of year because of the holiday season.” Van Domelen says she is “relieved” the food pantry is back in place in North Boulder. EFAA’s primary location serves as the main food bank in Boulder and provides food for about 400 households every week. Though EFAA was able to accept donations and distribute food and other necessities at a temporary location while the building was being refurbished, it wasn’t able to operate at full capacity. “I think we saw roughly the same number of people, but pounds [of food] out the door, pounds per person decreased,” Van Domelen says. In order to make the temporary food bank work, EFAA staff and volunteers moved hundreds of pounds of salvageable food and equipment to another building in North Boulder. The operation was up and running within a day of the water damage at EFAA’s main food bank. Van Domelen credits a “really heavy volunteer effort” to not only set up the temporary bank but get the main bank operational again. “Our food pantry runs through volunteers,” Van Domelen says. “They moved everything, moving food and paperwork and all kinds of stuff, then they moved it all back up here. They’ve just been wonderful.” The food bank is laid out like a regular, self-service grocery store, but during the holidays, EFAA seeks specific foods that people celebrating holidays might not be able to afford on their own. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

“During the holidays, we do drives [for] special items like turkeys or holiday foods, things like matzo and corn husks and pie crusts and those kinds of things,” Van Domelen says, adding that additionally, “a number of schools and faith-based communities run food drives around November and December,” which helps stock the pantry.” The EFAA food bank is seeking donations this year — and accepting them starting Nov. 7 — to stock those holiday staples and replenish the supply of food that was lost. Frozen turkeys are in demand, as are staples like canned chili and tuna, frozen meat, baby food, condiments and large diapers (size 4 and 5, in particular). But of course, Van Domelen says, anything is appreciated. “When you’re out today shopping, if you want to get one extra of everything and drop it off here, we’d appreciate it,” she says. EFAA’s importance to the community is underscored not only by the many volunteers that help operate it, but by the number of events run by local businesses (many in the food and beverage realm) in the county to support it. There are too many restaurants, breweries and food businesses to name here that host festivals and fundraisers that benefit EFAA, donate food and materials inkind, and otherwise support the food pantry. Too, EFAA provides supportive programs to complement the food and other items it offers to the community. On Nov. 8, for instance, it’ll host an event that provides attendees tips for hosting a holiday dinner on a budget (go to efaa.org/all-event-list/holidaymeals-budget for more information.) In short, it’s all a reminder of how deeply food is integrated into our lives and our communities, and how providing something as simple as a frozen turkey or an extra can of chili can help our neighbors have the happy holiday season (and beyond) we all want for ourselves. I

coffee – breakfast – lunch – tapas – dinner 5530 spine rd, boulder 303.719.1431 aperitivoboulder.com Executive Chef: Miguel Vazquez

$20 BOTTLE OF WINE TUESDAYS +1 free happy hour tapa 3pm - close

fresh, authentic, tasty japanese food

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AUTHENTIC JAPANESE CUISINE

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

LUNCH Tue-Fri, 11:30am – 2pm DINNER Sun, Tue-Thu 5pm–9pm Fri-Sat 5pm – 10pm. Closed Monday Follow us on instagram: Sushiyoshilouisville

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Aries psychologist James Hillman said

LIBRA

we keep “our images and fantasies at arm’s length because they are so full of love.” They’re also quite flammable, he added. They are always on the verge of catching fire, metaphorically speaking. That’s why many people wrap their love-filled images and fantasies in metaphorical asbestos: to prevent them from igniting a blaze in their psyches. In my astrological opinion, you Aries folks always have a mandate to use less asbestos than all the other signs — even none at all. That’s even truer than usual right now. Keep your images and fantasies extra close and raw and wild.

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Libran blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle was

TAURUS

SCORPIO

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Poet James Merrill was ecstatic when

he learned the Greek language. According to his biographer, he felt he could articulate his needs “with more force and clarity, with greater simplicity and less self-consciousness, than he ever could in his own language.” He concluded, “Freedom to be oneself is all very well; the greater freedom is not to be oneself.” Personally, I think that’s an exaggeration. I believe the freedom to be yourself is very, very important. But for you in the coming weeks, Taurus, the freedom to not be yourself could indeed be quite liberating. What might you do to stretch your capacities beyond what you’ve assumed is true about you? Are you willing to rebel against and transcend your previous self-conceptions?

asked, “What is your signature perfume?” She said she hadn’t found one. But then she described how she would like to smell: “somewhere between fresh and earthy: cinnamon and honey, a rose garden, saltwater baked in the sun.” The coming days will be an excellent time to indulge in your own fantasies about the special fragrance you’d like to emanate. Moreover, I bet you’ll be energized by pinpointing a host of qualities you would like to serve as cornerstones of your identity: traits that embody and express your uniqueness.

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Studies suggest that on average each of us has a social network of about 250 people, of whom 120 we regard as a closer group of friendly acquaintances. But most of us have no more than 20 folks we trust, and only two or three whom we regard as confidants. I suspect that these numbers will be in flux for you during the next twelve months, Scorpio. I bet you’ll make more new friends than usual, and will also expand your inner circle. On the other hand, I expect that some people who are now in your sphere will depart. Net result: stronger alliances and more collaboration.

SAGITTARIUS

cards called Oblique Strategies. Each card has a suggestion designed to trigger creative thinking about a project or process you’re working on. You Geminis might find it useful to call on Oblique Strategies right now, since you’re navigating your way through a phase of adjustment and rearrangement. The card I drew for you is “Honor thy error as hidden intention.” Here’s how I interpet it: An apparent lapse or misstep will actually be the result of your deeper mind guiding you to take a fruitful detour.

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: I blame and thank the Sagittarian part of me when I get brave and brazen enough to follow my strongest emotions where they want to lead me. I also blame and thank the Sagittarian part of me when I strip off my defense mechanisms and invite the world to regard my vulnerabilities as interesting and beautiful. I furthermore blame and thank the Sagittarian side of me on those occasions when I run three miles down the beach at dawn, hoping to thereby jolt loose the secrets I’ve been concealing from myself. I suspect the coming weeks will be a favorable time to blame and thank the Sagittarian part of you for similar experiences.

CANCER

CAPRICORN

hoping about the meaningful joys we’d love to bring into our lives. And yet few of us have been trained in the best strategies for manifesting our wishes and hopes. That’s the bad news. The good news is that now is a favorable time for you to upgrade your skills at getting what you want. With that in mind, I present you with the simple but potent wisdom of author Maya Angelou: “Ask for what you want and be prepared to get it.” To flesh that out, I’ll add: Formulate a precise statement describing your heart’s yearning, and then work hard to make yourself ready for its fulfillment.

1037) wrote 450 books on many topics, including medicine, philosophy, astronomy, geography, mathematics, theology and poetry. While young, he tried to study the Metaphysics of Aristotle, but had difficulty grasping it. Forty times he read the text, even committing it to memory. But he made little progress toward fathoming it. Years later, he was browsing at an outdoor market and found a brief, cheap book about the Metaphysics by an author named al-Farabi. He read it quickly, and for the first time understood Aristotle’s great work. He was so delighted he went out to the streets and gave away gifts to poor people. I foresee a comparable milestone for you, Capricorn: something that has eluded your comprehension will become clear, at least in part due to a lucky accident.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Musician Brian Eno made a deck of oracular

JUNE 21-JULY 22: We devote a lot of energy to wishing and

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: What are the key parts of your life — the sources and influences that enable you to be your most soulful self? I urge you to nourish them intensely during the next three weeks. Next question: What are the marginally important parts of your life — the activities and proclivities that aren’t essential for your long-term success and happiness? I urge you to corral all the energy you give to those marginally important things, and instead pour it into what’s most important. Now is a crucial time in the evolution of your relationship with your primal fuels, your indispensable resources, your sustaining foundations.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: “When she spoke of beauty, he spoke of the fatty tissue supporting the epidermis,” wrote short story author Robert Musil. He was describing a conversation between a man and woman who were on different wavelengths. “When she mentioned love,” Musil continued, “he responded with the statistical curve that indicates the rise and fall in the annual birthrate.” Many of you Virgos have the flexibility to express yourself well on both of those wavelengths. But in the coming months, I hope you’ll emphasize the beauty and love wavelength rather than the fatty tissue and statistical curve wavelength. It’ll be an excellent strategy for getting the healing you need.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: Persian polymath Avicenna (980-

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: In addition to being a key figure in

Renaissance art, 15th century Italian painter Filippo Lippi had a colorful life. According to legend, he was once held prisoner by Barbary pirates, but gained his freedom by drawing a riveting portrait of their leader. Inspired by the astrological factors affecting you right now, I’m fantasizing about the possibilty of a liberating event arriving in your life. Maybe you’ll call on one of your skills in a dramatic way, thereby enhancing your leeway or generating a breakthrough or unleashing an opportunity. (Please also re-read your horoscope from last week.)

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ning will come,” writes Piscean novelist William Gibson. He isn’t suggesting that we literally stand on top of a treeless hill in a thunderstorm and invite the lightning to shoot down through us. More realistically, I think he means that we should devotedly cultivate and discipline our highest forms of expression so that when inspiration finds us, we’ll be primed to receive and use its full power. That’s an excellent oracle for you.

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BY DAN SAVAGE Dear Dan: I am male. A close female friend was raped by an old acquaintance of mine. I knew this guy when we were tweens, I didn’t really care for him as we got older, so it goes. It turns out that a few years ago, he raped my friend in an alcohol blackout situation. I don’t know more than that. She says she considers the encounter “not strictly consensual” and confided that this guy didn’t react well when she tried to talk to him about it. This isn’t something she’s “out” about. My feelings toward this guy are pretty dark. Now he’s moved back to town and I see him around, and some good friends of mine who stayed in contact with him invite him to stuff. I don’t know what to say or how to act. I know I don’t want to talk to him or be his friend. I would like to tell my other friends about this guy so I don’t have to see him, but I can’t because it’s not my story to tell. I would rather just skip social events he’s at. But without an explanation, I doubt my friends will understand, and it feels like I’m surrendering my friends to someone who assaulted a dear friend. I told someone once to please not invite him to something or I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

answer. Even worse, questions will be put to “Chuck,” and he’ll be free to lie, minimize or spin. My only other piece of advice would be to follow your close female friend’s lead. You describe what transpired between her and Chuck as rape, while your friend describes the encounter as Dear AC: “I don’t like hanging out “not strictly consensual.” That’s a little with Chuck and would appreciate it if you more ambiguous. And just as this isn’t didn’t invite him to the party/show/bris/ your story to tell, AC, it’s not your experiwhatever.” ence to label. If your friend ROMAN ROBINSON “What’s the issue doesn’t describe what hapbetween you guys?” pened as rape — for what“Look, we go a long ever reason — you need to way back, and it’s not respect that. And does your something I want to disfriend want Chuck excluded cuss. It’s just awkward for from social events hosted us to be in the same by mutual friends or is she place.” able to tolerate his presThat’s the best you can ence? If it’s the latter, do do without outing your the same. If she’s not makfriend — without telling a ing an issue of Chuck being story that isn’t yours to tell at a party, you may not be — and it’s likely your mutudoing her any favors by al friends will be confused by the ask, making an issue of his presence yourself. AC, but you’ll just have to be at peace If you’re worried your friend tolerates with that. You could add something vague Chuck’s presence to avoid conflict and that omits identifying details (“He did a that being in the same space with him shitty thing to a friend”), but any details actually upsets her (or that the prospect of you share — however vague — could being in the same space with him keeps result in questions being put to you that her from those spaces), discuss that with you can’t answer or are tempted to her one-on-one and then determine — would skip it. They were confused, and it felt like an awkward ask. What should I say to my friends about this guy? What can I do to keep him out of my life? —Angry Confidant

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NOVEMBER 7, 2019

based on her feelings and her ask — what, if anything, you can do to advocate for her effectively without white-knighting her or making this not-strictly-consensualand-quite-possibly-rapey thing Chuck did to her all about you and your feelings. It’s really too bad Chuck reacted badly when your friend tried to talk to him about that night. If he’s an otherwise decent person who has a hard time reading people when he’s drunk, he needs to be made aware of that and drink less or not drink at all. If he’s a shitty person who takes advantage of other people when they’re drunk, he needs to know there will be social and potentially legal consequences for his behavior. The feedback your friend offered this guy — the way she tried to hold him accountable — could have prevented him from either fucking up like this again (if he’s a decent but dense guy) or taking advantage like this again (if he’s a shitty and rapey guy). If he was willing to listen, which he wasn’t. And since he wasn’t willing to listen… yeah, my money is on shitty and rapey, not decent but dense. On the Lovecast: A drug that cures heartbreak? Seriously. Listen at savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

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A rose by any other name By Seymour

F

ile this one in the “academics have way too much time on their hands” folder. My guess is you didn’t wake up this morning wondering whether people prefer the word cannabis to the word marijuana. But some-

body somewhere did. Despite the complete lack of interest in this vocabularic subject matter by anyone we’ve ever known anywhere at any time, the researchers at Vanderbilt University took it upon themselves to sort it all out. They talked to more than 1,600 people in their effort to determine

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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the answer to this not-so-burning question and, not so shockingly, this is what they found: Nobody cares. Or to put it in the researchers’ own words as they appeared in the journal PLOS-One, where the study’s findings were published, “Throughout each of our tests, we find no evidence to suggest that the public distinguishes between the terms ‘marijuana’ and ‘cannabis.’” You heard it here first folks, or actually you heard it in PLOS-One first, but whatever. What’s important is that you now know choosing between the terms cannabis and marijuana isn’t important. And that must be quite a relief to absolutely no one. In all fairness to the researchers who wasted somebody else’s money on this study, I think they may have been trying to figure out the best language to put forward in order to garner public support for legalization efforts. Which means this study might have

NOVEMBER 7, 2019

actually had value about 30 states ago. I could have saved those Vandy researchers a lot of time and money by just reminding them of a little THC history. If you put the word “medical” in front of any moniker for pot it will pass at the ballot box about 95% of the time even in crazy redneck places like Oklahoma. I suspect medical ganja, medical weed, medical herb of the magnificent sacred light or medical anything else would all get the A-OK come election time. And that’s not just because people like to get high without the risk of losing their voting rights or getting to spend time with their favorite local cop. People vote for medical (insert your preferred pot term here) because the vast majority of humans now realize that cannabis/marijuana has amazing usefulness for what ails folks, whether it’s a cancer patient’s nausea, a child’s seizures or grandma’s arthritis. And when you put those medical weed/pot/ grass supporters into the pool of recreational cannabis/marijuana enthusiasts, you get a pretty easy majority of voters come election time. Be sure and join us here in the pages of the Journal BW next week, when we publish the final results of our study on whether people prefer to call their cannabis/marijuana cigarette-type smoking devices “joints” or “doobies.” It could make all the difference in the world… or not.

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South Dakota likely to vote on recreational, medical pot initiatives By Paul Danish

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t looks like one of the most socially conservative states in the country will be voting on not one but two marijuana legalization proposals next year. On Nov. 3, activists in South Dakota submitted a petition with more than 50,000 signatures for a proposed state constitutional amendment legalizing recreational marijuana in the state. A separate group submitted a petition with more than 30,000 names for a state law legalizing medical marijuana. The constitutional initiative needs 33,921 valid signatures to make the ballot, while the statutory initiative needs 16,961, so both initiatives have a good chance of getting on the ballot. They also have a good chance of encountering serious opposition. According to Kyle Jaeger at Marijuana Moment, South Dakota’s Republican governor vetoed a hemp legalization bill last March, and the state’s Republican Party actively urged residents not to sign the petitions. However, the pro-legalization campaigns have a couple of formidable allies. According to Jaeger, both initiatives are backed by the Marijuana Policy Project and the New Approach PAC. The

Marijuana Policy Project was the group behind Colorado’s Amendment 64, the initiative that in 2012 made Colorado the first state to legalize recreational pot. Not surprisingly, the South Dakota recreational initiative looks a lot like Amendment 64. It’s unknown if there will be any

attempt at a squeeze play to keep the initiatives off the ballot (by disqualifying signatures on technicalities, for instance), but opponents might want to be cautious in that regard. That’s because the sponsor of the recreational initiative is Brendan Johnson, a former federal prosecutor. • • • • According to a story in The Coloradoan, about 80 of Colorado’s 270

incorporated towns allow marijuana sales. Loveland is not one of them. In last Tuesday’s election, Loveland voters rejected a proposal to allow recreational and medical dispensaries in the town. Initial returns showed the measure getting about 47% of the vote. • • • • Marijuana journalist Mike Adams had a piece in a recent issue of Forbes pointing to a couple of inconvenient truths about marijuana legalization — that legal pot has failed to deliver on some of the major talking points of the legalization movement. One of the biggest arguments of legalization advocates, he says, is that legal marijuana would wipe out the illegal market. It hasn’t. In California, the illegal market is still bigger than the legal one, Adams says, with the result that the state took in only about half of the $643 million in tax revenue it was expected to collect in the first year. Adams suggests that California’s high pot taxes are in part to blame and cites a forecast from BDS Analytics And Arcview Market Research that predicts it could take five years before the legal market starts outselling the illegal one.

(It’s worth noting that although alcohol prohibition was repealed in 1934, bootleggers continued to operate for years, with some still being busted in the 1960s.) Adams also points out that although legalization and decriminalization is continually spreading, the number of U.S. marijuana arrests has actually gone up, not down. FBI data shows that more than 500,000 people a year are still being busted for pot, and that marijuana arrests in 2018 were actually higher than in 2016 and 2017. This isn’t as odd as it might sound. While 12 states have legalized recreational use, 38 haven’t. In states that legalized medical marijuana but not recreational, people without a medical card can still be arrested for possession. And the fact that medical marijuana is available might give recreational users in those states a false sense of security. • • • • Speaking of pot busts, California pot busters are claiming they seized more than $1.5 billion in illegally grown marijuana plants during the state’s annual eradication raids. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra claims the raiders seized 950,000 plants from 350 illegal grows, arrested 150 people and grabbed 168 weapons. The raiders admit they could not put a street value on the plants seized but estimated wholesale prices of $1,600 a plant. $1,600 a plant wholesale, huh? It makes you wonder what they’re vaping.

ANY SHELF

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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