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F R E E E v e r y T h u r s d a y F o r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / N o v. 2 8 - D e c . 4 , 2 0 1 9


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departments 5 7 21 28 29 31 38 41 43 45 46

The Anderson Files: Why Medicare for All is the only answer Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: Thanksgiving, by Nicole Kelly Film: Divorce, more or less, in ‘Marriage Story’ Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Profiles in brew: Laura Lodge of Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywines Festival Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Bluff calls Weed Between the Lines: It’s not easy being green. Or is it? Cannabis Corner: Trump says it out loud: Prohibition doesn’t work

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NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Publisher, Fran Zankowski Editor, Joel Dyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Coordinator, Corey Basciano Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo Cover, Clay Jones November 28, 2019 Volume XXVII, Number 15 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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Why Medicare for All is the only answer By Dave Anderson

U

nder our current patchwork health care system, the United States spends many times more than other rich nations on health care administration, pharmaceuticals and doctors’ salaries. But we have the 29th best health care system, according to the Lancet. In 2018, Canada spent approximately 11% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health care and has the planet’s 14th highest quality health care system. All of its citizens are covered from cradle to grave with single-payer, government-provided health insurance (free at the point of service with no premiums). They are free to go to any doctor, hospital or clinic. I

During that same year, the U.S. spent approximately 18% of its GDP on health care. But we have around 30 million people who are uninsured. More than half of Americans delay or don’t get health care because they can’t afford it. Healthcare was the most important issue in the 2018 elections. Voters were upset by attempts to destroy the Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) and alarmed by rising premiums and drug prices. It continues to be the predominant issue in the 2020 Democratic primary. Trump claims he is going to come up with the absolutely greatest health care plan. Meanwhile, he and his fellow Republicans are bludgeoning the ACA, Medicare, Medicaid and the VA with big budget cuts and privatization schemes. This spring, Trump said that Sen. Rick Scott (R-Florida) would help create a “spectacular” plan for him. That’s not entirely reassuring. see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 6

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In the 1990s, Scott was the CEO of Columbia/HCA, a company that owned more than 340 hospitals, 135 surgery centers and 550 home health locations. He resigned in 1997, the same year the FBI announced an investigation of the company for massive Medicare and Medicaid fraud. Columbia/HCA would plead guilty to 14 corporate felonies and pay out some $1.7 billion in criminal fines and penalties in what the Justice Department called the “largest health care fraud case in U.S. history.” While Trump’s health care bullshit and lies are being challenged, the movement for single-payer Medicare for All has grown enormously. This has provoked a response from powerful health care interests. In June, the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen released a report entitled “Fever Pitch: Surge in Opposition Lobbying and Advocacy Validates the Credibility of the Medicare for All Movement.” The study disclosed that “between the first quarter of 2018 and the first quarter of 2019, the number of organizations hiring lobbyists whose lobbying disclosure forms indicated that they worked on Medicare for All increased by nearly seven times, and the overall number of lobbyists hired increased ninefold.” Public Citizen program associate Craig Sandler, the report’s author, said that “the increase in lobbying against Medicare for All serves as validation from our opposition that this movement has arrived.” The report noted that “the diverse and powerful array of trade groups, conservative activist organizations, GOP-linked establishment groups, and health care industry interests launching an all-out advertising blitz against Medicare for All further reinforces this reality.” Arguments about Medicare for All have played a big role in the Democratic presidential debates. The more moderate candidates say that many Americans love their employerprovided private insurance and don’t want it taken away. I suspect many may like their doctor but how much deep abiding love is there for faceless behemoths such as Aetna and Cigna?

Joe Biden and Pete Buttigieg claim Medicare for All is “elitist” because it takes away freedom of choice. This is quite dishonest. Workers don’t have the choice to keep their plan. That is their employer’s prerogative. Rising costs have been forcing employers to shop around for plans that are cheaper for them and more expensive for their employees. Private insurers restrict your choice of doctors by authorized networks. They restrict your access to health care by cost with deductibles, co-pays and other out-of-pocket expenses. Under single-payer, your insurance is funded by progressive taxes and you can go to any doctor or hospital. You don’t get a wallet biopsy when you see your doctor. Recently, the Los Angeles Times and the Kaiser Family Foundation conducted a nationwide poll and found that “(s)oaring deductibles and medical bills are pushing millions of American families to the breaking point, fueling an affordability crisis that is pulling in middle-class households with health insurance as well as the poor and uninsured.” Times reporter Noam N. Levey writes: “The explosion in cost-sharing is endangering patients’ health as millions, including those with serious illnesses, skip care. ... Half said costs had forced them or a close family member to delay a doctor’s appointment, not fill a prescription or postpone some other medical care in the previous year. ... Hardest hit in the cost shift are lower-income workers and those with serious medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer — who are more than twice as likely as healthier workers, according to the Times/KFF poll, to report problems paying medical bills and to say they’ve cut back on spending for food, clothing and other household items.” Many desperate people are turning to charities and GoFundMe to get necessary health care. This is outrageous. It is time for us to stand up and fight. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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In response to Charlie Danaher’s Nov. 14 letter (Re: “Build on open space?”) about building on open space to make Boulder more affordable, I have this to say: As a person born in Arvada 60 years ago and raised in Boulder since age 7, I, needless to say, have seen a lot of growth in Boulder, and Colorado, especially in the last 7-8 years with 100,000 people moving here annually, mostly along the Front Range. Boulder had been pretty affordable until cannabis was legalized in Colorado, Google moved to Boulder, and word got out about the awesome outdoor recreation opportunities on all the open space. A friend of mine in Philadelphia said, “Google will ruin your city.” Maybe so, but changing Boulder’s building regulations and building on open space will definitely ruin our city. Those are primary reasons why so many people want to live, play, work and move their corporations here. The only way I can continue to afford to live in Boulder, as a middle-income household, is because I live in a manufactured home, though in a park where the lot rent is rapidly approaching the price of a one bedroom apartment. If we increase population density on behalf of affordability, how will we limit greed-motivated housing cost increases? I wonder, Charlie, if you would like a high-rise, 200- to 300-unit apartment building on the west side of your house (blocking the mountain

view) with as many families, with at least as many vehicles driving by your house daily? Has density in other cities (i.e. Seattle, San Francisco) kept housing costs “affordable”? Instead, how about preventing businesses from moving to Boulder without an affordable housing and transportation plan for their employees? Or let’s get the companies here that are benefitting from all the tax breaks to fund mass transit for their workers, and the service industry employees supporting them, that in-commute to Boulder? Or telecommuting, carpooling, ride-sharing, company-funded transport vans...? You know how a building has a maximum occupancy? Maybe a state should too, based on ecological sustainability, human and wildlife wellbeing, water availability, infrastructure maintenance, population diversity, etc. I just don’t find it comforting, as someone said to me recently, that, “at least the pollution on the Front Range is not as bad as Los Angeles.” (Even L.A. should not be as bad as L.A.) I see the optimistic opportunity in this difficult situation to keep beautifully unique places from getting even more damaged. I agree with you, Charlie, that, “We can make a difference in other people’s lives if we would dare to.” And I would add that we all may need to dare to “take a hit to our investment portfolios” to make a substantial difference in other’s lives (and our own) locally and globally. Ronda Lawrence/Boulder

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAT AMENT

SWAPPING LEADS

DAVE REARICK and Bob Kamps standing below the Diamond on Longs Peak. The pair made the first climb of this famous wall in 1960.

Reflections on the ‘Golden Age’ of climbing, from Dave Rearick and the Diamond to ‘Curving Crack’

by Pat Ament

IN

1964, as fall began a chilly dissolve into winter, Dave Rearick and I drove the 11-plus miles up Boulder Canyon and made a free ascent of a short route on Castle Rock. I named it “Curving

Crack.” I was aware of this left-leaning depression up vertical granite and thought to show it to my friend and mentor, Rearick. Most people will recognize his name. He and Bob Kamps were the first to climb the Diamond — that sheer wall on the East Face of Longs Peak — in 1960. No Colorado climb has received more notoriety than their first ascent of the Diamond. Those days remain for me indelible. I was 13 and followed the various newspaper accounts. My parents drove me along the Peak to Peak Highway to get a closer view of the great East Face. After the Diamond, Rearick accepted a teaching position in the math department at the University of Colorado. The dean had followed the news about the climb and invited Rearick to apply. Rearick moved into a small apartment on East College, in September 1961. Among his first climbs around Boulder was the “Grand Giraffe,” in Eldorado Canyon. His partner George Hurley could not do the overhanging crack and invited Rearick to give it a try. Rearick made straightforward work of the notorious challenge. BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

During the spring semester of ’62, Judith Chase was his teaching assistant. They fell in love, married, and in February 1963 moved to an upstairs apartment on Mapleton Street. He immediately started to search out potential free climbs around the area. When I heard he lived in Boulder, I phoned him, probably in late February or early March 1963. Rearick remembers I was excited and a bit breathless on the phone when I said, “We should climb.” At his upstairs Mapleton Street apartment, I met a meticulous man who had good manners. He was professional, with a clean appearance and high character. We had mutual interests, such as rock climbing and music, and right away we practiced various gymnastics. He showed me three presses into handstands, and then he lay on his back, had me place my hands into his, and he pressed me into a handstand. He made us a protein “shake,” a pasty concoction he said would build muscle. Judy made tea from mint she grew in her garden. At Castle Rock the day we did “Curving Crack,” Rearick had with him several of the pitons he and Kamps used on the Diamond. These included some of Yvon Chouinard’s earliest prototypes, made of tough chromoly steel Chouinard had begun to hand-forge in his small shop in California. One heavy piton was made from an angle iron, sawn and a hole drilled in it by Bill Feurerer, a guy we knew as I

Dolt. With its weight, Rearick and Kamps were happy on the Diamond to have only one of those. They’d also brought some “lightening holes,” made by Dick Long and Chouinard, named for holes drilled in the sheet iron to make it less heavy. Still later these were called bongs. Rearick had early knifeblade pitons made by Chouinard and/or Chuck Wilts. Rearick’s favorite was a piton made by Herb Swedlund, a small horizontal, useful size made of heat-treated alloy. Rearick carried this piton up virtually every climb he would do. I loved history and liked to imagine the earlier days. On the Diamond, Rearick and Kamps used oval Bedayan carabiners. Kamps used a wood-handle hammer made in California, and Rearick used a wood-handle hammer made by Holubar, in Boulder. The head of Rearick’s hammer later would break off in Eldorado when he and Bob Culp free-climbed “T-2.” The head of that hammer would go missing in the brush on the slope below that climb. The hammer held together, though, for the Diamond. While they took six ropes up the Diamond, they had minimum water and a shortage of food. The best meals were raisins and candy. Rearick and Kamps were both influenced by the Sierra Club, although Kamps was more extreme than other members of that club. They had to fill out an application for permission to climb the Diamond, and the application, they mused, was more difficult than the climb. They were required to have a support see REARICK Page 10

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REARICK from Page 9

party, and a back-up rescue group. Many of Boulder’s Rocky Mountain Rescue hesitated to participate, because they were unhappy Colorado climbers such as Dale Johnson and Layton Kor had previously been denied permission to climb the Diamond. So, Rearick and Kamps enlisted the Evergreen Rescue Group along with a few Boulder climbers and those in the Rocky Mountain Rescue who refused to go along with the boycott. No one knew if the Evergreen people knew the first thing about climbing, and they probably didn’t, but the rangers had little clue about anything. The rangers must have been impressed when Holubar Mountaineering loaded a 1,200-foot spool of Colombian rope onto a horse and sent it the 5 miles up to the shelter cabin. Rearick and Kamps made their ascent of the Diamond during the first two and a half days of August, 1960. I was about to start the eighth grade. Large telephoto shots published in the newspaper gave me a glimpse of the straight-up nature of the forbidden wall, two climbers lashed to the vast upright surface of granite. I imagined the delirious exposure beneath their feet. The Diamond was not Rearick’s first experience with the East Face of Longs. Nine years earlier, in 1951, he applied for a summer job at a YMCA Camp northwest of Estes. While employed at the camp, he and Canadian Jack Hilton went AWOL on July 1. They made a long, trailless trek to Longs Peak from the camp, through Estes, the way the crow flies to the mountain. They could see the mountain and, in this extreme cross-country jaunt, stumbled through foothills, into forest, around rocks and lakes, to Storm Pass — where Estes Cone and Thunder Mountain connect. They continued onward past Jim’s Grove to the Chasm Lake cutoff and finally up to the base of the towering face of the mountain. Had they gone by car, along the road, it would have been 12 miles to the ranger station and then another rugged six miles to the foot of the rock face. They did not know how to rock climb but were eager to see what they could teach themselves. Jack had a 50-foot rope, a few carabiners, and had hitchhiked to the mountain town of Ward to buy a small number of pitons from Gerry Cunningham. Rearick had not seen a piton before. He brought a hatchet that could be used to hammer in the pitons. They began up the granite edifice. The two ascended in the area of Alexander’s Chimney and arrived at the top of Longs at sunset. The summit was hardly the end of this astonishing epic. They climbed down the north side of the treacherous mountain in dark, hiked down the next eight or so miles to the ranger station, hitch-hiked back to the YMCA camp, and arrived back at midnight. • • • • Rearick and I climbed many times at Castle Rock. One day, in 1963, we did a route Royal Robbins later would name “Athlete’s Feat.” When 10

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PAT AMENT Rearick saw the third pitch of pushed the stanthis route, a 50-foot, overhangdards of climbing, ing crack that leaned sharply to pioneering routes like ‘Supremacy the right in a big dihedral, his Crack’ in Eldorado attraction to these type of steep Canyon. liebacks seized him. He was beginning to be famous for them, what with his overhanging Split Pinnacle lieback in Yosemite, the third 5.10 climb in the Valley. I was in good shape and ready to attempt the crack, yet I put up no resistance when Rearick asked if he could lead it. Too wide for any normal piton, the crack might take one of our large, aluminum bongs. He stepped across the ledge to the crack, leaned back with hands against the crack’s edge, and pulled into a lieback. He slid his hands up the edge of the crack, as he walked his feet higher and higher on the smooth right wall. Less than halfway up the crack, he stood on a quarter-inch wide, flat foothold that ran horizontally across the right wall. He pulled with his left hand against the crack, to hold himself in, as he hammered in a bong with his right hand. He clipped a carabiner to the eye of the bong and continued up. Many or most climbers would have needed a rest now and either reversed the moves to the big ledge or lowered on the rope through the piton back to the ledge. But this was Dave Rearick. He proceeded higher, in the strenuous lieback. At last he reached the upper lip of the crack, where the rightleaning wall curves up and slightly left. Two or three touchy moves from easier rock, and a good distance above the bong, he was aware of the situation. The bong might not stop him, were he to slip at the coming difficult transition out of the lieback. If the piton held, he might hit the ledge from the stretch of the rope. His tie-in to the rope was a single loop around his waist and a bowline, as was mine — not a comfortable way to fall. I paid close attention, as I belayed, and slid my right hand as far up the rope as

NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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I could, ready to pull in a large amount of slack fast. Rearick stepped onto a small patch of flaky, crumbly granite with his right foot, and that foot whipped out to the right — off the rock. He plummeted head-first. I pulled in every inch of rope with blistering speed. The rope jolted tight against me, and his head stopped about two inches above the big ledge. He hung there a few shocked seconds and righted himself. Instead of giving up for the day, as most any climber would do, Rearick stood on the ledge and reflected, in his quiet, composed way, “If I don’t go back up now I’ll develop a mental block.” He concentrated his mind and every tendon and muscle on the moves. With my right hand high on the rope, I was ready again. He moved up and out of view, onto a small ledge above. The lead was worthy of the new 5.10 grade. A soft voice told me I was on belay. • • • • To my surprise — a year later in 1964 at the foot of Castle Rock’s “Curving Crack” — Rearick asked me to lead. He wrapped the rope around his lower back, and I started up. His old, white Colombian rope had some of the DNA of the Diamond in it. Thirty feet up this slippery inset crack, winter arrived. My fingers had already become numb. Rain soon became snow. To smear with climbing shoes against the granite was like smearing against the ice of a frozen lake with hard dress shoes. The climb angles in a gentle curve up left, and the higher a climber moves the more vertical the rock becomes with fewer holds. As I hit the steeper rock, everything was wet. My hands lost all feeling, as I crushed fingertips into the shallow crack. I came to the obvious black streak where water had run down the rock for decades. The route was polished to a black pearl. The upper, steepest last moves required a rounded lieback. I leaned to the right, against the slick finger holds, as my feet smeared on the slimy left wall. When my body wanted to barn-door left, I reached up left and planted a palm over a flat, round ledge. I moved my hand up to where my fingertips caught on a sandy edge. A big step left onto a small, sloping foothold, and I pulled myself onto the ledge. Snow whipped across the granite. I put in an anchor and was on belay. The wet rock required exact technique. Rearick started up, as fast as he could climb. By the time he reached the difficult moves, the rock was white. He did not hesitate to call for a tight rope. I pulled the rope, and he used it to hoist himself onto the ledge. He was impressed that I’d freed the pitch in this minor hurricane of rain and snow. I was not used to seeing Rearick struggle on a rock. A reader might wonder why I would write about so small a climb. It is because this was the moment — I sensed — at which Rearick viewed me as the stronger climber. This climb alone would not support such a conclusion, but he seemed to resolve from this day that a new standard was on the way BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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and that I was among those who would establish it. Rearick was generous. From here out, more often than not, he would subtly place himself in a secondary role. I was flattered by this and, as always, impressed with his gentlemanly spirit. He respected people and always gave them credit. I preferred the idea that Rearick was my mentor, the Yosemite climber, the strong, free-climbing master, that friend of Kamps on the Diamond. I did not want a different Rearick. He expected me to improve as a climber and did not feel dishonored if I climbed moves he had trouble doing. Rearick had a competitive side, when the spirit moved him, but as a general rule he did not like to compete — other than in playful ways or with himself. Climbing, like art and music, was individual. People now tell me they think 5.10 might be an appropriate grade for “Curving Crack.” (It’s currently rated at 5.9+ according to the Mountain Project.) I will say it was a bit more difficult in the rain and snow, required a certain attention in the crummy shoes we had back then, and strained the arms to place a piton where a small Alien or Friend today slides easily in. Now, in July of 2019, Rearick is well into his 80s and lives in a Boulder apartment at the Meridian, his right hand mostly paralyzed from a stroke a few years ago. He and I talk often on the phone, and he has his same amazing memory for detail. He can say the exact date of almost any event in his life. In his day, Rearick was a great climber. He also was a classical guitarist, a math professor and an astronaut candidate who went very far in the difficult elimination process. He took up cycling and one day rode south from Boulder to Golden, then west steeply to the top of Berthoud Pass, and down past Winter Park, on north to Grand Lake, over Trail Ridge Road, through Estes Park and back to Boulder — a more than 200-hundred-mile “super loop” over two major passes in a single day. He also would do this loop the opposite direction. One day he pedaled his bike the steep 36 miles from Boulder to Longs Peak, rambled the 20-mile round-trip up and down the mountain, and rode home to Boulder. These are all “minor details” of what he later would call a relatively “uneventful life.” I climbed “Curving Crack” many times after that first free ascent with Rearick, and I thought of him each time. The days move on, yet Rearick and I muse that we did live life. We had climbing when it was young, when we were developing it, and when the rocks were not overrun by the masses. I think of the solitude I felt at times, when I could hear the slightest breeze through the tops of pines, the sound of a nearby river, or maybe the soft scraping as my partner brushed some part of his clothes against the rock. The experience involved so many sensations, so much beauty. To be with a friend was well worth the pain of frozen fingers. I suppose I don’t have to say why we called those years “the golden age.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Can Divestment help fix PERA?

New analysis highlights the financial risk of investing in fossil fuels

by Angela K. Evans

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here’s a growing movement both in Colorado and around the world calling on investment managers to rid their funds of coal and other fossil fuels stock in the interest of mitigating climate change. According to a new analysis, divesting from such industries may now be financially prudent as well. Earlier this month, the Fossil Free PERA Coalition released the results of a new financial study that shows Colorado’s Public Employees Retirement Association (PERA), along with the much larger California state pension funds CalSTRS and CalPERS, lost almost $19 billion over the last decade by not divesting from fossil fuels. It could be the motivation policy makers need to transition funds to more environmentally friendly investments. “To me this is a nice bonus that, among all of the ethical reasons to divest, there’s also some financial motive,” says Devon Reynolds, a 27-year-old CU graduate student researching the divestment movement, who is in the process of enrolling in PERA. PERA, the statewide pension fund with roughly 600,000 members including current and former teachBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ers, state troopers, snowplow drivers, corrections officers, public servants and others, has seen its fair share of scrutiny in recent years. Today PERA is only about 60% funded, despite boasting the ability to pay retirement benefits in perpetuity just two decades ago. The state legislature took action in 2018 in an attempt to keep PERA on track for full funding by 2047. But by the end of the year, PERA reported a 3.5% decline from the previous year, losing approximately $1.8 billion on investments — a blow to the pension fund that already pays out more than it brings in. For those involved with the Fossil Free PERA Coalition, divestment could be part of the solution to PERA’s troubles. For more than two years, the coalition has been pressuring the PERA Board of Trustees to divest from fossil fuels, with about 1,000 PERA members and beneficiaries signing onto a petition that asks the Board to conduct a more thorough carbon risk assessment for the fund. “The people in the Fossil Free PERA Coalition are concerned about the issue from a variety of angles, not just the moral and ethical angle of how fossil fuels are contributing to climate change, but also the fiduciary angle and the concern of I

how our fossil fuel investments are going to be playing out in the next 10 to 20 years,” says Deb McNamara, 350 Colorado’s liaison with Fossil Free PERA. The new analysis comes on the heels of 2019’s failed House Bill 1270. The legislation never made it out of the House Finance Committee, but would have funded an unbiased, third-party study of “the climate-related financial risk of PERA’s portfolio and the exposure of the fund to long-term risks.” Instead, funded by individual contributions from PERA members and beneficiaries, Fossil Free PERA commissioned Toronto-based media and research firm Corporate Knights to analyze the pension fund. It looked at PERA’s publicly disclosed holdings over the last decade, calculating a fossil-free scenario that excluded stocks in any companies that generate more than 10% of revenue from extracting, refining, transporting or burning coal, oil or gas. In this scenario, PERA could have generated an additional $1.77 billion — which translates to an additional $2,932 per member — in revenue over the last 10 years had it divested from fossil fuels and instead invested see DIVESTMENT Page 14

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in other sectors of its existing portfolio, according to the report. Comparatively, other industries like tech, health care, retail and entertainment saw significant gains over the same time period. In its methodology statement, Corporate Knights acknowledges that the numbers may understate the potential savings, given that the analysis didn’t use the entire portfolio. The results aren’t necessarily surprising considering that for the past 10 years, the energy sector, which excludes renewable energy, has continuously underperformed, finishing last in 2018, compared to others on the S&P 500. “When you have a sector that’s in transition, that’s shrinking, that has been shrinking and all the signs are that the shrinkage is accelerating, then as a fiduciary at some point you have to acknowledge that this is a sunset sector, and we have to reconsider our allocation to it,” says Toby Heaps with Corporate Knights. During the last century, there was a lot of money to be made in extractive industries, particularly fossil fuels, but that’s all changed in the last decade, he says. What used to be more of a moral or science-based argument for divestment has now become an investment conversation. “Now the actual growth has tapered off, expectations around the speed of that growth tapering off are changing by the day and the direction is not good for the market confidence in those sectors and the share prices reflect it,” Heaps says. “Today if you asked serious people, like the chief investment officers with the most sophisticated investment chops in the world, do you think that fossil fuels are likely to make more money than the broader market over the next 10 years, I don’t think you’ll find a single serious person put up their hand.” The new analysis only reinforces the divestment argument, according to Marie Venner, who became a PERA member in 1999 while she was a manager with the Colorado Department of Transportation. She has been appealing to the PERA board to divest for environmental reasons for more than 15 years. “I don’t know if I would have expected the last 10 years to have seen such a drop in fossil fuel profNOVEMBER 28, 2019

its,” she says. “We’re kind of funding our own destruction if we stay invested in fossil fuels, both financially and in terms of the economy and future of our state.” Fossil Free PERA introduced the report during public comment at the Nov. 15 PERA Board of Trustees meeting. Reynolds says some of the board members were receptive, acknowledging the problem of climate change as a real threat. But that didn’t come with any promises for divestment. “I think there’s openness to the conversation, but we don’t know how far that openness goes,” she says. According to a published statement, the PERA Board doesn’t generally support divestment efforts arguing that “increased divestment is costly and limits PERA’s ability to effectively seek the best risk-adjusted returns to secure the retirement benefits of public servants.” However, the board does make room for a possible exception to its stance — if opposing divestment is “inconsistent with its fiduciary duty.” Ron Baker, executive director of Colorado PERA, takes issue with the Corporate Knights analysis. In an email statement, he says, “The methodology used in the study is flawed, as it implies that PERA should have made investment decisions in 2009 using information from 2019.” He emphasizes PERA’s responsibility to “consider all material factors, including those that may qualify under [environmental, social and corporate governance], in making investment decisions.” Although he does also acknowledge that PERA’s investment managers consider “the

effects of changing demand over time.” If PERA does take action to divest, it would be the first to do so. In the U.S. to date, no state pension fund has divested from fossil fuels. But a handful of other large pension funds have, advocates argue. Worldwide, 144 pension funds have joined the divestment movement according to Fossil Free PERA — 61 since 2016 alone, including the University of California and New York City, which announced at the beginning of 2019 it would reinvest in climate change solutions. “Ideologically, the Fossil Free PERA Coalition would wish that PERA would make the choice to reinvest some of those monies into local renewable energy infrastructure and jobs here in Colorado specifically,” McNamara says. “With this report, it’s not focused on that per se. It’s looking at the broader issue of the performance of the fossil fuel investments and where else PERA could invest and do better, quite frankly.” For many concerned with the ever-increasing impacts of climate change, this is just one more reason to cut all ties with the fossil fuel industry. And, appealing to their fiduciary duty, they’re hoping this argument is enough for the PERA Board of Trustees. “The fact that we have some quantifications of these concerns beyond the threat to Colorado and our world is really helpful and I wish they (the PERA Board) were following this more closely,” Venner says. “I wish they were more tapped into what’s happening. They’re putting our retirement and our future at risk.”

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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FRANCESCA WOODMAN, UNTITLED PHOTOGRAPH, CIRCA 1975-1978. GELATIN SILVER PRINT. GEORGE LANGE COLLECTION. IMAGE COURTESY GEORGE LANGE © ESTATE OF FRANCESCA WOODMAN / CHARLES WOODMAN / ARTIST RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK.

The Francesca box MCA Denver exhibit humanizes one of Boulder’s most celebrated photographers

by Caitlin Rockett

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eorge Lange kept the box shut for nearly 40 years. So long as he did, his old friend Francesca Woodman stayed alive, in a way. The box was a time capsule of their friendship, a snapshot of their time at the Rhode Island School of Design, where both studied photography in the late ’70s. There was an old French fry, some handwritten invitations from Woodman inviting Lange over to her loft for ice cream, letters from Woodman’s father, postcards from her mother and, of course, photographs. When Woodman left RISD for New York, she told Lange to grab whatever he wanted from her loft in Providence. That’s what filled the box. Lange could hardly know his friend would take her own life soon after. Plenty has been said about Francesca Woodman’s death, about her serious nature and serious work ethic; about her artist parents, George and Betty, and their nontraditional approach to raising Francesca and her brother, Charlie; about how Francesca’s fame far overshadowed her parents’ art; about how the young

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photographer from Boulder struggled to find an audience for her work during her final years in New York before death, as it so often does, made her brilliance impossible to ignore. But when Lange looked at the box, all he could think

about was friendship. “You have this feeling that as long as you don’t open it that she’s still alive inside of the box — and she kind of was,” Lange says over the phone from his home in Pittsburgh. “And then her mother ... and her father created this legacy for her and she became very famous. “It was all done under the cloud — not that they wanted it to be that way — but it wound up being under the cloud of her death, kind of like Sylvia Plath, and everything was seen through that filter,” Lange says. “So no one ever saw a picture of her smiling — ever. And we laughed a lot. She was silly, you know, not all the time, but here was that whole piece of it. So this whole narrative went out in the world and she became very well-known and the work was beautiful and all that, but I felt like there was a single chapter that I had experienced with her.” Inside the box Lange carried with him for decades was a chapter of Woodman’s life Lange thought the world ought to see. A chapter with smiles and French

NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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fries and ice cream. Aided by Nora Burnett Abrams, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, Lange mounted Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation at the museum and published a book of the same name. A hallmark of Abrams’ curatorial work is her interest in the lesser-known narratives of an artist’s life. As curator at MCA in 2017, she presented Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980, a collection of works made by the artist during the years he shared a small apartment in the East Village in New York with his friend Alexis Adler. When George Lange approached her with his box of memories of Francesca Woodman, Abrams understood exactly what the box represented to him. “What George cared very much about and I recognized was the human aspect to this material,” Abrams says. “He had letters that had nothing to do with her artwork. They are just lines between friends. ... There was just so much joy and silliness and kind of character and personality that was contained in that. He wanted to make sure in sharing it with the world we preserved that. I recognized that’s what made this body of work he had so special. We’re going to allow people to see this artist as a person, not a mythic figure. [Woodman’s] work is enigmatic and it’s so suggestive of a lot of different ideas and themes. She can’t be pinned down. The nature of her death allowed people to treat the material very seriously and with so much gravitas ... but there’s so BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


GEORGE LANGE, UNTITLED PHOTOGRAPH, CIRCA 1975-1978. GELATIN SILVER PRINT. GEORGE LANGE COLLECTION. COURTESY THE ARTIST.

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much more. She was joyful in the studio.” Woodman’s handwritten letters are particularly intimate, with her angular penmanship, puns, inside jokes and stream-of-consciousness approach to communication. In a letter to Lange, she mentions missing her house in Providence, wonders what it means when her nose is cold, then admits her “train of thought looks to be heading to oatmeal.” She signs off, “your chicken of the sea.” Letters from her father remind that Woodman was a teenager as well as a talented artist. “Enclosed is a check for $40.00,” George Woodman writes his daughter while she’s away at boarding school in Massachusetts. “I am hoping that with this amount you can exist at some reasonable level between stinginess and extravagance. Expenses will turn up, like keeping your clothes washed and cleaned, and other unglamorous stuff. Besides you need to save a little ahead for traveling expenses, etc.” He sends her a few stamps and assures that her avocado plants are doing “MAGNIFICENTLY.” Woodman’s prints in Portrait of a Reputation show that she was already masterfully dealing in a gothic exploration of the human body that became the hallmark of her posthumously celebrated work. But these early prints are imperfect: smudged, off-center, over-exposed — traits not common in her later work. “There are all of these erota in the production,” Abrams says. “To me, that’s what makes them so real and relatable. … I think the fact we’re seeing them not as flawless makes them that much more intriguing. This idea of Francesca Woodman as an artist for whom her feet never touched the ground, I BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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don’t think that’s true. She was rigorous but she was also not perfect. In seeing the prints as they were made just widens that narrative a bit.” Lange included photos he took of Woodman at her loft, capturing the haphazard way the young artist lived, the way she wrote on walls, the vintage clothing and secondhand furniture she employed in her photographs. The mess in her loft is indicative of her genius, but also perhaps of her tender age. Portrait of a Reputation humanizes Francesca Woodman the individual, but it also celebrates the endless nuances of humanity. Each of us is more than meets the eye, we are more than the sum of our productivity. Over and over we try to apply straightforward narratives to people’s lives — not least of all artists — because it helps us make sense of a complicated world. It’s easy to understand Woodman’s suicide if she was a tortured, perfectionist workaholic; it’s more difficult to process when we see her as a silly, social young woman. But that’s the nature of suicide. It doesn’t make sense to those of us left behind. But that’s just one interpretation, and one that Lange would likely find far too existential. “I’m more interested in people understanding themselves [through Francesca],” he says. “We all have boxes in our lives, whether they’re physical boxes ... [or] emotional boxes that we carry around. It takes a long time sometimes to open them, if we ever can. But the big gifts that are hidden in those boxes are powerful. And for me, opening up the Francesca box was connecting with her again, but also connecting through her with myself in a way that I couldn’t do before this.” I

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TAKE DOWN THE DOOR PRESENTS...A CELTIC CHRISTMAS “Celtic Holiday”

Wednesday December 11

SHELVIS AND THE ROUSTABOUTS HOLIDAY SHOW “Holiday - Oldies”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 18

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Americana deluxe

Hot licks only half the story for acclaimed acoustic duo

by John Lehndorff

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hen Rob Ickes takes the stage The duo has opened for the Osborne at Boulder’s Chautauqua Brothers and Hot Tuna, appearing at Community House with Trey Southern bluegrass festivals and the top Hensley on Dec. 4, the first jam band venues. few rows will likely be jammed Perhaps it was his Northern California with serious guitar geeks. They will be upbringing, but early on Ickes exhibited a there to study one of the greatest living gui- tendency to push beyond the constraints tarists. and embrace jazz, blues and rock. After Along with Jerry Douglas, Ickes is one studying his dobro heroes Jerry Douglas of the true virtuosi on the resophonic guitar and Mike Auldridge obsessively, Ickes says played face up with a slide, commonly he eventually had to learn to sound like called a dobro. The obscure instrument got himself. little love during Ken Burns’ recent STACIE HUCKEBA Country Music series, even though that bluesy slide is a defining twang of the genre. In the bluegrass world, Ickes is royalty as the winner of the IBMA dobro player of the year award an unprecedented 15 times, and a 20-year member of the award-winning bluegrass band Blue Highway. He could spend the rest of his career playing traditional tunes at festivals and supplying licks on country music studio recordings. But when Ickes and Hensley play locally on Dec. 4 and 5, the shows will definitely not be “Uncle Pen/Will the Circle Be Unbroken” sets, although they surely will include that flavor. Ickes took a left turn in recent years and now performs full-time in a duo with Hensley. “I feel like everything I’ve done before in music has Ickes does unleash jaw-dropping, pyrobeen preparing me for this gig,” Ickes says. technic, superpicker moments, where notes “We started playing and just hit off.” launch like rockets, but he transcends the You can hear the chemistry when instrument with his eloquent melodies, achHensley is singing with Ickes’ guitar harmo- ing solos and propulsive rhythms. In the stunizing. “Trey has soaked up a lot of differdio he has backed everyone including David ent kinds of music in 28 years. I think he is Lee Roth. If you listen to country music, one of the best singer-songwriters on the you’ve heard Ickes. planet ever, right up there with Merle Hensley grew up in the bosom of tradiHaggard,” says Ickes, who recorded and tional American music, eastern Tennessee. performed with the country legend. He may be a relatively new name but he’s The guitar geeks may be drawn by not a fresh face. When Hensley was only Ickes’ wizardry but they will be wowed by 11 years old, Marty Stuart brought him Hensley’s flatpicking skills as the duo onstage to play with Earl Scruggs at the launches into open-ended jams replete Grand Ole Opry. with guitar duels. “We do get into this effortA multi-skilled acoustic guitarist (and an less groove,” Ickes says. electric guitarist with an affinity for the NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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ON THE BILL: ROB ICKES AND TREY HENSLEY. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 4, Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, chautauqua.com; 8 p.m. Dec. 5, Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver (with Mark Lavengood Band and Morsel), swallowhillmusic.org

Allman Brothers), Hensley has a resonant baritone voice that grabs hold of a lyric, not unlike his hero, Haggard. Ickes’ and Hensley’s choice of covers is striking. Go on YouTube and listen to them rock into “Pride and Joy” by Stevie Ray Vaughan, then watch them take a jamband-worthy excursion on the Grateful Dead’s “Friend of the Devil.” Their 2015 acoustic debut, “Before the Sun Goes Down,” was nominated for a Grammy. The duo’s just-released third album, The Country Blues, expands their sound exponentially with the help of multiple Grammy winning producer and engineer Brent Maher, whose credits include Elvis Presley and Ray Charles. “We both like to record live with everyone in the room, so the entire album was recorded that way,” Ickes says. Blues legend Taj Mahal lends his distinctive voice to the original “World Full of Blues,” an ear-grabbing workup with a full band including Hammond B-3 organ, drums, a horn section and backup singers. Ickes managed to talk country star Vince Gill into doing his first-ever cover of a Dead song, “Brown Eyed Women,” on the album. “I had mostly written instrumentals, but we went off to an isolated cabin near Franklin, Tennessee. There was bad cell and internet connections and we got a lot of songs written in a few days,” Ickes says. The duo’s original compositions are quintessential Americana. They embrace blues and traditional country and intersect with Western swing and country rock. They mainly play as a power duo and occasionally as a trio with a bassist. On rare occasions they will break out the full ensemble. “The last time we played the (Grand Ole) Opry we brought out the big band with the horn section. When I told my mom, she said: ‘Do you think they allow horns in the Opry?’” Ickes says. “It went over great.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


‘But you look so normal’

In her newly released memoir, former cam model and Boulder native Isa Mazzei looks to dismantle the stigma around sex work

by Laurenz Busch

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ast year, Boulder native Isa Mazzei received her first screenwriting credit for the Netflixproduced movie Cam, a supernatural thriller about a webcam model who realizes she’s been replaced by a cyber-doppelganger. This year, Mazzei got more personal and released her memoir, Camgirl, a beautifully and brutally authentic account of Mazzei’s life as a camgirl. In her memoir, Mazzei details how she used camming to reclaim her identity and body. By addressing everything from mental health, family dysfunction, relationship dynamics and marginalization, she normalizes sex work, leaving the reader with one direct message: sex work is work. “You’re performing, you’re filming, you’re filmmaking, you’re lighting, you’re makeup, you’re a stylist, you’re an event coordinator, you’re planning games, you have to focus on keeping your shows fresh for your viewers,” Mazzei explains. “On top of that you’re maintaining a brand, you’re doing online marketing, you’re doing social media marketing, you’re responding to emails and Snapchats and all these different types of messages, and you’re making sure your customers are feeling taken care of and feel respected.” Camming, Mazzei says, is “the hardest job” she’s ever had. Once a niche component of the adult entertainment industry, webcam modeling — camming — has become a multimillion (multibillion by some estimates) dollar global industry. According to 2016 research by Newsweek, there were at least 12,500 cam models and more than 240,000 viewers online at any given time. Unlike porn, camming is live, and personalized — but what a cam model does on camera can vary greatly. It often involves erotic acts, such as stripping or masturbation, but it can be much more innocuous, depending on what a paying client requests. Models use cam sites — such as Chaturbate, LiveJasmin and MyFreeCams — to broadcast their work. Money is earned through credits or tips that allow viewers to interact with models via chat messages. Many who work in BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

the industry say the advent of camming has given them freedom from pimps and unsafe work environments. Mazzei says mainstream media scarcely acknowledges sex workers as anything other than victims. By doing so, Mazzei believes people overlook how commonplace sex work is, leading to mistreatment and dismissal of their profession.

she says. “It’s my home, it’s where I grew up. It is a beautiful and lovely place that will always feel like my home, no matter where I live. I think that the one thing that I feel about Boulder is that it’s progressive until things begin to make people uncomfortable.” Mazzei says people in Boulder are often surprised to realize there is an active sex industry in their small town. “There are so many sex workMARINA FINI ers in Boulder, let me just tell you,” she says. “And I think it’s something that people aren’t aware of because they don’t want to be aware of it, because they’re not open to the idea of sex work being a part of the Boulder community.” According to Mazzei’s personal experience, Boulder’s sex workers are openly mistreated and face blatant contempt. “When [people] find out you’re a sex worker they’re so quick to be like, ‘What’s the weirdest thing “People’s main reaction to me saying, you’ve ever had to do?’ ‘What’s the weirdest thing that you’ve ever stuck in ‘Oh, I’m a camgirl,’ was, ‘Oh, but you’re your body?’” she says. so normal,’” Mazzei says. “And I would Backhanded compliments are comsay, ‘Of course I’m normal. Sex workers are normal people, what do you expect?’” mon, Mazzei says, like one woman who told Mazzei she wished she too “could Mazzei says. In Camgirl, Mazzei expands the focus just take off [her] shirt and make millions of dollars.” of sex work beyond sexual acts by shar“It was such a dismissal of the work ing experiences people can relate with. that I had done as a sex worker,” Mazzei The first time Mazzei received attention from a boy, the time she stirred up political says. In Mazzei’s experience, people feel unrest in fifth grade, or how she studied comparative literature at UC – Berkeley all comfortable saying dismissive things to sex workers because they don’t see their provide an understanding of the person work as valid. behind the performance. She writes of “It’s not OK,” she says. “It’s incredibly how she stumbled upon camming, disdehumanizing to be in a boardroom of secting and consuming every aspect of it, people being asked what’s the weirdest aspiring to be the best. The outcome is a thing I’ve ever done sexually.” profile of a relatable woman, and insight Mazzei’s experience as a camgirl was into what Mazzei and other cammers see positive, affirming and life-changing, and as a misunderstood job. she knows she’s not alone, but there’s Mazzei experienced the life of an more work to be done to normalize sex “out” sex worker in her hometown of work and create a safer world for sex Boulder. According to her memoir, workers. Boulder is “renowned for its liberalism, “I would hope that one day we could used bookstores, having the most PhDs move from, ‘But you look so normal,’ ‘But per capita — a bastion of suburban wine you went to college,’ ‘But do you need moms, white supremacy, and ninety-dolmoney that badly?’ to a genuine interest lar yoga pants.” She laughs at her and genuine appreciation for these memdescription of her hometown. bers of our community.” “I love Boulder first and foremost,” I

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WED. JAN 22

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NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


COURTESY RED LIGHT MANAGEMENT

THE WHITE BUFFALO.

8 P.M. TUESDAY, DEC. 3, FOX THEATRE, 1135 13TH ST., BOULDER, 303-447-0095. TICKETS ARE $18. Jake Smith, the big-voiced musician who performs as The White Buffalo, has always taken pride in making music that’s difficult to categorize. Since releasing his first album in 2002, Smith has explored the Venn diagram between genres, carving out a sound rooted in dark folk, countrified soul, cinematic storytelling and roadhouse-worthy rock. see EVENTS Page 22

PUBLIC DOMAIN

NIGHT OF WORLD DANCE.

‘ON STRANGE SOIL.’

6:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30, Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 720-699-7820.

6-9 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4, Upslope Brewing Company, 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-449-2911.

Work off that holiday feast with an evening of dance — and some more food. Some of the best local and international artists in the state will be showcasing their talents during Night of World Dance at Louisville Center for the Arts. Experience music and dance from the Makomba African Ensemble, Flamenco Denver, Sadie (bellydancer) and Sambrasil (Samba group). A $25 ticket will get you traditional savory food from Ghana and Brazil, (vegetarian options available) and one non-alcoholic beverage, or you can just enjoy the show for $15. For groups over eight, tickets are $20 each. This event is a fundraiser for the upcoming show ‘Tabom’ on April 1 at the Dairy Arts Center in Boulder. PUBLIC DOMAIN

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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SUGAR PLUM TEA PARTY.

1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30, Xilinx Retreat Center, 3100 Logic Drive, Longmont, 303-772-1335. Centennial State Ballet invites both young and old to join them in a delightful afternoon of warm tea, sweet and savory edibles, harp accompaniment, a mini-Nutcracker performance and a souvenir photo taken with the Sugar Plum Fairy. The event is the perfect introduction to the classic tale of Clara and her prince for young audience members and includes interactive portions for children. Advanced reservations required, and tickets sell out quickly. The event also offers a Nutcracker boutique with whimsical gifts for sale. Tickets are $38 at centennialstateballet.org.

NOVEMBER 28, 2019

Our public lands are under attack, and the production company Traverse Image is trying to do something about it. Their upcoming documentary, ‘On Strange Soil,’ will feature the majesty of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase national monuments, but they still need funds to finish the project. They’ve been winding their way through Colorado drumming up financial support, and the filmmakers will host a meet and greet at Upslope Brewing Company for the last week of the crowdfunding campaign. Contributors get a beer on them and a chance to talk about the project. Check out onstrangesoil.com/ support to learn more and contribute, and then head over to Upslope on Dec. 4 to meet the crew and all your fellow supporters.

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arts Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (BMoCA), 1750 13th St., Boulder: Adriana Corral: ‘Unearthed/Desenterrado;’ Gretchen Marie Schaefer: ‘Folding and Thrusting,’ through Jan. 19.

MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC ART BY LONGMONT ARTIST MAREN CAHILL​

WANT TO PARTICIPATE in a socially and environmentally conscientious gift-giving season that supports regional artisans and a local, independent, nonprofit business? Of course you do! Find your one-of-a-kind, functional and decorative gifts at Art Parts Creative Reuse Center’s fifth annual Holiday Bazaar, where everything is hand-crafted with a minimum of 60% reclaimed materials and the artists are oh-so clever and talented. Nov. 29 Dec. 31.

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Street Wise,’ Canyon Gallery, through Dec. 1; ‘Design Trail,’ Arapahoe Ramp, through Dec. 15. Bricolage Gallery, Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder: Fifth Annual Holiday Bazaar, Nov. 29 - Dec. 31. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder: ‘Grounded’ featuring: Sonja Hinrichsen, Kathleen Probst, & ReCalling Re/Call, through Dec. 1. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver: ‘Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature,’ through Feb. 2; ‘Shantell Martin: Words and Lines,’ through Jan. 31; ‘The Light Show,’ through May 2020; ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through January 2020;

Cameras’; ‘Tiny Stories: Art of the Dollhouse’; ‘The Flood of 2013’; ‘Native American Artifacts,’ and more.

Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont: ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit; ‘Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture,’ through Jan. 5.

Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Wild: Buffalo in Boulder,’ through Jan. 12; ‘Archive 75: Multilayered Stories Told Through a Boulder Lens,’ through January; ‘Boulder Through the Decades,’ through Dec. 2.

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons: ‘40 years/40 artifacts’; ‘All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons’; ‘Lyons Newspapers: A History,’ Swift/ Smith/Bohn Family’; ‘125 Years of Distinctive

MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/ event/monumental.

Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver: ‘Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation,’ through April 5; ‘Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler: Flora,’ through April 5; ‘Stacey Steers:

Edge of Alchemy,’ through April 5. University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder: ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June 2020; ‘Art Elements: Materials, Motive and Meaning,’ through Dec. 21. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Feathers and Flora,’ Henderson Building, through Jan. 31; ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

EVENTS from Page 21

High Plains — with Heidi Schmidt. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

Anjelah Johnson: Technically Not Stalking. 7 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106. Through Nov. 30.

Events

‘Home Alone’ in Concert. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

City and County of Denver Light the Lights 2019. 4 p.m. Civic Center Conservancy, 1560 Broadway, Suite 2250, Denver, 303-861-4633.

Alpine Bank Boulder Thanksgiving Day 5K. 9 a.m. 2000 Central Ave., Boulder.

John Mckay Duo. 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

Christkindl Market Denver. 4 p.m. 1515 Arapahoe, Denver, 303-558-8185. Through Dec. 23.

Lindsey Saunders. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

‘The Nutcracker ‘with Boulder Ballet. 2 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 0285, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8423. Through Dec. 1.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28 Music Open Mic. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Guardian Storage Winter Coat and Sock Drive. 8 a.m. Guardian Storage in your area, Longmont. Through Nov. 30.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29 Music Bassted featuribg 12th Planet & Borgore. 6 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Citizen Dan. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Derek Weiman and Matt Flaherty. 8 p.m. Bluff Street Bar & Billiards, 2690 28th St., Boulder, 303-931-5856. Eric Rachmany. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Harmony and Brad, Kingdom Jasmine, Nick Critchlow. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

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NOVEMBER 28, 2019

Live Music Fridays. 7 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. The Long Run “Alter Eagles” Project. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Miles Perry & Dave Pullins. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Ravin’Wolf. 7 p.m. Oskar Blues Homemade Liquids & Solids, 1555 S. Hover Road Longmont, 720-606-1734. The String Cheese Incident. 8 p.m. The Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver, 720-577-6884. Trevor Hall. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Events Alice Wetterlund. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Nov. 30.

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Rocky Dale Davis. 7:15 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Nov. 30.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30 Music 6 Million Dollar Band — The Ultimate 80s Experience! 8 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Aretha: A Tribute. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Card Catalog. 7 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Ethan Mindlin Jones. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Good Schemers. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder, 3 03-543-7339. Hazel Miller Band. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


words

Hillbilly Hellcats Duo. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

IT’S 1988 AND the only opportunity on the horizon for Shelley Cooper is 50 pounds of his brother’s marijuana, which needs to be driven from Colorado to Houston. The delivery goes off without a hitch, but getting home with the money proves to be a different challenge altogether. JP Gritton’s portrait of a hapless aspirant at odds with himself and everyone around him is both tender and ruthless, and considers the possibility of redemption in a world that grants forgiveness grudgingly, if at all. JP Gritton will speak about and sign his new book, ‘Wyoming,’ on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. at Boulder Book Store.

I Love The 2000s Tour — KS 107.5 1st Annual Turkey Jam. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-0360. Jeff & Paige. 4 p.m. Gunbarrel Brewing Company, 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, 800-803-5732. Joe Cool Band. 8 p.m. The Wild Game Entertainment Experience, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 720-600-4875. Johnny O Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Many Mountains. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Patty Jackson. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064. Potato Pirates (Album Release). 8 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Ravin’wolf. 6 p.m. Casa Alegre, 1006 Pine Street, Louisville, 720-606-1734.

SATURDAY, NOV. 30 Poetry Night. 7 p.m. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont.

MONDAY, DEC. 2

Reverend Freakchild & Friends Thanksgiving Celebration. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

World Literature Series: The Contemporary Irish Novel. 7 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Roots Music Project Post Thanksgiving Concert. 7:30 p.m. Roots Music Project Studio, 4747 Pearl, Suite V3A, Boulder, 512-276-5140.

TUESDAY, DEC. 3

Season of Light + Holiday Music Show. 2:30 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002.

Carol Guerrero-Murphy. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree

Soul School ‘A Holiday Cheer.’ 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Spoonbill. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. The String Cheese Incident. 8 p.m. The Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver, 720-577-6884. Thumpin’. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Trevor Hall. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Paul van Dyk. 8 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. We The Kings / Northbound. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. Events Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Crock”Pot” Passion and Play Party Danksgiving Edition! 7 p.m. Nontra, N. Broadway, Boulder. Double Feature: Solar Superstorms & Black Holes. 8:30 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Double Feature: We Are Stars & Life of Trees. 1 p.m. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Hearts and Hands Holiday Gift Market. 10 a.m. Tara Performing Arts High School, 4180 19th St., Boulder, 303-530-4534.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Norse Poetry Evening. 5:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. JP Gritton — Wyoming. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4 Women Writers of Frasier — Creative Crones. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

The Holiday Market. 4 p.m. Civic Center Conservancy, 1560 Broadway, Suite 2250, Denver, 303-861-4633.

Drums of the World. 2:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

Horseshoe Holiday Market. 10 a.m. Highland Masonic Temple, 3550 Federal Blvd., Denver, 720-301-4293.

LOCO Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186.

Night of World Dance. 6:30 p.m. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 720-699-7820.

Student Recitals: Undergraduate, Master’s and Doctoral musicians. 5 p.m. Imig Music, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-6352.

‘The Nutcracker.’ 1 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Through Dec. 29.

Timothy P & The Rocky Mountain Stocking Stuffers. 7 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757.

Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Events

Shop Small Saturday. 8 a.m. The entire City of Lafayette! Sixth Annual Leftover Turkey Trot. 10 a.m. Roger’s Grove Park, 220 S. Hover St., Longmont. Spanish/English Storytime. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Sugar Plum Tea Party. 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Xilinx Retreat Center, 3100 Logic Drive, Longmont, 303-772-1335.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1 Music Asa Wake, Dominick Antonelli, Ryan Hutchens. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

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Boulder Comedy Show. 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863. Colleen Sheehan: The World of Emma Woodhouse. 1 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 347-844-3247. Double Feature: ‘We Are Stars’/’Perseus & Andromeda.’ Noon. Fiske Planetarium, 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, 303-492-5002. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007. Hearts and Hands Holiday Gift Market. 10 a.m. Tara Performing Arts High School, 4180 19th St., Boulder, 303-530-4534. Sugar Plum Tea Party. 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Xilinx Retreat Center, 3100 Logic Drive, Longmont, 303-772-1335. see EVENTS Page 24

NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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EVENTS from Page 23

Winter Pop Up Market. Noon. Rayback Collective, 2775 Valmont Road, Boulder, 720-885-1234.

theater

MONDAY, DECEMBER 2 Music 106.7 The Bull Birthday Bash. 6:30 p.m. The Grizzly Rose, 5450 North Valley Highway, Denver, 303-295-2353.

IN ‘THE BEST CHRISTMAS Pageant Ever,’ the Herdman kids get wrapped up in a local Christmas pageant. Mayhem and fun ensue when the kids collide with the Christmas story head on. Now playing at Longmont Theatre Company through Dec. 18.

After School Uke. 4 p.m. Harmony Music House, 2525 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-444-7444. Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Chamber Music Showcase. 7:30 p.m. St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church, 2425 Colorado Ave., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Conan Gray with Benee. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. GriefShare Course. 6:30 p.m. Longs Peak United Methodist Church, 1421 Elmhurst Drive, Longmont, 303-776-0399. Jackson Maloney, Sandi Siegel. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Open Mic. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Ray Sings, Basie Swings. 5:30 p.m. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Events “Mis Pininos”/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Arabic Literature Discussion Group. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3 Music Caroline Stump, John Lensing, Julianna Smaltz. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Emarosa. 7:30 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Faculty Tuesdays: Ryan Gardner. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. The Long Run presents Alter Eagle Encore Performance. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-665-2757. Open Mic. 9 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Open Mic — with Andy Eppler. 6 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060.

The Addams Family. Jesters Dinner Theater, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Dec. 1 and Jan. 3-26.

Hip Hop Nutcracker. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Buell Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Dec. 24.

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 E. Main St., Longmont. Opens Nov. 29. Through Dec. 14.

Jesus Christ Superstar. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Buell Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Dec. 1.

A Broadway Christmas Carol — presented by CU Theatre & Dance. University Theatre, CU Boulder Campus. Through Dec. 8.

Mamma Mia! BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Through Feb. 22.

Calendar Girls — presented by Firehouse Theater. John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Dec. 22. A Christmas Carol. Miner’s Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Opens Nov. 29. Through Dec. 23. A Christmas Carol: The Musical. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Dec. 22. Dude, It’s Boulder! — presented by VIVA Theater. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Nov. 30.

Radio Show Taping — with Capitol Sun Rays & Special Guest. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. The White Buffalo. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Youth Concerts: Drums of the World. 9:50 a.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream — presented by The Upstart Crow. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Dec. 1. Looped. Vintage Theatre Productions, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Dec. 15. The Thanksgiving Play. Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Dec. 15. Tuck Everlasting. Vintage Theatre Productions, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Jan. 5. Twelfth Night. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Space Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Dec. 22.

Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777. Screenagers: Next Chapter. 6 p.m. Twin Peaks Charter Academy, 340 S. Sunset St., Longmont, 303-772-7286.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4

Events

Music

Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Astral Project. 6:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Brown Bag: Embodied Energy. Noon. Elevations Credit Union, 2960 Diagonal Highway, Boulder. Dance For Parkinson’s Program. 11:30 a.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-506-3568, thedairy.org. 11:30 Tuesdays (Gordon Gamm Theater) and Thursdays (Boulder Ballet Studio 3), $5. First Session: Everything before you hit record. 6 p.m. Boulder Digital Arts, 1600 Range St., Boulder, 303-800-4647.

Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Boulder In-the-Round Fifth Anniversary Show. 7 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-443-8696. Bourbon & Blues — with Deborah Stafford and the State of Affairs. 7:30 p.m. Nissi’s, 2675 Northpark Drive, Lafayette, 303-6652757. The Delta Sonics Duo. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. see EVENTS Page 26

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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FILMS

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 30

WHYT RBBT

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 4 RE: SEARCH

HULLABALO0 & AHEE

W/ AN-TEN-NAE + GOVINDA + ATTYA + ERIEL INDIGO

W/ GRYMETYME & JORDAN POLOVINA

TUESDAY DECEMBER 3

THURSDAY DECEMBER 5

FREDDIE GIBBS

W/ COUSIN STIZZ & CONWAY THE MACHINE

THURSDAY DECEMBER 5

FUNTCASE

W/ UBUR, DEFINITIVE, JOOF & AABEAR

FRIDAY DECEMBER 6

DR. FRESCH

W/ ANGELZ, PUNJAHBAE & MIXED MESSAGE

SATURDAY DECEMBER 7

DRAGON SMOKE

W/ BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION & FLOAT LIKE A BUFFALO

TUESDAY DECEMBER 10

ROBERT GLASPER TRIO FEAT DAMION REID, VICENTE ARCHER & DJ JAHI SUNDANCE

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 11

LIL TJAY

W/ ACO BABY SEAN, 100PACKSAVY, FORTY $EVEN & NAY RENEE

THURSDAY DECEMBER 12

LOUIS FUTON LIVE BAND W/ THE ORCASTRATOR

FRIDAY DECEMBER 13

ROB ICKES & TREY HENSLEY & MARK LAVENGOOD BAND W/ MORSEL

FRIDAY DECEMBER 6

GOOSE

W/ ENVY ALO & DIZGO

SATURDAY DECEMBER 7

MIDICINAL LIVE BAND

W/ NOTORIOUS CONDUCT, FUTURE JOY, THEBUSINESS & JUSCHILL

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 11 RE: SEARCH

MICHAL MENERT TRIO

FEAT ADAM DEITCH & NICK GERLACH

THURSDAY DECEMBER 12

SOULY HAD

W/ 12AM & FOGGIERAW

FRIDAY DECEMBER 13

DEAD FLOYD

W/ RUMPKE MOUNTAIN BOYS

SATURDAY DECEMBER 14

ANALOG SON

W/ DEATH BY DUB & DIGG

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 18

DIRTWIRE

COLORADO WINTER MINIFEST

SATURDAY DECEMBER 14

40 OZ TO FREEDOM

W/ MOON FROG & RICHARD VAGNER

DETOX UNIT

W/ MICKMAN, NAVIGATORZ (VINJA & SORTOF VAGUE) & THOUGHT PROCESS

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 18 RE: SEARCH

MR. BILL GATES (MR. BILL X ILL.GATES) W/ BOGTROTTER

FRIDAY DECEMBER 20

PNUMA

W/ EARTHCRY (ANTHONY OF PAPADOSIO), MZG & AUTONOMIX

SATURDAY DECEMBER 28

DUMPSTAFUNK

W/ POCKET PROTECTION FEAT MEMBERS OF THE REVIVALISTS & DRAGONDEER

SUNDAY DECEMBER 29

THURSDAY DECEMBER 19 (SUBLIME TRIBUTE) W/ UFER & WAVE 11

FRIDAY DECEMBER 20

W.R.D.

(ROBERT WALTER, EDDIE ROBERTS & ADAM DEITCH) W/ MANYCOLORS

SATURDAY DECEMBER 21

FRANK ZAPPA’S BIRTHDAY PARTY: CELEBRATING ZAPPA’S MUSIC W/ STEELY DEAD

SUNDAY DECEMBER 22

WINTERFEST

FEAT AN ALL STAR LINEUP OF 15+ DJS

SATURDAY DECEMBER 28

DOOM FLAMINGO

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND

FRIDAY & SATURDAY JANUARY 3-4

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 8

5TH ANNUAL WINTER STRING FLING

FEAT JOE TATTON (THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS) W/ DANIELLA KATZIR BAND

FEAT RYAN STASIK OF UMPHREY’S MCGEE W/ MARCUS REZAK’S GATEWAY DUAL VENUE!

FRIDAY JANUARY 10

TNERTLE

W/ MELODY LINES, TELEMETRY & KAPTAIN

SATURDAY JANUARY 11

JAMES MURPHY DJ SET (LCD SOUNDSYSTEM / DFA)

THURSDAY JANUARY 30

SUMMER CAMP ON THE ROAD FRIDAY JANUARY 31 DUAL VENUE!

EMANCIPATOR

W/ BLACKBIRD BLACKBIRD, FRAMEWORKS, TOR, PLANTRAE, THOMA & IL:LO

MONDAY FEBRUARY 3

EARTHGANG W/ MICK JENKINS

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6

PHORA

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 8

MARCO BENEVENTO SATURDAY FEBRUARY 15

W/ BEN MILLER BAND

RODINA

THURSDAY JANUARY 16

SATURDAY JANUARY 18

MADDY O’NEAL & NOBIDE + the NEWDEAL

Regal Cinebarre Boulder, 1164 W. Dillon Road, 844-462-7342: ‘21 Bridges’ ‘Abominable’ ‘A Beautiful Day In the Neighborhood’ ‘Charlie’s Angels’ ‘Doctor Sleep’ ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘Ford v Ferrari’ ‘Frozen 2’ ‘The Good Liar’ ‘Harriet’ ‘Joker’ ‘Knives Out’

NEDERLAND:

Backdoor Theater, 243 W. Fourth St., 303-258-0188: ‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil’

EVENTS from Page 24

18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

W/ BEN SILVER OF ORCHARD LOUNGE

SUNDAY JANUARY 19

JOE ROBINSON WEDNESDAY JANUARY 22 RE: SEARCH

MOODY GOOD W/ EFFIN

FRIDAY JANUARY 24

ARLO MCKINLEY & THE LONESOME SOUND SATURDAY FEBRUARY 1

RUNAWAY GIN

(TRIBUTE TO PHISH) W/ SQWERV & RUBY HILL

IANN DIOR

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 21

PASSAFIRE

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23

MARK GUILIANA

W/ DANDU & CHRONOLOGUE

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 29

MARC E. BASSY W/ GIANNI & KYLE

KENDALL STREET COMPANY & CBDB

WEDNESDAY APRIL 29

TUESDAY MARCH 17

MAX 15 MSG/MO. MSG & DATA RATES MAY APPLY TEXT STOP TO OPT OUT FOR OUR PRIVACY TERMS & SERVICE GO TO HTTP://CERVANTESMASTERPIECE.TICKETFLY.COM/FILES/2014/03/CERVANTES-PRIVACY-DOCUMENT.PDF

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

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LOUISVILLE:

FRIDAY JANUARY 17

LOUIS COLE BIG BAND BBNO$ TEXT CERVANTES TO 91944 FOR TICKET GIVEAWAYS, DRINK SPECIALS, DISCOUNTED TICKET PROMOTIONS & MORE

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Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., 303-444-0583: ‘21 Bridges’ ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’ ‘Charlie’s Angels’ ‘Dark Waters’ ‘Ford v Ferrari’ ‘Frozen 2’ ‘The Good Liar’ ‘Harriet’ ‘Joker’ ‘Jojo Rabbit’ ‘Knives Out’

Regal Village at the Peaks 12, 1230 S. Hover Road, 844-462-7342: ‘21 Bridges’ ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’ ‘Charlie’s Angels’ ‘Doctor Sleep’ ‘Ford v Ferrari’ ‘Frozen 2’ ‘The Good Liar’ ‘Harriet’ ‘Jojo Rabbit ‘Knives Out’ ‘Midway’ ‘Playing With Fire’ ‘Queen & Slim’

the NEWDEAL

W/ LANDON CUBE & POORSTACY

TUESDAY MARCH 3

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., 303-441-3011: ‘Emma’ with a tea party, 1 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 1.

LONGMONT:

W/ BEN SILVER OF ORCHARD LOUNGE

MONDAY FEBRUARY 17

ALO & TEA LEAF GREEN

Boedecker Theatre, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., 303-444-7328: ‘Edie,’ Nov. 27-30. ‘Fantastic Fungi,’ Dec 1-3. ‘Gift,’ Nov. 29-30. ‘Jinpa,’ Dec. 4-7. ‘Moonlight Sonata: Deafness In Three Movements,’ Dec. 4-7. ‘The Report,’ 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 28.

Upslope Brewing Company, 1898 S. Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898: ‘For the Love of Craft,’ 6 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 3.

W/ WHITEWATER RAMBLE

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 11

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 21

BOULDER:

‘Parasite’ ‘Queen & Slim’ ‘Waves’

FRONT COUNTRY

RODDY RICH

SPEED RACK CHARITY FEMALE BARTENDING COMPETITION

Written, produced and co-starring Shai LaBeouf, ‘Honey Boy’ is filmmaking by way of catharsis. Written during a stint in rehab, ‘Honey Boy’ presents two periods of LaBeouf’s life in parallel: the first of 22-year-old Otis (Lucas Hedges), who lands in court-appointed rehabilitation program while shooting a ‘Transformers’-esque blockbuster; the second of 12-year-old Otis (Noah Jupe) working on an ‘Even Stevens’esque sitcom. While both storylines are strong, the second, which co-stars LaBeouf playing the father, James, is the movie’s heart. James is a familiar figure of addiction: in control occasionally, helpless to his disease at key moments. Charismatic and charming when he wants, violent and aggressive when faced with no other option. The demons LaBeouf exercises through James are palatable, and the direction from Alma Har’el is stylish and vibrant. —MJC

NOVEMBER 28, 2019

Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley. 8 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Eklund Opera Scenes. 5 p.m. Imig Music, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-6352.

Events

Face Vocal Band Holiday Concert. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Hazel Miller Holiday Show. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Marc Emerson Townes of Kind Hearted Strangers. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Pendulum New Music — with the Ivalas Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020

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12 Tips for Getting FAST Marketing Results. 12 p.m. Longmont Area Chamber of Commerce, 528 Main St., Longmont. Adult Improv Class. 6:15 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Holiday Open House. 5 p.m. Microspa, 703 3rd Ave., Longmont, 720-930-6166. Library Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NOVEMBER 28, 2019

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Thanksgiving by Nicole Kelly

Open Range Competition Teams Summer Day Camps Classes & Private Lessons

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When we arrived in this unknown place we knit together in a way that made me want to shout this, this is my family. How could you know that I dreamed each of you up when my heart was just a tiny thing? I marvel at the way you rip at the seams of our old life, to make space for the new. You stretch us beyond comfort, to fit a shape still forming. Pulling loneliness close like an old friend, you seek to be known. Sometimes it feels exactly right, and sometimes all this new just weighs me down. But when I burrow down into the neck of this, of you, I can feel the light filtering in. I can feel the known this might become. Tonight we pull up the chairs, and we gather the people we’ve found. All the home I could have ever hoped for, seated at one expanding table. My heart is full. My heart is still so hungry. It’s usually too much, and it’s never quite enough. Yet, that fickle muscle dreamt this up. It formed tonight out of nothing, and this family out of long ago and tiny wishes. If something both so shiny and so solid can form from such as wispy seed as that, then I will give thanks for both the solitary nights and ones filled to bursting such is this. Nicole Kelly is new to these mountains, and all their possibilities.

Boulder Weekly accepts poetry and flash fiction submissions of 450 words/35 lines or fewer and accompanied by a one-sentence bio of the author. Send to: poetry@boulderweekly.com 28

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BOULDER WEEKLY


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ON THE BILL: t all started so well. There was love, and there was kind‘MARRIAGE ness. There was understanding, and there was support. STORY’ opens Nov. And then one day, there wasn’t. The supports were taken 29, Landmark Mayan, 110 Broadway, out, kindness gave way to cordiality, and romantic love disDenver, 303-744solved into something platonic. Something familial. 6799. On Netflix Dec. Yet, it was all there. Once. It’s a common refrain you hear 6. when a friend tells you of their breakup. It’s a common conundrum when you are that friend. We were happy once. Weren’t we? So opens Marriage Story, the latest feature film from writer/director Noah Baumbach. Presented as a shared montage of memories between Charlie (Adam Driver) and Nicole (Scarlett Johansson), Marriage Story’s opening uses voiceover narration and fleeting moments to capture and construct a relationship we will never see. It’s kind of like the opening of Up. And, like the animated classic, the marriage hinted at somehow feels fuller and more real than most of our real-life relationships. But there is no death here, only divorce. Well, sort of. As Charlie’s lawyer Bert Spitz (Alan Alda) describes it: Divorce is like a death without the body. Maybe it’s worse. As the movie weaves its way through the Kafkaesque mines of the legal system, Charlie longs for a cleaner break. “I feel like a criminal,” he says to no one in particular. A criminal guilty of no crime, and a death with no body — Marriage Story might be the year’s funniest film. And not in an ironic way (though it does have a good amount of that as well) but because life is a combination of the absurd and the ridiculous. When the love is there, inside jokes and odd behaviors can be chalked up to affection and meaningful communication. When the love leaves, then it’s all just odd. A great deal of the humor emanates from Driver and Johansson’s performances — partly from the script, partly because their characters have no better way of dealing with the issues at hand. The supporting cast is just as good: From Julie Hagerty as Nicole’s mother — who refuses to give up her relationship with Charlie — to the three lawyers representing Charlie and Nicole: Alda, Laura Dern and Ray Liotta. But Baumbach never loses the thread of tragedy in his story. Working with cinematographer Robbie Ryan, the two gradually move from spaces cluttered with life and love to bland sterility and phoniness. You can almost feel the walls closing in on Charlie and Nicole. Imagine how those walls look from their son’s eyes. Baumbach never fully reveals what brought this marriage to a halt, but there are plenty of possibilities. We never see any of those possibilities; we only hear of them. It’s up to us to decipher who is being truthful and who is embellishing. Who is guilty and who is ready to move on. Why, then, call a movie so explicitly about divorce Marriage Story? Because there is no divorce without marriage, or because you are married the whole time you go through the divorce? Maybe. Or maybe because a marriage never belongs to just the two parties engaged. There’s always more: Friends, family and, most importantly, the children caught in the middle.

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BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF PHOTOS BY STAFF

Szechuan Eggplant

Ayurvedic Chai

Hanuman Boulder County, hanumanchai.myshopify.com

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alance is the name of the game for Hanuman’s Ayurvedic chai. The Boulder-based company produces a lineup of bottled chai with various milks, as well as dried tea and karha, a turmeric- and cardamombased herbal beverage. But we like the equilibrium Hanuman has struck in its base chai blend — cardamom and cinnamon upfront, with a tastefully apportioned hit of ginger at the end. Prices vary.

Pineapple Express

Rollin’ Bones food truck Mobile, Boulder County, rollinbonesbbq.com

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ig and pineapple go together — glazed ham and pineapple rings, Hawaiian pizza, and now, the Pineapple Express from Rollin’ Bones. It’s a mountain of smoky, tender pulled pork piled onto a bun and topped with fresh pineapple and two slabs of pork belly. For as great as the flavor combo of savory pork and bright pineapple is, the star of the sandwich is the pork belly with a peppery, thick bark encasing deeply flavorful meat and fat that melts on the tongue. Top it with one (or two or three) of Rollin Bones’ excellent sauces, and eat it alongside mac and cheese or one of several sides. $11.

Tsing Tao Chinese 607 S. Broadway, Suite A, Boulder, tsingtsoboulderco.com

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h, the pleasures of a Chinese lunch special: cup of soup, crispy eggroll, plate of food and you’re out the door for less than $10. Tsing Tao has lunch plates in spades, but their Szechuan Eggplant is a highlight. The eggplant is tenderly sautéed and accompanied by al dente bell peppers, broccoli, carrots and celery, all sluiced in Szechuan sauce — sweet up front with a dull roar of pepper on the back — served next to a soft and pillow-y mound of steamed or fried rice. And if the Szechuan isn’t enough to open up those sinuses, dunk that eggroll in a dollop of their house mustard. $8.75.

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Gunbarrel Brewing Company 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, gunbarrelbrewing.com

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his juicy IPA from Gunbarrel Brewing Company is worth seeking out. It’s imbued with tropical fruit flavor — you might pick out lychee or pineapple — and is remarkably smooth-drinking. That fruit is balanced by 64 IBU, culminating in a brew that hits all the right notes. Prices vary.

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PHOTOS BY DAVID HAGERMAN

Picking favorites

Dissect a pomegranate and reap its sharp, sweet rewards

by Ari LeVaux

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s holiday talk builds to a festive pitch, and the cold darkness moves to embrace you, don’t sleep on pomegranate season. It’s on, and ready to sneak back into your life. With a fresh pomegranate in your palm, you have magic at your fingertips. Wave your hand, and food becomes more beautiful, more delicious and more exciting. Toss

salad. So can a bowl of plain arils, which looks like a bowl full of jewels and tastes like an unparalleled luxury. Thus, the fall harvest is a time to rejoice in pomegranate country, a wide swath across the Old World and South Asia, from the Black Sea to the Bay of Bengal. In ancient orchards, the bright red orbs dangle brightly from these sacred trees like Christmas tree ornaments.

those juicy rubies on salad, soup, steak, linguine ai funghi, Brazilian black bean soup, granola and yogurt. The flavor added by these fleshy seed packages, called arils, matches the color: sharp and sweet. Those arils don’t just make a bold garnish, they can be used as the substance of a meal, as one would use rice or pasta: a plate of fried arils with eggs on top, for example, or a bowl of arils and

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To the uninitiated, it won’t be obvious how to extract the arils. Indeed there are many ways, and some are messier than others. Treating those globes like softball-sized piñatas might not seem like the cleanest option, but it turns out if you slice them in half and tap gently enough, the seeds rush out like Black Friday shoppers storming the gates of Walmart. The technique comes from Turkey, where the Middle East meets Asia, and where one fall day a food writer named Robyn Eckhardt sat down with a group of women, 100 kilos of fresh pomegranates and some pieces of plastic pipe. They spent the day liberating the arils inside. Here is Eckhardt’s technique, as she recently emailed from Italy: “Gently squeeze one pomegranate half, cut side down, over a wide deep bowl to loosen the seeds. Place it cut side down in your nondominant hand. Spread your fingers to create a ‘sieve’ through which the seeds can fall. With the handle of a wooden spoon or spatula, tap the pomegranate all over; dislodged seeds will fall, with the juices, into the bowl (the bits of bitter white membrane will remain in your hand). Continue tapping, turning the pomegranate in your hand, until most of the seeds are dislodged. If any white membrane has fallen into the bowl, pick it out. Strain the seeds from the juice; you can reserve the juice for another use.” The first time I tried this method, my open hand was powerless to stop the flow of arils, as if a floodgate had opened. But at least I had a bowl to catch them. That day, Eckhardt and her friends were preparing nar eksisi, or Turkish pomegranate molasses. When made with 100% pomegranate juice and no additives, she says, it has as delicate and eye-opening a flavor as a fine balsamic. Among brands that an American could easily order online, Eckhardt’s favorite is Mymoune, produced by a women’s agricultural cooperative in Lebanon, followed by Cortas. Pure pomegranate syrup is worth paying good

served as part of a meze [tapas-like] spread or for breakfast with other dishes,” she says. The salad is an exciting ride, with many strong personalities balancing one another in spectacular fashion. Each bite is a different little drama, with spice, fat, herbs and salty chunks of cheese, all splashed with tangy pomegranate juice. It will brighten any table, any time of year. Sun-dried Tomato and Pomegranate Salad Serves 6 to 8 as a meze or 4 as a side dish Eckhardt lays out this salad in a layered, eye-catching way, as it would appear as part of a spread. For simplicity, I prefer to mix the ingredients in a bowl. She was gracious enough to let me make a few minor tweaks, which I’ve made as parenthetical suggestions. The salad is forgiving, and you can alter the proportions widely to suit your taste. 20 sun-dried tomatoes 1 medium pomegranate, cut in half horizontally 1 hot green chile, such as jalapeno or Anaheim, sliced (In winter I prefer chili flakes, such as Aleppo) 1/4 cup fresh mint or flat-leaf parsley, or a combination, chopped finely 1/4 cup crumbled lightly salty white cheese, such as Bulgarian feta 1/4 cup fruity olive oil 1 tablespoon pomegranate molasses (If you can get the pure stuff. Otherwise use lemon juice)

money for, she says. It keeps forever and is versatile far beyond salad dressings: as a chicken wing glaze, a mixer, a sweetener for your morning oatmeal. If you can’t get the good stuff, you might want to skip it. There is a recipe in Eckhardt’s book, Istanbul & Beyond: Exploring the Diverse Cuisines of Turkey, that calls for both the arils and the syrup. Sun Dried Tomato and Pomegranate Salad comes from a restaurant in Antakya owned by her friend Shiraz Demir, a pomegranate and olive farmer. “The dish perfectly embodies [Antakya’s] location, with the Mediterranean climate represented in the tomatoes, olive oil and pomegranate, and the Levantine [a Mediterranean region located in southwest Asia] influences in the fresh herbs and chilies. It would usually be

Soak the sun-dried tomatoes in warm water until soft and pliable, 10 to 20 minutes. While the tomatoes are soaking, seed the pomegranate. Drain the sun-dried tomatoes and pat dry, then slice (or cut with kitchen scissors) into 1/4-inch-wide strips. Arrange the tomato strips on a small plate and top with pepper slices (or chili flakes). Sprinkle over the mint or parsley, and then the cheese and pomegranate seeds. Drizzle over the olive oil and pomegranate molasses and serve immediately.

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ing the resources and culture of the Plains’ native peoples. The most famous “buff” in Boulder is Ralphie — actually, a series of five female bison over the years. Thanks to Ralphie and nationally broadcast football games from Folsom Field, Boulder is ID-ed nationally for two things: buffalo/bison and its mountain backdrop… well, those and beer, pot, herb tea and Mork). The current Ralphie — “V” — retired Nov. 23 as CU’s live mascot after 12 seasons but didn’t run the field, which made PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, happy. They want CU-Boulder to stop using live animals as mascots. By the way, the Ralphies never lived in Boulder because of the cost of living. They dwell on a secret Colorado ranch. Getting to know bison: If you want to learn more about Colorado’s real connection to bison,

Thundering exhibit, herds and roasted marrow bones bring bison home

By JOHN LEHNDORFF

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t’s hard to miss the buffaloes in Boulder. Everywhere you turn there are business names and large-headed animals on beer cans, signs, T-shirts, the University of Colorado and numerous menu items. There is a catch: The animals are bison, not buffalo. They are separate species but the names are used interchangeably. Water buffalo are the source for the rich milk that makes genuine fresh mozzarella so wonderful. There is a reason you don’t see bison cheese. Notoriously cranky bison are not an animal that you want to try and milk. Ironically, by the time Boulder was being born in the 1800s the immense bison herds had been systematically slaughtered with the intention of destroy-

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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visit “Celebrating Our National Mammal: America’s Last Wild Bison.” The exhibit on display at the Museum of Boulder through January 12 includes photographs, artwork and writings about the history of America’s bison, who once numbered 60,000,000. Also showing is the film Our National Mammal, directed by Thia Martin. Beyond Buffalo Bill: To learn more about the complicated Western history involving bison, visit Buffalo Bill’s Grave and Museum atop Lookout Mountain in Golden. The collection of Western artifacts includes Chief Sitting Bull’s bow and arrows. Besides serving bone-in 16-ounce ribeye steaks, the Buckhorn Exchange — Denver’s oldest eatery and a National Historic Landmark — is adorned with Wild West artifacts from the bison culture including taxidermied bison heads. It’s what’s for dinner: Often categorized as “game,” bison has a mild, sweet taste, similar to lean, grass-fed beef. Bison contains much less fat than beef so it should never be overcooked. A good source is the family-run Sunrise Bison Ranch (sunsee NIBBLES Page 36

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NIBBLES from Page 35

risebisonranch.com) in Ramah, which offers bison jerky, steaks, bratwurst and ground bison at the Boulder Farmers Market. They will be at the Market’s final event, the Winter Market Dec. 7 and 8 at the Boulder County Fairgrounds in Longmont. Bison on the menu: If you want to taste for yourself, bison is on the menu in Boulder. Colorado-raised bison burgers are available at the Boulder Cork, West End Tavern and Mountain Sun Pub. Grilled bison filet mignon is dished at Steakhouse No. 316 and ground bison pasties are at Shamane’s Bake Shoppe. Other bison dishes available locally include: Bison prime rib at Buckhorn Exchange, Denver; Braised bison ribs (on Osage-style fry bread with roasted green chilies and hominy salsa) at Tocabe An American Indian Eatery, Denver; Roasted bison marrow bones (plus bison tongue), at The Fort, Morrison; Bison carpaccio at Gashouse Restaurant, Edwards; and Bison back ribs at Roaming Buffalo BBQ, Denver. Where the buffalo do roam: If you want to see some of Colorado’s 12,000 bison (according to the Westminsterbased National Bison Association), you have two choices. Many locals and visitors head up to the Buffalo Herd Overlook on Interstate 70 at Genesee Park, get out of their cars, and get disappointed because the bison decided to lunch elsewhere. Instead, take the next exit, Chief Hosa, and follow signs to a back pasture where the herd often hangs out in the early morning and late afternoon. At Rocky Mountain Arsenal National

WORDS TO CHEW ON “I come from a family where gravy is considered a beverage.” — Erma Bombeck John Lehndorff hosts Radio Nibbles at 8:25 a.m. Thursdays on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org).

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

Wildlife Refuge near Commerce City you can potentially have a close encounter of the third kind. Inside a fenced preserve you can enjoy a self-guided, 11-mile drive where the bison herd lives and sometimes block the road. Believe the sign at the Refuge: “Bison are wild, unpredictable animals — do not try to attract their attention.” Finally, Boulder Dog Food Company (boulderdogfoodcompany.com) offers allnatural bison lung cubes as treats for your dog. LOCAL FOOD NEWS Congratulations to Boulder County farmer Gregory Alan Isakov, who has been nominated for a Grammy Award in the Best Folk Album category for “Evening Machines.” … According to Boulder Valley School District policy, students are fed lunch regardless of their meal account balance. However, many students build up meal debt that they struggle to pay. Consider making an end of the year donation to the District’s Meal Debt Project. food.bvsd.org/meals-nutrition/mealaccounts … The new Forbes list of the 50 best American vegetarian restaurants includes Root Down and Linger in Denver. … Plan ahead: In 2020, Slow Food Nations will be cooler when it moves from summer to Sept. 11-13 in Denver.


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Profiles in brew: Laura Lodge of Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywines Festival by Michael J. Casey

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eld every winter high up in the Rockies, the Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywines Festival is one of the year’s premier beer events. “It’s largely a brewers’ festival,” Laura Lodge, cofounder of Big Beers, says. “And they like to show off ... and discuss innovation and new ideas with each other.” Spanning three days (Jan. 9-11, 2020), Big Beers features brewmasters leading dinners calibrated to their ales and lagers, panels on the science and history of beer styles, a homebrewing competition, and the best commercial beer tastings you’ll ever attend inside a ski resort. And though much has been added in the past 20 years, little of the festival’s core ethos has changed. “The idea was to educate,” Lodge says. “Not only educate the buyers but to educate the public.” Big Beers debuted in Vail in 2001. DAVID FOXHOVEN At the time, Lodge’s brother and festival cofounder, Bill, owned High Point Brewing Corp., a distributor for various microbreweries — to use the parlance of the early aughts — as well as an importer of Belgian ales. Though Bill’s portfolio was enviable, knowledge of imports and microbrews in the late-’90s/early-’00s was limited. So too were Front Range brewers’ access to the mountain ski towns. They wanted their beers in restaurants and bars, but to do that, they needed to create demand. They needed beer drinkers to know what was out there, and how good it tasted. “So the whole idea of Big Beers, Belgians, and Barleywines started with the idea of having a trade show,” Lodge says. The trade show quickly became Big Beers’ commercial tasting, a chance for brewers, buyers and the public to try the most boundary-pushing brews on the market. It didn’t take long for Big Beers to turn heads. Adam Avery of Avery Brewing Co. was an early supporter, as was Sam Calagione (Dogfish Head Brewery), and the two teamed up for a Brewmasters’ Dinner in 2005 — a staple ever since with two new brewmasters leading the dinner every year. This year features Neil Fisher of WeldWerks Brewing Co. and Troy Casey (no relation) of Casey Brewing & Blending. Another staple that’s been with Big Beers since year two is the Homebrew Competition, an integral component of any beer festival. “The homebrew clubs are so passionate and so driven to make things happen,” Lodge says. “They will come up and make the world move for you.” And from those humble roots, Big Beers grew from one day to three, relocated from Vail to Breckenridge’s Beaver Run Resort in 2017, and continues to incorporate more dinners, more educational seminars and more beer. Lodge is still trying to make Big Beers bigger, and this year’s festival will feature a first: the Box of Big Beers Raffle. Ten mystery 12-packs filled with bottles from the commercial tasting will be raffled off on the final day. Raffle tickets are $10 (or three for $25), and you need not be present to win. Raffle tickets, as well as passes to the commercial tasting and certain seminars, are still available. Visit bigbeersfestival.com for more.

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BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Humans invented the plow

in 4,500 BC, the wheel in 4,000 BC, and writing in 3,400 BC. But long before that, by 6,000 BC, they had learned how to brew beer and make psychoactive drugs from plants. Psychopharmacologist Ronald Siegel points to this evidence to support his hypothesis that the yearning to transform our normal waking consciousness is a basic drive akin to our need to eat and drink. Of course, there are many ways to accomplish this shift besides alcohol and drugs. They include dancing, singing, praying, drumming, meditating and having sex. What are your favorite modes? According to my astrological analysis, it’ll be extra important for you to alter your habitual perceptions and thinking patterns during the coming weeks.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: What’s something you’re afraid of, but pretty confident you could become unafraid of? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to dismantle or dissolve that fear. Your levels of courage will be higher than usual, and your imagination will be unusually ingenious in devising methods and actions to free you of the unnecessary burden. Step one: Formulate an image or scene that symbolizes the dread, and visualize yourself blowing it up with a “bomb” made of a hundred roses.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: The word “enantiodromia” refers to a phenomenon that occurs when a vivid form of expression turns into its opposite, often in dramatic fashion. Yang becomes yin; resistance transforms into welcome; loss morphs into gain. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you Geminis are the sign of the zodiac that’s most likely to experience enantiodromia in the coming weeks. Will it be a good thing or a bad thing? You can have a lot of influence over how that question resolves. For best results, don’t fear or demonize contradictions and paradoxes. Love and embrace them.

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: There are Americans who speak only one language, English, and yet imagine they are smarter than bilingual immigrants. That fact amazes me, and inspires me to advise me and all my fellow Cancerians to engage in humble reflection about how we judge our fellow humans. Now is a favorable time for us to take inventory of any inclinations we might have to regard ourselves as superior to others; to question why we might imagine others aren’t as worthy of love and respect as we are; or to be skeptical of any tendency we might have dismiss and devalue those who don’t act and think as we do. I’m not saying we Cancerians are more guilty of these sins than everyone else; I’m merely letting you know that the coming weeks are our special time to make corrections.

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: “Erotic love is one of the highest forms of

by you. Yes, you might temporarily fall behind. But in the meantime, you’ll get fully recharged. No more than three weeks from now, you’ll be so energized that you’ll make up for all the lost time — and more.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Most sane people wish there could be

less animosity between groups that have different beliefs and interests. How much better the world would be if everyone felt a generous acceptance toward those who are unlike them. But the problem goes even deeper: Most of us are at odds with ourselves. Here’s how author Rebecca West described it: Even the different parts of the same person do not often converse among themselves, do not succeed in learning from each other. That’s the bad news, Libra. The good news is that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to promote unity and harmony among all the various parts of yourself. I urge you to entice them to enter into earnest conversations with each other!

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: Poet Cecilia Woloch asks, “How to un-want

what the body has wanted, explain how the flesh in its wisdom was wrong?” Did the apparent error occur because of some “some ghost in the mind?” she adds. Was it due to “some blue chemical rushing the blood” or “some demon or god”? I’m sure that you, like most of us, have experienced this mystery. But the good news is that in the coming weeks you will have the power to un-want inappropriate or unhealthy experiences that your body has wanted. Step one: Have a talk with yourself about why the thing your body has wanted isn’t in alignment with your highest good.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: Sagittarian composer Ludwig van

Beethoven was inclined to get deeply absorbed in his work. Even when he took time to attend to the details of daily necessity, he allowed himself to be spontaneously responsive to compelling musical inspirations that suddenly welled up in him. On more than a few occasions, he lathered his face with the 19th century equivalent of shaving cream, then got waylaid by a burst of brilliance and forgot to actually shave. His servants found that amusing. I suspect that the coming weeks may be Beethoven-like for you, Sagittarius. I bet you’ll be surprised by worthy fascinations and subject to impromptu illuminations.

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: During the next 11 months, you could

initiate fundamental improvements in the way you live from day to day. It’s conceivable you’ll discover or generate innovations that permanently raise your life’s possibilities to a higher octave. At the risk of sounding grandiose, I’m tempted to predict that you’ll celebrate at least one improvement that is your personal equivalent of the invention of the wheel or the compass or the calendar.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: The only thing we learn from history is that we never learn anything from history. Philosopher Georg Hegel said that. But I think you will have an excellent chance to disprove this theory in the coming months. I suspect you will be inclined and motivated to study your own past in detail; you’ll be skilled at drawing useful lessons from it; and you will apply those lessons with wise panache as you re-route your destiny.

VIRGO

Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) was acclaimed and beloved. At the height of his fame, he earned $3,000 per poem. But modern literary critics think that most of what he created is derivative, sentimental and unworthy of serious appreciation. In dramatic contrast is poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). Her writing was virtually unknown in her lifetime, but is now regarded as among the best ever. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to sort through your own past so as to determine which of your work, like Longfellow’s, should be archived as unimportant or irrelevant, and which, like Dickinson’s, deserves to be a continuing inspiration as you glide into the future.

Adventures in Wonderland, our heroine uses a magic mirror as a portal into a fantastical land. There she encounters the Red Queen, and soon the two of them are holding hands as they run as fast as they can. Alice notices that despite their great effort, they don’t seem to be moving forward. What’s happening? The Queen clears up the mystery: In her realm, you must run as hard as possible just to remain in the same spot. Sound familiar, Virgo? I’m wondering whether you’ve had a similar experience lately. If so, here’s my advice: Stop running. Sit back, relax, and allow the world to zoom

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contemplation,” wrote the sensually wise poet Kenneth Rexroth. That’s a provocative and profitable inspiration for you to tap into. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re in the Season of Lucky Plucky Delight, when brave love can save you from wrong turns and irrelevant ideas; when the grandeur of amour can be your teacher and catalyst. If you have a partner with whom you can conduct these educational experiments, wonderful. If you don’t, be extra sweet and intimate with yourself.

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: In the follow-up story to Alice’s

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Talking to him about this sends him into a depressive episode where I then have to spend hours telling him he’s not a bad person, so I’ve stopped bringing it up. I’ve tried to talk to therDear Dan: I’m a heterosexual cis apists about navigating this issue, but woman in a monogamous marriage. My most change the subject. One actually husband and I have always struggled to told me that it was good that we don’t connect sexually, mostly because he has have good sex, because if we did, we extreme anxiety that makes doing anywouldn’t have good communication in thing new or different difficult. He’s been other areas. (I never went in therapy since before I ROMAN ROBINSON back to that one.) This has met him, but it doesn’t gone on for so long that seem to be helping much. I’ve lost all interest in sex. His anxiety has caused My libido, which used to be him to shut down every very high, has vanished. sexual ask I’ve ever made Whenever he wants sex, I because he’s afraid he do it — but I dread it. Do won’t “do it right.” He’s a you have any ideas on how PIV-and-nothing-more kind I can navigate this topic of guy, but I’m not asking with my husband so he for varsity-level stuff, just doesn’t shut down? How boring things like talking can I make him understand about fantasies, a little that it’s okay to experiment role-play, staying in bed on sexually and it will be okay a Sunday just to have sex, etc. All of it is if it’s not perfect? off the table. I understand he has a right —Lost And So Sad to veto sex acts, but isn’t this all pretty basic, run-of-the-mill stuff? He’ll still get Dear LASS: You’re going to have to his PIV; I just want there to be other elecall your husband’s bluff, LASS, and ments before the PIV starts. It’s still a no.

BY DAN SAVAGE

power through the predictable meltdown. That means raising — again — your unhappiness with your sex life, explaining your need for some pre-PIV intimacy and play, informing him this is no longer a desperate request but a non-negotiable demand, and then refusing to shift into caregiver mode when his depressive episode starts. I’m not suggesting your husband’s anxiety and depression are an act, LASS, or that being made aware of your unhappiness isn’t a trigger. But if depressive episodes get your husband out of conversations he’d rather avoid — and if they allow him to dictate the terms of your sex life and treat your pussy like a Fleshlight — then his subconscious could be weaponizing those depressive episodes. And if you shift to caregiver mode every single time — so long as you’re willing to spend hours reassuring him that he’s not a bad person — then your grievances will never be addressed, much less resolved. So even if it means spending an extremely unpleasant evening, weekend, or few weeks with him, you’re going to have to raise the issue and refuse to reassure your husband. Line up whatever support you think he might need before you make your stand — you could also make your stand dur-

ing a couples counseling session — and give him maybe one “You’re not a bad person, really!” and then refuse to back down. And when he shuts down, LASS, it will be his therapist’s job to pry him back open, not yours. And the sex you’re currently having? The sex you dread and don’t enjoy? The sooner you stop having it, LASS, the sooner your husband will come to understand that he’s going to have to give a little (so very little!) if he wants to have sex at all. If and when he does, then you can borrow a page from the varsity-level kinkster handbook: Take baby steps. In the same way people who are turned on by, say, more intense bondage scenes (suspension, immobilization, etc.) start with lighter bondage scenes (hands behind the back, spread-eagled on the bed, etc.), you can start with something small and easy for him to get right, like 20 minutes of cuddling in bed together on a Sunday morning before progressing to PIV sex. On the Lovecast, shy lady doms rise up! With Midori: savagelovecast.com. Send emails to mail@savagelove. net, follow Dan on Twitter @ FakeDanSavage, and visit ITMFA.org.

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It’s not easy being green. Or is it? by Seymour

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et’s level with each other: There’s a lot of one-time-use plastic involved in the cannabis industry. There. We said it. The elephant has been acknowledged. But as Fred Rogers said, anything mentionable is manageable. And there are plenty of companies (some of them right here on the Front Range) creating sustainable packaging for marijuana products.

Doesn’t matter whether you’re buying flower, concentrate or edibles, dispensaries use a lot of plastic, often in the name of meeting regulations for child-resistant packaging. Also, this obviously isn’t a problem confined to the marijuana industry; single-use plastic is everywhere, it’s how everyone does business. From snack food companies to floss picks for your teeth to bows for presents and straws and disposable gloves and

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party balloons… everything is built around plastic. So the marijuana industry, in its infancy, is primed to lead the way. Here are a handful of companies offering sustainability without jeopardizing safety and quality. SANA PACKAGING Based in Denver (but developed in Boulder — more on that in a moment), Sana creates cannabis packaging using 100% plant-based hemp plastic, 100% reclaimed ocean plastic, “and other sustainable materials,” according to its website. The Sana Hemp Tube 78, for example, is ideal child-resistant packaging for vape cartridges and mini pre-rolls. And not only is the hemp plastic 100% plant-based, it’s also chemical-free and #7 recyclable. Sana makes tubes for larger pre-rolls and vape pens, as well as a container for flower, concentrates and edibles. Hemp is a regenerative material that requires less water to cultivate than many other industrial crops. It’s also naturally insect resistant so it doesn’t require pesticides. Plus, hemp plants sequester metric tons of carbon dioxide from the air and rejuvenate the soil as a rotational crop. To cut back on air pollution, Sana products are manufactured in the United States. The founders of Sana attended CU-Boulder and developed Sana in CanopyBoulder, a business accelerator and venture capital fund for the legal cannabis industry. FUNKSAC FunkSacs are fully recyclable, tamper evident

NOVEMBER 28, 2019

bags that are robust in child safety standards. And the bags have an FDA approval as completely odorless storage for marijuana flower products and other raw cannabis materials. Also based in Denver, FunkSac also manufactures domestically to cut back on transportation pollution. CRATIV PACKAGING With their multi-use, child resistant, recyclable boxes, CRATIV focuses on disrupting the single-use mindset that dominates the cannabis industry. CRATIV boxes are great for volume sales of pre-rolls (say a dozen instead of one) or whole vaporizer set-ups or a bunch of gummy bears or concentrate. Made with food-grade polypropylene, these boxes are reusable and repurposable, so even if you never keep another dozen joints in there, you could keep medicine, cosmetics, sharp objects or anything else you don’t want children getting a hold of. Oh, and this company is also based in Denver. N2 PACKAGING Last but not least, this Twin Falls, Idahobased company makes one of the coolest packaging solutions out there. N2’s patented packaging process cans and hermetically seals cannabis to preserve the contents and extend shelf life. The packaging is fully recyclable, child-resistant (also available in senior friendly lids) and guaranteed to keep weed fresh throughout the entire shipping process. Ask your favorite dispensary what kind of sustainable packaging they carry, and talk with them about why it’s important to you as a customer.

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Trump says it out loud: Prohibition doesn’t work By Paul Danish

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resident Trump last Friday said aloud what every U.S. president since Harding has known about prohibition but has rarely been willing to say — that it doesn’t work. The occasion was a White House meeting on whether to ban vaping products, or at least the flavored ones. “When you watch prohibition, when you look at

the alcohol, you look at cigarettes, you look at it all, if you don’t give it to them, it’s going to come here illegally,” Trump said. “You just have to look at the history of it,” he continued. “Now, instead of having a flavor that’s at least safe, they’re going to be having a flavor that’s poison. That’s a big problem. “How do you solve the fact that it’s going to be shipped in from Mexico? That’s a problem. You have the same problem with drugs and everything else.” (The quotes come from a story by Marijuana Moment writer Kyle Jaeger.) You might hope for a more grammatically polished statement of the case against prohibition, but

you couldn’t ask for a more direct one. (Whatever other sins Trump might be accused of, nuanced speech isn’t one of them.) U.S. presidents have known for decades that prohibition doesn’t work, but the only one who took on the prohibitionists and won was FDR, who made repealing the Eighteenth Amendment a major plank in his 1932 campaign platform. Roosevelt’s successors pretended that alcohol prohibition was unique and bore no relation to any other form of prohibition — including marijuana prohibition, which started in 1937. They wouldn’t take a stand against any of the country’s other prohibitionist proclivities, and, starting with Nixon, they signed the bills that started and sustained the war on drugs. Trump’s remarks are a real departure from what other presidents, both Democrat and Republican, have been willing to say about the country’s prohibitionist impulses, so it’s reasonable to wonder whether he’s serious or whether he’s just shooting off his mouth. It’s probably a little of both. Trump isn’t bashful about thinking out loud, and he commented after sitting through a meeting in which a lot of prohibitionist bullshit was spoken about the need to ban flavored vapes in order to protect “the children,” including by Mitt Romney, not one of Trump’s favorite people. It’s possible Trump spoke the truth about prohibition just because Mitt pissed him off. He does things like that. But according to Reuters, Trump had been peppering both advocates and opponents of vaping bans with questions during the meeting, so his remarks about prohibition not working didn’t just come out of thin air. Trump may have surprised himself by going public with misgivings about prohibition, but now that

his views are out, he may be more inclined to embrace them and double down on them when they are attacked. He does things like that too. Especially since a number of nanny-statist prigs in the coastal media are already beating him up for abandoning a proposed ban on flavored vapes. Update: Forbes is reporting that a Trump campaign internal poll found a big majority of Trump supporters would be less likely to vote for him if he supported vaping bans. • • • • May the pot of paradise fly up your nose… Doctors in Sydney, Australia, recently reported the strange case of a 48-year-old man who showed up at their hospital with a 3/4-by-1/2-inch “rhinolith” — the nasal equivalent of a kidney stone — lodged up his right nostril. It turned out that 18 years earlier the guy had been doing time, and that during a prison visit his girlfriend had slipped him a small balloon filled with pot — which he shoved up his nose and forgot about. OK, it’s not as nutty as it sounds. It turned out the guy had gotten the pot past the guards, but when he tried to get it out he pushed it farther up his nostril and eventually thought he had sucked it out the back and swallowed it. That’s when he forgot about it. But the balloon had gotten stuck in his nostril, where it calcified. The docs discovered it after giving the guy a head scan to find the cause of the headaches and nasal infections he had been complaining about. The latter went away after the rhinolith was removed endoscopically. “To the best of our knowledge, our case represents the first report of a prison-acquired marijuanabased rhinolith,” they reported. Yet, inexplicably, their report appeared in the journal BMJ Case Reports rather than the Guinness Book of Records.

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11.28.19 Boulder Weekly  

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