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B o u l d e r C o u n t y ’ s Tr u e I n d e p e n d e n t Vo i c e / FREE / www.boulder weekly.com / Nov. 23-29 2 0 1 7

INSIDE: I LOVE LOCAL GIFTS 2017


contents NEWS:

For Native Americans, fighting diabetes means fighting the federal government for their fair share of health care funds by Sydney Worth

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....................................................................... NEWS:

Facing diminishing rights, manufactured home owners begin effort to create statewide homeowners association by Sarah Farley

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....................................................................... BOULDERGANIC:

Organics plus: Biodynamic agriculture is on the rise by Angela K. Evans

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....................................................................... ADVENTURE:

Changes in ownership, attitudes and operations spark renaissance at Eldora by Tom Winter

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....................................................................... BUZZ:

Danielle Feinberg and the technical triumph of ‘Coco’ by Michael J. Casey

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....................................................................... OVERTONES:

The comeback kid: Gary Numan’s second act by Caitlin Rockett

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departments 5 THE HIGHROAD: Donald Trump’s strange bromance with Rodrigo Duterte 6 DANISH PLAN: The dawn of the new era in Boulder politics 6 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 27 CULTURE: Trans Awareness Week honors and educates 28 ARTS: More than just pretty still lifes 31 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 37 WORDS: ‘Mother’s Persian Rugs’ by Jodie Hollander 38 SCREEN: The ‘Justice League’ is full of idiots 39 FILM: And into the frying pan with ‘Brimstone & Glory’ 41 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 43 NIBBLES: Culinary notables recall Thanksgiving feast’s best, worst, funniest moments 48 DRINK: Profiles in brew: Ashleigh Carter of Bierstadt Lagerhaus 53 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 55 SAVAGE LOVE: Public players 57 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Criminal 59 CANNABIS CORNER: Fake news and good news about marijuana 61 ICUMI: An irreverent and not always accurate view of the world Boulder Weekly

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers: John Lehndorff, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Amanda Moutinho, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Gavin Dahl, Paul Danish, James Dziezynski, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, Michael Krumholtz, Brian Palmer, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Gregory Thorson, Christi Turner, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner, Mollie Putzig, Mariah Taylor, Betsy Welch, Noël Phillips, Carolyn Oxley Interns, Sarah Farley, Sydney Worth, Eliza Radeka SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executive, Julian Bourke Account Executive, Trevor Garrison Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Marketing Manager, Devin Edgley Advertising Coordinator, Olivia Rolf Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Production Manager, Dave Kirby Art Director, Susan France Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Assistant to the Publisher Julia Sallo CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama 17-Year-Old, Mia Rose Sallo Cover, Christian Saber of Rincon Argentino by Susan France November 23, 2017 Volume XXV, Number 16 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2017 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

Boulder Weekly welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

Boulder Weekly

the

Highroad Donald Trump’s strange bromance with Rodrigo Duterte by Jim Hightower

W

e’ve had a great relationship,” exulted a giddy Donald Trump, following his two-day schmoozefest in Manila with the thuggish Philippine president, Rodrigo Duterte. Duterte, who calls himself a “toughie,” brags that he’s personally killed many people and likes to compare himself to Satan. He’s been on a murderous rampage since his election last year. In the name of eliminating the drug trade, he has unleashed a massive military assault across the country, not merely targeting dealers, but also people using drugs. His onslaught is a human rights atrocity, with untold thousands essentially being executed in what are antiseptically termed “extra judicial killings” — i.e., illegal, unjustified... murderous.

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

Yet, the present President of the United States says Duterte is his new buddy, and Trump stressed in their official discussions that the Philippine president can count on him and the U.S. (which includes you and me) to be a friend. And, as a friend, Trump didn’t bother his authoritarian buddy with any unpleasant talk about those rampant human rights abuses. Instead, the Duterte-Trump get-together was one of mutual praise and even affection. Indeed, Donald was delighted when Rodrigo impulsively grabbed the microphone at a gala state dinner and serenaded Trump with a love ballad, crooning: “You are the love I’ve been waiting for.” In fact, Duterte had earlier demonstrated that love when he named Jose Antonio to be his trade representative to our country. Antonio, a Philippine real estate mogul, happens to be a partner with our president in the luxurious new Trump Tower, now under construction in Manila. Cozy, huh? Hugging up the Manila Satan might be good business for Trump, but it’s a sorry deal for our national interest — and it’s an insult to our people’s support of human rights. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. November 23 , 2017 5


danish plan The dawn of the new era in Boulder politics by Paul Danish

W

ow! That was one Friday. The rest were either dropped off awesome piece of poli- in person or cast on Tuesday at one of the ticking. two polling places that were open in New Era Boulder (at the Clerk and Recorder’s Colorado, the milleni- office on 33rd Street or at the CU al-oriented activist organization that all Environmental and Safety Center, just but single-handedly saved the muni, did west of 28th Street on the CU Boulder a terrific job of identifying, persuading campus. and turning out voters for ballot issue 2L, Which means someone did a kick-ass including the late surge of votes that put job of turning out a late surge of voters it over the top. for 2L. Boulder politics will never be the And that “someone” was mostly New same. No, really, they won’t. Era Colorado. Ballot issue 2L (in case you spent the On Election Day (Nov. 7), New Era last year in a persistent vegetative state) volunteers were busting their butts to was the tax extension proposal that will round up CU students on campus and raise $16.5 million to give them rides (pizza fund another three and drinks included) years of the City’s to the Environmental decade-long drive Health and Safety to socialize and 2L PASSED BY A Center. According green — or at least MARGIN OF 3.4 to Lizzy Stephan of greenwash –— its New Era, the orgaelectric utility, PERCENT BUT AS nization gave 428 which is currently OF 8:18 P.M. ON van rides to the owned and operatELECTION DAY, IT Center. ed by Xcel Energy. In other words, Personally, I WAS LOSING BY A 12 about 40 percent of think it’s an PERCENTAGE POINT obscenely expensive tax extension’s winMARGIN. nutty idea that ning margin probaowes more to antibly came from votcorporatism than ers driven to the environmentalism, but let’s save Center on Tuesday. Not bad for a day’s that discussion for some other time. work. What’s important here is how New Era In the final 24 hours before the elecprevailed and what that means for how tion, “we didn’t leave any stone politics in Boulder is done in the future. unturned,” Stephan told the Daily First a few numbers. Camera. Ballot issue 2L passed 15,852 to Nor in the weeks running up to the 14,807, a margin of 1,045 votes, or 3.4 election. percent. (Figures are as of Monday, Nov. According to Stephan, New Era 20.) activists also registered 2,075 new voters That in itself was not particularly sur- from whom they obtained “pledges” for prising. What was surprising was that as 2L votes. Assuming most of them fulof 8:18 p.m. on Election Day, 2L was filled their pledges, that alone determined losing by a 12 percentage point margin the outcome. — 7,442 to 9,421 (44.13 percent to New Era’s effort on behalf of 2L also 55.87 percent). included sending out 21,000 text messagThe votes that had been counted by es, and not just to students and millenni8:18 p.m. — 55 percent of the total votes als. This may be the first time social cast on 2L — included all of the votes media had a central role in a local that were received by the County Clerk Boulder election, and it was a game before Tuesday morning. The remaining changer. 45 percent of the ballots, the votes that “One thing we’re increasingly realizput 2L over the top, were cast or received ing about young voters in the muni fight on Tuesday. is that they’re very suspicious of money in Many of the votes which reached the politics and very suspicious of large corCounty Clerk on Tuesday were probably see DANISH PLAN Page 8 mailed over the weekend or the previous

BALLOT ISSUE

6 November 23 , 2017

letters Combat fracking

The people of Boulder County must unite and utilize every conceivable option available in order to combat the existential threat of fracking to our community from the sociopathic oil and gas industry. In the evening of Nov. 17, 2017, I along with my wife and 9-year-old daughter joined other outraged parents and children in Erie to protest against the leaking fracking well right next door to and less than 50 feet from Aspen Ridge Preparatory School. The State of Colorado cited Crestone Peak Resources for improperly plugging the oil and gas well; however, it is a little late now because the adverse health effects on the children and damage has already been done. There is no way that the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) should have ever approved an application to frack next to an elementary school. The quality of life in Broomfield and Erie are ruined with fracking wells next to schools and homes. We cannot allow that to happen in Lafayette or Boulder County; consequently, oil and gas cannot be allowed to gain even a foothold in our community. Fracking must be kept out of Lafayette and Boulder County at all costs. The fact that Crestone Peak Resources filed an application to put a fracking well next to Pioneer Elementary School in Lafayette demonstrates the oil and gas industry’s dishonesty, misdirection, bottomless bad faith and willingness to endanger the safety, health and welfare of the people of Lafayette to make a buck. There is absolutely no way that fracking can be done safely, and it cannot be allowed within 20 miles of schools or homes.

For the oil and gas industry to argue that there are no proven health dangers to fracking is like the tobacco industry saying there are no health dangers to smoking. I am reading the book Frackopoly by Wenonah Hauter, which should be required reading by all City Councilors, County Commissioners, legislators or anyone else concerned about reigning in the power of this ruthless, sociopathic industry. Andrew J. O’Connor/Lafayette

Boulder voters: Forward on local power

Once again, by passing 2L, Boulder voters have made clear their commitment to taking the kind of serious, complex action required of us in the fight against climate change. And this year, the Utility Occupation Tax extension passed by a larger margin than it did when it was first on the ballot in 2011. Boulder has been a critical leader in the climate crisis — with voters behind the wheel. We’ve shown once again that we’re not willing to wait on the sidelines hoping that Xcel Energy will change at the pace required to maintain a livable planet. At New Era Colorado, we’ve consistently seen that young voters want bold action on climate change, and they’ll show up in local elections to help make it happen. We look forward to working with this City Council in enacting the will of the voters on municipalization, and we’ll continue to hold Xcel accountable to their commitments made on the stand at the Public Utilities Commission. We’re thrilled with the see LETTERS Page 8

Boulder Weekly


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porations,” Stephan told the Camera. “So right away, talking to a young person and explaining Xcel’s involvement in this fight — it doesn’t take a lot of convincing.” The last is a bit ironic, considering that Xcel didn’t put any money into this year’s muni fight, while as of Thursday, Nov. 2, the deadline for the last financial disclosure before the election, New Era had contributed $24,048.66 to Voters for 100% Renewables, a political committee it had set up to campaign for ballot issue 2L. New Era’s narrative and talking points are as much anti-Xcel as they are pro-muni. Anti-corporatism has a central role in its playbook. But financial disclosure, not so much this year. All of Voters for 100% Renewables’ contributions are listed as coming from New Era Colorado. There is no disclosure of where New Era Colorado’s money came from for this year’s campaign. However, ballot issue 2L is not New Era’s first rodeo with Xcel. In 2013, Xcel spent a fortune trying to pass a ballot measure which would have required voter approval of the debt the City could take on if it condemned Xcel’s Boulder system. The proposal was fiercely opposed by New Era, which raised $193,000 to oppose it through an Indiegogo crowd-funding campaign. And it won. The measure was defeated by a better than 2 to 1 margin, but a somewhat similar mea-

sure put on the ballot by the City Council passed by about a 2-to-1 margin. New Era’s Indiegogo campaign attracted 5,702 backers, most of them small contributors. That’s impressive. New Era made the contributor list public; the overwhelming majority of the contributors did not live in Boulder, and a substantial number of them didn’t live in Colorado. That’s troubling. Apart from saving the muni at the ballot box repeatedly, New Era Colorado has done at least three things that will transform Boulder politics: 1) It has shown that CU students can be turned into a political force to be reckoned with by those who have the wit to reach out to them and treat them like citizens instead of transients; Boulder pols will ignore this at their peril going forward. 2) It has demonstrated that the use of social media will likely become the primary means of conducting local campaigns in the near future, displacing newspaper advertising, direct mail and even door-knocking. 3) It has shown how tons of outside money can be raised quickly over the internet. That too is likely to become the new normal. Whether the new ways of doing local politics are a good thing or a bad thing remains to be seen. But we’re in a new era, and there’s no turning back. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

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LETTERS from Page 6

results of this election, and excited for what’s next in the fight for a renewable energy future. Lizzy Stephan, Executive Director of New Era Colorado

Don’t redeem Sand Creek Massacre perpetrators

The Sand Creek Massacre in November of 1864 was a mass murder far more horrific than any of today’s mass shootings. Old men, women and children were killed and mutilated, with fingers cut off to secure rings and scalps and body parts taken as souvenirs. John Nichols and forty other Boulderites were participants in this slaughter. Paul Danish [Re: “CU’s roots: Tales of the founders,” Oct. 26] asks us to look past this in his desire

that Nichols be honored for his civic (and commercial) role in securing the siting of the University in Boulder. The same seems to hold true in Denver for John Evans, the Territorial Governor and Superintendent of Indian Affairs removed from office for his part in facilitating the attack, and Jacob Downing, whose widow, perhaps unaware that her husband had testified that he had seen no scalps being taken, later donated a scalp to the State from his possessions. The commercial honors remain but there can be no redemption from the events of that day. Robert Porath/Boulder see LETTERS Page 9

Boulder Weekly


LETTERS from Page 8

Who is taking care of us?

Normally we elect a president to care and defend America from danger whether it be foreign or local. The president usually appoints a man with impeccable moral character as his attorney general to defend America against evil threats and use his/her prosecutorial powers to quickly enforce justice upon those who have harmed us. These obligations always include defending our freedom of speech, freedom of the press and, of course, freedom from corruption in our elections. Clearly the Russian government under mobster Vladimir Putin invaded our 2016 election and now we know that clearly they had attempted coordination with some of our own citizens. When Obama, in his roll as our protector, learned that our 2016 election was being penetrated by Russia, he quickly announced it and retaliated. Today, we are living with a president and an attorney general who remain conspicuously silent when they should be enraged as new facts arrive almost daily concerning the Russian cyber-attacks. Trump recently has said that he has no real evidence that Russia affected our elections, even after publicly asking Putin “if you are listening” to commit espionage and expose Clinton emails. Is he really that stupid or does he expect that we are? Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions are shirking their duty by ignoring their sworn oaths to protect us. Could it be they are hiding behind their lawyers for more sinister reasons? Vladimir Putin must be ecstatic. He has succeeded to divide Americans as a people and pit our judicial against our executive branches essentially handicapping our ability to govern. Most importantly, by helping to put a narcissistic conspiracy theorist in the White House Putin’s dream of seeing America’s credibility in the world reduced to that of a rogue nation has come true. Is it time to drain the swamp again? Tom Lopez/Longmont

#MeToo is not enough

Raised by my mother and grandmother and being a father of a 6-year-old girl, I’m happy to see a movement that’s empowered women to speak out against men who treat them poorly. Still, it should be noted that before this potentially watershed moment, our president (who gleefully boasted immature “locker room talk” of criminal behavior with a reporter when he was in his 60s) and his Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos (who said an excellent example of educational free choice was blacks who started black colleges when they weren’t allowed into white ones — she later apoloBoulder Weekly

gized) — rescinded Obama legislation that made it easier for young women to speak up when they get harassed or assaulted on college campuses across America. In canceling legislation many feminists have spent decades asking for (and that may have inspired this movement years ago), DeVos touted the end of Obama’s oppression, and said that once again men across America would get a fair shake. Remember, this was before

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#MeToo. DeVos and Trump promised to take sexual harassment and assault seriously. Perhaps their goal was simply to fulfill the Republican objective first stated the day after Obama was elected in 2008 — discredit and dismantle everything Obama does and make him look like the worst president in American history. Still, even if DeVos and Trump were just playing politics, they annulled a law that empowered women.

Like administrations in universities nation-wide (including the University of Colorado) — who say they’ll maintain standards set by Obama despite those given by DeVos and Trump — I hope people everywhere ignore leadership that struggles to talk the talk and has yet to prove they’ll walk the walk. (Has he tweeted about this?) And, give voice and power to women who speak out against men who abuse theirs. Curtis Griffin/Boulder

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news

Sydney Worth

The Special Diabetes Program for Indians helps Native Americans, like Theresa Halsey, a member of the Hunkpapa Lakota tribe. But the program suffers from short renewal cycles for federal funding.

For Native Americans, fighting diabetes means fighting the federal government for their fair share of health care funds

SDPI. This chronically underfunded agency originates from the nation’s earliest treaty agreements established in 1787, according to the department’s website. Yet, Native American health care too often sits on the backburner of the government’s to-do list. Historically, tribes have argued that the federal government has violated many treaty provisions, as evidenced most recently by last year’s Standing Rock protests against the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, which threatens the Standing Rock Tribe’s water supply. IHS’s lack of funding may well be viewed as yet another outgrowth of these violations. This poses a problem for Native Americans seeking diabetes programs since IHS has little money to work with. Sparse funding leads to limited options for programs, which dissuades many Native Americans from getting help. According to the First Nations Development Institute, 68 percent of Native Americans live on or near their home reservation in rural areas that often lack adequate medical facilities. Sparsely populated areas such as these are often overlooked by government and corporations that fund the healthcare system. With the nearest reservation in Colorado about seven hours away from Denver, many of the state’s Native Americans struggle to find the same quality of medical care as their urban counterparts.

by Sydney Worth

T

heresa Halsey, a member of the Hunkpapa Lakota tribe and producer of the Indian Voices radio show on KGNU, has been dealing with diabetes for a couple of decades. In 2000, she decided to visit Denver Indian Health and Family Services to get tested. That’s where her journey with the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) began. Through SDPI, Halsey attends classes for diabetes management. She learns how to navigate the produce section of the grocery store and how to cook vegetables. She sees what healthy portion sizes look like, and she gets to participate in monthly challenges that promote healthy living. For November, she’s vowed to drink water every day — no sugary drinks allowed. Halsey insists SDPI has helped her adopt healthier habits in her and her children’s lives. Yet, as much of an impact as this program might have in bettering her health, the federal government has been less than enthusiastic when it comes to acknowledging its significance. In October, Congress renewed 10 November 23, 2017

funds for SDPI, but only until Dec. 31. Despite the program’s success, renewal periods only last months at a time between Congressional debates regarding its funding. While the current state of government support looks bleak, researchers at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus and members of the SDPI community are committed to making sure the Native voice isn’t lost. “People need to be lobbying their states because that’s where the actual money will be coming down from; not that much money is coming from the [federal] government,” Halsey says. According to the National Indian Health Board, current costs for diabetes in Colorado total around $3 billion. Even so, the state’s SDPI program receives only $900,000 to fund Denver Indian Health and Family Services, Ute Mountain Tribe and the Southern Ute Tribe. The program is facilitated by the federal Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services. The agency works through a network of hospitals and clinics, many of which facilitate

“At the funding level — the federal level, they don’t care,” Halsey says. “They don’t care about the poor, they don’t care about the young, they don’t care about the old. They don’t care.” However, Native Americans are two times more likely to develop type two diabetes than any other subsect of the population, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Despite the dramatic disparity, the general public remains ignorant of the problem. Dr. Spero Manson, a Chippewa from Turtle Mountain Reservation and the research director at Anschutz’s Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, says that even his colleagues within the program aren’t aware all of the issues that plague Native communities. “They’re stunned by the extent of discrimination that our people experience,” Manson says. “It’s just not even on the radar screen for them. These are colleagues whom I work with who are studying these matters. Think about how that multiplies when you go out into the broader community.” Manson has spent his career researching the potential solutions to the problems Native communities face and learning how to apply them in the areas of need. One of his first exposures to the disparity between Native Americans and the rest of the population came during a 1970s study that found a link between combat and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Native soldiers were not included in the study, preventing them from receiving government aid for PTSD. The diabetes epidemic within the Native community shares the same disparity today. But a huge part of SDPI’s Boulder Weekly


$150 million

301Grantees

Per year since 2004

252 Tribal 20 IHS 29 Urban Established in 1997 by Congress to address the diabetes epidemic in Native Americans

in

780,000

35 States

People served each year

Diabetes and Costly Complications Reduced Obesity and diabetes rates in youth have not

Diabetic eye disease rates

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is the most effective federal initiative for combating diabetes in our AI/AN communities. Thanks to SDPI, our people are healthier - now and in future generations.

Lincoln Bean (Tlingit ) Alaska Area Representative Tribal Leaders Diabetes Committee 1

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CDC Vital Signs https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/aian-diabetes/index.html

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Indian Health Service July 2017

success revolves around uniting the Native community and creating a positive environment for each patient. “I think [Native Americans] really like that we talk about traditional food practices and the role of historical trauma in the development of diabetes,” says Sarah Hormachea, a registered dietician and certified diabetes educator for Denver’s SDPI chapter. “I think it would be harder to have those discussions in a heterogeneous class.” Manson refers to this as the collective genius. Bringing together Native Americans to share lessons of success makes SDPI an important program. Creating positive communities like this is crucial, given centuries of discrimination and poor living conditions. Manson insinuates that diabetes may be a symptom of the trauma many Native Americans still face today. His 2005 study found that they “witnessed traumatic events [and] experienced traumas more often than the U.S. population as a whole.” Halsey can attest to this research. She credits her development of diabetes to her traumatic experience at a boarding school for Native Americans. Over the course of several years in a South Dakota boarding school, Halsey Boulder Weekly

was starved, received poor treatment from teachers and was forced to do work around the school. While she managed the trauma of boarding school, she says that many of her classmates continue to struggle with the experience. “A lot of my friends have gone on to the spirit world already because of all the problems,” Halsey says. “It’s not because they’re alcoholics, it’s not because they do drugs — those are the symptoms. The [cause] is intergenerational trauma.” Halsey has always been a fighter, though. She describes standing up to the teachers for her younger siblings, something that was unthinkable in boarding school. “I’ve always been advocating for myself and others,” she says. SDPI hopes to expand its program in Denver to continue improving the health of Colorado Native Americans. But the age-old narrative of Native Americans against the government is never far away as Congress is continuously unwillingness to provide ample, long-term funding to the program. If history has taught us anything, it is that the Native community is willing to fight for its rights and is in it for the long haul.

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Unified voice

Facing diminished rights, manufactured home owners begin effort to create statewide homeowners association by Sarah Farley

M news

ore than 93,000 families in Colorado rely on the affordability that living in a manufactured (or mobile) home community provides. But for many of the low-income families, minorities and senior citizens who live in these communities, there’s a problem: They own only their home and must rent the land on which it sits. Simultaneously, manufactured home parks across the country are being sold for redevelopment, and the people in these parks are left scrambling to find another affordable option. For those reasons and others,, owners of manufactured homes are organizing to empower themselves. Mobile homeowners from 13 Colorado municipalities came together in Boulder on Oct. 21 as a first step toward forming a statewide homeowners association (HOA). The Manufactured Homeowners Fall Forum facilitated a full day of discussion on how to advocate for manufactured home parks on the community and state level through the unified voice an HOA provides. At the forum, residents learned how to start and finance such a statewide HOA from nonprofit and housing advocates. Attendees also discussed the state’s Mobile Home Park Act, which provides some rights for manufactured homeowners, but is weak when it comes to protections for things like arbitrary eviction, short notice before park closures and retaliation from landowners. They also discussed the opportunity for residents to purchase the land under their communities. There is precedent for a manufactured home HOA, but only at the local level. Jean Gehring, who has lived in Boulder’s Vista Village community for the past 24 years, serves as the vice president of her HOA. She says the organization was started two years ago to “put our relationship with management on civil footing.” So far it seems to be helping. “Having this HOA is like having the Boulder Weekly

Wikimedia Commons/ Amanda Bicknell

power to stand up,” Gehring says. In bills in the state legislature to strengthen fact, in 2015, the HOA successfully mobile homeowners’ protections, howhelped pass a city ordinance in Boulder ever all have failed to pass. He says that that limited the park owner’s ability to the opposition, which includes lobbyists prohibit the sale of homes built before for landowners, claims that the Mobile 1976, which were subject to different Home Park Act provides strong enough building regulations — park owners legislation, but he, and the attendees of have tried to force pre-1976 homes to the recent forum, strongly disagree. The be removed Act effectively Wikimedia Commons/ Riverview Homes, Inc. from their maintains the parks upon landowners’ sale, effectively power over resilosing their dents, which is entire value. a dynamic that Boulder’s ordihas manifested nance protects itself in various housing ways across the investments by state. allowing preFor instance, 1976 homeColorado’s state owners to sell statute has no their manufaclaw explicitly tured house without first removing it prohibiting landowners from retaliating from the park. against the residents living in their manSince this victory, Gehring says, “We ufactured home parks, according to feel very good that our relationship Prosperity Now, an organization working [with the park owner] is improving, but to help low-income families. that doesn’t mean they get a free pass on “Really we’re just seeing retaliation in anything.” the sense of, if a landowner or park staff Other mobile home parks are not as management has an issue with one of well-off and many lack any framework the residents, they’ll begin to start to negotiate with their landlords. enforcing a really arbitrary rule within Senator John Kefalas, who represents the communities, such as, the children Fort Collins, saw the Bender mobile not being able to play in the community home park near his neighborhood close after a certain time at night,” says Kris for redevelopment. The 40 or so families Grant, a policy analyst at the Colorado who lived there were ultimately disCenter on Law and Policy. placed. Many community members at the “Through this lens I got to see the forum reported inexplicable rent or utilimportance of this type of housing and ity increases. how we’re losing it, and how, oftenLandlords can raise the land rent by times, the playing field is not level,” an unlimited amount with just 60 days’ Kefalas says. notice. This is a huge problem for homThat park closed five years ago, and eowners because unlike someone living since then, Kefalas has introduced four in an apartment, “You can’t pack up a

home,” according to Ishbel Manufactured Dickens, a homeowners in housing lawColorado are taking the first step yer who towards forming a helped orgastatewide homeowners nize the association to forum. maximize their rights. Boulder City Council, for the record, is currently working on changes to the manufactured home ordinance that may prevent park owner from retaliatory tactics and clarify other rights for homeowners. A lot of Dickens’ efforts are focused on giving residents longer notice periods so they can plan and react to their changing situations accordingly. Colorado only requires landowners to notify park residents 10 days before they plan to sell the park. After that, residents have a minimum of six months before they have to leave the property. The process of relocating a manufactured home is expensive, and often not even possible. Grant explains that the term “mobile home” is really a misnomer. “These homes aren’t mobile. They’re homes in every sense of the word except for the fact that they were built in a factory.” He adds, “These people are overwhelmingly making a median income of $30,000.” That’s notable because it can cost up to $10,000 to move a manufactured home, and park residents rarely have the budget for that. So they end up losing everything. With so much strife arising in the relationship between landowners and homeowners, many advocates and residents support a solution in the form of resident-owned communities. In such a structure, park residents purchase the park’s land and operate it like a nonprofit organization, meaning all monthly expenses go directly back into the community. Community members would have more power to make the most beneficial decisions for themselves. Having the opportunity to purchase the park would prevent forced evictions and the hardships that come with it. However, residents have to compete with developers to buy the land, and they usually do not have the funds to match the price a corporation can pay. But, for now, by creating a statewide HOA, manufactured homeowners are hoping to at least gain the necessary footing to adequately voice their needs to their elected officials. November 23, 2017 13


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boulderganic Jason Griffith

Organics plus

Biodynamic agriculture is on the rise by Angela K. Evans

C

hef and farmer Eric Skokan of Black Cat Farm Table Bistro was shoveling out the duck house several years ago when he had an idea. In order to avoid triggering his gag reflex, why not create a portable shelter for the birds to move around his fields and fertilize his crops? “Essentially what we’re doing is encouraging the animals to poop in the most productive place,” Skokan says. “That’s ultimately what the goal is: poop location management.” It’s this philosophy that led Skokan and the entire Black Cat operation to become a certified biodynamic grower in June and the first biodynamic farmto-table restaurant in the country. While not new, biodynamic agriculture is a growing field in the U.S. as more and more farmers move toward sustainable agricultural practices that go beyond organic certification standards. “We’re talking about crop rotation and the value of manures and soil fertility; and biodiversity and how that provides habitat for predators that eat the bad insects,” says Jim Fullmer, executive director of Demeter Association, Inc., the only biodynamic certifier in the country. “The biodynamic system is just the original idea of an organic system. That is what it was supposed to be. Not a list of materials that are allowed or prohibited, [which] is what organic has become.”

According to Demeter, there are roughly 250 biodynamic farms and wineries throughout the U.S. representing more than 20,000 acres. The organization is a qualified USDA organic certifier as well, meaning all biodynamic operations are also organic certified. At Black Cat, Skokan and his wife and business partner, Jill, grow more than 250 different vegetables and raise sheep, pigs, chickens, turkeys and geese on 130 acres spread between three different plots of land in Boulder County. At the lowest point of production in March, about 65 percent of the Bistro’s menu comes directly from the farm, Skokan says. At the height in the fall, it hovers around 95-97 percent. On a 60-acre plot of land on Jay Road, Skokan currently has corn and farro fields, and asparagus planted in alternating rows with clover. A grouping of bee hives sits in one corner and an almost invisible wire fence separates a large sheep pasture guarded by several white dogs that almost get lost in the herd. Skokan will move the sheep into the crop fields after lambing season in the early spring. The animals will then graze their way through the field over several months, eating the corn and farro stalks leftover after harvest, along

Angela K. Evans

with the clover. “The whole time they’re mashing organic matter, plant matter, into the soil, and dropping manure and urine and that is essentially a walking, living, composting system,” he says. Integrating livestock into the farming operation is essential in biodynamics, Fullmer says. “When you do that you’re addressing a lot of input concerns. You’re generating fertility out of the manures, but also the pasture and the crop rotations and everything that comes out of the presence of animals,” he says. “When that starts happening, you’re building soil humus and when you do that, the farm is able to hold onto water, it’s able to hold onto crop nutrients and provide them in a living, balanced way, which leads to pest control because you have

healthy resilient crops.” Top: The Next year, biodynamic preparations at Skokan and the Aspen Moon team at Black Cat Farms. Bottom: The sheep paswill plant beans ture at Black in the fields, then Cat. the year after that, all the nightshades. At the other plots of land that make up Black Cat, he does the same thing — raising other livestock alongside crops and rotating fields between pasture and vegetable production. He produces all his own seeds on site, another aspect of the biodynamic system, and he hasn’t used fertilizer in five years, he says. The biodynamic standard also See BIODYNAMIC Page 18

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BIODYNAMIC from Page 17 Courtesy of Black Cat

requires the use of eight different “preparations” made from manure, herbs and minerals. While Skokan imports these, they make their own at Aspen Moon Farms — the first biodynamic farm on the Front Range — in Hygiene. “Biodynamics is organics plus,” says Jason Griffith, who coowns Aspen Moon with his wife, Erin Dreistadt. “We have to do all the things that a normal organic farm is going to do, and then we’re going to make our own fertility, and then we’re going to make preparations, and then we’re going to plant by the planting calendar. It’s definitely a work of passion, so to speak.” To make the mineral sprays, the team at Aspen Moon buries cow horns filled with either cow dung (left in the ground throughout the winter and sprayed in the spring) or finely ground quartz crystals (buried in the spring to spray in the fall). The barrel compost is made by mixing cow manure, a salt rock rich in minerals and eggshells, along with the biodynamic compost preparations made from animal intestines stuffed with herbs. The mixture is then buried in a pit for 3-6 months and used to promote fertility throughout the entire operation with its “homeopathic qualities,” Griffith says. “One way to understand [the preparations is that they are medicine for a living organism, which is the farm, and it’s no different than how a homeopath or a naturopath would treat you or I if we were ill,” Fullmer says. “The assumption is that the earth is ill and in a state of disease. The biodynamic preparations themselves are just a remedy to heal the earth, literally and intentionally.” The folks at Aspen Moon and Black Cat were first introduced to the concept of biodynamics while their kids attended different Waldorf schools in Boulder County. Biodynamic farming and Waldorf education are intricately linked as both were developed by Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner in the early 20th century. Steiner was a somewhat controversial public figure and his biodynamic agricultural practices have been criticized for their astrological

and homeopathic philosophies by some in the scientific horticultural community. But Elizabeth Candalario, managing director at Demeter Association, Inc., is adamant about the lack of mysticism in Demeter’s certification standard, and the astrological practices behind Steiner’s work (like planting by the lunar calenEric Skokan of dar) is not Black Cat Farm Table Bistro. required for certification. “I’m so happy I’m not in the business of certifying people’s’ spirituality,” Candalario says. “What we certify is people’s farming to this beautiful agronomic standard.” Plus, she says, biodynamic farming naturally sequesters carbon and helps combat climate change at the local level. “We should not only be focused on not putting carbon into the air but also pulling that excess carbon that’s in the air back into the ground through the very mechanism that builds soil and creates really healthy and delicious food.” Skokan isn’t under any illusion that biodynamic agriculture is more productive or cost-effective than traditional agriculture. He does maintain, however, that it’s a more responsible and sustainable way to grow our food. “Am I going to make more money per acre with biodynamic broccoli? Nope. Am I going to trash the planet and contribute to global warming with the biodynamic broccoli? No,” he says. “If I focus on the conventional method of maximizing yield per acre, than I’m just as guilty as anyone else.” For Boulder County biodynamic farmers, it’s not just about going above and beyond, but about looking at food production through a different lens. “In biodynamics, we view the farm as a living organism,” Griffith says. “And I myself as the farmer, I’m in the middle. And I’m not in charge. The farm is in charge, it’s its own living entity. And I can control and try to navigate and persuade but at the end of the day we’re following what the farm needs and what’s happening on the farm.” Boulder Weekly


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Boulder Weekly


ADVENTURE

Tom Winter

F

rom Bret Tregaskis’ office on a late fall day, you can look out at the most visible manifestation of the changes occurring at Boulder County’s only ski area. Eldora Mountain Resort’s new six-pack high-speed quad is slowly rising from the mud of a parking lot wetted by a fall snowstorm, and the realigned bottom terminal dominates the view. I’m at Eldora meeting with Tregaskis and Eldora’s newly minted director of communications, Sam Bass. Both men are ski industry veterans, albeit from very different backgrounds. Tregaskis, Eldora’s general manager, spent 17 years at Big Bear Mountain, a 748-acre operation perched on the edge of the San Bernadino Mountains above Los Angeles. A two-and-a-half-hour drive from legendary So-Cal surf breaks like Trestles and T-Street, the mountain chalks up a mere 80 inches of snow a

Boulder Weekly

New Lift, New Vibe, New Season

Changes in ownership, attitudes and operations spark renaissance at Eldora by Tom Winter

year and, because of its proximity to the coast and the action sports culture of Southern California, is known for a vibrant snowboarding scene anchored by the ski area’s terrain park and half pipe.

Bass, on the other hand, is a longtime Boulder resident who spent years as a ski journalist, heading up titles like Skiing Magazine and covering all aspects of the sport. He landed at Eldora after a short stint in the public

relations and brand management world with Backbone Media, an agency in Carbondale, Colorado, that counts some of the outdoor industry’s major players as clients. He’s only a few weeks into the new job, and his excitement is palpable. Tom Winter The new lift, a $5.5 million investment, is only one of the changes that will greet skiers and snowboarders at Eldora this season. According to Bass and Tregaskis, the ski area’s new owners, Utah-based Powdr Corp, which purchased the mountain in 2016 from an ownership group headed by Bill Killebrew, are making up for lost time, revamping both the visible amenities — bathrooms and food service are getting a makeover — as well as essential but non-visible infrastructure, such as electrical systems. The latter makes a difference: with improved reliability, the mountain will avoid power outages and can also support things like an upgraded Wi-Fi

Angela Hester carves up some powder in Eldora’s gladed terrain. The Boulder County ski area is known for capturing sneaky upslope storms that other ski areas miss.

system for guests. At most ski areas in Colorado, these improvements would be par for the course. Vail Resorts, for example, has made a religion out of replacing outdated chairlifts with modern, high-speed lift infrastructure, with this year’s new Northwoods high-speed, six-person chair the 10th new lift in the last 11 years on Vail Mountain. However, at Eldora, these investments are notable for the fact that they involve some eye-watering dollar figures for a local mountain that doesn’t see the kind of destination tourism traffic that defines ski resorts like Breckenridge (1,600,750 skier visits in 2016) or Vail (1,634,250 skier visits in 2016). They’re also symbolic of a more nuanced cultural shift at Eldora that’s a welcome change from the sometimes see ELDORA Page 22

November 23 , 2017 21


ELDORA from Page 21

combative management style that became a hallmark of the ownership period under Killebrew. While there is no doubt that Killebrew and his team made some positive changes, with investments in enhanced snowmaking and extensive glading being their brightest legacy, all too often the ski area and its managers seemed at odds with the community, one of the most glaring examples being the abrupt decision to cancel the lease of the Ignite Adaptive Sports program in 2013. Ignite had offered highly discounted lessons, gear rentals and lift tickets to more than 200 disabled skiers and snowboarders at a lease of only $1 each year prior to the dispute. The optics of the lease revocation by Eldora were damning, with an intense public outcry ultimately forcing the resort to backtrack. Other problems, including what many saw as substandard food and beverage options along with surly customer service, only exacerbated the perception that Eldora’s ownership didn’t care about the folks who bought the tickets, rode the lifts and après skied in the bar. “There are two kinds of ski area owners,” says Jimmy Ackerson during a recent conversation. “Those who make a priority to invest every cent they earn back into the mountain and those who try to do everything as cheaply as possible and who try to squeeze every single cent out of an operation and the customer.” Ackerson should know. Currently the general manager of the Chilean freeride Mecca, Corralco ski area, his globe-trotting career has been spent working at the highest levels of management at some of the world’s best ski areas, including the unparalleled Chilean resort of Valle Nevado. Eldora during Killebrew’s tenure, implies Ackerson, looked like a resort run by the latter. And, for those who skied or snowboarded regularly at Eldora, the old lifts and dingy bathrooms were daily reminders of the lack of investment into mountain operations and facilities. Of course, if there is a perception that a resort doesn’t care about the people who keep the lifts running, who purchase season passes, or who drink beers in its bar, people may not end up caring much about that place. And while there are a variety of reasons that Killebrew and Eldora found the going tough when the mountain broached the concept of an aggressive expansion plan, one of the big problems was a lack of allies in the local community. The proposal, first unveiled in 2011, was met with substantial opposition 22 November 23, 2017

Photos by Tom Winter

from the Sierra Club and other environmental organizations, from the residents of the historic mining town of Eldora nestled in the valley below the Corona sector of the mountain, and from other community stakeholders. The most controversial element of the plan was the “Placer” component of the expansion, featuring a new lift serving 86 acres west of the existing Corona Bowl’s “backside” terrain at the mountain above Boulder Middle Creek. Most of the dissent regarding the Placer sector was focused on impacts to wildlife and backcountry users, but critics of the ski area’s expansion also pointed out that when it comes to doling out money for cutting new trails and putting in new lifts outside Eldora’s existing permit area, that money might be better spent inside the current operating envelope, where capital improvement dollars would make a big difference to the existing client experience. “As long as the ski area stayed ‘up there,’ we were fine with it,” says Dave Hallock of the Middle Boulder Creek Coalition, a group that quickly mobi-

Top: Rider Chris Albers enjoying some buffed powder on Eldora’s front side. This terrain will now be accessed by a brand new six-pack lift. Below: Ski racers organizing training on Eldora’s frontside.

lized in opposition to the Placer component of the proposed expansion due to environmental concerns and the potential for conflict and impact on preexisting backcountry users. “We never envisioned them trying to come down here [to the town of Eldora].” Compounding the adverse reaction of the Middle Boulder Creek Coalition and other parts of the community, support for Eldora’s expansion was also muted. The skiers and riders who may have rallied for the proposed new lifts and trails remained — for the most part — quiet. The story isn’t quite over when it comes to the ski area’s expansion proposals — the mountain, local stakeholders and local environmental groups are working on a collaborative solution

that could result in limited expansion that would likely include at least one ski lift as well as new trails and additional terrain. And while we’ll never know how much Killebrew’s personality or inability to build allies in the community played into a lack of support for the expansion plans, we do know that at this point, it may no longer matter that much anymore. There’s a new sheriff in town. His name is Tregaskis, and his low-key, conciliatory style seems to be making a big difference. To add to that, the change in ownership coincided with the end of the Forest Service’s review process for the expansion. “It’s been agreed to allow the ski area to develop their new lift on the frontside and make improvements within the special use area,” says Bill Ikler, the wilderness chair of the Sierra Club’s Indian Peaks group, during a recent phone conversation. “As far as expansion beyond the permit boundary, the Forest Service has said the folks that were opposed to that needed to get together with the ski area to resolve the issues. That’s what they wanted to see.” Ikler, who admits that he holds a season pass for Eldora’s cross country trails, adds that the Sierra Club and other stakeholders, such as the Middle Boulder Creek Coalition, are now working with the new owners of the ski area and the ski area’s management, a development that was unimaginable during the combative period that preceded the acquisition of Eldora by Powdr. “We’ve had productive meetings with them,” Ikler says. Still, Ikler is also quick to add that, “nothing is a done deal. Eldora has said they are backing away from the Middle Boulder Creek [Placer] expansion, but there are other issues we are working on.” But, says Ikler, “a lot of our concerns have been addressed by the ski area backing away from putting in that [Placer] lift. I’d say we’re encouraged by the discussions.” “We were very happy when Powdr purchased Eldora,” adds Hallock. “It’s been a breath of fresh air.” Still, says Hallock, his organization remains engaged and watchful. “The nature of ski areas is that 10 years down the road someone else buys it and may want to expand,” says Hallock. “We’ve talked about permanent protection in the Middle Boulder Creek area. The Hesse area has also been neglected, and the most heavily used areas of the Indian Peaks are the non-wilderness portions: Hesse and Lost Lake. And that’s probably why that area was left out of the Indian Peaks Wilderness designation. Ideally Boulder Weekly


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we don’t want to see the ski area ever come down into that area.” “Ski areas can be agents of change,” adds Hallock. “You never know when some future owner will want to expand, and you have to have to be ready for these things.” Regardless of what may — or may not — happen in the future, the cautious optimism shared by Ikler and Hallock should probably be laid at the feet of Tregaskis. “I am trying to listen to our customers and to listen to the people who have not been Eldora’s fans,” Tregaskis says, adding that, “the Middle Boulder Creek Coalition, and the Sierra Club, we feel we’ve established a good relationship with them.” “Brent is out speaking with the community and the stakeholders and that is where there is the opportunity for compromise,” says Bass. In his former role as a ski industry journalist, Bass is intimately familiar with the emotions that arise from battles between resort expansions and environmental concerns. “We want to be something that Boulder County can be proud of: we have a lot planned that will make Eldora the centerpiece for the outdoor community here.” “We all live here,” Bass says. “Eldora Boulder Weekly

Eldora’s backside has long been one of the best kept secrets when it comes to skiing in Colorado, with a great mix of trees, steeps, powder and rolling terrain that’s challenging enough for hard-core locals who don’t mind missing out on the notorious Interstate 70 traffic to the state’s larger ski areas.

is not a big, publicly traded company. We are a different animal. We liken the experience here as similar to making a craft beer. That’s who we think we can be. We don’t want to be Budweiser. This is who we are as people, and that’s what we feel the resort should be.” And, while there’s no word on if Budweiser will actually be on tap at Eldora’s venerable Timbers bar this season, the flavor that Tregaskis, Bass and the rest of the management team at Eldora are brewing up seems to be a smoother, less bitter concoction than in years past. With ongoing, collaborative discussions with former adversaries, attention to the little things like free Wi-Fi and better burgers, as well as an understanding that community matters — and with a fancy new lift to top it all off — Eldora could be one of the feelgood stories of Colorado skiing this season. It’s exciting enough to make you want to catch first chair.

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November 23 , 2017 23


buzz The place where

imagination

becomes real

Danielle Feinberg and the technical triumph of ‘Coco’

by Michael J. Casey

24 November 23 , 2017

J

ust as every journey begins with a single step, a lifetime of passion blossoms from a simple aha moment. “My junior year in college I was in this computer graphics class, and the professor showed these short films that were computer animation,” Danielle Feinberg excitedly tells Boulder Weekly. “It was really the first computer animation I think any of us had really ever seen. ... I had an epiphany of, like: That is what I want to do with my life! This is crazy, all the math, science and code I’ve been learning can come together to create worlds and characters and tell stories? Is there anything more magical than that?” The year was 1994, and the films that hooked Feinberg were Knick-Knack, Tin Toy and Luxo, Jr. — all from the then-burgeoning Pixar Animation Studios. Three years later, and with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Harvard University under her belt, Feinberg began working for Pixar and has remained at the Emeryville, California, studio ever since. Though born and raised in Boulder, Colorado — returning frequently to visit family and speak at area schools — Feinberg is as

delightfully Californian as the vibrant Golden State sunshine. She speaks fast and thinks faster, breathlessly racing from one thought to the next with an energy that exists only in the truly dedicated. And for anyone working at Pixar, dedication is a base requirement. Feinberg’s dedication has paid off, landing her positions on 10 Pixar features, most notably as the Director of Photography: Lighting for Brave, WALL•E (where she helped bring cinema’s greatest trash compactor to life) and the studio’s latest, Coco. “In a lot of ways, this was such a satisfying, creatively satisfying, movie,” Feinberg says of her newest film. Coco follows the story of Miguel, a young boy from Santa Cecilia, Mexico, who accidentally crosses over to the Land of the Dead on Día de los Muertos. To get back to the Land of the Living, Miguel must track down an ancestor in this never-ending City of the Dead before the sun sets, trapping him forever. “I was so connected to it,” Feinberg continues. “It’s a movie about family, and following your dreams; even when people around you don’t believe in your dream. All things that super resonated with me.

Boulder Weekly


“And the lighting was really cool,” Feinberg says with a grin. Taking place mainly in the Land of the Dead, Coco is one of the lushest animated movies in recent memory, a prospect that proposed just as many problems as possibilities. “For the Land of the Dead, you can make any world you want; which is awesome and also awful because you can do anything, so where do we start? What are the rules?” Feinberg explains. “We sort of start figuring that out, but we kept basing it on stuff we saw in Mexico so it still feels Mexican — but feels like this fantastical world that looks nothing like the town we just left.” A few research trips to Mexico also offered Feinberg a chance to experience the real-world location and culture first-hand, allowing the light and color to influence her approach — to “figure out the pieces that I’m feeling and seeing ... that I can bring back to the film to feel more like Mexico,” Feinberg explains. Feinberg then used her research as a jumping-off point for creativity, finding imaginative ways to bend real-world rules. “We’re in the computer for a reason,” Feinberg says with a smile. “We didn’t choose live action, you know?” But, as Feinberg is quick to point out, there are other limits to creation beyond imagination. Ultimately, the audience has to believe what they are seeing on screen. “It’s really easy to pull the audience out of it if you blow that, or if you go too far,” Feinberg says. “It’s sort of this balancing act ... you can overwhelm the audience, visually for sure. “I’m not sure we’re great at knowing when that happens,” Feinberg continues, with a laugh. “You definitely want to be able to up the ante where you need to so you feel it emotionally.” This emotional balance is the genius of Coco. Take the movie’s greatest moment: a simple scene between two characters, with a song. Visually the scene is free of distraction, just some hazy sunlight to provide texture. Compare that to the sweeping awe of the movie’s climactic battle, complete with wide vistas, plunging falls and a crowd of thousands. Contrast these two, and you’ll get an idea of how Pixar uses every possible element to extract emotional engagement. Those elements are partly thanks to Feinberg’s 21-year career at Pixar and partly thanks to the technological advancements Pixar has made. Each movie passes the technological baton a little further up the road. “In The Good Dinosaur, there’s a scene with the fireflies and they made a special light where it basically takes the location of all the fireflies and puts a light there. Boulder Weekly

But, with some fancy math and code, the computer considers it one light,” Feinberg says, going on to explain that for Coco they used the same code for the street lamps lining the City of the Dead. “In the scene where we reveal the City of the Dead, there’s probably a million street lamps” Feinberg continues. “So, if we had to hand place or use an older way of doing it, we would’ve paid for a million lights. And we can’t render a million lights.” One of the most enchanting aspects of cinema is the intersection of

art and science. What would The Wizard of Oz be without the lushness of three-strip Technicolor? What would The Shining be without those long Steadicam shots? What emotional impact would that initial shot of the City of the Dead have if there weren’t millions of street lamps? Feinberg describes this intersection perfectly in her 2016 Ted Talk: “This is the moment that I live for in lighting. The moment where it all comes together and we get a world that we can believe in. We use math, science and

code to create these amazing worlds. We use storytelling and art to bring them to life. It’s this interweaving of art and science that elevates the world to a place of wonder, a place of soul, a place you can believe in. A place where the things you imagine can become real.” In Coco, those imaginary places feel so real you can practically touch them. “There was no stone left unturned in this movie,” Feinberg says. “It’s a big, epic movie.” That’s because there’s a big, epic talent behind it.

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The comeback kid

Gary Numan’s second act by Caitlin Rockett

I

Courtesy of BB Gun Press

overtones

n September, Gary Numan’s new album, Savage (Songs from a Broken World), entered the U.K. Album Charts at No. 2. This, Numan’s 22nd album, marked his highest chart position since 1980’s charttopping Telekon. Numan cried for about 10 minutes when he found out. “I did,” he says. “I had waited so long to be in that kind of position, to be back in the charts again — 35 years or more since I’ve had any kind of success like that. I’ve had an incredibly long career considering how little success I’ve actually had. It amazes me really that I’m still around because I don’t have a lot to show for it, just reputation and legacy, I guess. “The outpouring of emotions... I wasn’t prepared for it. I didn’t have any sense that I felt that deeply about it. My wife came over to me and said, ‘It’s No. 2’... ” he stops and laughs a little. “Even now I get upset.” For an Englishman whose career was built in the early ’80s on a deliberately android-like persona who delivered dystopian songs about humanity’s relationship with machines, Numan’s really a softie. It’s early November when we catch up with Numan, who’s home with his family in Los Angeles between the European and North American legs of his tour for Savage. “This is just a quick 10 days to catch up on what’s happening at the house — we’ve got lots of animals... and children. “Children and animals,” he corrects. “Every time I come home the children have rescued another cat, so it keeps growing.” He’s lost count of how many cats his three daughters have brought home,

26 November 23 , 2017

but he thinks there are nine. He couldn’t name all the cats if his life depended on it, but he’s positive there are three dogs. As for that reputation and legacy he mentions, it’s no joke: a diverse array of artists that includes Kanye West, Prince, the Foo Fighters, Marilyn Manson and Trent Reznor have cited Numan as an influence. But those acknowledgments are recent, within the past decade or so, part of what Numan sees as a sort of “reevaluation” of his massive body of work (further evidenced when he received the Ivor Novello Inspiration Award for songwriting this year). His career began in 1979 with his band Tubeway Army’s hit “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?,” which became a stepping stone (following Kraftwerk’s 1975 single “Autobahn”) in the synthpop genre that birthed bands like New Order, Depeche Mode and Soft Cell. Pioneering the electro sound, Numan went on to have massive success with his first solo album, The Pleasure Principle. The dream-like synths and staccato vocals on “Cars” made it a classic that still gets airplay today, while the hit “M.E.” has been sampled and covered by electronic artists like Basement Jaxx, Nine Inch Nails and Foxy. His second solo album, Telekon, was his third consecutive No. 1 album — and his last. But Numan never stopped making music and, apparently, the 22nd time’s the charm. Savage is a concept album loosely based on a narrative about a not-toodistant future in which the Earth has been ravaged by global warming. Water

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is hard to find in the expansive desert that now makes up most of the world’s terrain. There is no joy, only survival. It’s a story borrowed largely from a science fiction book Numan’s been working on for the last five or six years (an “embarrassingly long time, really”). He didn’t intend for Savage to be a concept album, but while Numan began to write songs, Donald Trump began to gain steam in U.S. politics. “He was saying so many things about global warming that I just didn’t agree with. These songs that I’d written down so far became far more relevant than I thought they would be because I’m talking about what may happen if we don’t control the temperature and the whole thing becomes the catastrophe they are warning it might be. “It’s not meant to be political,” he says. “I’m not pointing my finger at Donald Trump saying, ‘You’re an idiot.’” He pauses to consider his next statement. “Though I do think that, to be honest, but the album wasn’t meant to [be political].” Savage works with industrialized plays on Middle Eastern themes, from the dark melodies that run throughout the album to the accompanying artwork and imagery. The lead single, “My Name is Ruin,” features Numan dressed in layers of beige (a sort of reimagined version of Luke Skywalker’s wardrobe on Hoth) moving about a vast desert with his 11-year-old daughter, Persia, who sings on the track. “In the world I’m thinking about, religion is long gone,” he says. “There’s no place for it. Nobody has any faith any more because of what has happened. There’s no divide between Eastern and Western culture. What fragments remain have become part of one great, big melting pot.” Political or not, Savage is a triumph for Numan, and a reminder for us all that the future is now. Boulder Weekly


COLORADO CRAFT CINEMA

Becoming a better ally

Trans Awareness Week honors and educates by Sarah Farley

M

cul ture

onday, Nov. 17 marked 2017’s Trans Day of Remembrance (TDoR), honoring the lives of transgender people lost this year. It’s a day to stand in solidarity, but it’s also a time for nontrans people to educate themselves about the dangers trans people, especially trans women of color, endure in everyday life. In the week leading up to TDoR, Out Boulder County organized Trans Awareness Week, with most events geared toward helping cisgender (the term for those who identify with the gender they were assigned at birth) people become better allies to the trans community. Cisgender allies are important to the transgender community because violence against trans people often stems from ignorance and intolerance on the part of non-trans people. “A good ally is somebody who spends some time to educate themselves,” says Ravyn Wayne, a volunteer on Out Boulder County’s board of directors and trans steering committee. A quick lesson in gender goes something like this: Gender is socially constructed. Humans, as a society, have created what it means to be “feminine” or “masculine” by assigning meaning to certain characteristics (like one’s physique or demeanor), or even to certain objects (like toys or clothes). This system relegates nearly everything into two categories, a gender binary. The consequences of such a binary are harsh for those who don’t fit the mold. “[Gender] has become so fundamental, it’s become invisible,” says Jennifer Molde, who describes herself as an out and proud trans woman and activist. She also volunteers with Out Boulder County and helped found the trans steering committee. According to Molde, we automatically assign gender to people in order to apply these two cultural definitions of male and female. However, definitions and understandings of gender are evolving. The concept of gender as a spectrum is slowly working its way into mainstream parBoulder Weekly

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lance. People can still identify as firmly female or male, but there’s fluidity, both between and outside of those categories. In essence, the spectrum is infinite. “It’s not up to me, or anybody else, to define what your gender is for you,” Wayne says. “That’s something that you have to figure out on your own.” Educating yourself about gender concepts saves trans individuals the energy of constantly educating those around them (while they are often spending immense energy every day on surviving in a binary world). “It is not OK to misgender somebody,” Wayne says, but mistakes happen. Wayne stresses a simple apology, correcting the pronoun, and moving on with the conversation. Getting flustered usually makes the situation worse. When in doubt about pronouns, politely ask. Wayne suggests including pronouns in introductions as “it automatically signals to somebody in the trans community that this is somebody who understand the importance of pronouns.” Molde adds that if you are unsure, use the neutral pronouns they, them and theirs. She says she does this until the person’s gender is said either through pronouns or otherwise. Respecting people’s pronouns also involves correcting others when they use the wrong one. A lot of trepidation lies in the trans experience, in everyday actions that cisgender individuals take for granted, like using a public restroom. Offering to accompany a trans friend to the restroom can make them feel safer. Wayne says a really good ally will encourage public spaces with single-stall restrooms to make them gender neutral. Allies have to speak up in myriad

situations. Wayne encourages people to not tolerate transphobic comments (including jokes), both online and in person. And cis allies need to be visible to the transgender community. “Show up,” Wayne says. “The greatest disservice that you can do is to say you’re an ally, but you don’t show up to the events where we need you the most.” When someone is transitioning or questioning their gender identity, Sorin Thomas, the non-binary executive director and clinical supervisor at Queer Asterisk, stresses the importance of listening and believing the person and bringing awareness into the spaces cisgender people occupy. Molde encourages cisgender allies to show interest when a friend is questioning their identity, “but try to keep [the questions] from being too intimate. You shouldn’t ask them about their genitals or physical changes in their body.” Dr. Karen Scarpella, executive and clinical director at the Gender Identity Center, adds that you should let people experiment with their gender, unless asked for direct advice. “Trans people aren’t helpless,” she says. She stresses not treating trans people like an “oddity.” “If the person would like to talk about their experience and they’re willing to share that with you, that’s a privilege, but that’s not something that we’re entitled to,” she says. Reporting on transgender murders can be difficult as many victims are misgendered following their death. But so far there are more than 270 reported murders of trans and gender non-conforming people worldwide in the past year (as of Nov. 20). It’s never been more pressing to become a better ally.

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All photos of paintings courtesy Denver Art Museum

More than just pretty still lifes

‘Her Paris’ exhibit focuses on women of impressionism by Amanda Moutinho

I

a rt s

n the 19th century, Paris was undergoing major change. The city was starting to blossom and open its narrow designs, shedding its medieval past. Artists flocked to the city, as it was considered the art capital of the known world. Paris garnered this reputation for many reasons. There were opportunities to show your work and be critiqued; you could meet collectors and dealers; and you could get an education at one of the finest art schools, École des Beaux-Arts. “The art machine was really well oiled and active at the time in Paris,” says Angelica Daneo, curator of painting and sculpture at Denver Art Museum. “That made it the center, which really justified why women and artists came from all over the world.” It’s these women artists that are

28 November 23 , 2017

the focus of the DAM’s exhibit, Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism, showing through Jan. 14. The show features more than 80 paintings, with works from wellknown names such as Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot and Rosa Bonheur. Her Paris offers the perspective of 37 different artists from different backgrounds and countries, and with various levels of notoriety. “Several of these women had a role and had recognition in their own time and in their own country, but at times were forgotten by writings in art history,” Daneo says. “This [show] might feel like a revelation, but it’s more of a recuperation of past fame.” At DAM, Daneo says, the curators look for art that is significant, whether culturally, aesthetically or otherwise. That’s where they started for Her Paris. “When we looked at the list for this show, we were struck by the quality, by the contribution to the different

genres — landscape, Her Paris offers the genre scenes, perspective of 37 portraits,” different women artists from diverse she says. “In backgrounds and a way, you countries, and with various levels didn’t need of notoriety. to know who the artist was who produced these works to know these were important works. They just happened to be painted by women.” The time period represented in Her Paris was, unsurprisingly, a restrictive era for women. For all the modernity that the city was embracing, it was still very much a backwards time for women’s social roles. While women, mainly in the upper class, were encouraged to practice art, it was mainly a leisurely pursuit. “Women were supposed to be mothers and wives. Professional ambition on the part of women [artists] was OK as long as they were directed Boulder Weekly


As a result of having limited access to public spaces, many women led their lives mostly indoors, which led their paintings to focus on the surroundings of their homes and families

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toward the feminine genre, still life or fan painting or ceramic painting, something that was considered delicate and minute,” Daneo says. “Any ambition for larger composition, history paintings for instance, or large portraits or genre scenes — those were less expected of a woman, and certainly less tolerated in a way.” Women were not allowed to attend the École des Beaux-Arts, so they had to learn other ways, like at private academies or by working for established artists. Also, women’s social outings were restricted — it wasn’t socially acceptable for a woman to wander Paris unchaperoned. This meant women had limited access to public spaces like cafes, where artists congregated and showed their work. As a result, many women led their lives mostly indoors, which led their paintings to focus on the surroundings of their homes. Her Paris explores common scenes — paintings of tea times or people reading, and many portraits, mainly of family members and children. But the exhibit also takes a look at the women who ventured into ambiBoulder Weekly

tious undertakings, specifically histor- school in 1891. “They blazed the road for the genical paintings, which were considered eration of women artists that came with the highest regard at the time. after them,” Daneo says. Daneo tells the story of Lady For example, the painters in last Elizabeth Butler, who was known to year’s Women of Abstract use war veterans as models and buy Expressionism, which showed works uniforms for her paintings. spanning the decade of 1950 to “Allegedly she bought a plot of 1960, benefited from land and had men risks the women in charge toward her so Her Paris took. she could get a sense of ON THE BILL: Her Paris: Daneo notes the what a battle would Women Artists in the Age direct lineage look like,” Daneo says. of Impressionism, Denver between the women “[Women] knew they Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy., Denver. were tackling an of impressionism that Through Jan. 14. eventually led to important subject that those of abstract was ambitious, and they did their expressionism. “You cannot think research.” of their experience without the experiOne of the exhibit’s most prominent themes is perseverance. Despite ence of these women in Paris [during 1850-1900],” she says. “Their societal limitations, these women painters continued to create art. And advancement in the recognition that they were able to obtain certainly many were active in changing the helped the generation that followed.” status quo, like those who formed Her Paris chronicles the influence together to create the Union des these women had on the art world. Femmes Peintres et Sculpteurs. Many also fought for admission to And as Daneo says, “They proved École des Beaux-Arts, and women wonderfully that they could paint more than just pretty still lifes.” finally gained acceptance to the

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Leftover Salmon 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 24 and Saturday, Nov. 25, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Tickets: $32.50. When you’re tired of that leftover turkey, waddle on over to the Boulder Theater for some Leftover Salmon. If you’re still in a food coma for the band’s first show on Friday, Nov. 24, never fear, because the band’s got a second show on Saturday. Their new album, Places, is the band’s first compilation of new music in three years. These shows feature High Country Horns with special guest Jennifer Hartswick (of Trey Anastasio Band) and Skerik, with opening sets from Grant Farm, The Drunken Hearts and the CU Denver Bluegrass Ensemble.

Wikimedia Commons/ © Nevit Dilmen

A Very Soulful Christmas — with The Hazel Miller Band 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 25, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Tickets: $10-$20. So, it’s the day after Thanksgiving and it’s officially acceptable to hang your Christmas lights, but if you’re gonna kick off the holiday season, kick it off with some soul from The Hazel Miller Band. Prepare to groove to “Silent Night” in an Afro Cuban style, tap your toes to “O’ Holy Night” in a blues style, and raise your hands to the sky for “Away in a Manger” in a Gospel-ballad style. It’s never too early to start celebrating the holidays, especially when Hazel’s involved.

Movie Night at Caribou Room 7 p.m. Saturday Nov. 25 - Sunday, Nov. 26, The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland. $5 donation.

CHRIS ISAAK HOLIDAY TOUR 2017. 8 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 26, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Tickets are $55-$69.50. see EVENTS Page 32 Boulder Weekly

Keep the Thanksgiving vibes alive (without sitting in your house with your relatives) by heading up the mountain and popping into The Caribou Room IMDb for a double-feature movie night centered around Turkey Day. First up is Alice’s Restaurant, the 1969 cinematic adaptation of Guthrie’s classic song wherein a lazily discarded bag of trash leads to a major manhunt and lots of laughs. Next up is The Last Waltz, a Scorsese-directed documentary capturing the final concert of The Band on Thanksgiving Day, 1976. Triple bonus feelgood points: All proceeds from movie night go to a local charity.

November 23 , 2017 31


events

EVENTS from Page 31

Thursday, November 23 Music Thanksgiving at the Hi-Dive — with JJ. 6 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver. Events Comedy Night at Vision Quest. 8:30 p.m. Vision Quest Brewing, 2510 47th St., Boulder. Denver Christkindl Market. 11 a.m. Skyline Park at 16th Street Mall, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver. Through Dec. 23 Open Ride — Public Session. 9 a.m. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Sundance Shorts. 2 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton. 4:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Trivia at Tandoori’s Bar. 6 p.m. Tandori’s Bar, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder. The Unruly Mystic: Saint Hildegard. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Friday, November 24 Music The Burroughs. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver. Cellar West Friday Bluegrass Pick. 6 p.m. Cellar West Artisan Ales, 1001 Lee Hill Drive, Suite 10, Boulder. Daedelus — with Free The Robots, Mono/Poly. 8 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Danny Shafer Duo. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont. Florea Album Release. 8 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 South Broadway, Denver.

The Simba Claus: King of the Jingle — A Holiday Sketch Comedy Show. 8 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver.

Thanom BDay Bash. 9 p.m. The Black Box, 314 E. 13th Ave., Denver.

Sundance Shorts. 4 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Tiffany Christopher Duo. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder.

Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton. 1:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Wasted Youth. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. Wax Tailor — Solo Set and Guests. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder.

The Unruly Mystic: Saint Hildegard. 6:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Saturday, November 25

Events

Music

ComedySportz. 7:30 p.m. Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave., Denver.

45s Against 45. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver.

Fate of The Comedy Show. 8 p.m. Los Tacos Famous Taqueria, 600 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Ben Hammond. 8 p.m. Wash Park Grille, 1096 S. Gaylord St., Denver.

CU BOULDER EVENTS Monday, Nov. 27

Wikimedia Commons/Frinck51

Doctoral Student Recital: Ida Findiku, violin. 7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Chamber Hall (C199) 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Latin Jazz Ensemble.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112) 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Silicon Flatirons Crash Course: Deciphering Blockchains and ICOs… Future or Fad? 7 p.m. Wolf Law, 2450 Kittredge Loop Road, Boulder.

Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Health after Legalization.

Best of the West 9. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver. Blue Canyon Boys, Caribou Mountain Collective, The Ginny Mules. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Brunch with David Burchfield. 10:30 a.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver. Chris J Arellano (Album Release Party). 8 p.m. Walnut Room, 3131 Walnut St., Denver. DeadSet Colorado. 9:30 p.m. The Dark Horse, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder.

Tuesday, Nov. 28

7 p.m. CU Museum (Henderson Building), 1030 Broadway, Boulder.

Faculty Tuesdays: Cello + … Piano.

Professional Certificate Recital: Ajax Quartet.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112) 1020 18th St., Boulder.

7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Grusin Music Hall (C112) 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Eddie Turner and Trouble. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Wednesday, Nov. 29

Senior Student Recital: Jordan Stern, jazz guitar.

Evinair & Wolf Poets — with Son and Cynic, Gestalt. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver.

Opera Scenes: An Evening with Amadeus.

5 p.m. Imig Music, Music Theater (N1B95) 1020 18th St., Boulder.

Guttermouth, Koffin Kats. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver. John Mckay. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Ken Walker Sextet. 9 p.m. Dazzle@Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver. Kevin Dooley. 6 p.m. Chuburger, 1225 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont. Klassick. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver. Leftover Salmon — with The High Country Horns featuring Jennifer Hartswick and Skerik. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. One Be Lo (of Binary Star), Reason The Citizen, Travellers Music, J.O.B. (Just Ova Broke), 5Ve Music. 9 p.m. Your Mom’s House, 608 E. 13th Ave., Denver. Pile Of Priests (EP Release). 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Rock-a-billy Night — The Von Hodads. 8:30 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons. Sontres Latin Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. 32 November 23 , 2017

The Symbols, Nick Willis & Barrel of Blues. 7 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont.

7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium,1595 Pleasant St., Boulder.

The Grawlix. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver. Friday Night Bazaar — Holiday Edition. 4 p.m. Denver Rock Drill, 1717 E. 39th Ave., Denver. Grey Gardens. 8:45 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony. 6:30 p.m. Sixth Avenue Plaza, Sixth Avenue and Main Street, Longmont. L’Estrange Menagerie: A Sexy Circus. 11 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver. Lobster Fest. 6 p.m. Charcoal Restaurant, 43 W. Ninth Ave., Denver. The Nutcracker — Belliston Ballet University of Denver. 7 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. The Nutcracker Ballet. 2 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. On The Spot: Improv in the Style of Whose Line Is It Anyway? 10 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. Password:Comedy. 7 p.m. The Speakeasy, 301 Main St., Longmont.

Denver.

Freddy Todd (EP Release Party). 9 p.m. The Black Box, 314 E. 13th Ave.,

George Nelson. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland. GWAR, Ghoul, He Is Legend, U.S. Bastards. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Happy Hour Live Jazz. 5:30 p.m. Tandoori Grill South, 619 S. Broadway, Boulder. Hayden James. 9 p.m. The Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. The Holiday Affair feat. Soul School & The Hot Lunch Band at Soiled Dove Underground. 8 p.m. The Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver. The Jack Hadley Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder. Jazz at The Dairy Presents: A Very Soulful Christmas — with The Hazel Miller Band. 7:30 p.m. The Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Kavsko. 10:30 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver. Leftover Salmon — with The Drunken Hearts. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder. Boulder Weekly


events events Live Music: Paul Soderman and the BBC Reunion Band. 7:30 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder.

Stand-Up Comedy and Bottomless Margaritas. 8 p.m. Los Tacos Famous Taqueria, 600 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

The Midnight Club. 6 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver.

Sugar Plum Tea Party. 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Xilinx Retreat Center, 3100 Logic Drive, Longmont.

Monxx — with Synoid, Swayd, BLOODHOUND, NJoy. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver.

Sundance Shorts. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Patty Jackson. 7 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont.

Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton. 12:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Rat’s WoodShack BBQ. 4 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Tennyson Berkeley Small Business Holiday Passport Crawl. 9 a.m. Tennyson Small Busi-

Retrofette. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Shattered Mirrors Goth Night — Blackest Saturday. 9 p.m. The Black Box, 314 E. 13th Ave., Denver.

theater

Sixty Minute Men. 9 p.m. The World Famous Dark Horse, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder.

Annie. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-449-6000. Through Feb. 24.

SNAP! ’90s Dance Party, DJ A-L (The Soul Pros/Future Classic Music). 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver.

Beau Jest — presented by Cherry Creek Theatre Company. Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Through Dec. 10.

Taylor Shae. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder.

Christine Fisk

Verses The Inevitable, The Robby Wicks Band. 9:30 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver.

Earthquakes, tidal waves, infernos and the unforgettable songs of the ’70s take center stage in Disaster!, an homage to classic disaster films.

A Very Soulful Christmas. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Chamber, 2440 Pearl St., Boulder. Events 3MCS Stand-Up, Sketch, and Live Comedy. 9 p.m. Blackbird Pub, 305 S. Downing St., Denver.

Drums of the World. 1 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver. Espresso. 5 p.m. Oskar Blues, 303 Main St., Lyons. Jazz Dinner — with Annie Booth Trio. 6 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver. Johnny O. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. Katy Perry. 7 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver. Open Mic Night. 6 p.m. Dannik’s Gunbarrel

A Christmas Carol — presented by Miners Alley Playhouse. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Begins Nov. 24. Through Dec. 23.

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DISASTER! — presented by Equinox Theatre Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through Dec. 2. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Arvada Center Main Stage Theatre, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Dec. 23. The Marriage of Bette and Boo. University of Colorado Boulder Theatre, 261 UCB, Boulder. Begins Nov. 29. Through Dec. 3.

& Sushi

Red — presented by Vintage Theatre. 1468 Dayton St, Aurora. Begins Nov. 24. Through Jan. 7. The SantaLand Diaries. Denver Center Theatre Company, 950 13th St., Denver. Begins Nov. 24. Through Dec. 24

Colorado Ballet’s The Nutcracker. 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver.

Siren Song: A Pirate’s Odyssey. Buntport Theatre, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through May 14, 2018.

ComedySportz. 7:30 p.m. Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave., Denver. The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Dinner Show. 6 p.m. Embassy Suites by Hilton Downtown Convention Center, 1420 Stout St., Denver.

Beauty and the Beast. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse. 747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Feb. 14.

The Grawlix. 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver.

Body Of An American. Curious Theatre Company, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Through Dec. 9.

A Year with Frog and Toad. Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Through Dec. 19.

Holiday Horseshoe Craft and Flea Market. 10 a.m. Highlands Masonic Temple, 3550 Federal Blvd., Denver. Lott Of Laughs Drag Show. 8 p.m. Mile High Hamburger Mary’s, 1336 E. 17th Ave., Denver.

nesses, 38th-46th Avenues and Tennyson Street, Denver.

The Magic Within, Psychic Explorations — with Erica Sodos. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Sunday, November 26

The Nutcracker — Belliston Ballet University of Denver. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver.

Adam Ben Ezra. 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Dazzle@ Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver.

The Nutcracker Ballet. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Off the Clock Burlesque & Comedy. 11 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver. On The Spot: Improv in the Style of Whose Line Is It Anyway? 10 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. RESPECT: An Aretha Franklin Show starring The Mary Louise Lee Band. 8 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver. The Simba Claus: King of the Jingle — A Holiday Sketch Comedy Show. 8 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. Sleightly Impossible: Comedy Magic Show. 4 p.m. Lumber Baron Mystery Mansion, 2555 W. 37th Ave., Denver. Boulder Weekly

Music

Afton Showcase featuring TBA. 6:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver. The APX. 9 p.m. Your Mom’s House, 608 E. 13th Ave., Denver. The Assemblage (Farewell Show). 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver. Bluegrass Pick. 12 p.m. Home Made Liquids and Solids, 1555 Hover St., Longmont.

Corner Bar, 6525 Gunpark Drive, Boulder. Ukulele Jam. 2 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing, 142 Pratt St., Longmont. Events Boulder Comedy Show. 6 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder. Holiday Craft Fair. 9 a.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder. Holiday Horseshoe Craft & Flea Market. 10 a.m. Highlands Masonic Temple, 3550 Federal Blvd., Denver. The Last Dalai Lama? 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder.

Boat Drinks. 7 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Michelle Houchens — Mile High Psychic Medium and Energetic Practitioner. 7 p.m. The Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver.

Brunch — with Casey Russel Trio. 10:30 a.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver.

The Nutcracker. 1 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver.

Chris Isaak Holiday Tour 2017. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

The Nutcracker — Belliston Ballet University of Denver. 1 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver.

Devan Blake Jones. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver.

see EVENTS Page 34

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November 23 , 2017 33


events

arts

A gathering place for...

live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks

Elemental Forms. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2018.

Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com

Faculty Exhibition: 2017. University of Colorado Art Museum, Visual Arts Complex, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through Dec. 23.

BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, benefit, or wedding at Nissi’s – award winning cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting.

Ganesha: The Playful Protector. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through October 2018.

Louise Abbéma, “Lunch in the Greenhouse,” 1877

Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Jan. 14.

www.nissisevents.com

Upcoming Events & Entertainment

Legacy — presented by Gallery 1261 and Denver Public Library. Denver Central Library, Level 7, Vida Ellison Gallery, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Dec. 31.

Friday Nov 24th

THUMPIN’

Lined Out — Ted Larsen. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St. Through Jan. 21.

“Dance / R&B”

Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism features more than 80 paintings by 37 female artists from across Europe and America, who had migrated to this epicenter of art to further their careers. See page 28 for a review of the exhibit.

Revealing A Mexican Masterpiece: The Virgin of Valvanera. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Feburary 2018. Sinner in Gingham. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St.. Through Jan. 21.

Neo-Cubism: A New Perspective — by Roger Reutimann & William Stoehr. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Dec. 3. Past the Tangled Present. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Oct. 28, 2018.

Spiritual Dimensions. Dairy Arts Center, Polly Addison Gallery, MacMillan Family Lobby, and Hand-Rudy Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Dec. 3. Then, Now, Next: Evolution of an Architectural Icon. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through February 2018.

Saturday Nov 25th

CITIZEN DAN

“Steely Dan Tribute”

Wednesday Nov 29th

BOURBON & BLUES WITH THE JOHNNY O BAND FREE ADMISSION

Thursday Nov 30th BOULDER WEEKLY SPONSORING

COLLEGE RADIO “Classic Alternative” FREE ADMISSION

Friday Dec 1st

PHAT DADDY “Dance”

Sunday Dec 3rd & Monday Dec 4th

SKANSON & HANSEN HOLIDAY SHOW “Two Guitars for a Cool Yule”

Wednesday Dec 6th

BLUES & BOURBON WITH THE RHYTHM ALL-STARS FREE ADMISSION

Friday Dec 8th

BOULDER WEEKLY SPONSORING

MOSES JONES BAND “Dance”

Sunday Dec 10th

TIMOTHY P. & THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN STOCKING STUFFERS “Americana/Folk”

Friday Dec 15th

THE CORPORATION “Dance”

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

EVENTS from Page 33

The Nutcracker Ballet. 2 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder. Peter Pan: NT Live Encore. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Small Business Sunday. 10 a.m. 17th Avenue Event Center, 478 17th Ave., Longmont. Sugar Plum Tea Party. 1 p.m. Xilinx Retreat Center, 3100 Logic Drive, Longmont. Monday, November 27 Music FACE: Holiday Shows. 5:30 p.m. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

Events Black & Blu — Comedy/Variety Show. 7 p.m. Tennyson’s Tap, 4335 W. 38th Ave., Denver. The Improv Hootenanny. 7:30 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver. Movie Night: Star Wars V — The Empire Strikes Back. 7 p.m. The Dickens Tavern and Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont. Share with the Class — with Popcorn Millie. 9 p.m. Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver. Tuesday, November 28 Music

Open Mic — with Jam and Jiggatones. 6:30 p.m. KCP Art Bar, 364 Main St., Longmont.

’90s TV Dinners. 5 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver.

Psychodillo. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont.

Bluegrass Jam. 6:30 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Purity Ring. 7 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Boulder Phishin. 7 p.m. Owsley’s Golden Road, 1301 Broadway St., Boulder.

words

CU Denver Pop/Rock Ensemble. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Cubs. 9 p.m. The Black Box, 314 E. 13th Ave., Denver. FACE: Holiday Shows. 5:30 p.m. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Fat Tuesdays — A Tribute to New Orleans Funk. 8 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver. The Frights. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver. Hinder, Josh Todd, The Conflict — with Adelitas Way, Wayland. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver. Jeff Finlin. 12 a.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont. see EVENTS Page 36

Boulder Book Store

Saturday, November 25 Boulder Writing Dates. 9 a.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Monday, November 27 David Barsamian — Global Discontents. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. So, You’re a Poet: Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 8 p.m. Laughing Goat Coffeehouse, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder. Tuesday, November 28 Innisfree Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

The 12 interviews in Global Discontents, co-authored by David Barsamian and Noam Chomsky, examine the latest developments around the globe including the rise of ISIS, the reach of state surveillance, economic inequality, conflicts in the Middle East and the presidency of Donald Trump. The Boulder Book Store will host a discussion with Barsamian on Nov. 27.

Amber Cantorna — Refocusing My Family. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Wednesday, November 29 Author & Agent Panel — with Michael F. Haspil and Sara Megibow. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Instruments of Peace. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 34 November 23 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


D E C E M B E R

J A N U A R Y

All-Beethoven Conducted by Brett Mitchell

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban™ In Concert

CLASSICS

DEC 1-3 FRI-SAT 7:30 SUN 1:00

JAN 5-6 FRI-SAT 7:30

Brett Mitchell, conductor Jeffrey Kahane, piano

Colorado Symphony Chorus, Mary Louise Burke, associate director

HalfNotes

HARRY POTTER characters, names, and related indicia are © & ™ Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. J.K. ROWLING’S WIZARDING WORLD™ J.K. Rowling and Warner

Handel’s Messiah

Bros. Entertainment Inc. Publishing Rights © JKR. (s16)

HOLIDAY

DEC 8-9 FRI-SAT 7:30

A Tribute to Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops

Brett Mitchell, conductor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director

BOULDER BALLET and BOULDER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA with the Boulder Children’s Chorale

JAN 13 SAT 7:30

Yo-Yo Ma with the Colorado Symphony DEC 10 SUN 7:30

SYMPHONY POPS

Christopher Dragon, conductor John Sipher, trombone Julie Duncan Thornton, piccolo

SPECIAL

Brett Mitchell, conductor Yo-Yo Ma, cello *Single tickets on sale August 1. Pending availability.

Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons

CLASSICS

JAN 19-21 FRI-SAT 7:30 SUN 1:00 ■

A Colorado Christmas ■

Brett Mitchell, conductor Angelo Xiang Yu, violin

HOLIDAY

DEC 15-17 FRI 7:30 SAT 2:30 & 6:00 SUN 1:00 ■

HalfNotes

Christopher Dragon, conductor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director Colorado Children’s Chorale, Deborah DeSantis, artistic director

Holiday Brass Returns to Boettcher Concert Hall DEC 20 WED 7:30

HOLIDAY

Colorado Symphony Brass

HalfNotes Please join us for family-friendly

Too Hot To Handel

activities 1 hour before the concert.

DEC 22-23 FRI-SAT 7:30

HOLIDAY

Christopher Dragon, conductor Cynthia Renee Saffron, soprano Vaneese Thomas, mezzo Lawrence Clayton, tenor Colorado Symphony Chorus, Mary Louise Burke, associate director

A Night In Vienna DEC 31 SUN 6:30

HOLIDAY

Brett Mitchell, conductor

These performances include FULL SCREENING OF THE FEATURE FILM!

TICKETS START UNDER $20. for most concerts!

Limitations, fees, and taxes apply.

Thanksgiving Weekend 2017 Macky Auditorium, CU Boulder

Fri Nov. 24 at 2PM | Sat Nov. 25 at 2PM & 7PM | Sun Nov. 26 at 2PM

presenting sponsor

colorado symphony proudly supported by

Tickets: 303.449.1343

www.BoulderPhil.org/nutcracker Photo by Eli Akerstein

COLORADOSYMPHONY.ORG Boulder Weekly

November 23 , 2017 35


events Boulder Weekly holiday Eat with friends, start that holiday shopping or trot that turkey off — a little round-up of Thanksgiving happenings.

Thursday, Nov. 23 24th Annual Fort Collins Thanksgiving Day Run. 8:45 a.m. Kids Gobble Gobble (1/4 mile); 9 a.m. 4-mile walk/run, College Avenue, Fort Collins. Denver Christkindl Market. 11 a.m. Skyline Park at 16th Street Mall, 1601 Arpahoe St., Denver. Thanksgiving Service & Community Potluck. 10 a.m. Unity of Boulder Spiritual Center, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder.

Mile High United Way Turkey Trot. 10 a.m. 5-mile start; 11 a.m. 1-mile start, Washington Park, Louisiana and Downing St., Denver.

Harvesting Hope 5K. 8 a.m. registration; 9:30 a.m. Kids Fun Run; 10:15 a.m. 5K start. Central Park, 8801 M.L.K. Jr Blvd., Denver.

Bailey Turkey Trot. 8:30 a.m. late registration, 9:30 walk/run star. 599 Rosalie Road, Bailey.

High Plains Turkey Trot. 8:30 a.m. race start, Peace Lutheran Church, 1404 S. Ninth Ave., Sterling.

Broomfield Turkey Day 5K. 8:40 a.m. Kids Fun Run, 9 a.m. 10k and 5k Start, 13200 Sheridan Blvd., Broomfield.

day after:

Clement Park Gobble Wobble. 8:30 a.m. Clement Park, 7306 W. Bowles Ave., Littleton.

4th Annual Leftover Turkey Trot 5K. 10 a.m. Roger’s Grove Park, 220 S. Hover St., Longmont.

Durango Running Club Turkey Trot 5M. 10 a.m. Fort Lewis College, Kroeger Hall, 1000 Rim Drive, Durango.

And one for the

Friday, Nov. 24

see EVENTS Page 34

Kent Denver Jazz Combo, Azucartones and Quincy Ave Rhythm Band. 6 p.m. Dazzle@ Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver. Mogwai. 8 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Poolside At The Flamingo. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver.

Help preserve Boulder’s 119 year-old National Historic Landmark and invest in its future.

SUPPORT US ON COLORADO GIVES DAY DECEMBER 5, 2017!

GIVE where you LIVE

Spicy Lounge Music and Dancing. 7:30 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder. Events Broadway Cabaret Dance. 4 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder. Denver Tonight. 9 p.m. Voodoo Comedy Playhouse, 1260 22nd St., Denver. Geeks Who Drink Live Trivia. 9 p.m. The Intrepid Sojourner Beer Project, 925 W. Eighth Ave., Denver. International Film Series Presents: All About my Mother. 7:30 p.m. Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado Ave., Boulder.

Open Mic. 6 p.m. Twisted Pine Brewing Company, 3201 Walnut St., Boulder.

Set to Stun — with Northern Ghost. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver.

Questions in a World of Blue: An Improvised Show Based on the Works of David Lynch. 7:30 p.m. Bovine Metropolis Theater, 1527 Champa St., Denver.

Signature Jazz and Acoustic Guitar Ensembles. 7:30 p.m. King Center Recital Hall, 855 Lawrence Way, Denver.

Music Ashley Koett. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver. Dave Honig. 7 p.m. Declaration Brewing, 2030 S. Cherokee St., Denver. Dinner — with El Javi. 6 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver.

36 November 23 , 2017

Nikki & Eman. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Ragtime Randy. 4 p.m. Flatirons Terrace, 930 28th St., Boulder.

Wednesday, November 29

SCHEDULE DONATIONS AT YOUR LEISURE VISIT coloradogives.org/chautauqua

Joe Smith & the Spicy Pickles. 6:30 p.m. Dazzle@Baur’s, 1512 Curtis St., Denver.

Meta Skateboards Presents: The Shop Vid. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder.

Taco Tuesday Stand-Up Comedy. 7 p.m. Los Tacos Famous Taqueria, 600 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

#COGivesDay

SEE FULL EVENT LISTINGS ONLINE. To have an event considered for the calendar, send information to calendar@boulderweekly.com. Please be sure to include address, date, time and phone number associated with each event. The deadline for consideration is Thursday at noon the week prior to publication. Boulder Weekly does not guarantee the publication of any event.

Endless, Nameless. 7 p.m. Herman’s Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, Denver.

Stone Disciple. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver. Events Brimstone & Glory. 7 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Christmas Craft Fair. 4:30 p.m. Flatirons Family Pharmacy, 603 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont. Peter Pan: NT Live Encore. 1 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Rebel in the Rye. 4 p.m. Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Trivia in Longmont — with Quizmaster Entertainment. 7 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont.

Boulder Weekly


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VOTED BEST OF BOULDER 2013

Mother’s Persian Rugs by Jodie Hollander

Mother wouldn’t have liked those three men— with their long grizzly beards and big Milwaukee guts, not to mention the mud they tracked all over Mother’s Persian rugs. That day it was raining harder than it had in years in Wisconsin, plus the dog was barking it never did like strangers. And now these three tramping through the house in big workman boots, and shouting at each other. Rain’s comin’ harrrrd, how she would have hated the way they said their r’s. Gimmee dat tarrp the fattest man yelled writing on his pad. The dog was yelping now, and snapping at their boots. Don’t upset the dog I can still hear her say— as they slipped the tarp beneath her, covered up her body and took my mother away. Jodie Hollander’s first full-length collection, My Dark Horses, is available with Liverpool University Press in the U.K. and Oxford University Press in the U.S. “Mother’s Persian Rugs” is reprinted with permission from Oxford University Press.

Boulder Weekly

November 23 , 2017 37


screen Friday december 1

PhuturePrimitive w/ andreilien, Soulacybin & midicinal

Saturday december 2

dragon Smoke Feat robert mercurio & Stanton moore (galactic), ivan neville (dumPStaPhunk) & eric lindell w/ green iS beautiFul – tribute to blue note guitariSt grant green Feat eddie robertS (new maSterSoundS) & alan evanS (Soulive)

Friday & Saturday december 8-9

the del mccoury band w/ the travelin’ mccouryS

Friday december 15

Shwayze w/ dylan montayne, dallaS garcia, Joon bug & write minded

Saturday december 16

azizi gibSon w/ J-kruPt, Foxgang, meelo v, conti & chicitychino

Saturday & Sunday december 30-31

trevor hall 12/30: SatSang 12/31: caS haley

Friday & Saturday January 5-6

bluegraSS generalS Feat chriS PandolFi & andy hall (the inFamouS StringduSterS), Sam buSh, keith moSeley (Sci) & larry keel

thurSday & Friday January 11-12 cervanteS’ 15th anniverSary celebration

the new maSterSoundS 1/11: the runnikine 1/12: the SiSterS oF Soul (kim dawSon, tanya Shylock & chriStie chamberS)

Saturday January 13

octave cat Feat JeSSe miller (lotuS), eli winderman (doPaPod), charlie Patierno & brazilian cheeSe Feat michael kang (Sci), dominic lali (big gigantic), aaron JohnSton & JeSSe murPhy (brazilian girlS)

Friday January 26

JeFF auStin band Saturday January 27

the Funk hunterS Saturday march 10

the exPendableS w/ through the rootS & PaciFic dub

Saturday march 24

the dance Party time machine thurSday march 29

michael Schenker FeSt Feat michael Schenker,

Saturday november 25 tueSday november 28

Fat tueSdayS

tribute to nola Funk, Soul, r & b Feat the muSic oF the meterS, allen touSSaint & more w/ houSe band: caSey ruSSell (magic beanS), will traSk (great american taxi), clark Smith (dynohunter) & Sean dandurand

wedneSday november 29 re: Search

Feat caSual commander (SunSquabi) & FriendS, borham lee (Pretty lightS live & break Science) & mikey thunder & Jubee thurSday november 30 graSS For that aSS PreSentS

kind county

w/ acouStic mining comPany & bottlerocket hurricane

Friday december 1

oliver FranciS

w/ Slouch, don PicaSSo & deSrude

Saturday december 2

whitewater ramble w/ wood belly & banShee tree

Sunday december 3

the mile high riot

Feat octoPuS tree, meeting houSe, Sovereign SuPerior, diSinherited, Partial PieceS, what young men do, backSeat vinyl, the aPoStled knaSh, liquid titanium, the Solid ocean & manic aSSault

wedneSday december 6 re: Search

Feat JeFFrey ParadiSe (PoolSide) w/ caPyac, Plaid hawaii (late Set), mikey thunder & Jubee thurSday december 7

very SPecial headliner tba w/ the dyrty byrdS

Friday & Saturday december 8-9

Joey Porter’S Shady buSineSS

Feat Joey Porter (the motet), robert “SPut” Searight (Snarky PuPPy), mononeon (Prince), dJ williamS (kdtu), JenniFer hartSwick (trey band), drew SayerS (the motet) & corey Frye (the main Squeeze) w/ cbdb

wedneSday december 13 re: Search

Feat eSSekS & chamPagne driP w/ linear Symmetry, mikey thunder & Jubee thurSday december 14 graSS For that aSS PreSentS

tangled & dark – emily clark & FriendS

(Feat dave wattS, todd Smallie, ben thomaS, Sarah clarke, Seth Freeman, bill mckay & michelle Sarah) Pay tribute to bonnie raitt w/ kory montgomery band Feat mark levy (circleS around the Sun) & Shawn eckelS (andy FraSco & the un)

Friday & Saturday december 15-16

Steve kimock & FriendS

Feat JeFF chimenti, John kimock, andy heSS & leSlie mendelSon

monday december 18

menagerie awardS banquet Feat FlaSh mountain Flood hoSted by doran JoSePh

tueSday december 19

rival (n*o*v*a*)

w/ boogie lightS & mammoth water

Friday december 22

diSco Floyd

w/ Phour Point o & SoundS travelS

Saturday January 13 cervanteS’ 15th anniverSary celebration

Steve mann

Stupid friends

The ‘Justice League’ is full of idiots

Sun-dried vibeS

w/ the knightbeatS & beyond bridgeS

robin mcauley & doogie white chriS glen, ted mckenna &

H

ere are five things I didn’t know before watching Justice League: 1) “The uncanny valley” is actually an area located on the upper lip of Superman (Henry Cavill). 2) The Flash (Ezra Miller) is so catastrophically dumb, he’s lucky he hasn’t exploded himself by awkwardly running at Mach 5 directly into a brick wall clearly labeled “Careful, idiot, this is a brick wall.” 3) Atlantis receives the broadcast signal for the FX channel, as is evident by the fact that Aquaman ( Jason Momoa) has a persona based entirely on an extra from Sons of Anarchy.

tueSday december 5

gary barden, graham bonnet & (michael Schenker’S temPle oF rock),

They’re looking for a plot line. They didn’t find one.

monxx

w/ Synoid, Swayd, bloodhound & nJoy

dJ z-triP

Friday January 19

tatanka

w/ bumPin uglieS

text cervanteS to 91944 For ticket giveawayS, drink SPecialS, diScounted ticket PromotionS & more

4) Humanity’s evilest villain is named after the guys who sang “Born to Be Wild,” looks like a buff Larry King in a beer helmet and just wants to make three metal boxes kiss. 5) Ben Affleck knows how to blink “I regret all my life’s choices” in Morse code. Being better than the fiery cinematic hemorrhoid that was Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice does not make Justice League pleasant or, you know, “good.” Actually, the one way in which BvS outdoes JL is perhaps the most bizarre: Given a budget the size of curing cancer or developing functional time travel, how was this movie released with flat-out atrocious — often seemingly unfinished — visual effects? The digitally resurrected corpse of Peter Cushing from Star Wars: Rogue One refuses to see JL because the unnatural effects make him uncomfortable. And yet, the script is somehow even worse than that. Here’s all of it: Batman (Affleck) sees a flying, alien, bug-looking dude in Gotham City, so he gets Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) to help convince the Flash, Cyborg (Ray Fisher) and Aquaman to resurrect Superman in order to punch Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds), who looks like Iggy Pop covered in powdered sugar. With comedy beats written by a “Dad Jokes” Twitter-bot, the attempted climactic crowd-pleasing moment is horrifyingly punctuated by a black man triumphantly declaring “boo-ya” in 2017. DC Comic fanatics — and director Zack Snyder’s apologists in particular — have created a profoundly misguided and frequently repellent narrative that suggests a secret conspiratorial agenda to hold Marvel movies to a lesser standard. In reality, the secret to Marvel’s success is merely a basic functional understanding of its characters, whereas DC movies treat their own heroes like poo-poo caca. Consider: The Flash is a scientist who runs fast. In Justice League, there’s a running gag that he’s so dumb that he doesn’t know the four cardinal directions, and he runs like someone who doesn’t understand the concept of legs. Superman should be a noble Boy Scout who inspires the masses; here, he once more fights everyone and acts like a dick. Batman is the world’s greatest detective; Snyder can’t wait to have him fire all the guns again. Cyborg’s entire thing is he’s half-robot; he looks worse than Robocop. And not the movie, the short-lived 1994 TV show. Wonder Woman is fine, save for the copious upskirt cinematography that surprisingly wasn’t there when a woman directed her earlier this year. Justice League is a bad movie with a bad script, a bad villain, bad direction, bad effects and bad acting. That it is less bad than Batman v Superman only means Jesse Eisenberg didn’t pee in a jar this time. This review previously appeared in The Reader of Omaha, Nebraska.

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

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38 November 23 , 2017

Boulder Weekly


film Out of the frying pan

And into the fire with ‘Brimstone & Glory’ by Michael J. Casey

A

ll stories have to begin somewhere. ON THE BILL: Brimstone & Glory, the new docuBrimstone & Glory. Nov. mentary about Mexico’s weeklong 29–Dec. 2. National Pyrotechnics Festival, takes The Boedecker Theater, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 place in modern-day Tultepec, but its Walnut St., Boulder. origins lie on the other side of the Atlantic, in thedairy.org Portugal specifically, at the end of the 15th century with the birth of João Duarte Cidade: or, John of God. Born March 8, 1495, Cidade was both a believer and a wanderer. From Portugal to Spain to Africa and back to Granada, Cidade cared for the sick and the poor, and once ran into a burning building to rescue those trapped inside. He died in 1550, and a century later, Cidade was canonized as San Juan de Dios, patron saint of hospitals, nurses, firefighters, alcoholics, booksellers, the sick and firework makers. Little of this backstory is found in Brimstone & Glory, but what happens on screen is so compelling, you leave itching to know more. Sometimes knowing why things are happening isn’t nearly as exciting as wondering. That seems to be director Viktor Jakovleski’s overall aim in this immersive and captivating work, one that favors the immediacy of an art film over the explanation of a documentary. Here’s what we learn from the movie: Half of Mexico’s fireworks are crafted in Tultepec. Crafted and not manufactured because you won’t find assembly lines or heavy machinery putting together Watching director the goods in Brimstone & Glory. Instead, the focus is on Viktor Jakovleski’s film about Mexthe people who make and assemble the fireworks by ico’s weeklong hand in a tradition passed down from generation to genNational Pyrotechnics Festival eration. A tradition based on intuition: “A handful of leaves you fascithis, a handful of that,” one firework maker jokes. nated and hungry for more. There is an enviable casualness to their work. While an old-timer tapes a cherry bomb together, we can’t help but gawk at his hands, clearly crippled from an explosion. However, it’s not slowing him down. While he works, another is taught to slowly mix gunpowder by hand so as not to create too much friction. The casualness of craft gives way to the chaos of creation when the residents of Tultepec recreate San Juan’s heroic inferno with fireworks galore. These two celebrations, Día de los Castillos (Day of the Castles of Fire) and Día de los Toros (Day of the Bulls), are a form of penance for the residents of Tultepec. One subject refers to the scars the fireworks leave as the places where “the saint reaches down to pull us from the fire.” Others believe burns occurred during the festival will protect them for the rest of the year. Jakovleski passes no judgment. Instead, the director revels in their festival, places his cameras as close to the action as possible and dances among the sparks with everyone else. Some shots are taken with the Phantom camera’s seductive slow motion, others play out in real-time with the enchanting kinetics. At a lean 67 minutes, Brimstone & Glory leaves you fascinated and hungry for more. When was the last time you watched a documentary and left with more questions than answers? When that happens, you know you saw something special. Boulder Weekly

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November 23 , 2017 39


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Boulder Weekly


Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Photos by staff

Shultach Sandwich

Southern Sun Pub & Brewery 627 S. Broadway, Suite E, Boulder, mountainsunpub.com

Colorado Farmivore Mac and Cheese Twisted Pine Brewing Company 3201 Walnut St., Boulder, twistedpinebrewing.com

T

Blueberry Danish Pancakes

Snooze an A.M. eatery 1617 Pearl St., Boulder, snoozeeatery.com

T

here’s a reason Snooze has long lines nearly every day of the week and every time of the day (until 3 p.m.) The breakfast joint started in Denver just over a decade ago and has been popular, and growing, ever since. Ranging from savory to sweet, the options are endless so don’t be afraid to mix and match items across the menu. The blueberry danish pancake is just as rich as its namesake. A delightfully fluffy buttermilk pancake surrounds a center of tangy lemon cream cheese filling that adds to every bite. The entire thing is smothered in a tart blueberry coulis (thick, strained blueberry sauce) and sweet cream drizzle. Almond streusel sprinkled on top adds just a bit of crunch. These pancakes feel decadent, but that didn’t stop us from eating every last bite. $7.50.

hank goodness for the innovation of embellished macaroni and cheese. Whoever decided to make a great thing greater should be given a Congressional Medal of Honor. Twisted Pine, a fantastic brewery on beer merits alone, ups its culinary stature with a menu of well-made pub staples, including a section reserved for special macs and cheeses. Their Colorado farmivore is a delight; on top of their pasta (kind of a frilled macaroni) is feta cheese, goat horn pepper, roasted garlic and spinach. The goat horn pepper has a strong kick, but it also has beautiful fruit sweetness to settle the flavor. The vibrant feta, sweet garlic and herbaceous spinach round this mac and cheese dish out into a proper meal. $13.

Y

ou just can’t beat the number of house-made beers Southern Sun (and all the Sun locations for that matter) has on tap. But if you had to pick something outside its brew inventory to harp on about, it’d be the food specials, which rotate daily. Given, you may not be able to catch the shultach sandwich if you pop in on a random day, but keep an eye out for this delicious concoction. Baked ham, cranberry jam, walnut, goat cheese and spinach are packed between two pieces of ciabatta bread. The ham is smoky, the jam is bittersweet, the walnut (in strips and softened) is earthy, the goat cheese is salty and punchy, and the spinach is fresh, crunchy and sweet. The truth is whether it’s the shultach or any number of the Sun’s creative lunchtime creations, you’re liable to walk away pleased. $11.50.

Special Pho

Chez Thuy Vietnamese Restaurant 2655 28th St., Boulder, chezthuy.com

P

ho will cure what ails you. The now-ubiquitous Vietnamese soup has magical properties that’ll fix everything from a hangover to stuffed sinuses to just plain hunger. And pho doesn’t get much better than Chez Thuy’s take on it. In fact, whatever Chez Thuy does, we’re pretty much on board with. The “special” pho comes with rare steak, brisket, meatball, tendon and tripe all simmered in an umami broth with glass noodles, jalapenos, basil and chili sauce. The brisket falls apart as soon as it’s in your mouth, the steak is hearty, and the meatball is well-seasoned and soaks up all the broth. The noodles are slurp-worthy, and by the time you get to the end of the truly massive bowl, all that chili sauce, jalapeno and lime juice you squeezed in there has concentrated into a flavorful, savory punch. $13.95.

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Boulder Weekly


Grateful Chefs

Culinary notables recall Thanksgiving feast’s best, worst, funniest moments

Susan France

A

s young kids we naturally assume that every other kid lives like we do and eats the same foods because our family is all that we know. I grew up in the epicenter of Thanksgiving — Massachusetts. I believed that all families had a Thanksgiving Day table loaded with a roast turkey with hot Italian sausage and mashed potato stuffing. On the side: jellied cranberry sauce, lasagna, pumpkin pie and kielbasa with kraut. It made every nation happy in our extended Susan France immigrant family. I asked local chefs and culinary notables what they remember most about Thanksgiving and to share a recollection. You will note that these are far from archetypal Norman Rockwell, Middle American memories. You may laugh, cringe, tear up and get really hungry reading these charming tales of kitchen explosions, family distress, excellent side Susan France dishes and love. The beauty of America’s great non-sectarian holiday is that its tent and table infinitely expands to include each and every person and the food that means “thanks” to them. Happy Thanksgiving to all.

me off. She brought me to get my ears pierced in fourth grade without telling them. Here is her Thanksgiving recipe: Aunt Jeannette’s Turkey Stuffing 2 eggs 4 cups bread crumbs 1/2 cup chopped celery 1/2 envelope onion soup mix 1 cup uncooked popcorn Directions: Beat eggs, mix all ingredients together. Stuff into the turkey. Bake at 375 degrees for three hours. then, get the hell out of the kitchen because that stuffing is going to blow that turkey’s ass right out of the oven!”

Hosea Rosenberg, Blackbelly Market and Santo

“My fondest memories of Thanksgiving were going to my dad’s house. My parents split when we were pretty young, and we spent most of our time at our mom’s house. My dad got us for Thanksgiving, and it was always a really fun weekend. One of the best parts for me was seeing what Robin, my stepmom, was baking. She always surprised us with lots of pies from pumpkin to apple, pecan and cherry. There were more desserts on the table than what you might call ‘real food.’ I was more than OK with that. Once I started cooking in restaurants I would still make it to their house to show off what I had been learning. I have always remembered Thanksgiving with my dad, Robin and my siblings with a lot of warmth, love and thankfulness. “

nibbles

Kyle Mendenhall Susan France

BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

Kyle Mendenhall, Arcana Hosea Rosenberg Susan France

“Every Thanksgiving for as long as I can remember my father has taken it upon himself to do one specific Jennifer Bush appetizer. My mother cooks most of the meal but this dish my father owns. We get flat packages of supermarket ‘chipped beef ’ and lay the meat out overlapping on a cutting board. We spread a layer of Philadelphia cream cheese over them and place one scallion, whole, on top of the cream cheese and roll it up lengthwise. We place toothpicks about one inch apart on the roll and cut bite size slices. This combo is delicious. Most of them never make it to a platter.”

Karen DeVincenzo, baker

Bobby Stuckey

Boulder Weekly

“My family lived on the outskirts of a small town. Aunt Jeannette lived in the big city. She was the one who took me out of my sheltered life, time after time, and sent me back home a different person. I think my parents were always a little nervous sending

Bobby Stuckey, Frasca Food and Wine

“I grew up in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona, in the early ’70s. My grandfather had been there since childhood so ours was a rare third-generation Phoenix family. My father’s older sister married Tish Yoshimira, a gentle, quiet Japanese man. He would take on the responsibility of having Thanksgiving at his house with the entire Stuckey clan. Sure, we had turkey, but I might also be the only kid who thought it was normal to have sushi at Thanksgiving dinner. Looking back I think how nerve-racking it was for Tish to host his wife’s crazy family.”

Jennifer Bush, Lucky’s Bakehouse

“Thirty years ago, when I was in high school, my mother owned Thanksgiving ... and still does. Organic turkeys were nonexistent in Boulder but my mom located one and was beyond thrilled. On Thanksgiving Day filled with family and friends, the table was set and Champagne was flowing. As my dad carved the turkey we all smelled something extremely ‘off.’ As dad carved, he exposed a huge tumor in the turkey. The smell was unreal, tainting the stuffing and literally all the food, and we couldn’t get the aroma out of the kitchen. Mom was beyond upset, we threw away nearly all the food and there was fighting, tears and a holiday in see NIBBLES Page 44

November 23 , 2017 43


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Tim Brod, Highland Honey

“I was probably about 10 years old. Being New Englanders we always had oyster stuffing in our turkey and drank this very strange bubbling wine called Cold Duck. A dozen of us were sitting at the very large table waiting for the turkey. My father decides to open a bottle of Cold Duck, which erupted with foam that went everywhere, especially over the turkey. That was the year us kids got to enjoy Cold Duckmarinated turkey even though my parents were not in the habit of letting us have any alcohol! If only mom and dad were still alive so I could make them turkey and oyster stuffing served with a glass of Cold Duck.”

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shambles. Needless to say, organic has come a long way, but for Thanksgivings from there on out the family has been riding the Butterball train. This year we are trying an all-natural turkey. Wish us luck.”

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Susan France

en brown, add cranberries and cook until berries start to crack open. Add peeled fresh pearl onions — an amount equal to the cranberries. Splash in a little high quality vinegar, cracked black pepper, some fresh orange zest, a cinnamon stick, a bay leaf and a pinch of salt. Cover and simmer until onions are tender.”

Kate Lacroix, Kontently

“My funniest Thanksgiving moment was trying to have a wishbone contest with my brother one year. We tousled for a long time with that greasy bone and neither of us emerged victorious. Note to self for the girls this year: Dry the wishbone first!”

Tim Brod Susan France

Peg Romano, The Med, Brasserie Ten Ten, Via Perla

Julia Joun

“I come from a multi-ethnic hometown, Honolulu, where eating well is a serious and joyous preoccupation. My parents’ Korean culture is also one where tastiness looms large. They celebrated major holidays with a group of friends where the husbands all graduated from the same elite Seoul high school. Every year, the table was laden with the traditional Thanksgiving dishes like my beloved turkey and mashed potatoes. There was also a full complement of Korean food including the ubiquitous kimchi and rice, glass noodles with vegetables, Korean barbecue with thin slices of ribeye, and lots of vegetable side dishes. I ate everything and was thankful for each wonderful morsel.”

Chef James Van Dyk

“I had this Thanksgiving side dish combining pearl onions and fresh cranberries 30 years ago and it has been a hit ever since. Heat some sugar in a heavybottom sauce pan until it becomes gold-

“My grandmother would bring sweet potatoes with marshmallows for Thanksgiving. It was intriguing but too sweet for me. My best memory is of the sandwich my dad made me on the day after Thanksgiving. He put sliced turkey on bread with turkey dressing, mayo, lettuce and a touch of fresh cranberry sauce. It was the best.”

John Hinman, Hinman Bakery

“Last Thanksgiving at our house we hosted neighbors and an Iraqi refugee family we had met at a benefit event. The father was a translator for the U.S. Army, his wife is a photographer, and they have an autistic son. It was their first Thanksgiving so it was interesting to introduce them to the traditions and foods. They seemed to really like the sense of community at the meal. Listening to them talking about the extreme violence and terrorism they had witnessed made me think about all I have to be thankful for.” John Lehndorff hosts his annual extended live Thanksgiving Day version of Radio Nibbles 8:30-9 a.m. Nov. 23 on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, kgnu.org). Call in with last minute cooking questions and memories at 303-443-4242. Boulder Weekly


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community

Susan France

TABLE

Susan France

Christian Saber, along with his wife, Karly, have turned Boulder’s Rincon Argentino into their American dream.

B

oy, it seems a little unfashionable nowadays to share a story extolling the virtues of the American dream. Particularly around Thanksgiving, at a time in our country when, for many, expressing due “gratitude” for the institutions that once made the dream possible is more important than ensuring those freedoms are still available to today’s multi-cultural Americans. But I still believe in it. And so does Christian Saber whose story just might restore your faith in our shared dream if yours has waned of late. Saber grew up in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the son of a clothes importer. Saber’s father shipped in clothes from Milan twice a year, often taking the entire family to Italy to purchase the latest high-end fashions. It was a unique life, but by no means a luxurious one. “I come from a middle-to-high class, so I had the opportunity to go to a good private school,” Saber says. “My country has a lot of poverty. Not everybody had these possibilities. I saw both parents working hard to make that happen.” Like anywhere else, being of moderate means in Argentina doesn’t really make business any easier and it doesn’t

THE ARGENTINE DREAM

Rincon Argentino’s Christian Saber on making it work in America by Matt Cortina

46 November 23 , 2017

exempt you from crime or public safety concerns. These were lessons Saber and his family learned first-hand. “It’s hard to make a living there. It’s hard,” Saber says. “The store that we owned, we [were] robbed a lot of times. There were a few situations where you go and try to open your business and the door is broke and there’s nothing inside, and you have to start all over.” Enter the United States of America. When Saber was 25, he joined an exchange program wherein Argentines traveled to Breckenridge to teach skiing and snowboarding during

the winter, and U.S. instructors traveled to Argentina in the summer to teach in Patagonia. Saber, not knowing anything about Colorado beforehand, fell in love with it. He also fell in love with a human. And in short time he took his Colorado native, soon-to-be-wife, Karly, back to Buenos Aires. Before the arrival of their first son a few years later, they decided to return to the States and settle in Boulder to round it all out. Skiing and fashion had been a part of Saber’s life since he was small. And indeed he worried that all he knew

how to do was travel to Milan and purchase high-end clothes. But his passion was food. He grew up loving to grill, the Argentine craft of asada, and earned a degree from Argentina’s Gato Dumas culinary institute. But the ability to turn that passion into a career still evaded him. That is, until he had settled in the U.S. Working odd jobs — from car salesman to landscaper — to make ends meet, Saber and Karly began baking and handing out empanadas (Argentinian hand pies of various meat, vegetable, cheese and herb fillings) to friends and family on weekends and special occasions. Of course they were a massive hit, and the Sabers were encouraged to try and make a go of it: to open an empanada shop. Saber thought of it as a rinconcito, or a little corner — a place to bring the culture of Argentina to the U.S. To blend the Argentine and American dreams. No story like this would be complete without tribulations. After signing a lease on a storefront, the Sabers figured it would take three months to get their shop up and running. It took Boulder Weekly


Susan France

a year. And with Karly pregnant with their second child, times were tough. “We had about $13 left in our checking account when we opened,” Karly says. “Maxed out all our credit cards. ... And on the first day we were like, ‘Is anybody going to come? Does anyone know what empanadas are?’” In triumphant fashion, their efforts were appreciated by the Boulder community, but not without a little sacrifice at the beginning. “Right from the first day we had a line out the door,” Karly says. “We started making empanadas at two in the morning with the kids sleeping on the floor, and we didn’t get done until midnight. For about three weeks straight we did that. We about died.” But if you’ve been in Boulder since Rincon Argentino opened five years ago, you know the rest. The business has not only attracted a steady stream of loyal fans, but it’s doubled its indoor dining area and launched catering operations. At the heart of the success is the humble empanada, which Saber makes using locally sourced ingredients and time-tested techniques. “I make them exactly the same as in Argentina, but we get local products,” Saber says. “I think I make them a little more gourmet than usually you find in Argentina. Usually it’s cheap food in Argentina ... but there are a lot of people that come here and say, ‘This is way better than in Argentina.’” Given such success, you might wonder why there aren’t Rincon Argentinos popping up everywhere along the Front Range. That’s certainly not without precedence among Boulder County restaurants, and it’d certainly be the American thing to do. To that, Saber says, “Why do we want to fix what is not broken?” Since opening Rincon, Saber’s parents have moved to the U.S., as have his brother and sister. There aren’t going to be a lot of return trips to Argentina, at least for a few years. And for as much comparing between the two countries and their systems as I’ve done here, Saber himself doesn’t spend too much time thinking about it. “I’m not really into politics,” he says. “It’s something like religion; we can have two different points of view and never get to understand each other.” Food, however, is one way to understand people. And the truth is, Saber’s journey from Argentina to the U.S. isn’t that different from those people born here or others who immigrate here. But to eat at Rincon is to experience at least a small bit of Saber’s unique journey, no matter what label you want to put on it. Boulder Weekly

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ackcountry Pizza & Tap House, one of Boulder County’s premier establishments for craft beer consumption, is an embarrassment of riches. With 68 brews on tap and 300 more in bottle, choice can sometimes present a challenge: Do you pair your beverage with your meal? Match the weather outside? Or just return to an old favorite? Well, should you find yourself in the hesitation department, fret not and order the sexiest beer on Backcountry’s list: Bierstadt Lagerhaus’ Slow Pour Pils. “Slow Pour Pils is an accumulation of everything we do and have learned and experienced in our beer drinking,” says Ashleigh Carter, Bierstadt’s cofounder and head brewer. “We’ve always been fascinated with German pils, and I think it’s one of the most perfect things on the planet.” But perfection takes time. Slow Pour Pils is brewed slow (roughly 30 hours), lagered longer (more than most would have the patience for) and comes out of the tap slow and steady — about three to five minutes per pour. “We call it Slow Pour but the reality of it is that if you’re in Europe or in Germany, that’s how it’s poured no matter what,” Carter explains. “You won’t be getting it quickly [but] every single time you get it, it comes with the doily and the glass and head over the rim.” The result is a beautiful, pillowy pile of white head atop a golden, crystal clear, thirst-quenching brew served in

Bierstadt’s signature 300-milliliter chalice. The nose is earthy and the taste is clean with just enough hop bitterness to draw you down the glass. “An experienced beer drinker should get down about halfway and order the next one,” Carter says with a laugh. Formerly of Dry Dock Brewing Co. and Prost Brewing, Carter, and her cofounder, Bill Eye, brew what they drink, and they drink time-tested, Reinheitsgebot-approved German lagers. They even went the extra mile and imported an 85-year-old copper brewhouse from Nuremberg, Germany, for their RiNo brewery. As one of the bartenders at the facility quipped, “The only thing not German in our beer is the water.” But specificity often comes with a hurdle or two. And though Slow Pours Pils is a magnificent beer, trying to educate customers on the elegance of pilsners is the biggest challenge. “People call [pilsner] an introductory beer,” Carter says. “I find that a little bit insulting because it’s what I’ve chosen to do with my life. ... I don’t know why it’s got to be double or triple IPA or be a sour or barrel-aged to be considered a real beer that people can really appreciate.” Slow Pour Pils is a beer worth appreciating, with or without pizza, and the true beauty behind the brew is Carter’s passion for it. She will continue to brew what she drinks with care, commitment and a simple edict: “Beer should be there to lubricate everything else you do in life.” Boulder Weekly


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astrology

is an ideal time to get this project underway.

ARIES

CANCER

come too easily for you in the coming weeks. I’m worried you will meet with no obstructions and face no challenges. And that wouldn’t be good. It might weaken your willpower and cause your puzzle-solving skills to atrophy. Let me add a small caveat, however. It’s also true that right about now you deserve a whoosh of slack. I’d love for you to be able to relax and enjoy your well-deserved rewards. But on the other hand, I know you will soon receive an opportunity to boost yourself up to an even higher level of excellence and accomplishment. I want to be sure that when it comes, you are at peak strength and alertness.

suggest that you take a LIBRA piece of paper and write SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: down a list of your bigHere are themes I suggest gest fears. Then call on the Go to RealAstrology.com to check out you specialize in during magical force within you Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO the coming weeks. 1) How that is bigger and smarter HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE to gossip in ways that don’t than your fears. Ask your HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes diminish and damage your deep sources of wisdom are also available by phone at social network, but rather for the poised courage you 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. foster and enhance it. 2) need to keep those scary How to be in three places fantasies in their proper at once without commitplace. And what is their ting the mistake of being nowhere at all. 3) How to express proper place? Not as the masters of your destiny, not as conprecisely what you mean without losing your attractive trolling agents that prevent you from living lustily, but rather mysteriousness. 4) How to be nosy and brash for fun and as helpful guides that keep you from taking foolish risks. profit. 5) How to unite and harmonize the parts of yourself and your life that have been at odds with each other. LEO

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: I hope that everything doesn’t

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: You were born with the potential

to give the world specific gifts — benefits and blessings that are unique to you. One of those gifts has been slow in developing. You’ve never been ready to confidently offer it in its fullness. In fact, if you have tried to bestow it in the past, it may have caused problems. But the good news is that in the coming months, this gift will finally be ripe. You’ll know how to deal crisply with the interesting responsibilities it asks you to take on. Here’s your homework: Get clear about what this gift is and what you will have to do to offer it in its fullness.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: Happy Unbirthday, Gemini! You’re

halfway between your last birthday and your next. That means you’re free to experiment with being different from who you have imagined yourself to be and who other people expect you to be. Here are inspirational quotes to help you celebrate. 1) “Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” — George Bernard Shaw. 2) “Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one’s mind.” — W. Somerset Maugham. 3) “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson. 4) “The snake which cannot cast its skin has to die. As well the minds which are prevented from changing their opinions; they cease to be mind.” — Friedrich Nietzsche.

Boulder Weekly

JUNE 21-JULY 22: I

JULY 23-AUG. 22: In his book Life: The Odds, Gregory

Baer says that the odds you will marry a millionaire are not good: 215-to-1. They’re 60,000-to-1 that you’ll wed royalty and 88,000-to-1 that you’ll date a model. After analyzing your astrological omens for the coming months, I suspect your chances of achieving these feats will be even lower than usual. That’s because you’re far more likely to cultivate synergetic and symbiotic relationships with people who enrich your soul and stimulate your imagination, but don’t necessarily pump up your ego. Instead of models and millionaires, you’re likely to connect with practical idealists, energetic creators and emotionally intelligent people who’ve done work to transmute their own darkness.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: What might you do to take better

care of yourself in 2018, Virgo? According to my reading of the astrological omens, this will be a fertile meditation for you to keep revisiting. Here’s a good place to start: Consider the possibility that you have a lot to learn about what makes your body operate at peak efficiency and what keeps your soul humming along with the sense that your life is interesting. Here’s another crucial task: Intensify your love for yourself. With that as a driving force, you’ll be led to discover the actions necessary to supercharge your health. P.S. Now

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: I predict that in the coming months you won’t feel compulsions to set your adversaries’ hair on fire. You won’t fantasize about robbing banks to raise the funds you need, nor will you be tempted to worship the devil. And the news just gets better. I expect that the amount of self-sabotage you commit will be close to zero. The monsters under your bed will go on a long sabbatical. Any lame excuses you have used in the past to justify bad behavior will melt away. And you’ll mostly avoid indulging in bouts of irrational and unwarranted anger. In conclusion, Scorpio, your life should be pretty evil-free for quite some time. What will you do with this prolonged outburst of grace? Use it wisely!

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: “What is love?” asks philosopher Richard Smoley. “It’s come to have a greeting-card quality,” he mourns. “Half the time ‘loving’ someone is taken to mean nurturing a warmish feeling in the heart for them, which mysteriously evaporates the moment the person has some concrete need or irritates us.” One of your key assignments in the next 10 months will be to purge any aspects of this shrunken and shriveled kind of love that

may still be lurking in your beautiful soul. You are primed to cultivate an unprecedented new embodiment of mature, robust love.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: You know that unfinished task you

have half-avoided, allowing it to stagnate? Soon you’ll be able to summon the gritty determination required to complete it. I suspect you’ll also be able to carry out the glorious rebirth you’ve been shy about climaxing. To gather the energy you need, reframe your perspective so that you can feel gratitude for the failure or demise that has made your glorious rebirth necessary and inevitable.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: In an ideal world, your work and your

character would speak for themselves. You’d receive exactly the amount of recognition and appreciation you deserve. You wouldn’t have to devote as much intelligence to selling yourself as you did to developing your skills in the first place. But now forget everything I just said. During the next 10 months, I predict that packaging and promoting yourself won’t be so #$@&%*! important. Your work and character WILL speak for themselves with more vigor and clarity than they have before.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: There used to be a booth at a

Santa Cruz flea market called “Joseph Campbell’s Love Child.” It was named after the mythological scholar who wrote the book The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The booth’s proprietor sold items that spurred one’s “heroic journey,” like talismans made to order and herbs that stimulated courage and mini-books with personalized advice based on one’s horoscope. “Chaos-Tamers” were also for sale. They were magic spells designed to help people manage the messes that crop up in one’s everyday routine while pursuing a heroic quest. Given the current astrological omens, Pisces, you would benefit from a place that sold items like these. Since none exists, do the next best thing: Aggressively drum up all the help and inspiration you need. You can and should be well-supported as you follow your dreams on your hero’s journey.

November 23 , 2017 53


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Dear Dan: I’m a twentysomething straight woman. About a month ago, I had a really vivid dream in which I was at a party and engaging with a guy I had just met. We were seriously flirting. Then my fiancé showed up — my real, flesh-and-blood, sleeping-nextto-me fiancé — who we’ll call G. In the dream, I proceeded to shower G with attention and PDA; I was all over him in a way we typically aren’t in public. I was clearly doing it to get a reaction from the guy I’d just spent the last dream-hour seducing. It was as if it had been my plan all along. Last night, I had a similar dream. This time, the guy was an old high-school boyfriend, but otherwise it was the same: flirty baiting, followed by the use of G to reject and humiliate the other guy. I was really turned on by these dreams. In real life, whenever another woman has flirted with G, I get aroused — conscious of some feelings of jealousy but drawing pleasure from them. And when other men have flirted with me, I get similarly aroused for G. There is definitely a component in that arousal that wants to tease and mock these other men with what they can’t have, even though the teasing is just in my head. I would NEVER use another person like I do in these dreams/fantasies, because it’s cruel. But could this become a healthy role-playing outlet for me and G? Are there ethical implications to hurting strangers (albeit imaginary ones) for sexual pleasure? From what little I know

Boulder Weekly

SAVAGE by Dan Savage

of degradation/humiliation kinks, it’s important that the person being degraded is experiencing pleasure and satisfaction. Is it healthy to make someone’s (again, an imaginary someone’s) unwilling pain a part of our pleasure? If G is into it, this would be our first foray into fantasy/role-playing/whatever. But I worry that I might be poisoning the well by pursuing something so mean-spirited. My Extra-Arousing Meanness Dear MEAM: We watch imaginary people being harmed — much more grievously harmed —i n movies and on television and read about imaginary people being harmed in novels. Think of poor Barb in Stranger Things or poor Theon Greyjoy in Game of Thrones or poor Christian in Fifty Shades of Grey. If it’s okay for the Duffer brothers and HBO and E.L. James to do horrible things to these imaginary people to entertain us, MEAM, it’s okay for you and your boyfriend (if he’s game) to do much less horrible things to an imaginary third person to entertain yourselves.

Love

But why limit this to fantasy? Why not fuck your fiancé’s brains out after flirting with and subsequently humiliating a living, breathing, willing third? But first, MEAM, give some thought to what exactly turns you on about this and then discuss it with your fiancé. It turns you on to see your partner through another’s eyes for obvious reasons — when someone else wants to fuck him, you see him with fresh eyes and want to fuck him that much more. As for the power-play aspects of your fantasy, does your turn-on evaporate if your victim is a willing participant? And how do you feel about threesomes? Threesomes don’t have to involve intercourse or outercourse or any other sort of ’course, of course. Bringing someone else in — someone who gets off on the idea of being humiliated — counts as a threesome, even if all your third “gets” to do is be ditched in a bar. You could even work up to letting your willing third watch and/or listen while your fiancé gets to do what he will never get to do — fuck your amazing brains out — which would allow

for the humiliation games to continue all night long. Once G is on board, MEAM, you can start with a little role-playing about this scenario. Then, once you’ve established that this is as exciting for G as it is for you, advertise for your willing third. The internet is for porn, first and foremost, but it’s also pretty good at bringing like-minded kinksters together. As long as your third consents to the play and gets off on it, you aren’t poisoning the well or doing harm. And if you’re worried it won’t be as much fun if your victim is a willing participant, MEAM, remember there will be witnesses, i.e., other people in the bar who won’t know it was a setup, and in their eyes you will be cruelly humiliating this poor schmuck. Not into threesomes of any sort? Well, flirting is just flirting — it’s not a binding contract — and there’s no law that requires all flirtations to be strictly sincere and/or immediately actionable. A little casual flirtation with someone else before your fiancé rolls into a bar is permissible — but you’ll have to let the other person know right away that you have a fiancé and that this flirtation isn’t going anywhere, and then you can’t go too crazy with the PDA once your fiancé arrives. Send questions to mail@savagelove.

November 23 , 2017 55


EEDBETWEENTHELINES

by Sarah Haas

Criminal

A

s soon as the wheels touched the tarmac worked together to create a diversity that is truly at St. Louis’s Lambert airport, everyone American. on the plane scrambled for their phones, I was lost in that thought when a voice called out eager to find out what they’d missed from behind me: “Don’t turn around. I’m coming to during the one-hour-and-40-minute you.” flight. Soon the plane filled with dings and chirps and Of course, I turned around to see a man in an buzzes. Mine was humming in my lap. oversized Rams jacket hustling toward me. He smiled It was a text from my Colorado friend, born and at my rebellion, revealing more than a few missing raised in the Gateway City: “Have fun!! It’s a great teeth. city... and be careful.” “This is a cash deal,” he said. “You got any Sarah Haas “Thanks and I will (I think)! money?” But, I don’t really know what “I’ve got money, but no being careful means...” cash.” “Just be aware. It’s not safe.” “Funny, ’cause I’ve got cash She’s right. According to but no money,” he said, reaching the FBI, St. Louis ranked the into his pocket and fishing for a most violent U.S. city in 2016, minute before pulling out a little racking up the highest number nugget of weed. of rapes, robberies, aggravated “Not even enough cash for assaults and murders in the some bud?” he asked. I shook my head and he told me I could country. There are 88.1 violent find him at the Crack Fox later, crimes for every 10,000 resiif I changed my mind. dents in the city. Compare that In St. Louis, the man was to a rough estimate of about 20 treading a strange line of crime. crimes per 10,000 residents in Since 2013, possession of 35 Boulder, which has a slightly grams or less of marijuana has lower than average crime rate. been “decriminalized” in the city, Hours later, walking around and since 2014, according to the bare streets in the freezing rain, I’d forgotten all about safety. St. Louis Metropolitan Police My only thoughts were how to View of St. Louis from the Gateway Arch. Department, 842 citations have keep warm enough so I could been given in lieu of jail time, keep gawking at the city’s 704 of which came during inciarchitectural patina — a blend of hand-carved dents where no other law was being broken. facades, gothic revival churches, art deco design and Still, in St. Louis, it is decidedly illegal to sell post-modern masterpieces — not to mention the 680- marijuana. But the man needed cash, and weed was foot arch sneaking into vistas all around the city. what he had to work with. As the starting point for the westward movement A block later I happened upon the Crack Fox, of settlers in the 1800s, St. Louis represents a hodgeskipping over pools of vomit as I walked by, like a podge of the melting pot that is America, condensed kid bounding from rock to rock to get across a and preserved in the buildings that line the pond. I couldn’t get his words out of my head: “I’ve Mississippi. On the river’s western banks, all cultures got cash but no money.” Why did that phrase

Boulder Weekly

sound so familiar? Days later, it hit me. They were the words of my father on Thanksgiving day 1994. I was 8 years old and my dad had just been laid off from his job as a public school arts teacher, and he hadn’t yet started collecting unemployment. Somehow, he’d scrabbled together the money to fly out for Thanksgiving, but instead of a feast, we went to get popcorn at the movies. But in buying the tickets, card after card was declined. I don’t remember any tone of regret or embarrassment in his voice when he joked with the ticket vendor, “I got no money, but at least I got some cash.” My dad spent his last $20 on one adult ticket and a large, buttery popcorn. (My admission would come by way of a father-assisted sneak in through the back exit door). Many people, from Rahul Gandhi to Ben Carson, have said that “poverty is a state of mind” and for the most part I agree, but only if I’m allowed to split semantic hairs and say that you’re either poor or you’re not. If that’s the case, the St. Louis dealer and my cashwielding father were both “poor” men, choosing to see abundance in instances of poverty. If living is an art, they are modern-day likenesses of Vincent van Gogh, making masterpieces out of next to nothing. They are also both criminals. Sneaking into movies will always be illegal, but marijuana might not always be. This year, like the last three years, legislation is being introduced to legalize marijuana in St. Louis (Board Bill 180), but it’s unlikely the bill will pass. The City doesn’t seem quite ready to be so contrarian to the staunchly conservative state government. But as I walked around the city, looking at row after row of American architectural masterworks, I couldn’t help but remark at the life that persisted in spite of the daunting odds of the country’s surmounting poverty. As both money and cash become harder to come by for the 99 percent, “criminal” seems less black and white, and more a matter of perspective.

November 23 , 2017 57


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cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

Fake news and good news about marijuana

T

he big news about marijuana this week takes the form of fake news and good news. First, the fake news. A lot of media outlets reported that an 11-month-old baby boy in Denver had become the first person whose death had been attributed to marijuana. The origin of the story was a “case report” by two doctors in the August edition of the journal Clinical Practice and Cases in Emergency Medicine. The report was written by Dr. Christopher O. Hoyte, an emergency medicine professor at the University of Colorado-Denver Anschutz Medical Campus, and Dr. Thomas Nappe, who is now the director of medical toxicology at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Nappe was apparently with the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center in Denver at the time the death took place. “We are absolutely not saying that marijuana killed that child,” Nappe told a reporter for the Washington Post. He said the doctors had observed an unusual sequence of events, documented it and wrote a case report that alerted the medical community that it is worth studying a possible relationship

between marijuana and the child’s proximate cause of death, myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. “We’re not saying definitively that marijuana caused the mycarditis,” Nappe said. “All we are saying is that we didn’t find any other reasons. So we

need to study this further.” The case report had said, “As of this writing, this is the first reported pediatric death associated with cannabis exposure.” Nappe emphasized that the word “associated” should not be interpreted as indicating a cause and effect. The report said the boy suffered a seizure at home and arrived at the hos-

pital with slowed heartbeat and breath. He subsequently went into cardiac arrest and died. In the 48 hours prior, he had been lethargic, retching and irritable. He was considered otherwise healthy and well-nourished. Postmortem tests found a metabolite of THC in his body, and a postmortem blood draw from his heart confirmed the presence of marijuana compounds. The autopsy revealed his heart was severely inflamed; the condition is called myocarditis. However, a single blood draw from a jugular vein revealed the presence of Bacillus bacteria, a bacteria that can cause myocarditis. The report said that since only one test found the bug, it was possible its presence was due to contamination rather than an actual infection, and that the tissue damage and immune response was more consistent with druginduced, toxic mycarditis. Ah, but what drug? The report also found that the baby’s parents were in “an unstable motel-living situation” and admitted to drug possession, including cannabis. No other drugs appear to have been found in the baby’s body, but marijuana stays in the system longer than other drugs. The possibility that the condition could have been caused by some other drug whose presence could no longer be detected apparently wasn’t addressed. The call for more research on a possible link between marijuana and heart

inflammation certainly has merit, but jumping to the conclusion that marijuana caused the child’s death, even indirectly, falls into the category of latterday reefer madness and fake news — a still-common syndrome found in all too many media outlets. • • • • Now for the good news. Michigan’s Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol submitted an initiative petition with more than 360,000 signatures on it to state election officials in Lansing on Monday. The group needs roughly 252,000 valid signatures to put the initiative on the November 2018 ballot. If passed, Michiganders over the age of 21 will be able to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and grow up to 12 plants at home. A 10 percent excise tax and a 6 percent sales tax would be levied on pot. The tax revenues would go only to those communities that “opt in” to allowing marijuana cultivation, sales and related business activities within their borders. Organized opposition groups are forming up, but legalization seems to have growing support in Michigan. A statewide poll taken last February found 57 percent of Michiganders favored legalizing marijuana, and in November, voters in Detroit decisively repealed restrictive zoning ordinances that the City Council had passed that made it virtually impossible to open medical marijuana dispensaries in the city. The repeal measures passed with about 60 percent of the vote.

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November 23 , 2017 59


icumi (IN CASE YOU MISSED IT) AN IRREVERENT AND NOT ALWAYS ACCURATE VIEW OF THE WORLD Wikimedia Commons/David Shankbone

3...2...1...BLASTOFF! Most of us will spend this Thanksgiving weekend gorging on our holiday favorites, laughing, fighting and laughing again with family members and sitting on the couch aimlessly flipping through the channels waiting for A Christmas Story to start playing on repeat. In so doing, you may just catch sight of a rocket launch, albeit we can’t guarantee it will be impressive. This weekend, Californian ex-limosine-driver-turned-pseduo-mad-scien-

tist Mike Hughes will climb into his homemade $20,000 rocket and launch himself 1,800 miles in the air above the Mojave Desert from a makeshift mobile-home-turned-launch pad. If you question the goal of Hughes’ quest, look no further than the boldly painted “Research Flat Earth” written along the side of the rocket. That’s right, Hughes is a Flat Earther, following in the footsteps of others who deny the Earth is round, such as the rapper B.O.B. This small but mighty group of conspiracy theorists

think that the whole “ball Earth” theory is just made up by astronauts and government officials. Really, the Earth is more like a Nabisco cookie — mostly flat, with only the slightest dome on one side. The oceans, of course, are held in place by a ring of sea ice. What’s beyond that, who knows? We couldn’t make this stuff up if we tried. So enjoy that hearty meal, then settle in for the show. This could just be the Thanksgiving that the whole world gets turned upside down. Or it could be Mr. Hughes’ last Thanksgiving

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El ements Bo ulder 56

ELEMENTS RECREATIONAL

CAN’T ARGUE WITH THAT

What often passes for fun around BW’s office is the reading aloud of press releases. We have even talked of saving a few dozen of our favorites throughout the year and dedicating an entire special issue to them. Maybe we could call it something like the Daily Weekly issue. But we digress. This press release headline caught our eye this week: “Colorado Springs, CO has been recognized as the nation’s top city for sleep.” What can we say other than we agree. Folks in Colorado Springs must spend their days focusing on their families and then going right to bed. Seriously, we’d be pissed off if any town in Boulder County won this award. What will the Springs win next year? How about best place with absolutely nothing to do, or maybe America’s boredom capital, or how about top town to be in a coma? Best effing city for sleep. They should put that proudly on one of those green signs as you come into town.

is the leading dispensary in Boulder, CO, featuring the highest quality cannabis at the most affordable prices possible

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New Hours

8AM-6:45PM SUNDAY-TUESDAY

8AM-9:45PM

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“Boulder”to 720-463-1422

BOULDER • 1534 55th St. ((NE corner of Arapahoe and 55th) • (303) 444-0861 HOURS: Sun - Tue 8am-6:45pm • Wed - Sat 8am-9:45pm

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Boulder Weekly

21+

November 23 , 2017 61


AF TER THE ME AL, ENJOY THE DE ALS

Green Friday N O V. 2 4 O N LY

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30% OFF BLUE KUDU MED + REC

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SEE AD ON PG 52 for BLACK FRIDAY SPECIALS! New Hours

last word

Divine Resonance Massage & Skin Care Please see ad on page 49. Now offering acne treatments. www.divineresonance.com www.bouldermassageandskincare.com 720-432-1108

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1750 30th Street, Suite 7 720.379.6046

5420 Arapahoe • Unit F 303.442.2565 • www.boulderwc.com

2801 Iris Ave., Boulder, CO

See our full-page ad on PG 62!

Featuring Walleye Weekends: Saturdays & Sundays Direct shipped to us from Red Lake, MN

Boulder – 1144 Pearl St. 303-443-PIPE Westminster – 3001 W. 74th Ave. 303-426-6343 Highlands Ranch – 7130 E. County Line Rd. 303-740-5713 Denver – 2046 Arapahoe in LoDo 303-295-PIPE

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$100 HALF OZ Strains* Strains will rotate. For available strains, please visit thefarmco.com/shop * Not to be combined with other discounts. While supplies last. Some exclusions may apply.

on pageDOWNLOAD 57. THE

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Voted Boulder’s Best Recreational Dispensary 2015-2017! Open daily until 9:45pm

Give thanks for

Green Friday

Best Selection of Concentrates in Boulder! CONCENTRATE FLIGHT: Buy 4 grams, get 20% off each. Buy 8 grams, get 25% off each. Quest Concentrates, Viola Extracts, Essential Extracts, The Lab, Craft, Hummingbird Brand CO2 Cannabis Nectar, Kaviar, Keef Cola, Indigo Pro

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845 Walnut Street • TheDandelionCo.com Offers only valid 11/24. For registered Colorado medical marijuana patients only. Tax not included. Cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Limit one per customer per day.

• ROW VOT

Open until 10pm every day

Check out our expanded selection of edibles. 21+

1534 55th St., Boulder 303-444-0861

8a- 6:45p Sun-Tues • 8a- 9:45p Weds-Sat

www.elementsboulder.com

Met Your Soul Drum Yet? HAND DRUMS, DRUM SETS, AND LESSONS FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES.

The Drum Shop 3070 28th St., Boulder 303-402-0122

We Provide 100% Compliant, Comprehensive MMJ Evaluations Which Include: – 30 Minute Office Visits – A Body Composition Analysis – Computer Stations to Complete the Online Application in Our Office – Follow-up Services for Further Questions About Treatment Plans

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3000 Center Green Drive, Suite 210, Boulder, CO 80301 | By Appointment Only M-F | Online Appointments Available at www.holoshealth.org or Call 720-273-3568

11 23 17 boulder weekly  
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