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F R E E E ve r y T h u r s d a y Fo r 2 5 Ye a r s / w w w. b o u l d e r w e e k l y. c o m / O c t o b e r 3 - 9 , 2 0 1 9

FENTANYL IN THE

FAMILY BY CHRIS FARAONE


news:

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boulderganic:

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Ben Westhoff ’s ‘Fentanyl, Inc.’ is the most frightening book of the year, and it’s mandatory reading by Chris Faraone

Volunteer naturalists spread enthusiasm, knowledge and love for Boulder County’s wild, open spaces by Will Brendza

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adventure:

David Roeske’s path to the summit of K2 without supplemental oxygen by Giselle Cesin

buzz:

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overtones:

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Immersive theater with Denver dance company Control Group by Amanda Moutinho

From birth to ‘Dépaysé’ with Sinkane’s Ahmed Gallab by Caitlin Rockett

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How Bee brought the taste of tom yum from Phayao to Lafayette by John Lehndorff

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The Anderson Files: Trump lives in the shadow of Watergate Guest Column: Immigrationspeak Letters: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views Arts & Culture: Ars Nova Singers, Stratus Chamber Orchestra present ‘Music that Connects’ Boulder County Events: What to do and where to go Words: ‘big night out’ by RD deWinter Film: ‘Judy’ and the loneliness of the one-sided affair Tasting Menu: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County Drink: Can’t make it to GABF? Go to your local taproom instead Astrology: by Rob Brezsny Savage Love: Bad guys Weed Between the Lines: Israel at the forefront of marijuana research Cannabis Corner: Bill would end financial aid ban for students with pot convictions

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Publisher, Fran Zankowski Editor, Joel Dyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Michael J. Casey Adventure Editor, Emma Athena Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama Founder/CEO, Stewart Sallo October 3, 2019 Volume XXVII, Number 7 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holds-barred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@ boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper. 690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

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welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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Trump lives in shadow of Watergate By Dave Anderson

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ecently, long-time investigative reporter Jefferson Morley authored an eye-opening piece in The New Republic entitled “Democrats Are Trapped in Trump’s ‘Deep State’ War.” He said we are facing a depressing question: “Whose side must be taken in a power struggle between a legion of professional liars and a consummate bullshit artist?” Even before he became president, Trump was at war with the “Deep State” when the U.S. intelligence community issued a report declaring I

that it had concluded that he received covert help from a foreign power. This declaration was a big shock but the intelligence community had a credibility problem. Morley focused on two of Trump’s critics on cable TV, James Clapper and John Brennan: “In March of 2013, then-Director of National Intelligence James Clapper told the Senate, falsely, that the NSA did not collect intelligence on hundreds of millions of Americans. Does that mean Clapper is wrong when he says Trump lives in OCTOBER 3, 2019

a ‘no-fact zone reality bubble?’ Not necessarily. “The CIA, under the directorship of John Brennan, fed false information about the agency’s torture program to the Senate Intelligence Committee investigators and, when the investigators discovered it was false, sought to charge them with a crime... Does that mean Brennan is right to say Trump’s talk of a CIA coup is ‘sociopathic rambling’? Not quite.” There is a difference between Trump and the spymasters. He lies constantly about everything while Clapper and Brennan “lie selectively” allegedly to protect the country. see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 6

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THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 5

Morley says this dispute masks a power struggle between Trump and a secret branch of the U.S. government with enormous powers. Trump wants to seize control of the national security apparatus for his personal benefit. This is very dangerous. From the beginning, he has attacked institutions that try to constrain him such as the press, the courts and Congress. He has brazenly said he wants to be a dictator. Some may think he’s joking but his actions indicate otherwise. This has happened before. Richard Nixon had similar ambitions. He wanted to have more control over the executive bureaucracy, crucially the intelligence community and the FBI. In 1970, White House aide Tom Charles Huston put together a domestic intelligence plan to coordinate the gathering of information about leftist radicals and the anti-war movement. The plan called for domestic burglary, illegal electronic surveillance and opening the mail of domestic leftists. At one point it also called for the creation of camps in Western states, where anti-war protesters would be detained. Nixon approved the proposals and they were submitted as a document to the directors of the FBI, CIA, DIA and NSA. FBI director J. Edgar Hoover was the only leader who opposed the plan, and he received the support of Attorney General John Mitchell to pressure Nixon to revoke the plan. However, several of the plan’s proposals were implemented. The public would learn of the Huston plan during the Senate Watergate hearings in 1973. Nixon established a“Plumbers Unit” to stop the leaking of classified information, but they mostly engaged in numerous “dirty tricks” to sabotage political opponents. The unit was established a week after the leaking of a secret scholarly Defense Department history of the Vietnam War called The Pentagon Papers. The whistleblower was Daniel Ellsberg. Their first task was a burglary of Ellsberg’s psychiatrist’s office. They were looking for material to discredit Ellsberg. Their crime spree ended in 1972 when they were caught burglarizing the Democratic Party headquarters in the Watergate complex. 6

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Historian Beverly Gage recently told The New Yorker that “Watergate did really produce a whole series of massive political reforms, many of which had to do with transparency and accountability in the executive branch, and some of those are playing a pretty dramatic role in what we have going on today in the intelligence committees...” The intelligence committees were only established after Watergate. The scandal inspired several Congressional investigations into illegal activities and abuse of the intelligence agencies, particularly the FBI and CIA. The abuses included domestic spying on Americans, harassment and disruption of dissident individuals and groups, infiltration and manipulation of media and business, assassination plots targeting foreign leaders, and human experimentation using drugs as part of a “mind control” program. Some of the findings led to the House Select Committee on Assassinations, which investigated the murders of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. Congress created permanent intelligence oversight committees in both the Senate and House. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court was established, which is a tribunal that reviews requests from law enforcement and intelligence agencies seeking permission to undertake wiretap surveillance on any “foreign power or an agent of a foreign power” within the U.S. The national security elite would pushback. There was the huge IranContra conspiracy in the 1980s which undermined Congress and was organized by CIA officials. After 9/11, we’ve had endless wars and an overdose of militarist bombast. Today we should oppose rising authoritarianism here and abroad. We shouldn’t go to war with Russia but we have to deal with their cyberwarfare and disinformation campaigns in this country and in Europe. We can’t return to the pre-Trump world. We need a foreign policy that empowers ordinary Americans, not multinational corporations. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. OCTOBER 3, 2019

Immigrationspeak by Andrew Moss

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hether or not Donald Trump continues in office in the near future, he has already contributed to a language of immigration that’s both larger than him and that will outlast him. The language is spoken by members of the Trump administration and its allies in the media and in restrictionist think tanks. Grounded in a narrative of threat from within and without, it’s a language that sanctions and rationalizes violence against immigrants. For convenience’s sake, I’ll call it “immigrationspeak.” Immigrationspeak ranges in register from the inflammatory to the cool. Inflammatory language has been central to Trump’s rhetoric since the day he announced his candidacy, declaring that Mexico is “sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” Since then he has continued to frame an incendiary narrative of menace, tweeting on several occasions that caravans of Central American migrants constituted “invasions” of the U.S. border. Trump isn’t the only one to contribute significantly to a narrative of menace. Often in the cooler language of policy analysis, think tanks like the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) and

NumbersUSA have been depicting a wide range of threats — to the environment, to Americans’ jobs and safety, to the economy in general — that can only be countered by substantial restrictions on immigration. By itself, a narrative of threat won’t advance an immigration agenda as ambitious as this administration’s. Immigrationspeak requires a veneer of legality, a vocabulary of criminalization, to move its agenda forward. Within five days of Trump’s inauguration, the White House issued an executive order, “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States,” that rescinded Obama-era enforcement priorities focusing principally on undocumented persons who committed violent crimes. By removing these priorities, the Trump administration widened the net of potential enforcement to all of the 10.7 million people living in the U.S. without documentation. How to label these persons? “Removable aliens.” Lest there was any ambiguity about the change, the then-Acting Director of ICE, Thomas D. Homan, stated at a hearing in Washington D.C., “If you’re in this country illegally, and you committed a crime by entering this country, you should be uncomfortable. You should look over your shoulder.” Soon after the issuance of the executive order, the administration began sweeping people

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I noticed the brief letter to the editor commenting on tax fairness and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). (Re: “Whose side are candidates and elected officials on,” Letters, Sept. 26, 2019). The richest 1% of Americans own a whopping 40% of total household wealth. 83% of the 2017 tax cuts are going to the top 1%, making our wealth divide much worse. Economies depend on consumer spending and that spending comes mostly from the bottom 90%. The Working Families Tax Relief Act would help the uneven path we’re on, by expanding the EITC and Child Tax Credit. Forty-four million U.S. families would benefit and lift 11 million children above the poverty line. In Colorado, 1,821,000 individuals, including 781,000 kids would benefit. We need the Working Families Tax

Relief Act in any upcoming tax legislation. Donna Munro/via internet

Greta and the Pope

There is a comity of message in Pope Francis’ call for a compassionate Christianity and Greta Thunberg’s campaign for action addressing climate change, a message of caring for the Earth and one another, present and future. The Pope has said he welcomes criticism from Conservative America, and Greta sees the negative attention paid her as confirmation of the fear she and her message create in the world powers currently sitting idly by. Speaking truth to power is powerful indeed. Robert Porath/Boulder

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President Trump’s spin on his Ukraine scandal is cartoonish, his see LETTERS Page 9

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up in ICE raids: a restaurant worker and father of four, an evangelical Guatemalan minister, a student activist. These were people I knew, or came to know, in my own community in Los Angeles. Similar apprehensions were occurring all over the country. But interior enforcement is just one part of a vast picture, and legalistic language just one instrument in the immigrationspeak toolbox. Falsehood, denial and a faux humanitarianism play significant roles too, particularly in advancing a policy of aggressive deterrence at the border. When the administration provoked outrage last year by separating migrant children from their parents, by incarcerating children in cages, and by denying them basic necessities like soap, toothbrushes or beds, administrative spokespersons like former Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen argued that the children were being used by smugglers and traffickers to get into the country illegally. As she attempted to explain, “We are trying to protect the children, which is why I’m asking Congress to act. We are a country of compassion. We are a country of heart.” As these tools haven’t succeeded in quelling outrage, the administration has turned to other devices. I

Silence and secrecy also play their role as when journalists and other observers are denied access to the new “tent courts” set up at the border to expedite hearings for asylum seekers stuck in Mexico under the administration’s controversial “Remain in Mexico” policy. Fences, locked gates and barbed wire also constitute a language of their own. One can only assume that the current administration would like to see immigrationspeak become a lingua franca: a common way of speaking, thinking and writing about immigration. But America remains a stubbornly multilingual nation. Dialects of defiance and resistance haven’t been suppressed. I recently attended an immigration rights rally in Los Angeles, where a young woman, one of the organizers of the event, got up and said: “I may not be able to vote, but that won’t stop me from getting out the vote. I am undocumented, but that won’t stop me from continuing to speak out and organize.” Andrew Moss, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is an emeritus professor (English, Nonviolence Studies) at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. BOULDER WEEKLY


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argument that’s he’s done nothing of substance wrong (“for that?!”), childish and immature. A president asking for personal favors, financial or political, from another nation in a quid pro quo manner is what the Constitution calls an impeachable “high crime”; it’s a kind of treason since it betrays the national trust. It’s what precipitated the Mueller investigation. Shortly after the Mueller Report was “released” (and covered up), Trump publicly announced he’d accept help from a foreign nation in the upcoming 2020 election. People were rightly amazed, and the FBI Director Wray issued a statement warning candidates that such activity was illegal. Apparently, Trump just didn’t get it — and still doesn’t. According to the New York Times, the White House has a “listening room” where top officials with clearance listen into a President’s conversations with foreign leaders. Almost two dozen officials, including Secretary of State Pompeo, listened in on Trump’s July 25 conversation with Ukrainian president Zelensky. Here, then, are Trump’s alleged “spies.” Apparently, several were stunned by the clearly illegal nature of the conversation, and not one, but several, approached an appropriate government official with their concerns. That official, in turn, determined those concerns had enough merit to require investigation and officially filed the complaint as a secondary source; thus, simply by doing his or her legitimate job, that official became the “traitor!” Trump wants to meet face to face and have executed. Of course, intimidating witnesses is illegal Mafiosi-like behavior that’s still further cause for impeachment. But won’t Senate Republicans dismiss impeachment out of hand? The Hill reports that “GOP strategist Mike Murphy last week said on MSNBC that a Republican senator had told him that as many as 30 GOP senators would vote to impeach President Trump if it were a secret ballot.” Senator Mitt Romney is leaning towards impeachment; Murphy adds that Senate Republicans now fear staying blindly loyal Trump could lose them seats in at least four

states, including Colorado. With a CBS News poll showing 55 percent of Americans now supporting impeachment and that number growing daily, don’t assume the Senate and its Republicans are a dead end. Also, impeachment needs to target Mike Pence. Trump sent him to Vienna to meet with a Ukrainian official as part of Trump’s scheme; so, he’s in the loop and implicated too. Paul Dougan/Boulder

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In the third primary debate, Cory Booker was asked, “You are a vegan since 2014 ... should people follow your diet?” As a vegan Cory Booker gave the worst possible response to this unexpected question. He said “no” and repeated the translation in Spanish as a joke, “No.” He could have said it would help the climate if everyone made changes towards a plant based diet since deforestation for cattle grazing is the number one reason for the Amazon rainforest fires going on for the past month. He could have said that would make a huge impact on our health care system and costs, since the majority of our chronic diseases are related to diet, specifically cardiovascular disease which is the number 1 killer of Americans. He could have said that would be great but I do not plan to legislate people’s diets. Why did Cory Booker fumble this question? Maybe he lacks the courage to lead on this and a number of other issues. It’s fantastic that veganism was finally discussed during a presidential debate. Whether or not you want to believe it, the Amazon is burning because of hamburgers. Also, a half pound of beef causes as much greenhouse gas to be emitted as driving 55 cars for one mile. We all marched in the Global Climate March, inspired by Greta Thunberg’s school strike for climate. Greta is vegan, too. Yes, just 100 companies are responsible for 71% of greenhouse gas emissions and we demand change at the top but we can also stop consuming their products to create change. We can end their profits. Please be a conscious consumer and don’t eat animals. Joshua Smith/Boulder

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B

oulder County is far from immune to the national opioid epidemic. Whether it’s high-profile overdose deaths, like that of Eric Chase Bolling Jr., a 19-year-old CU student and son of former Fox News personality Eric Bolling in 2017, or the 33 arrests connected to suspected opioid trafficking, like the one in Longmont in July 2019, the reality of the crisis is never far away. In late 2017, President Donald Trump declared it a national health emergency, as the rate of overdose deaths nationwide increased 45% between 2016 and 2017 according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2017 alone, 1,012 Coloradans died due to drug overdose, 57% of which involved an opioid as reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment. In Boulder County, 191 residents have died of an opioid overdose, either from prescription drugs or heroin, since 2010, which has led public health officials and law enforcement to pour increasing resources into fixing the problem. As the story below describes, at the center of the crisis is the increase of synthetic opioids like fentanyl, which can be 50 times as potent as heroin. “It’s an incredibly dangerous drug,” says Boulder County District Attorney Michael Dougherty. “It’s cheap to manufacture and easier to distribute because it’s harder to crack and detect. It’s also more difficult for people using the drug to understand or to know what

they’re putting in their bodies.” Boulder County is combating the crisis on two fronts, he says, first targeting the distribution of such drugs within the community and also focusing on substance abuse treatment and prevention. In July, local law enforcement — with the help of the Drug Enforcement Agency — seized 1,472 counterfeit fentanyl pills in Longmont, along with other prescription drugs and methampetamine, and made 33 arrests. Although the case is still pending, Dougherty says his office is prioritizing such distribution cases. On the other end, the DA supports Colorado’s defelonization of drug possession (see “High county defelonization,” Sept. 5) in an effort to divert people from the criminal justice system into treatment. Dougherty also correlates an increase in property crimes with increasing drug offenses, “because they’re trying to feed the addiction,” he says. He also believes more resources are needed within the community to keep people from touching the criminal justice system in the first place. “Whether we address this addiction and take it head on because we’re compassionate and we want to help our fellow community members or we do it because we want to make sure that the crime rate doesn’t continue to rise,” he says, “either way, we need to give this all our energy and resources in Boulder County.” —Angela K. Evans

Fentanyl in the family F Ben Westhoff’s dive into the ‘deadliest wave of the opioid epidemic’ is the most frightening book of the year, and it’s mandatory reading

by Chris Farone 10

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irst a spoiler alert: Among the multiple apocalyptic revelations in Ben Westhoff ’s book, Fentanyl, Inc.: How Rogue Chemists Are Creating the Deadliest Wave of the Opioid Epidemic, is sour news for all hard drug users, from casual weekend abusers to full-time cocaine cowboys. In light of developments presented in this epic book in gruesome and unprecedented fashion, putting questionable substances up your nose, in your veins, or even on your tongue is highly discouraged from here on in. “Any drug where it’s a powder or a pill, you just can’t trust it,” Westhoff said in an interview about his latest project. “There can be fentanyl in anything … [Home drug-testing kits] are getting very sophisticated, and there are websites you can consult, but in terms of going to a party and someone offering you some blow or something like that, it’s over.” Of course, many will not see this book or heed such warnings, and in tens of thousands of cases this year will steer directly off a cliff. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “among the more than 70,200 drug overdose deaths estimated in 2017, the sharpest increase occurred among deaths related to fentanyl and fentanyl analogs (other synthetic narcotics) with more than 28,400 overdose deaths.” I

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


When he started this endeavor nearly four author nevertheless said some of his sources “were years ago, Westhoff couldn’t have imagined those dealing [the extremely dangerous carfentanil] and statistics. Fentanyl showed up and kicked the hing- breaking it up with their bare hands.” es off a prior psychedelic focus that turns up in “This stuff is so new that there isn’t much trace amounts throughout the book but that is agreement — there’s not even agreement about overshadowed by the eponymous grim reaper. how to pronounce the word fentanyl. Half the Quoting a CDC report, Westhoff notes, “in 2013 country says, ‘fenta-nall’; the other half says, ‘fenthe ‘third wave’ of the opioid epidemic began.” ta-nil.’ But nobody knows. It’s like a black box … a And “because of fentanyl, it is the most deadly one lack of information.” yet.” Focusing on urban Missouri in one especially As for the innumerable analogues available harrowing chapter, he reports: “In 2012, St. Louis online and maybe at your local McDonalds, saw 92 opioid-related deaths, a number PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION that rose to 123 in 2013 and up to 256 in 2017.” “Fentanyl completely changed the game,” one character, a former jam band road dog who jumped from newfangled hallucinogens into the far more dangerous opioid scene, told Westhoff. Beyond the numbers, which are ugly but far from reliable in this nascent abusive honeymoon phase of the crisis, this is a story about people, and Fentanyl, Inc. features a roster of villains and victims who stray far from movie archetypes. From fast and furious nerdy bros brewing up alphabet soup in bunkers underneath the desert, to 20-something call center employees who peddle poison by phone from the back offices of semilegal chemistry labs in China, their stories follow a theme reflected in all of Westhoff ’s vignettes: Everything you think you know about drugs has changed. Even the people packing, slinging, sniffing and filling their vaults thanks to this garbage don’t know the half. Or the wrath. They mostly only care Westhoff said, “It evolves too quickly for people to about the math. even come up with a clever name for [new drug “A lot of drug dealing comes from people who incarnations]. … People don’t even realize what have addictions of their own,” Westhoff said. they’re taking — whether it’s heroin, or pills, or “Painting the dark web or these people with a cocaine, or whatever.” broad brush isn’t a good idea, because everyone has In his quest to source answers to new widetheir own philosophies. A lot of people are in it for open questions, Westhoff “consulted politicians, harm reduction; there’s a legitimate case to be police, DEA agents and international drug policy made for getting a lot of these psychedelics and makers, who would like to put these traffickers other potential medicines out to people they can away forever,” as well as “counselors, doctors, activpotentially help. And then it gets a little harder ists and policy wonks, some of whom believe these when you get this guy who is selling nasal spray drugs should be legal.” He even “corresponded with with fentanyl analogues and saying that he’s helptwo infamous, now-imprisoned LSD kingpins who ing opioid addicts maintain their addictions in a worked together out of an abandoned missile silo more affordable way.” in Kansas.” Westhoff, a relatively early explorer into the “The demise of their operation in 2000,” he unknowns of these notorious intoxicants, stresses writes, “may have inadvertently fueled the rise of a the lack of common facts and figures in this postnew hallucinogen whose effects are far worse than medicine chest Wild West. “They used to say that LSD.” touching fentanyl can make you overdose,” he said. You may be wondering, is this one of those stoUnsure of the verdict on the epidermal threat, the ries about a real Walter White? You could say that, BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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but there are thousands of them, wearing different hats on multiple continents, dealing on the web and in your backyard. Fentanyl, Inc. is like Breaking Bad, sure… meets Night of the Living Dead meets New Jack City, Gummo, Kids, and Gremlins. With a cast from a lot of the places on President Donald Trump’s shithole list. As one candid former U.S. State Department special agent explains: “Fentanyl can be produced anywhere a laboratory can be set up, such as a warehouse in an industrial park, a home in a residential area or a clandestine lab in the mountains.” For Westhoff, the first taste of disaster came nearly a decade ago, in Los Angeles. He writes: In 2010, fifteen-year-old Sasha Rodriguez fatally overdosed at Electric Daisy Carnival at the LA Coliseum, reportedly from ecstasy. Local politicians revolted, and the event was forced to relocate to Las Vegas. A Plymouth State University student named Brittany Flannigan overdosed and died in late August 2013 after attending a Boston EDM concert featuring the popular DJ Zedd, and just days later a University of Virginia student named Mary “Shelley” Goldsmith passed away as well. Both were nineteen, and reports said they had taken “Molly.” “I had a friend who died from multiple fentanyl patches a while back, before I even knew what fentanyl was,” Westoff said. “My way in was through the rave scene in LA when I was the LA Weekly’s music editor. I had gone to raves a lot back in the day, and ecstasy was pure MDMA, and people weren’t dying. … But at these raves, someone, if not multiple people, were dying at every one. I wanted to investigate that, and I found out about all of these ecstasy substitutes and learned that there were all these new drugs coming out of China. But then all that stuff was really just the tip of the iceberg, because by 2016 fentanyl was much worse than all of the others by far. So it’s a completely different project than I envisioned.” Westhoff includes ample relevant history — from when “one could buy opium from the Sears, Roebuck catalog”; to a Boston dealer who unknowingly tipped off the DEA in 1992 about the nation’s first known leading source of black market fentanyl; and back to the industrial revolution and addiction in the United Kingdom, and how that nation attempted “to balance its trade deficit by see FENTANYL Page 12

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FENTANYL from Page 11

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using its British East India Company to ply opium in tremendous quantities to the Chinese, causing a pair of wars.” The latter is especially critical background, as fentanyl and other new drugs have not caught on in China, spurring many to think revenge is why China has been so lax about its laws and exports. “In May [China] blanket-banned all fentanyl analogues, which has been proven to be effective,” Westhoff said. “When China actually bans stuff it has an effect. At the same time, there’s all these loopholes. China is shipping the fentanyl precursors by the boatload to Mexico, and they’re getting [government] incentives for it. … It’s a huge sprawling bureaucracy — there’s not this one person who has a plan and is manipulating everything. It’s just capitalism gone awry. On the other hand, how could they not know what they’re doing?” In the words of one of Wethoff ’s Chinese sources, a less-than-clandestine manufacturer: “We are afraid that a reporter will come to our lab, to our country, to find out why we synthesize these chemicals, or why we sell these chemicals to your country. To let your people’s health down. To harm your country’s people.” There is plenty of blame to go around. Some fingers can be pointed at figures like former presidents of the United States, including but by no means limited to Barack Obama, whose 2012 Synthetic Drug Abuse OCTOBER 3, 2019

Prevention Act outlawed multiple kinds of synthetic cannabinoids, but which Wired magazine cracked, “was obsolete before the ink of his signature dried” thanks to “the speed of innovation in drug culture.” More generally speaking, the culprit is every rank and file Greatest Generation prohibitionist who ignorantly warned us that our drugs could be laced with something deadly long before that was a thing that really happened. Other formerly contrived tropes about the horrors of drugs have also become real, like the one in which dealers walk around offering complimentary samples to teens. As one young woman from the Rust Belt told the author about a strip that doubles as a literal trap in her town: “They’ll come up to anybody who’s parking, getting gas, even getting cigarettes. They’ll drive up to you and ask if you mess around. They give it to you for free... There’s one condition, however,” Westhoff writes. “You must have a working cell phone and give them your number.” Of course all of the yellow bricks lead back to governments, complicit politicians, all those gratuitous checkboxes. Those pining for the halcyon days when it seemingly couldn’t get worse than regionally concentrated crack, meth and heroin scourges may take aim at lazy and misguided attempts to throw a wrench in the cycle of supply and addiction, like

with the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005. After that law limited the amount of drug store staples like Sudafed that you could buy and subsequently harvest to manufacture methamphetamine in your barn, Mexican cartels stepped in to fill the gaps, and we all know how that’s turned out. To learn more about the source of so much mayhem, Westhoff “infiltrated a pair of Chinese drug operations, one a sophisticated laboratory operation distilling outsize quantities of the world’s most dangerous chemicals in industrial-size glassware, and the other an office of young, cheery salespeople, who sat in rows of cubicles and sold fentanyl ingredients to American dealers and Mexican cartels.” After demasking wizards in China and possibly learning more than any other American civilian has to date about the mechanics of that country’s fentanyl trade, Westhoff came to understand that the problem is bigger than the F-word and its awful analogues. There are countless oddball drugs available on the black market. Take U-47700, for example; “originally created in the mid-1970s as a morphine alternative, it never received FDA approval.” Nevertheless, for one of Westhoff ’s sources and who knows how many others, U-47700 “was like an ‘antidepressant,’” making them feel “whole, confident, and happy, very little stress.” Also of note is that fake weed

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


can kill you. “Even today,” writes Westhoff, “synthetic cannabinoids remain the fastest growing class of drugs … Some are twice as potent as marijuana; some are one hundred times as potent or more. And there is little formal testing, almost nobody knows how safe each blend is, not even the scientists who invented them.” The good news keeps on coming. “Even more disturbingly,” the author reports, “fentanyl began to be being pressed into pills that look exactly like name-brand prescription tablets. Raids across the United States have turned up operations in houses and apartments that turn fentanyl powder into tablets using specialized presses. Both the drugs and the machines are bought from China. These operations can make thousands of pills per hour. They stamp pills with the OxyContin or Percocet logo, and they’re indistinguishable … The dosages of these fake pills vary greatly. One might have ten times as much fentanyl as the next. Investigators believe such counterfeit pills were responsible for the death of music star Prince; about one hundred white pills found on his property looked exactly like Vicodin but actually contained fentanyl.” From Paisley Park to the park behind your apartment, no place seems to be immune. “When you think of the opioid epidemic, you think of a lot of white, middle class people,” Westhoff said. “That certainly has been a big part of it, but there’s always been a huge African American population using heroin, and now that fentanyl is in the mix it’s causing massive casualties in places like LA and Chicago. This is not a death sentence for just one demographic. Just when the prescription pill deaths were finally falling, and just when the heroin deaths were finally falling, the deaths from fentanyl are going way up. And prescription pills are still abused at a very high rate, so if fentanyl really starts getting cut into pills, then this thing can balloon even worse than it already is. “It just seems like with each drug epidemic, things keep getting worse.” Toward the end of Fentanyl, Inc., Westhoff points to some solutions. “The crack epidemic, the meth epidemic — keep in mind people were blaming the user back then, so thankfully we’re moving beyond that.” He also supports harm reduction strategies like supervised injecBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

tion facilities, which he argues “is really just a no-brainer.” “We know from the failure of the War on Drugs that focusing on the supply side is not going to work,” Westhoff said. “Killing a drug kingpin from Colombia or capturing El Chapo doesn’t do anything — the drug supply is just getting worse. The drugs will find a way to get here, drug users will find a way to get their drugs, and all we can do is focus on the demand side.” The shifting goal posts make the

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problem nearly impossible to smother; still, the author hopes his contribution can play an important role in navigating us out of this state of emergency. “The inventor of fentanyl, Paul Janssen, there’s literally nothing written about him, and so I wanted to tell his story and that of the other people who brought these drugs to life. No one did it on purpose really — these are all drugs taken from scientific literature. “I tried to have it not just be

OCTOBER 3, 2019

about statistics, but about bigger trends. Even when this information is out of date, I think people are going to want to look back on how this fentanyl crisis got off the ground.” Chris Faraone is the editor-in-chief of DigBoston and the editorial director of the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism. This article was produced in collaboration with BINJ as part of its Film Intervening Getting High Team (F.I.G.H.T.) initiative. For more information and coverage of the epidemic visit binjonline.org.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


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ue Cass is a Boulder birder with a keen interest in raptors, a master gardener with an encyclopedic knowledge of the area’s wildflowers, trees and foliage, and the matriarch of a sixthgeneration Boulder Valley family. So, when she enrolled in the 10-week Boulder County Parks and Open Space (BCPOS) volunteer naturalist training, she remembers thinking (perhaps a little smugly, she admits) that she wasn’t going to learn much that she didn’t already know from her nearly 40 years in Boulder County. COURTESY OF SUE CASS “Boy was I wrong!” she says — it was one of the best learning experiences of her life. That was in 2001, and the learning has continued ever since. “Never in my wildest dreams had I imagined it would consume my life the way it has,” Cass says. “It’s been an extraordinary experience with extraordinary people.” Volunteer naturalists, like Cass, provide hands-on environmental field experiences, leading hikes in County parks and presenting natural history slide shows for both students from Boulder County schools and the public. Volunteers pick and choose which programs they want to host, selecting from myriad different opportunities: from leading insects and tracking courses at Walden Ponds, to foothills ecology hikes at Heil Valley Ranch, the “Story in the Rocks” hike near Lyons and wetland wildlife courses. One of Cass’ most memorable BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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experiences happened early in her time as a volunteer naturalist, while she was leading a group of English as a Second Language (ESL) students at Heil Valley Ranch. At the end of a wildlife presentation and hike, a student told Cass that her birthday was coming up. “Her grandmother was taking her to Chuck E. Cheese to celebrate,” Cass says. “But she said she didn’t want to go to Chuck E. Cheese, instead she wanted to come to Heil Valley Ranch Open Space to spend time in nature. “The seed we hope to plant every time we introduce young children to the wonders of the natural world had taken root.” Cass was elated, and she was hooked on volunteerism. She’s been running naturalist programs ever since, volunteering up to five times a month. Besides leading hikes for school kids, Cass also enjoys using “the amazing BCPOS ‘Living Map’ in the classroom,” she says. She’s referring to a big visual resource for the naturalist programs that allows volunteers to illustrate the different geographic features of the County — the drainages, the mountains, valleys and foothills of the area. It’s a 3D tool to show students where different life zones are located and help hone their mapreading skills. Naturally, as a lifelong birder, some of Cass’ favorite programs to lead are the raptor tours. When she first became a volunteer, Cass says I

that longtime volunteer and naturalist Jim McKee took her under his wing and got her deeply interested in Boulder’s birds of prey. He shared with her everything he knew, and today her passion for these birds is inextinguishable. “It was one of the greatest gifts I ever received,” she says. Now, she trains new volunteers on raptor identification and ecology. “Our birds of prey are extraordinary creatures.” Sharing knowledge and passion is common among BCPOS volunteer naturalists, according to Cass. Most of the people who sign up have a deep interest in some aspect of nature, and have a huge base of knowledge to tap into. “We all share freely and openly what we know with other volunteer naturalists,” Cass says. “Extraordinary friendships are developed... I call it my second family.” The call for BCPOS volunteer naturalists is currently open. Anyone interested in following in the footsteps of other naturalists like Cass, and sharing their enthusiasm and passion for nature with others, can now apply for 2020 on the BCPOS website. Prospective volunteer naturalists must complete a 10-week training course, which meets once a week, for a full day, to learn about BCPOS’ “history, mission and resource management; geology; plants and ecosystems; forestry; wildlife and birds; agricultural lands and weed management; water resources; and interpretive programming and resources.” It’s kind of an intense training, Cass admits. But it’s well worth the time and effort, she says. “If you want to learn more about this Valley and Boulder County, it’s absolutely one of the best things you can do.” OCTOBER 3, 2019

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


PHOTOS COURTESY HIMALI

From sea to peak

holiday hike ended with a serendipitous encounter. On the trail, Roeske and his dad met a climber who’d just bailed from a technical climb on Longs Peak. Their conversation led to the climber’s tales about many Himalayan adventures, and while hiking back down to the car, Roeske couldn’t shake the thought of those big, otherworldly mountains. Would he ever be capable of doing something like that? Later that night, back at his childhood home, he found two old postcards he’d collected as a teenager, one of Everest and the other of K2. It felt like a sign. Shortly after, Roeske came back to Colorado and hired a guide to take him up the Notch Couloir, a technical climb on Longs Peak. Even though Roeske didn’t have a climbing background, he was an avid runner with an impressive personal sub-2 hour-35minute marathon. The guide, impressed with Roeske’s fitness and ability to summit a difficult route in the winter, told him the Notch Couloir was 10 times harder (technically speaking) than Everest. That was the exact confidence boost Roeske needed to sign up for an Everest expedition, via the Tibetan side. That spring, Roeske stood at the highest point on Earth. He’d reached the summit only 20 days after arriving at Base Camp (the average climber takes six to eight weeks to acclimate for a summit push), and Roeske only used supplemental oxygen for the last

David Roeske’s path to the summit of K2 without supplemental oxygen

By Giselle Cesin

T

he mountain known as K2 is also known as “Savage Mountain.” Its sheer, jagged slopes rise from Pakistan’s Karakoram Valley floor and culminate in the second-highest peak in the world: 28,251 feet above seal level. Ascending the mountain’s layers of ice, snow and rock requires a technical expertise and altitude acclimatization known only to a small sliver of people on Earth. In the years before 2014, most who tried didn’t make it to the summit, and one in 10 climbers died during their attempt. Those were the conditions under which David Roeske started dreaming of summiting K2. He knew the dangers. He imagined a demanding, intimidating Himalayan adventure. And still, he wanted to go — he wanted to close a chapter of his life that’d opened on Christmas Eve, at the Longs Peak trailhead, in 2012. Roeske, born and raised in Colorado, had moved to New York City in 2007. In December 2012 he’d returned to the mountains to visit his family, and he went hiking with his dad to Chasm Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park. What started as a normal BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 3, 2019

DAN ROESKE has 500 meters. Considering he’d climbed many of the never been higher than world’s tallest peaks Longs Peak, it indicated that without supplemental oxygen. his physiology, somehow, was primed for high altitudes. Though Roeske described his first Everest climb as a “wonderful experience,” he went home to NYC wanting more. The idea of trying Everest again without any supplemental oxygen lingered in the back of his mind. Only a small percentage of climbers ever reach the summit of an 8,000-meter peak without it, and for many mountaineers, it’s the ultimate accomplishment. As the months went on, Roeske kept running marathons. He entered city skyscraper races, pounding up the Empire State Building’s stairs. He frequently visited Colorado to climb and he sumitted Mt. Denali in Alaska, North America’s highest peak. Once Roeske decided to return to Everest, he hired Scott Johnston, a renowned alpinism coach originally from Boulder. Roeske trained with Johnston’s guidance to become as fit as possible. “Living in New York, it’s not like you can climb a 14er over the weekend,” Roeske says. “I would climb the stairs of my 40-story building with a heavy pack and take the elevator down. My record was 10,000 vertical feet.” On May 23, 2016, Roeske stood on the summit of Everest for the second time. But that wasn’t all. see ROESKE Page 18

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ROESKE from Page 17

That year he also tackled Cho Oyu, the sixth-highest mountain in the world at 26,906 feet, becoming the first person coming to climb Everest and another Himalayan 8,000-meter peak in the same season without supplemental oxygen and coming from sea level. “After a successful season in the Himalayas in 2016, I was nothing but grateful,” Roeske says. “Having the confidence of two back-to-back summits, K2 seemed the natural progression, a more technical and beautiful mountain.” He wanted to see how far he could go, motivated not by ego, but by curiosity. In the summer of 2018, Roeske left for the Pakistani Himalayas alongside his climbing partner, Frederick Sträng, with two big objectives: Broad Peak, the 12th highest mountain in the world, and K2. While getting ready for their Broad Peak summit push (26,414 feet) at Camp 3, an unexpected call changed their plans. Instead of going for the summit, they went to rescue Rick Allen, a climber presumed dead after failing to return to camp. “A cook in base camp happened to be looking through a telescope and saw the missing climber, then other people flew a drone up and found him alone and off route,” Roeske recalls. He and Sträng immediately took off to help, finding Allen alive with only minor injuries. But the rescue lasted about five hours and drained all the energy Roeske and Sträng needed for their summit push. They decided to climb down to base camp to recover and try the summit a few days later. Though they eventually summited Broad Peak, it delayed them a week. The 2018 season on K2 was a good one. The development of commercial climbing, fixed gear on-route and strokes of good weather had improved the peak’s notoriously low success rates and reduced the objective danger on “Savage Mountain.” The number of successful summits swelled to a recordbreaking 60, plus a Polish mountaineer skied down the peak for the first time. Roeske and Sträng arrived late to the party, however, and only made it to 7,000 meters before encountering all the summiteers heading down. They’d missed the good weather window and were forced to turn back home. Back in NYC, Roeske already knew he wanted to try K2 again. His finance firm approved no more than 25 days off work, and Roeske decided that would

be enough to reach the summit. Typically climbers take 60 days. On July 25, 2019, without the use of supplemental oxygen, Roeske reached K2’s summit only 22 days after leaving NYC. The road toward the summit was not drama-free. Roeske had joined the commercial expedition team Furtenbach Adventures, and after a summit attempt on July 18, Roeske realized he was not yet fully acclimatized and had to turn back. There was also particularly deep snow, susceptible to avalanches, hanging above a critical section known as “the Bottleneck,” which caused most of the commercial expeditions on the mountain to reconsider their climbs. While Roeske’s team packed up base camp and left, he stayed. He wouldn’t leave without giving it another try and managed to change climbing teams for his final, successful push to stand on the second-highest point in the world, breathing only the thin air available to him in that hostile, savage landscape. “It was a ridiculously short period of time. I went from the summit straight to base camp and then took a helicopter out to catch a flight home,” Roeske says. “I also used a helicopter to avoid the one-week trek to base camp. This is embarrassing to me because I don’t feel like I had to do that, but it was the only way to make it happen with work.” Among alpinism’s elite, the strongest and fastest take into account alpine style, consisting of climbing without supplemental oxygen, without fixed ropes and with no assistance from porters or sherpas. Roeske doesn’t have a problem with the fact that he has used porters and climbing sherpas as partners and took help from fixed ropes. “There are definitely better ways to climb, but for me, not being a professional climber it’s an unreasonable risk,” he says. Even though Roeske belongs to an elite group of athletes who can both run marathons on asphalt and ascend into the icy-thin air at the top of the world, he doesn’t want to be known only for his fitness. He wants to be known as someone who wasn’t an athlete in college, who didn’t learn to climb until a few months before attempting to summit Everest, and who had a stroke of inspiration plus the freedom to put in the hard work to reach the summits of the world’s highest peaks. “I want people to think that if I did it, maybe they can do it too,” he says.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


PHOTOS BY NICHOLAS CAPUTO/CONTROL GROUP PRODUCTIONS

ty, transcendence, sublimation,” the voice said. “And to the degree that it does become a receptacle for fear, that makes it intrinsically a place of hope. That’s really what we’re here for, not to trigger fear or encourage morbidity or incriminate our own mortality, but to conjure hope. To shift our relationship with darkness and death.” The words resonated immediately. I relaxed into the darkness, letting my fear evolve into receptivity. The moment of vulnerability stayed with me after the production ended. I left contemplating the themes presented in the show with a closeness and depth — instead of watching them take place from afar, I had intimately engaged with them. The hand treatment scene is one of many from Control Group’s performance of Aggregate Immateriality. For more than a decade, the company has used theater and dance to go beyond storytelling and provide an emotion-centered, sensory experience. The group invites audiences into worlds that blur the line between performer and viewer, gently involving the crowd in the world they create. Their newest production, Cutting Room Floor, opens Oct. 17 at the Aurora Fox Arts Center. Early on, Control Group founder Patrick Mueller knew he wanted to be an artist. Born and raised in Colorado, he started in theater, but a dance class in college awakened him to the power of dance as an artform. He connected with its ability to convey an idea in an abstract way that evoked more emotion than logic. “Acting always felt a little bit like playing,” Mueller

To be transformed

Immersive theater with Denver dance company Control Group

by Amanda Moutinho

A

s an avid theater lover, I’m always excited to try a new experience. Last spring, I was intrigued when a friend invited me to an immersive theater production about fear, death and darkness that was taking place in an abandoned slaughterhouse. I had no idea what to expect. Soon after the production began, our group stood awkwardly waiting for instructions when a cast member approached me with a wheelchair and asked me to take a seat. She handed me a blindfold and said I could put it on if I wanted. Always a willing theater participant, I tied on the blindfold and let a stranger wheel me away. I knew I was safe, but I felt a visceral fear — fear of the unknown, of being encased in darkness alone, not knowing what was going to happen next. When the chair stopped, someone took my hands and exfoliated them, massaged them with fragrant oil, and wiped it all off with a hot towel. Then I was whisked off to another room where an enigmatic voice spoke. “So often darkness gets conjoined with fear, but it can also be a place of refuge, comfort, ecstasy, hilariBOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 3, 2019

says. “I think it can arrive to a ON THE BILL: Cutting Room Floor — presented rich level of reality, but it starts by Control Group with a premise of pretend and Productions. Aurora Fox fakeness. Dance felt real.” Arts Center, 9900 E. Colfax Ave., Aurora, 303He went on to work for 739-1970, controlgroupdance companies and tour productions.org. Europe. When Mueller returned to Colorado in 2008, he started Control Group Productions as a way to offer a different approach. His vision of performance art blends dance, acting, visual design, installation and more to disrupt the standard theatrical model. “We did a few where it was like audience on one side and the performers on stage,” Mueller says. “But we were immediately interested in things that were outside the realm of standard technique. Dance that doesn’t necessarily look like dance, and dance that doesn’t always happen like dance. It’s so different to watch a moving body 5 feet or 5 inches away from you verses 100 or 500 feet away from you on some opera house stage.” When they felt they had done all they could do within a theater setting, Mueller and company realized there were many other sites they could take advantage of. For one production, they bused the audience around the city and performed at different locales; for another, they led a walking tour around Denver; Mueller even put on a production in his own two-car garage. In 2016, Mueller was cast in the Denver Center’s production of Sweet & Lucky. Created by Third Rail Projects, Sweet & Lucky was an immersive theater see CONTROL GROUP Page 22

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CONTROL GROUP from Page 21

experience that took place in a warehouse and explored memory, relationship and time. The big-budget production was a pivotal moment for Mueller. Sweet & Lucky featured a graveyard where it rained on the audience, a functioning watering hole, and an 800-square-foot house. But Sweet & Lucky offered more than immersive sets. Intimate moments enveloped the audience, like a scene where an elderly woman tries to conjure memories and reaches out to audience members, asking if they’re her grandchildren. The work made sense to Mueller. He felt like he had come home. “Just seeing how much deeper you could go with an audience member and a group of audience members when you talk to them and treat them as humans, when you give them agency in the experience, when it’s interactive — it’s intimacy you don’t see in a public event,” he says. “There’s something really resonant in that.” Control Group then began incorporating more immersive elements into their productions. From the start, Aggregate involves the audience by asking people to “check in for work” and giving everyone an apron and hairnet to wear. Throughout the show, characters engage directly with the audience: asking questions, giving hand treatments, gifting tokens, serving food and drinks, even slow dancing. The interactions are immediate and intimate. You’re invested in the action because it’s happening to you. “It feels like a very expanded set of potentials in live performance when you take away the proscenium division between the audience and the performers,” Mueller says. “Putting the audience in the middle of the experience ... everything becomes possible there.” Aggregate features a woman passing from life to death, with a gardener, butcher and bartender as supporting cast. The storyline is nonlinear, like all of Control Group’s productions. The elements of the show cultivate a multifaceted reflection on the subject matter instead of following a direct narrative. Associate director and sound designer Nicholas Caputo says you 22

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might be at a disadvantage if you only look for a story. “It’s almost like creating vignettes where the arc actually comes from an emotional experience; you’re having that rather than the intellectual content, or the narrative content, that you can hold in your mind,” Caputo says. “If you’re really looking for that, you’ll totally miss the feeling that you’re supposed to be getting.” Caputo first saw Control Group back in spring of 2018 with their production of Solace. He found their approach to creating art familiar and relatable to his own. He immediately volunteered to serve drinks in order to get involved and see the show more than once. He calls Control Group’s productions emotionally experiential and ineffable — but describing them is beyond the point. OCTOBER 3, 2019

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“You could throw adjectives at it all day and night, but it was really a feeling space,” he says. Mueller calls narrative necessary but problematic. His goal is to create an experience rather than deliver a cohesive story. For that reason, Control Group’s shows grow out of an organic process that involves gathering information around subject matter. Aggregate was the final production in a series about dancing in the dark, where the troupe looked at various literary, historical, spiritual and scientific sources. They studied research on blindness and emotional darkness. They looked at communities that thrived in the dark, including the queer men’s scene in New York in the ’60s and ’70s. They also pulled from people they knew, like a composer the group worked with who was an Iraqi war veteran suffering from PTSD. Location is another major factor that influences the productions. The creators look at the neighborhood and the buildings they’re performing in. For Watching Night Falling, which took place partially in Denver’s Stanley Marketplace, Caputo learned about the history of Stanley Aviation and its founder Bob Stanley, who had a prolific life that ended in tragedy. For their upcoming show Cutting Room Floor, the company is taking over the Aurora Fox and using its history to inform the production. Collaboration is also vital to the process. Conversations with the artistic team are exploratory and can examine heavy subject matter says associate director Bailey Harper, who has starred in multiple productions. “On the first day [of creating Aggregate] we were like, ‘OK, let’s talk about death and your experiences of death and what that is,’” Harper says. “It was some personal and also our belief systems, and what we found really potent in the cultural concept of death.” Beyond that, Mueller and his team are known to hand out open-ended prompts to performers, which they can interpret into something creative like a movement phrase or a bit of dialogue. Prompts have included phrases like, “This is how I pass through to the BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EXPERIENCING a Control Group production is unlike a typical theater show as the performers interact with the audience.

other side;” “These are all things I’ve lost;” and; “If I could see my obstacles, I wouldn’t keep running into them, would I?” Performers also insert their own lives into the play. Harper’s grandmother passed during the creation process of Aggregate. As a part of her character, Harper included stories and details from her grandmother’s life. With material collected, scenes and characters begin to emerge. In discussing death, Mueller realized they wanted to look at the concept in the sense of past flesh, present flesh and future flesh. This idea became embodied in three characters, and while it wasn’t an essential concept for the audience to grasp, it lent structure to the show. “The gardener is growing the thing that you will then eat, that will then become you. Then you will die,” Mueller says. “The butcher is dealing with the thing that is already dead and turning that into the next life. And then the bartender is serving drinks that enliven the experience of the moment.” To get audience members to actively engage with the ideas, the creators craft experiences to elicit emotions. The hand treatment scene — experienced in darkness ­— activates the audiences’ other senses, compelling them to be more reflective. “If you take the eyesight away, you’re very much within your own world,” Harper says. “With death and dealing with grief, you’re in your own world. It felt so important to me to get people to drop into themselves within this giant collective experience. “It’s really challenging to get you to feel the emotions that I’m feeling on stage,” she says. “You can kind of empathize with that, but for you to find it within yourself is a totally different experience.” For Mueller, it’s all about putting the audience back in the center of the production. “We work to keep the performance opened ended; it’s not prescriptive,” he says. “We don’t want the audience to have some specific catharsis and think a certain way about a certain topic at the end of the show, but instead we work to create rich experiences that put people in a position to be transformed.” BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Mutual understanding

From birth to ‘Dépaysé’ with Sinkane’s Ahmed Gallab

by Caitlin Rockett

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n June of 1989, a military coup, led family to Ohio. by Omar al-Bashir, overtook the gov“My first language is Arabic,” Gallab ernment in Sudan. Combined with told music blog Under the Radar this widespread famine, the military viosummer. “I didn’t speak any English at lence in Khartoum launched a mass the time. In fact, on my first day of school exodus, sending millions of Sudanese out in the U.S. I pissed my pants because I into the world looking for a safe place to didn’t know how to ask to go to the bathcall home. room. The moment did teach me how to “My family included,” Ahmed Gallab ask to do that and, thusly, the first English tells me over the phone recently. Gallab word that I learned was ‘restroom.’” is the architect of the genre-blending rock In sixth grade, when his friends startproject Sinkane, whose new album, ed a band and needed a drummer, Dépaysé, uses Gallab’s Sudanese roots Gallab picked up some sticks and never to explore universal looked back. Years PHOTO BY TIFFANY SMITH down the road, Gallab questions about what it means to be human would end up drumin the world today. ming for some of his “Nearly every sinfavorite bands: of gle person in Montreal, Yeasayer Denver’s Sudanese and Caribou. community ... fled But Gallab was because of [almaking music of his Bashir],” Gallab says. own as well. By 2008, “The United States he had recorded two accepted my family in albums as Sinkane, 1989; we were given playing all of the asylum because my instruments himself. dad was a politician. The records were, in It’s the reason why his words, “self-indulI’m able to do what gent and whimsical,” I’m doing now and but the process connect with all these showed Gallab what people and talk to he was capable of you on the phone, making. you know?” In 2011 he set about making his third Gallab is grateful, but his eyes are album, Mars, calling upon his musician wide open. IUNHCR, the United Nation’s friends to not only shoulder the instrurefugee agency, reports there are more mental burden, but also to keep Gallab than 70 million forcibly displaced people grounded and focused. The end product worldwide, with some 3.5 million people got Gallab a deal with DFA, the New seeking asylum. Gallab knows not all of York-based indie label co-founded by Mr. them, including those seeking asylum Indie himself, James Murphy of LCD here in the U.S. today, are as lucky as he Soundsystem. was. Dépaysé is his response to that, his Everything seemed like it was falling battle cry in a way, built around danceinto place. But Gallab had some lessons able grooves that acknowledge the pain to learn. of violence and bigotry but focus on our “When I got back to working on shared humanity. Much like Gallab, the Sinkane after I’d played with a lot of sucalbum is a blend of genres and cultures, cessful indie rock bands, I thought everyfusing krautrock and funk with Sudanese thing was going to be easy,” Gallab tells pop and reggae. me. “In the early aughts, [a musician] Dépaysé — a French word meaning would start a side project and then it “situated in unfamiliar surroundings; being would be all over Pitchfork, and then all out of one’s element” — is something of a sudden they’d get signed and they’d Gallab is intimately familiar with: Born in come up with a booking agent and then London, then shuttled back to his parents’ they’d be on the best tour and then within native Sudan before the coup sent the like a year of quote, unquote, ‘hoofing it,’ BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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ON THE BILL: Sinkane — with The Jauntee featuring Mad Alchemy Light Show. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder. Tickets are $15, foxtheatre.com

they would be successful. And I thought, ‘Oh yeah, that’s what you do.’ “And it wasn’t that way at all,” he says. “Beyond just having to totally understand what hard work was, a lack of understanding how to communicate with my bandmates was a really big failure at the beginning and I ended up almost burning a few bridges. It allowed for those first couple of years of Sinkane to be very tough and very, very much a failure.” Gallab’s learned an important lesson since then: Don’t be an asshole. Truth is, Gallab was never really an asshole, just a young musician learning the ropes of a tough business, trying to keep the integrity of his vision alive while also learning to create art in a group. It’s clear he wasn’t a real asshole because he got the chance to fine tune his collaboration skills as the musical director of The Atomic Bomb! Band, working with legends like David Byrne (Talking Heads), Alexis Taylor (Hot Chip), Pat Mahoney (LCD Soundsystem) and Money Mark (Beastie Boys). The band set out to perform the music of Nigerian legend William Onyeabor live for the first time ever. Today, Gallab says Sinkane operates like a well-oiled machine. Gallab loves to praise its members for their intellect and musical prowess. The band is also a representation of the American melting pot: guitarist Jonny Lam is Chinese; keyboard Elenna Canlas is Filipina; drummer Chris St. Hilaire is Trinidadian; and bassist Michael “Ish” Montgomery is black American. “We are a true representation of what the United States is,” Gallab says. “A collection of people from different places that are different from one another, come from different walks of life, different socioeconomic backgrounds, demographics, everything. That’s what you deal with on an everyday basis in the United States, and that’s what we deal with with each other. And I think it has allowed us all to be our best selves, not only with one another but with the world … that means understanding, having empathy and sympathy, but being very honest and brutally confrontational about who we are and challenging the world to get to a place where there is mutual understanding.” OCTOBER 3, 2019

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2019 | 7:00-10:00PM

MUSEUM OF BOULDER, TEBO CENTER, 2205 BROADWAY, BOULDER Tickets are $75.00 per person

Includes Private Preview of Archive 75

Please join us by purchasing tickets today: museumofboulder.org/all-that-glitters


Not as simple as it seems

Ars Nova Singers, Stratus Chamber Orchestra present ‘Music that Connects’

by Peter Alexander

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ave you ever been stranded in an airport between flights? If so, Boulder’s Ars Nova Singers and Denver’s Stratus Ensemble have a musical program for your playlist. “Intermezzo! Music that Connects” features works written to connect scenes in operas, or to make other types of connections. The Intermezzo from Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana, the “Humming Chorus” from Puccini’s Madama Butterfly and Mozart’s Regina Caeli (queen of heaven), could be part of a playlist for stranded travelers. But they are great works of music as well, as are the other works on the program. Conducting will be shared by David Rutherford, conductor of Stratus, who will lead pieces with orchestra; Tom Morgan, musical director of Ars Nova; and Ars Nova’s assistant director, Brian Dukeshier, who will lead one piece. The Mascagni and Puccini works are theatrical intermezzos, linking acts of operas. Regina Caeli is a hymn that is part of Vespers, the Roman Catholic evening service that connects day to night. The other major work on the program is Randall Thompson’s Frostiana, a setting of poems by Robert Frost; here the meaningful connection is between the music and Frost’s poetry. Other works on the program include four a cappella works to be sung by Ars Nova. Stratus will open the concert with movements from the Serenade for Strings by Norwegian composer Dag Wirén, music you may recognize even if you don’t know the title. Although Ars Nova and Stratus have never performed together, their conductors had talked for some time about a joint concert. “Part of the joy of collaboration [is] to have each ensemble present to the other BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

ON THE BILL: ‘Intermezzo! Music that Connects’ — presented by Ars Nova Singers with Stratus Chamber Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4, First Plymouth Congregational Church, 3502 S. Colorado Blvd., Denver. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, Augustana Lutheran Church, 5000 E. Alameda Ave., Denver. 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6, First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder. Tickets: 303-388-4962, or https://augustanaarts. org/buy-tickets/

organization’s patrons and audiences,” Morgan says. “We shared ideas of possible choral and orchestral things. We were both hoping to create an eclectic program. The theme actually came from David Rutherford.” They decided to pick one of the programs that Stratus had outlined for the coming season. “I had a series of concerts taking musical terms and applying that to musical presentation,” Rutherford says. These included “Danza” and

“Karlson is a Latvian composer, and we’re going to sing in Latvian. It’s a very short piece, but very fast and virtuosic for the choir.” Runestad’s “Let My Love be Heard” was written for the choir at Cal State Long Beach, in memory of a CSLB student who was killed in the Paris terrorist attacks. Both the music and the political connection have made it a very successful piece with choirs. The final piece will be Thompson’s Frostiana, “which is just COURTESY OF STRATUS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA a gorgeous piece of Americana,” Rutherford says. “It’s wonderfully endearing.” Both New Englanders, Thompson and Frost knew one another, which is likely why the composer got permission to set Frost’s poems. In fact, Frostiana is one of a very small number of musical settings of Frost, because today, the Frost estate generally turns down requests from composers. Thompson selected seven poems, three of which are set for full chorus, with two “Quartetto,” but “as we looked at what more each for women’s chorus and could work for our collaboration, men’s chorus, all with chamber orchestra. ‘Intermezzo’ made the most sense,” he Among the poems are the very well says. known “Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by The one piece actually titled the Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Intermezzo” is the instrumental piece “Choose Something like a Star.” Frost that falls in the center of Mascagni’s attended the first performance and is said Cavalleria Rusticana. One of the most familiar instrumental excerpts from opera, to have liked Thompson’s music. “Most everything [in the music] is it is a beautifully lyrical piece but not necvery straightforward, and certainly nothessarily easy to perform. ing is over-challenging,” Rutherford says. “Sometimes it’s those things that you “In its simplicity, [Frost’s poetry] reveals hear all the time that end up being really the depth of the thought. difficult,” Rutherford says. “It’s very slow, “Thompson’s musical setting matches [and] because it is so slow, there’s so very well to Frost, in that it allows us the much opportunity for screwing it up. It time to spend thinking about the words. takes a tremendous amount of concentration and connection, to feel like there’s There are times when [Thompson] could have gone further in developing emotional a line that goes all the way through. And moments. But instead he’s understated. when you get it, it’s unmistakable!” Ars Nova will sing four pieces without And that allows the text to speak for itself. “The longer you spend with it, the accompaniment: works by Bruckner, more depth it reveals, even though it may Randall Thompson, Jake Runestad and seem simple on the surface.” Juris Karlson. Morgan explains that I

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BRUCE COCKBURN NOV 18 ................................................................................................... T-PAIN NOV 22 .............................................................. THE LAST WALTZ REVISITED NOV 23 ..................................................................................................... EKALI NOV 24 .................... MICHAEL MARTIN MURPHEY’S COWBOY CHRISTMAS NOV 29 & 30 .............................................................................. TREVOR HALL

DUCKWRTH, BENJI

OCT 30 ......................................................................................... COM TRUISE OCT 31 ............................................................................................... RIOT TEN NOV 1 ........................................................................................... CORY WONG NOV 2 .................................................................................................. CHERUB NOV 7 ........................................................................................ POLICULTURE NOV 8 .................................................................................................... KLOUD NOV 9 ..................................................................................... HOUNDMOUTH

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OCTOBER 3, 2019

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2028 14TH STREET NOW FT. MCDEVITT TACO SUPPLY SUPER HEADY TACOS! 303-786-7030 | OPEN DURING EVENTS

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


EMOTIONAL ORANGES — WITH CHIIILD. 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7, Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

SOME MUSICIANS UNDERSTAND the power of mystique: Pink Floyd, Bob Dylan, Björk, Aphex Twin, Joni Mitchell and Daft Punk all stepped back and let the music speak for itself. Add Los Angeles-based duo Emotional Oranges to that list. This enigmatic collective — even how many people are in the group is a mystery — are letting their sultry blend of funked up, jazz-infused R&B do the marketing for them as they embark on a U.S. tour that stops at Boulder’s Fox Theatre on Oct. 7. Using only letters to identify them, singers A and V spoke with NME this year about their vision: “Being able to do this project and not have to worry about the restraints of money or who’s going to get the fame or who’s going to be the person talking in interviews — all that shit, that’s what clouds great artistry,” A said. —CR

BRANDO

7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3, Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder, 303-449-3464. LD Gregg Eisenberg is WA OS

your local geographer, musician and stand-up philosopher. Instead of college, he went on a writing journey across the deserts of Greece, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Palestine and Israel. A fortune cookie in a Chinese restaurant in the Arab quarter of Jerusalem led Eisenberg to study Asian languages and literature at the University of California, where he deepened his passion for Taoist thought and songwriting. Eisenberg will present an evening of Buddhist comedy, reading excerpts from his book ‘Letting Go Is All We Have To Hold Onto,’ as well as new material from the forthcoming ‘Follow Your Bris.’ Free and open to the public.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NEDERLAND FOOD PANTRY BENEFIT FEATURING NOGO GILBILLIES WITH PLUCKIN’ GRASSHOLES.

BOULDER MUSIC FESTIVAL.

Noon. Saturday, Oct. 5, DV8 Distillery (49th & Pearl), 2480 49th St., Boulder, 720-441-5006.

For the second year, DV8 Distillery and Finnalli Ent. present the Boulder Music Festival, a celebration of local small businesses that have emerged in the East Boulder neighborhood and throughout Colorado. Show off your dance moves at the silent disco, get into the music festival vibe with some body painting or henna, grab a snack from a food truck and wash it down with a craft beer. There will be laser light shows, original visuals by Sam Mortitz (Onyro Visuals out of Denver), a graffiti wall, magicians, raffles and prizes... oh, and a boat load of great live music from the Gasoline Lollipops, DeadPhish Orchestra, Chris Karns (from EDM darlings Pretty Lights), DJ Abilities, Bandshee Tree and more. Tickets are $20 (plus service fees) at nightout.com/events/ boulder-music-festival/tickets. OCTOBER 3, 2019

6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637.

PIXA BY

S AR

AH

THINK OF ME WHEN YOU’RE MEDITATING — BUDDHIST COMEDY NIGHT.

For more than 25 years, the Nederland Food Pantry has supported working families in the Peak to Peak region. Its work is even more necessary now, as basic housing costs skyrocket in the region. Head to The Caribou Room for a concert and auction that will help support the Nederland Food Pantry as it seeks to provide food to local working families. Enjoy homegrown country bluegrass with Gilpin Countybased The Gilbillies: Adam Pause (banjo), Dave “Pump” Solzberg (bass), Paul Sink (guitar) and Dave Pullins (mandolin). Pluckin’ Grassholes hail from Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Entry is paid for by your generous donation; no one will be turned away.

see EVENTS Page 30 I

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arts UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

ADRIANA CORRAL, ‘UNEARTHED/DESENTERRADO,’ (DETAIL), 2018. INSTALLATION PHOTOGRAPH, RIO VISTA FARM. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND BLACK CUBE.

‘Eyes On: Erika Harrsch,’ Hamilton Building, through Nov. 17; ‘Eyes On: Jonathan Saiz,’ through Nov. 17; ‘Phantom Canyon: A Digital Circuit,’ through Oct. 16; ‘The Light Show,’ through May 2020; ‘Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection,’ through January 2020. Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont: ‘Working Artist Project,’ through Oct. 6. Artist duo Lyndsey Webster and Cory McKague invite anyone to join them as a working artist. They provide the supplies, you do the work. Be part of the culminating exhibit. Foothills Art Center, 809 15th St., Golden: ‘Character and Narrative,’ East Gallery, through Oct. 20; ‘Evolving Perceptions, Studio Art Quilt Associations,’ North Gallery, through Oct. 6;

eTown & Homevibe Present

10 Carbon Leaf Oct

with Adam Ezra

ADRIANA CORRAL’S minimalist sculptures in ‘Unearthed/ Desenterrado’ bring to mind concepts surrounding human rights by highlighting current and historic violations of these rights. Corral employs a rigorous researched-based practice, in which anthropologists, writers, journalists, gender scholars, human rights attorneys and victims provide her with the foundation for her works. The opening reception for Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art’s fall exhibitions is Thursday, Oct. 3. Members’ preview starts at 5:30 p.m. The public reception begins at 6:30.

eTown & Homevibe Present

Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada: ‘Colorado Abstract +10: A History and a Survey,’ through Nov. 17.

11 Delta Rae

Oct

with Frances Cone

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder: Adriana Corral: ‘Unearthed/Desenterrado;’ Gretchen Marie Schaefer: ‘Folding and Thrusting,’ through Jan. 19.

Oct

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Ron Pope

Oct

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10.22 10.24 10.25 10.27 10.29

Christone “Kingfish” Ingram

Caleb Klauder & Reeb Willms Concert: Richard Shindell Concert: Smooth Hound Smith Concert: Kris Allen HIPPY BLUEGRASS CHURCH Movie: The Human Element

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact jenny@etown.org 30

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Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Wild: Buffalo in Boulder,’ through Jan. 12; ‘Boulder Through The Decades,’ through Sept. 31; Google Garage, ongoing with changing activities; ‘PACK-IT-UP,’ through Sept. 23. Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver: ‘Francesca Woodman: Portrait of a Reputation,’ through April 5; ‘Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler: Flora,’ through April 5; ‘Stacey Steers: Edge of Alchemy,’ through April 5.

Boulder Public Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Japanese Ikebana — Fall flower show,’ Canyon Gallery, Oct. 4-6.

NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder: ‘Photography by Mark Shegda’ and ‘Pastel Paintings by Teri Hoyer,’ through Oct. 26.

Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver:

Radio Show Taping

MONUMENTAL — coproduced by Black Cube and the Denver Theatre District. Through Jan. 31, 2020. For times and locations, denvertheatredistrict.com/event/monumental/.

Naropa University Nalanda Campus, 6287 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder: ‘Fine Evident’ — by Cathy Ellis, Cube Gallery, through Sept. 29.

Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder: ‘Modern Habitat: Building Energetic Spaces,’ MacMillan Gallery: Will Day; Polly Addison Gallery: Margie Criner; McMahon Gallery: Arch 11, HMH, HouseFish, Pyatt Studio, SopherSparn, Renée del Gaudio Architecture and Workshop 8; Hand/Rudy Gallery: Davis Arney, through Oct. 15.

& Pieta Brown

Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons: ‘40 years/40 artifacts’ includes objects, photographs, and documents detailing the museum’s 40 years of operation.

BMoCA at Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., University of Colorado Boulder: ‘Helen Zughaib: Stories My Father Told Me,’ through Nov. 24;

Bricolage Gallery, Art Parts Creative Reuse Center, 2860 Bluff St., Boulder: ‘Potato People and Other Flights of Fancy: Gerda Rovetch Retrospective,’ through Oct. 5.

Radio Show Taping

Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont: ‘Front Range Rising,’ permanent exhibit; ‘Ruckus Rodeo: Pop Art & Cowboy Culture,’ through Jan. 5, 2020.

University of Colorado Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder: ‘Body Language: Picturing People,’ through June 2020; ‘Object: Color,’ through September; ‘Its Honor is Hereby Pledged: Gina Adams,’ through Nov. 2. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado Henderson Building,1035 Broadway, Boulder: ‘Feathers and Flora,’ Henderson Building, through Jan. 31; ‘Fossils: Clues to the Past,’ Paleontology Hall, ongoing exhibit; ‘Ground Level Ozone,’ McKenna Gallery, ongoing exhibit; ‘Life in Colorado’s Freshwater,’ ongoing traveling exhibit; and more.

EVENTS from Page 29

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 Music Austen Carroll Grafa, Leaders of the Heart, Marc Emerson Townes (of Kind Hearted Strangers). 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Bluegrass Generals featuring Chris Panolfi and Andy Hall. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes’ and The Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Boulder Drum Circle. 7 p.m. The Root Kava Bar, 1641 28th St., Boulder, 707-599-1908. Boulder Tango Festival (theater show). 7 p.m. Cleo Parker Robinson Dance, 119 Park Avenue West, Denver, 303-295-1759. Brendan James: Live in Concert. 7:15 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374.

OCTOBER 3, 2019

Hip Pop for Adults. 6 p.m. Boulder Jewish Community Center, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 720-749-2531. Johnny O. 5:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Nia Source Class — with Live Music by Lis Addison. 6 p.m. Unity of Boulder, 2855 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-442-1411. Open Mic — with Tony Crank. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. slenderbodies. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. The Songwriter Hour. 7:30 p.m. Still Cellars, 1115 Colorado Ave., Longmont, 720-204-6064.

Events Art & Sip: Monarch Butterfly Creation. 6:30 p.m. Longmont Museum, 400 Quail Road, Longmont, 303-651-8374. Chad Daniels. 8 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Oct. 5. Great American Beer Festival. 11 a.m. Colorado Convention Center, 700 14th St., Denver, 303-447-0816. Through Oct. 5. Pete Holmes. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Works, 1226 15th St., Denver, 303-595-3637. Through Oct. 5. Tinker, Make, Create: Hallow-Zines and Image Transfer Techniques. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

This Wild Life. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Viva Brazil Festival: Opening Gala. 7 p.m. Museo de Las Americas, 861 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, 720-699-7820.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4

theater

Music Finn O’Sullivan. 6:30 p.m. The Tune-Up, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. flor. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Goatz! 5 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. He$h. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Jeremy Garrett. 8 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

BASED ON THE ABBA HIT SONG, ‘MAMMA MIA!,’ tells the hilarious story of a young woman’s search for her birth father on a Greek island paradise. On the eve of her wedding, Sophie’s quest to discover the identity of her father brings three men from her mother’s past back to the island they last visited 20 years ago. ‘Mamma Mia!’ plays at BDT Stage Oct. 5 through Feb. 22.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Buy Tickets: www.nissis.com

Legato Trio. 7 p.m. Gunbarrel Brewing Company, 7088 Winchester Circle, Boulder, 800-803-5732.

The Addams Family. Jesters Dinner Theater, 224 Main St., Longmont. Opens Oct. 4. Through Dec. 1 and Jan. 3-26

Mamma Mia! BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder. Opens Oct. 5. Through Feb. 22.

Let It Roll (A Tribute to Little Feat) & Friends. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397.

A Doll’s House/A Doll’s House Part 2. Denver Center Theatre Company, Ricketson Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Nov. 24.

The Necromancer’s Stone. The BITSY Stage. 1137 S. Huron St., Denver. Through Nov. 23.

Live Music — with Funkiphino. 8 p.m. The Wild Game Entertainment Experience, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 720-600-4875. The Noise Presents Amon Amarth: Berserker Tour. 6 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble: The Gray Cat and the Flounder. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Second performance on Oct. 5. Ponderosa. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Ramaya & The Troubadours. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Everybody — presented by The Catamounts. Dairy Arts Center, Carsen Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 12. Ghosted: A Paranormal Mystery. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Through Oct. 27. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through Nov. 17. I do! I do! Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Opens Sept. 29. Through Oct. 27. Indecent. Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Space Theatre, 14th and Curtis streets, Denver. Through Oct. 6.

Ride. 8:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 conducted by Brett Mitchell. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Second performance on Oct. 5. Events Barley-Har-Har Comedy Open Mic Night. 7:30 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292. Don Quixote. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Through Oct. 13. First Friday Food Lab: Halloween Candy. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 Music Acoustic Alchemy. 7 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Ars Nova Singers and Stratus Chamber Orchestra present Intermezzo! 7:30 p.m. Augustana Lutheran Church, 5000 E. Alameda Ave., Denver, 303-499-3165. Barns Courtney: The 404 Tour — with The Hunna. 7 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Dan and Dian’s Concerts Duo Violão Plus 1. 9:30 p.m. Boulder Mennonite Church, 3910 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-886-9887. Darci Lynne. 7 p.m. Buell Theatre, 1350 Curtis

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

A gathering place for... live entertainment, special events, great food and drinks BOOK YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT AT NISSI’S Have your next business meeting, celebration, benefit, or wedding at Nissi’s – award winning cuisine & service and world class sound in a beautiful and artistic setting.

www.nissisevents.com

Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday October 3

Once. Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington Ave., Golden. Through Oct. 13.

COLLEGE RADIO

Pass Over. Curious Theatre, 1018 Acoma St., Denver. Through Oct. 12.

FREE ADMISSION

The Quality of Life. Benchmark Theatre, 40West Arts, 1560 Teller St., Lakewood. Through Oct. 6. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street — presented by Equinox Theatre Company. The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Through. Oct. 19. Tiny Beautiful Things — presented by Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company. Dairy Arts Center, Grace Gamm Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Oct. 12. Universe 92. Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Through Oct. 19.

“80s Alternative Rock” Sunday Oct 6

GOATZ

“Country – Rock”

FREE ADMISSION Wednesday Oct 9

BOURBON & BLUES ROBERT WILSON BAND “Blues”

FREE ADMISSION Thursday Oct 10

LAST AMERICAN TRIO “Variety Rock”

FREE ADMISSION

St., Denver, 888-929-7849. The Dear Landlords. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Dopapod. 9 p.m. The Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-832-1874. Dr. Fresch — with Angelz, Punjahbae, Mixed Messages. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Dru Heller Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway St., Boulder, 303-499-2985. The Drunken Hearts — with Extra Gold, Bison Bone. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. The Early November. 8 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. The Music of Chuck Pyle. 7 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Finn O’Sullivan. 10 p.m. No Name Bar, 13131325 Broadway, Boulder, 303-447-3278. Full Circle Blues Band. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. Jack Grace Band. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914. Longmont Symphony Opening Night: The

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Organ Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont, 303-772-5796. The Louisville Cultural Council Presents: Acoustic Eidolon. 7:30 p.m. The Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant Ave., Louisville, 303-335-4581. Marisela & Amanda Miguel. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

Friday/Saturday Oct 11/12

THAT EIGHTIES BAND

Mike Wird — with Indigenous Peoples, Oscify and more. 7 p.m. Dickens Opera House, 300 Main St., Longmont, 720-297-6397. Pumpkin Harvest Festival. 10 a.m. Four Mile Historic Park, 715 S. Forest St., Denver, 720-865-0800. Through Oct. 6. Sinkane featuring Mad Alchemy Light Show. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. South to Cedars. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Street Wise Mural Block Party. Noon. The Chamber Center, 2440 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-352-8194. Veronique Van Pelt presents: the Deep Cuts Showcase no. 10 featuring Ryan Chrys. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl see EVENTS Page 32

OCTOBER 3, 2019

Sunday Oct 13

MELO & THE MIDDLEMEN “Rock & Blues”

FREE ADMISSION

Give the Gift of a Great Night Out! Nissi’s Gift Cards available @ nissis.com 2675 NORTH PARK DRIVE (SE Corner of 95th & Arapahoe)

LAFAYETTE, CO 303.665.2757 I

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FILMS

EVENTS from Page 31

St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Events The Brewery Comedy Tour. 7 p.m. Colorado Technical Center, 657 S. Taylor Ave., Louisville, 303-604-6675. Comedy Open Mic Saturday Night. 6:30 p.m. The Tune Up at Full Cycle, 1795 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-440-1002. Fall Flower Arranging Workshop with Pumpkins! 5 p.m. Petals By Pedal, 1029 Berea Drive, Boulder, 740-521-9937. A second workshop on Oct. 6. First Saturday Yoga: Camels. 11 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Handmade in Colorado Expo. 9 a.m. Central Park, 1236 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, 720-272-7467. Through Oct. 7. Heritage Lecture Series: The Rocky Mountain Climber’s Club. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Ikenobo Ikebana Grand Exhibition — Japanese Flower Arranging. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-264-4287. Mother Daughter Bookclub: Call of the Wild. 3 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Photography Portfolio Review. 10 a.m. Mike’s Camera, 2500 Pearl St., Boulder.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 Music Banners — Fall 2019 Tour. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Cold War Kids. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Hoodie Allen: Whatever USA Tour — with Jake Miller. 8 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Jack Grace Duo. 3 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Peanut Butter Players Family Theatre auditions for ‘Scrooge in Love.’ 1 p.m. Lafayette Recreation Center, 111 Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-444-4479. Sabrina Claudio. 7 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Sarah Morris, Vicky Emerson, Kelly Augustine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Viva Brazil Festival 2019: A Taste of Carnival in Colorado. 7 p.m. Cleo Parker Robinson Dance, 119 Park Ave. West, Denver, 720-699-7820. Events Artist/Curator Talk. 5 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122. Boulder Comedy Show. 7 and 9:15 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7 Music GriefShare Course. 6:30 p.m. Longs Peak

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OCTOBER 3, 2019

Watching a Stan Brakhage film is like dreaming with your eyes open. The collision of colors and International Film Series, University of Colorado shadows, images overlapping images, distortions Boulder, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 Colorado and rapid-fire editing imprints on your eye and Ave., 303-492-8662. synthesizes in your mind. Close your eyes, and ‘12 Days,’ 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3. what do you see? Not black, but pulses of light, Celebrating Stan, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 faint movements and an endless depth of halos, (inside ATLAS 100). lines and shapes. Those are the sort of images ‘The War Room,’ 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7. filmmaker and former CU professor Brakhage ‘The Nightingale,’ 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8. sought to create, and on the first Sunday of the ‘Honeyland,’ 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9. month, friend and fellow professor Suranjan BRAKHAGE (JANUS FILMS) DENVER: Ganguly screens a Sie Film Center, 2510 collection of Brakhage E. Colfax Ave., 303prints on campus. 595-3456. The line-up is secret, ‘Down By Law,’ 1 p.m. admission is free, and Sunday, Oct. 6. the show starts at 7:30 ‘Memory: The Origins p.m. inside ATLAS 100. of Alien,’ opens Oct. 4. —MJC ‘Joysticks,’ 9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4. BOULDER: ‘The Last American Boedecker Theatre, Virgin,’ 7 p.m. Friday, Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Oct. 4. Walnut St., 303-444‘Little Darlings,’ 1 p.m. 7328. Saturday, Oct. 5. ‘Desert Utopia,’ 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7. ‘Fiddlin’,’ Oct. 9-12. LONGMONT: Manhattan Short Film Festival, Through Oct. 5. Regal Village at the Peaks 12, 1230 S. Hoover ‘The Music Room,’ 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 8. Road, 844-462-7342. ‘Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly ‘Abominable’ Ivins,’ Through Oct. 5. ‘Ad Astra’ ‘The Sweet Requiem,’ Oct. 9-12. ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘Wrinkles the Clown,’ 8:45 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4. ‘Ghostbusters — 35th anniversary,’ 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., 303-786-7030. ‘Good Boys’ ‘Welcome — A Ski Movie Premiere,’ 9 p.m. ‘Hustlers’ Saturday, Oct. 5. ‘IT Chapter Two’ Teton Gravity Research: ‘Winterland,’ 6:45 ‘The Lion King’ and 9:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3. ‘Rambo: Last Blood’ Century Theatre, 1700 29th St., 303-444-0583. ‘Abominable’ ‘Ad Astra’ ‘Brittany Runs a Marathon’ ‘The Climbers’ ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘Hustlers’ ‘IT: Chapter Two’ ‘Joker’ ‘Judy’ ‘Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice’ ‘Once Upon a Time… In Hollywood’ ‘The Peanut Butter Falcon’ ‘Roger Waters Us + Them,’ 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., 720-645-2467. Absinthe Films: ‘Isle of Snow’ Screening. 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3.

United Methodist Church, 1421 Elmhurst Drive, Longs Peak Um, Longmont, 303-776-0399. Jonny Johnson, Paul Jamsa. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Tame Impala. The Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver, 720-577-6884. Second show on Oct. 8. White Reaper. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Events “Mis Pininos”/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

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Firehouse Art Center, 667 4th Ave., Longmont, 303-651-2787. Film Night. 6:30 p.m.

LOUISVILLE:

Regal Cinebarre Boulder, 1164 W. Dillon Road, 844-462-7342. ‘Abominable’ ‘Ad Astra’ ‘Brittany Runs a Marathon’ ‘Dora and the Lost City of Gold’ ‘Downton Abbey’ ‘The Goldfinch’ ‘Hustlers’ ‘IT Chapter Two’ ‘Once Upon a Time… In Hollywood’ ‘Ready or Not’

All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Arabic Literature Discussion Group. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Babies and Board Books. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Beginning Round Dance Class. 7 p.m. Glenn’s Den, 10178 Empire Drive (Basement Entrance), Lafayette, 303-578-6588. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, see EVENTS Page 34

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Experience Naropa OPEN HOUSE Discover. Connect. Engage.

Friday, October 18th 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Nalanda Campus 6287 Arapahoe Ave. Boulder, CO

For more information and to RSVP visit: Naropa.edu/October

On October 18th, Naropa University will throw open its doors to prospective graduate and undergraduate students from across the country and around the world at Experience Naropa—a whirlwind of activity designed to open minds, spark creativity, and begin to create the bonds of community. Tour campus, attend sample classes, and meet students and faculty who are changing the world for the better. Come for the answers to your questions, and stick around for an engaging afternoon full of lively activities and passionate people. For prospective students, family, and friends.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OCTOBER 3, 2019

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words COURTESY OF ARTIST

NATURALIST, ACTIVIST and stirring writer, Terry Tempest Williams is one of our most impassioned defenders of public lands. In ‘Erosion,’ a new collection of essays, Williams explores the concept of erosion: of the land, of the self, of belief, of fear. Williams will speak about and sign her new book, ‘Erosion: Essays of Undoing,’ on Wednesday, Oct. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at First Congregational Church.

Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

MONDAY, OCT. 7 The Education of an Idealist. 1 p.m. Naropa University’s Nalanda Campus, 6287 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. So, You’re a Poet. 8:45 p.m. Wesley Theater, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

TUESDAY, OCT. 8 Alan Getto. 5:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Jon Kelly Yenser. 6:30 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder.

THURSDAY, OCT. 3

SATURDAY, OCT. 5

Open Mic Night. 6 p.m. Barbed Wire Books, 504 Main St., Longmont.

Used Book Sale. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Jeanine Canty, Devon G. Peña and Stephen Polk — Globalism and Localization. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

SUNDAY, OCT. 6

FRIDAY, OCT. 4 Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

Used Book Sale. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Creative Writing Lab for Grades 3-5. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Stories Behind the Images. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Book Store, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9 Terry Tempest Williams — Erosion. 7:30 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 32

1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Events

Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver.

Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

Max Weinberg’s Jukebox. 8 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214.

Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Obituary / Abbath. 6 p.m. Summit, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299.

Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100.

NASA’s Exploration of Jupiter’s Asteroids. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500.

Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Toddler Time. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 Music David Booker, Racket Man. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9 Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733.

Jesse Malin. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Chick Corea Trilogy — with Christian McBride and Brian Blade. 7:30 p.m. Macky Auditorium, 1595 Pleasant St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Ruston Kelly — with Donovan Woods. 8 p.m. Bluebird Theater, 3317 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-377-1666. Yung Gravy. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

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Out Boulder County Gender Support Group: Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777.

Jade Bird. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095.

Roy Orbison & Buddy Holly: Rock’N’Roll Dream Tour. 8 p.m. Paramount Denver, 1621 Glenarm Place, Denver, 303-623-0106.

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GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

OCTOBER 3, 2019

Open Bluegrass Jam. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060. Philosopher’s Stone: Boulder Bach Festival. 7:30 p.m. eTown Hall, 1535 Spruce St., Boulder, 720-507-5052. Rabblefish. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Raconteurs. The Mission Ballroom, 4242 Wynkoop St., Denver, 720-577-6884. Events Boulder Computer Science Education (CSED) Working Committee. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Ice Sheets and Sea Level Rise: NCAR Explorer Series. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. James Blake. 7 p.m. Fillmore Auditorium, 1510 Clarkson St., Denver, 303-837-1482. Midday Music Meditation. Noon. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Faim & Stand Atlantic. 6 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Musical Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Jakob Ogawa. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

STEAM Storytime: Silly Putty. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

MANÁ: Rayando El Sol Tour 2019. 8 p.m.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


This Weekend:

October 5 & 6 FREE ADMISSION!

Central Park in Boulder (13th Street & Canyon) Open 9am - 6pm on Saturday; 11am - 6pm on Sunday

Featuring over 80 Colorado Artisans and Crafters

Great Live Music with RYAN HUTCHENS on Saturday LINDSEY SAUNDERS on Sunday www.handmadeincolorado.com

MONKTON GUITARS The new “local guitar store” in Broomfield

Fall Lessons! FALL GARDEN CLEANUP

Guitar, bass, ukulele, lap steel and violin/viola lessons

Beginner to advanced students Experienced teachers

Saturday, Oct. 12: Lafayette Library, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14: Boulder County Parks & Open Space, 6 – 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21: Boulder County Recycling Center, 6 – 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28: Erie Community Center, 6 – 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2: Louisville Library, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

All styles of music

For More Info:

www.monktonguitars.com 303-484-1271

The workshops will cover the following fall-specific topics: • Cleaning up the vegetable garden • Getting perennials ready for winter • Winterize your backyard compost pile • Preparing for spring composting *soil saver compost bins will be available at cost for $55 (exact cash or check only).

RSVP: www.BoulderCountyRecycles.org

1501 W. 1st Ave, Suite A Broomfield CO 80020 Tues-Sat 10 am to 6 pm

Sponsored by:

resourceconservation@bouldercounty.org 720.564.2220

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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‘NIGHT’ 1895 BY FREDERICK B. JOHNSON VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Thursday OcTOber 3

bluegrass generals

Friday OcTOber 4

sOngs OF ‘69

FeaT chris PandOlFi & andy hall (The inFamOus sTringdusTers), drew emmiTT (leFTOver salmOn), adam aijala (ymsb) & andrew alTman (railrOad earTh) w/ Pickin’ On The dead, meadOw mOunTain, winTer wOnder wOmen & banshee Tree

FeaT TOri PaTer & Friends wiTh beneFiTs w/ Pixie & The ParTygrass bOys & dylan miles exPerience PaTer’s 50Th bday ParTy!

Friday OcTOber 4

The drunken hearTs

kll bill (mr. bill b2b kll smTh) w/ FrequenT & craFTal

Friday & saTurday OcTOber 11-12

The new masTersOunds w/ ghOsT-nOTe

sunday OcTOber 13

saTurday OcTOber 5

w/ exTra gOld & bisOn bOne

sunday OcTOber 6

hOOdie allen w/ jake miller

wednesday OcTOber 9 re: search

sTeel Pulse

w/ judge rOughneck, red sage & dj blOOd Preshah

marTyParTy & vibesquad

w/ minx & jOrdan POlOvina

wednesday OcTOber 16

Thursday & Friday OcTOber 10-11

w/ raPsOdy & dOmani harris

10/10: ghOsT TOwn driFTers

big k.r.i.T.

Thursday OcTOber 17

The cOllecTive

(FacTiOn ski Film denver Premiere)

Friday OcTOber 18

The main squeeze

w/ jaden carlsOn band & ghOsT TaPes

saTurday OcTOber 19 cycles PresenTs

The game shOw

an inTeracTive cOncerT & game shOw exPerience w/ chOmPers & zeTa june

sunday OcTOber 20

ableTOn sPaces wednesday OcTOber 23

kiTchen dwellers saTurday OcTOber 12

jOe herTler & The rainbOw seekers w/ PrOxima Parada & lOs elk

wednesday OcTOber 16 re: search

PlanTrae & mOur

w/ vOlO (laTe seT) & jOrdan POlOvina

Thursday OcTOber 17

Thin air & PhOur POinT O Friday OcTOber 18

FuTurisTic

The magician

w/ scribe cash, absTracT, ekOh & Th3 kind r3d

Thursday OcTOber 24

The high hawks

w/ lea luna, Tri-TiP (laTe seT) & jOrdan POlOvina

O.T. genasis Friday OcTOber 25

sOnic blOssOm

FeaT blueTech, sPOOnbill, dynOhunTer, The librarian, laPa, janOver, k+lab, PhlO & PaTrick skyler

saTurday OcTOber 26

sTarT making sense (Talking heads TribuTe) w/ graham gOOd & The PainTers

sunday OcTOber 27

berner

w/ dj hOllywOOd, anOnymOus & rmean

wednesday OcTOber 30 re: search

bleeP blOOP

w/ sayer, liTTle snake & secreT reciPe

Thursday OcTOber 31

james brOwn dance ParTy

FeaT adam smirnOFF, eric benny blOOm, adam deiTch (leTTuce), adam chase (The chase brOThers), jenniFer harTswick (Tab), shareiF hObley (jOhn legend) & elizabeTh lea (Tedeschi Trucks)

Friday nOvember 1

muzzy bearr

w/ shOOka, PandasaywhaT & exO

sunday nOvember 3

danny brOwn

w/ ashnikkO & zeelOOPerz

Thursday nOvember 7

The TriFiniTy

(yheTi x TOadFace x mT. analOgue) FeaT OTTO vOn schirach

Friday nOvember 8

skizzy mars w/ yOshi FlOwer

saTurday nOvember 9

anders OsbOrne wednesday nOvember 13

TObe nwigwe Friday nOvember 15

hOw The grOuch sTOle chrisTmas w/ murs & dj abiliTies

saTurday nOvember 16

saTurday OcTOber 19

FeaT vince herman (leFTOver salmOn), Tim carbOne (railrOad earTh), adam greuel (hOrseshOes & hand grenades), chad sTaehly (hard wOrking americans), brian adams (deadPhish OrchesTra) & will Trask (greaT american Taxi) w/ kind cOunTry

wednesday OcTOber 23

maTTy maThesOn Thursday OcTOber 24

Tubby lOve & amber lily and TierrO band FeaT bridgeT law w/ buddha bOmb & dj TreaPhOrT

saTurday OcTOber 26

shawn james sunday OcTOber 27

universal language Thursday OcTOber 31

dragOndeer Friday nOvember 1

The cOPPer children

w/ kessel run, cOle williams band (FeaT members OF PimPs OF jOyTime) & zimma

saTurday nOvember 2

bumPin uglies

w/ PrOjecT 432 & beTaray

sunday nOvember 3

$nOT

Tuesday nOvember 5

maxO kream w/ q da FOOl

wednesday nOvember 6

ryan caraveO w/ alec king

Thursday nOvember 7

ThaT 1 guy

Friday nOvember 8

ParT & Parcel’s cOrdurOy classic

w/ Flash mOunTain FlOOd & mOrsel

cOllie buddz

saTurday nOvember 9

sunday nOvember 17

w/ chewy & bach, F-eTher & waxcaT

w/ adrian eagle

rainbOw girls

w/ keznamdi

hillTOP hOOds Friday nOvember 22

PlaneT OF The drums

(ak1200, dara, dieselbOy & messinian) w/ nvrsOFT, reid sPeed, Fury, salTee & slim_r_i

big night out by RC deWinter

bits & pieces of me slough off every day slivers of sanity flecks of hope scraps of intellect i sweep them up & save them for a rainy day whispers of old songs halfforgotten words melodies fading into midnight blue surround me as i walk alone into a night more fall than summer blue riffs & ice cubes swirls of smoke summoned from memory men once long and lean and women like me still pretending pretty big night out

mOOnTricks

sunday nOvember 10

w/ sTrings and The bOx

Tuesday nOvember 12

hirie

w/ rdgldgrn & Tunnel visiOn

TexT cervanTes TO 91944 FOr TickeT giveaways, drink sPecials, discOunTed TickeT PrOmOTiOns & mOre

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

RC deWinter, a superannuated debutante whose only claim to fame is a decent Twitter following, writes in several genres with a focus on poetry. “big night out” was previously published in borrowed solace in 2017, rights have reverted to the author.

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


Cold / Flu? Consider A Proven Ancient Alternative

ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

Southwest Acupuncture College • 6630 Gunpark Drive • Boulder, CO

Call 303.581.9933 to make an appointment

Oriental Medicine has been used effectively by billions of people for thousands of years.

VOTED BEST OF BOULDER 2013

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ON THE BILL: udy Garland was born in a trunk. Or so the story goes in ‘Judy.’ Century A Star Is Born, a movie about an aging actor on his way Theatre, 1700 29th out, thanks to addiction, and the young starlet he handSt., Boulder, 303picks to bear the burden of his departure. 444-0583. Who knows how many watching A Star is Born in 1954 knew they were watching a window into Garland’s life. Born Frances Gumm in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, in 1922, Garland was destined for fame. She was on the stage at the age of 2, and by the time she was 13, she’d inked a contract with Metro-GoldwynMayer, the studio she would call home for the next 15 years. A true triple threat, Garland sang, danced and acted with the best of them. She ran circles around ham Mickey Rooney, went toe-to-toe with James Mason, and carved her name in hearts and history books with “Over the Rainbow.” They were her best years, and they were her worst. There may come a day when someone has something nice to say about studio boss Louie B. Mayer, but it isn’t today. Mayer treated Garland, and the rest of his stable of acting talent, like cattle. He needled Garland about her weight and put her on a strict diet of pills: Uppers to keep the weight off and the feet moving after 18 hours of rehearsal; downers to force some shuteye. You don’t have to know this to understand Garland — you feel it. In her most transparent songs, a slight crack of her contra-alto voice is enough to cut the world at its knees. Watch how her eyes unfocus while singing “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” in Meet Me In St. Louis. Garland wanted to perform, and for that, she got more than her share of pain. All of this is presented faithfully in Rupert Goold’s Judy, the new bio-pic about Garland’s untimely twilight days in winter 1968 and based on the stage show with musical numbers, “End of the Rainbow,” by Peter Quilter. Renée Zellweger plays Garland full of wide eyes and pursed lips and looks every bit the part. And though she can’t quite match Garland’s singing voice (who could?), she manages Garland’s signature phrasing and physical posture with perfection. Zellweger is the reason to see Judy. The supporting cast is equally compelling, but the movie is ultimately let down by a lackluster presentation of a rote story. The addition of a middle-aged gay couple who idolizes Garland is a nice touch, but calling on them to hoist the movie’s climax and inject a bittersweet message is too much. Yes, Garland gave and gave and gave and received little in return. And yes, the audience took and took and took and gave so little back. Such is the tragedy of entertainment: We know everything about celebrities. We allow them to console us in our loneliest moments, pick us up when we’re feeling blue, and carry us through the good times and the bad. But they don’t even know our names, or where to find us should they need emotional reciprocity. What a lonely life, indeed.

C’mon get happy

‘Judy’ and the loneliness of the one-sided affair

by Michael J. Casey

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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NEW DAILY SPECIALS JOINT DAY MONDAY 1g Joints are $5.50 Tax

+

FRESH GEAR FRIDAY 20% OFF

FLOWER TUESDAY

Glass and Accessories

all Flower and Shake

SINGLE SERVE SATURDAY

20% OFF

WAX WEDNESDAY

50% OFF

20% OFF Concentrates & Vapes

Single serve Edibles

TASTY THURSDAY

CBD SUNDAY

all Edibles

all CBD products

20% OFF

20% OFF

2043 16th St, Boulder, CO 720-389-5726 villagegreenboulder.com

OCTOBER 3, 2019

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L O C A L

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TA B L E

EAST COUNTY’S BEST KEPT SECRET! Only 12 miles from Boulder

5 7 8 B r i g g s S t re e t E r i e, C O 8 0 5 1 6 303.828.1392 www.24carrotbistro.com

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BRUNCH

S AT & SU N 9 AM - 2 PM

L U N C H TUE-FRI 11AM-3PM

OCTOBER 3, 2019

DINNER

TUE-THR 5PM-9PM

F R I & S AT 5PM-10PM

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S U N D AY 5PM-9PM

BOULDER WEEKLY


BY BOULDER WEEKLY STAFF

PHOTOS BY STAFF

Wibtoberfest Lager

Buffalo Wings

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Wibby Brewing 209 Emery St., Longmont, wibbybrewing.com he weather’s turned and so we’re reaching for warming, malty brews, like Wibby’s Wibtoberfest, a traditional märzen style lager. It’s got a deep amber color and a flavor that hints at caramel without being sweet. At 5.5% alcohol by volume, it’s a medium-bodied easy-drinker that tastes best when accompanied by a pretzel and an autumn breeze. If you happen to be at Great American Beer Festival this weekend, stop by and try it fresh at the Wibby booth. Prices vary.

Steak fajitas

Wondervu Cafe, 33492 Highway 72, Golden, wondervucafe.net

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all has come to Colorado, which means driving into the mountains provides sweeping views of stoplight aspens, fading from green, to yellow, to red. It also means traveling through lesser known parts of the county and nearby environs, and one such trip recently led us up Highway 72, boasting sights of Longs Peak and other classic Boulder County views, to Wondervu Cafe. Although the menu has plenty of sandwiches, burgers and salads, what really drew us was the promise of “homemade Mexican food” at 8,888 feet. The steak fajitas are enough for two people (as advertised) and a sizzling plate of tender meat, plus perfectly sautéed bell peppers and onions is accompanied by refried beans covered in cheddar cheese, Mexican rice and enough guacamole, sour cream and pico de gallo to go around. It was a delightful meal in a delightful place and definitely worth the drive. $24.95.

Peckish 1320 College Ave., Boulder, peckishco.com oulder’s Peckish is dedicated to the wing. Bone-in, bone-out or cauliflower, Peckish’s wings come tossed in a variety of sauces and rubs, so it’s a little tricky to pick just one that intrigues you. We opted for bone-in wings with the classic hot buffalo sauce — somewhere toward the higher end of the heat scale, but the third-hottest buffalo sauce out of five. The wings come out crispy-skinned, with tender chicken on the inside. The sauce is zippy, and you’ll power through five wings in no time. Oh well, another opportunity to try more sauces. Five for $6.57; 10 for $12.57; 200 for $230.

Scrooge Bowl

Scrooge Maki 1107 13th St., Boulder, 303-449-0270

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or fast-casual rice bowls, poke, sushi and more, it’s hard to beat Scrooge Maki on the Hill. Their bowls are packed with loads of flavor and texture, as evidenced in the Scrooge Bowl. It’s a combination of tender beef strips, spicy pork and tempura-fried chicken, set atop rice, veggies and kim chi, and topped with soy sauce and sesame seeds. The meats are well-seasoned, and the crispy chicken, in particular, provides an attractive crunch as you work your way through the bowl. $12.

DINE IN • TAKE OUT 1085 S Public Rd. Lafayette (303) 665-0666 Hours: Tues. Weds. Thurs. Sun 11am - 9pm Fri. Sat 11am - 9:30pm Closed Monday BOULDER WEEKLY

Thank You for Voting us Best Asian Fusion

Restaurant

LAFAYETTE

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2016

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coffee – breakfast – lunch – tapas – dinner

5530 spine rd, boulder 303.719.1431 aperitivoboulder.com Executive Chef: Miguel Vazquez

TURN UP THE FLAVOR!

Colorado Green Chili Sauce & Salsa TM

LOCALLY SOURCED & HAND CRAFTED!

Vegan & Gluten Free Available At

www.cosdiner.com 40

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


SUSAN FRANCE

The Thai That Binds How Bee brought the taste of tom yum from Phayao to Lafayette

by John Lehndorff BEE RUNGTAWAN KISICH hosts cooking classes wherein she makes Thai curries, stir-fries, noodle dishes and more.

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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ragrant steam permeates the kitchen as Bee Rungtawan Kisich works the wok in her Lafayette home. She adds fresh tilapia, onions, mushrooms and tomatoes and builds a broth. As Bee cooks, she cheerfully tastes and adjusts, adding ginger-like galangal, kaffir lime leaf, minced garlic and lemongrass. Jasmine rice is cooking in a steamer while she throws together a quick taste-bud-tingling rice dressing. Bee’s quick meal is completed with a light shrimp salad on romaine and a stir-fried crispy pork belly with vegetables and tiny Thai chilies. For dessert: Molded, not-too-sweet mango treats. Watching her cook, it’s easy to imagine making these dishes at home and that’s why the Thai cooking classes she offers in her home and in private kitchens across Boulder County have become so popular. “I try to teach an easy way to cook at home, not ‘you must have this.’ You can use vegetables you like. Start with a small amount of spices, you can always add more,” Bee says. What you are attempting to achieve is that magical, sunny Thai flavor balance of salt, sweet, sour, funk, fire and herbaceous freshness. As she serves the meal, Bee smiles and describes the journey that brought her to this unexpected destination and vocation. She grew up in a lake-side town in northern Thailand near the borders of Laos and Myanmar. “We have a beautiful temple in the middle of Phayao Lake. A lot of tilaI

pia are fished from the lake,” Bee says. Produce grown in the inland region include lychee, cantaloupe, eggplant, cucumber, long beans and tomato. There is a little shop in the open market where Bee’s mom has been selling ready-to-eat food cooked at her home for 20 years. Among the dishes is a crunchy green mango salad with dried shrimp that comes with a roster of brightly hued dressings, including mango, red beet to lime. “It’s very popular in the town. The food there is not too spicy,” she says, belying Thai cuisine’s reputation for being fiery. Bee says she always helped her mom but spent her early career in accounting and working as a loan officer. She met Kevin Kisich when he visited Thailand, they married, and she and her two daughters, now 10 and 12, moved here a little over a year ago. As a part-time cook at Louisville’s Busaba Thai Restaurant, Bee saw which dishes locals crave the most and decided to share what she knew. Her casual classes focus on how to make red and green curries, stir-fries, noodle dishes like pad Thai and pad see ewe (“drunken” noodles), as well as soups (tom kha), salads (larb) and rice paper-wrapped rolls. see NIBBLES Page 42

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SUSAN FRANCE

NIBBLES from Page 41

The two-hour hands-on gatherings include a meal so the cooking happens rapidly. She shares where to source hard-to-find herbs, vegetables and other ingredients at local Asian food stores such as Westminster’s Lao Market. Her quick approach relies on flavorpacked Asian ingredients such as oyster sauce, nam pla (fish sauce), soy sauce, and chile and curry pastes. The idea of their mom being a cooking instructor clearly amuses her two children, who giggle and talk about K-pop music as she cooks. “At home in Thailand my daughters never saw me cook. I learned from my mother by watching but she didn’t teach me. It was her kitchen so she did all the cooking,” Bee says. Students go home with easy-to-follow recipes and Bee gets to practice her English. “I’m a new person here and I need to meet more people,” she says, and Bee’s Thai Kitchen (facebook.com/BeesThaiKitchen) gives her that opportunity.

• NOW OPEN • Noodle House & Hot Pot

HOMEMADE NOODLES | LOTS OF FREE PARKING GLUTEN FREE | VEGETARIAN/VEGAN OPTIONS

Sunday: 11:00am - 9:30pm Monday: Closed Tue - Sat: 11:00 am - 9:30pm 4800 Baseline Rd. A-110 Boulder, CO • 303.494.4210 www.noodlehousekitchen.com 42

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CHILE VS. CHILE There has been a lot of noise lately about the relative superiority of chilies grown in Colorado and New Mexico. Here’s the bottom line from Dr. Michael Bartolo, the man who developed the Pueblo chile: “The Pueblo (Colorado) chile and the Hatch (New Mexico) chile are two completely different varieties. The Hatch chile is the milder, long, green Anaheim chile. The Pueblo chile (or Mosco) tends to have thicker walls, which make it more amenable to roasting, and it has a little more heat. It really comes down to personal preference and how you use it.” LOCAL FOOD NEWS Chef Matt Collier of Seeds Library Cafe leads an Oct. 10 demo on molecular gastronomy — think faux-caviar and foam — at the Boulder Public Library. boulderlibrary.org … The Fort Restaurant in Morrison hosts an Oct. 18 four-course meal in darkness with a secret menu to test your taste buds. thefort.com … Upcoming class topics at Boulder’s Food Lab include: empanadas (10/6, 11/19), latkes (12/15) and fondue (12/27). foodlabboulder.com … Boulder’s Growing Gardens classes include: pickling and fermentation (10/10), pasta-making 101 (10/17). growinggardens.com. … Got an old apple/crabapple tree in your yard or know of one on public property? Let the Boulder Apple Project know as they gather essential info on heirloom and homestead apple varieties well-suited to local conditions. appletreeproject.org … Coming soon: Shake Shack, 29th Street Mall; Torchy’s Tacos, 2805 Pearl St. TASTE OF THE WEEK One of Colorado’s best food ambassadors is Noosa Yoghurt made northwest of Fort Collins. I’m a fan of this Australian-style whole milk yogurt with its silky creaminess, big flavors and reduced sweetness. Noosa’s new fall flavors include a salted caramel yogurt that would be at home on a pricey restaurant dessert plate and a pie-worthy variation with Granny Smith apples with cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves. It’s worth a drive to Noosa’s Morning Fresh Dairy in Bellvue for free tours concluding with a sampling of fresh milk products, including yogurt. morningfreshdairy.com WORDS TO CHEW ON “Some find it pleasant dining on pheasant / Those things roll off my knife / Just serve me tomatoes and mashed potatoes / Give me the simple life.” — Ella Fitzgerald John Lehndorff and Maeve Conran will co-host a super-sized Radio Nibbles special 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Oct. 10 on KGNU (88.5 FM, 1390 AM, streaming at kgnu.org). Comments: nibbles@boulderweekly.com I

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BOULDER WEEKLY


ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF BREWERS ASSOCIATION

That’s a great idea, Charlie

How the Great American Beer Festival fashioned a beer ark

by Michael J. Casey

T

he year: 1981. The protagonist: Charlie Papazian, America’s homebrewing advocate. The setting: the Great British Beer Festival in England. “In those days, the closest thing to a beer fest was a kegger in the woods,” Charlie Papazian says with a chuckle, reflecting 38 years later over coffee at Vic’s on Walnut. The Great British Beer Festival (GBBF) was and is something else. First organized in 1977 by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), GBBF is both a celebration and a preservation of unfiltered, unpasteurized, cask-conditioned “real ale,” Britain’s iconic brewing tradition. For the ’81 iteration, the festival invited Papazian as a judge. His charge: sit on a three-person panel and determine the grand champion beers of England. Recounting the festival years later in Microbrewed Adventures, Papazian uses the word “awed” to describe his experience. Following GBBF, Papazian traveled to London and reconnected with friend and British beer scribe, Michael Jackson. He talked of people relaxing, drinking traditional ales, talking about flavors and enjoying a beverage the way the brewers intended. We should do this in America, Papazian told Jackson. That’s a great idea, Charlie, Jackson responded. Only, what will you serve for beer? Jackson had every right to be skeptical. At the time, only 44 breweries were operating in the U.S., and the number was dwindling. Regionals were either consolidating or closing up. The big three: Bud, Coors and Miller sucked all the oxygen out of the room. But there was hope: Anchor Brewing Company, Boulder Brewing Company (now Boulder Beer Company) and Sierra Nevada Brewing Company had planted the microbrewing flag. Enthusiasm for homebrewing, spurred in great part by Papazian’s efforts, foretold a coming revolution. “By 1981, there was a well-established community, a network, of homebrew-

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THE GREAT ers and beer enthusiasts in Boulder and the Denver AMERICAN BEER area,” Papazian says. “There were four of us who were FESTIVAL has the core group who discussed the idea of putting grown from 24 partogether a beer festival where we could celebrate what ticipating breweries to 800. was left of American beer because there wasn’t a whole lot.” Comprising the four was Papazian, Tom Burns (Boulder Brewing’s then-brewmaster; a transplant from Portland’s Cartwright Brewing Company), and two students of Papazian’s weekly homebrewing class: Frank Morris, a Liquor Mart employee who Papazian cites as “instrumental” for championing imported beer, and Stuart Harris, a software engineer, who also wrote for Zymurgy — the homebrewing magazine Papazian launched in 1978. Inspired by Papazian’s experience at GBBF, the goal was to celebrate and elevate America’s rich brewing history. Coincidentally, CAMRA and subsequently GBBF were founded in 1971 by four men fearing that ubiquitous bland beer would obliterate British brewing heritage. They aimed to preserve tradition and promote quality. Ten years later, four men in Boulder picked up the baton. The first Great American Beer Festival (GABF) was held in a 5,000-squarefoot ballroom inside Boulder’s Hilton Harvest House Hotel (now the Millennium Harvest House on 28th Street) on Friday, June 4, 1982. It was the centerpiece event of the fourth annual National Homebrewers and Microbrewery Conference, put on by the American Homebrewers Association, and lasted from 4:30-9:30 p.m. During those five hours, 47 signature American beers from 24 breweries were poured for 800 guests. Now celebrating its 38th iteration, GABF spans three days, Oct. 3-5, and pours over 4,000 beers from approximately 800 breweries across 584,000 square feet of Denver’s Colorado Convention Center. Upwards of 62,000 people are expected to attend. Ask Papazian if he had any idea that GABF would reach this potential and he’ll smile, and, with a twinkle in his eye, admit: Maybe after I’ve had two or three homebrews. see GABF Page 46

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GABF from Page 45

• • • • “For the first time in decades the American beer consumer is beginning to see the possibility of choice,” declared the 1982 summer issue of Zymurgy, announcing the first GABF. Neither the words “micro” nor “craft” appeared in the seven simple paragraphs outlining the festival, but choice was front and center. As was the declaration: “Every attempt has been made to conscientiously represent the most unique, special and quality beers brewed in the U.S.” Not an easy task for Papazian and his circle. Communication between brewers was rare, and printed resources were few and far between. “We came across a book of beer labels,” Papazian explains. “Just one beer label after another. So we looked through that book and were able to determine what Yuengling was brewing. What August Schell was brewing. ... We saw that bock was being made. Oktoberfest was being made. Porters and stouts were being made here.” Most of the breweries invited were regionals and only four — Anchor, Sierra Nevada, Boulder Brewing and River City Brewing Company — represented the emerging microbrewing scene. Of those four, only Boulder Beer and Sierra Nevada will be pouring at this year’s festival. Tracking who’s in and who’s out through each GABF lineup provides a telling snapshot of the brewing world these past 37 years. At the first GABF, Coors debuted its Killian’s Irish Red. In 1985, then 6-week-old Boston Beer Company missed the truck, and founder Jim Koch airfreighted 20 cases of Samuel Adams Boston Lager just in time to make the festival. That year, Boston Lager took home top prize in the Consumer Preference Poll. It wouldn’t be the only year Samuel Adams won the Consumer Preference Poll, an award that would court a fair amount of controversy and consternation — both in how Koch attracted votes and I

how he marketed his victories. In 1987, Papazian and festival cofounder Daniel Bradford instituted a professional blind tasting of beers categorized by style, 12 in all, with gold, silver and bronze medals awarded. But Samuel Adams still walked away with the Consumer Preference Poll, this time for its Festival Lager. • • • • Though the Consumer Preference Poll proved to be more a source of derision than acclaim — it was discontinued in 1990 — the official competition based on style that arose from it might be GABF’s greatest accomplishment. Its objectivity lends legitimacy to the beers awarded, and its celebration of historical and regional styles has instilled a level of creativity in brewers heretofore unseen. From the original 12, GABF’s competition has blossomed to 108 competitive categories in 2019. Over 9,300 beers from nearly 2,300 breweries will compete for medals this year. Writing in Microbrewed Adventures, Papazian points out “some styles of beer were close to extinction before the new brewing revival in America saved them from the archival tombs.” And this year Franconian-style rotbier, kellerbiers, märzens and witbiers will compete alongside juicy/hazy IPAs, cream ales and California common. For those attending — tickets are still available — GABF once again offers a lupulin-soaked journey across time and space. “We have created the American Beer Ark to float above the light-lagered oceans of the world, harboring with care and passionate enthusiasm the great beer traditions of the world,” Papazian wrote in Microbrewed Adventures. And to think, it all started with an invitation to judge the Great British Beer Festival, a celebration of tradition that many felt was slipping away. A tradition Papazian knew was equally slipping away in the U.S. What would they serve for beer? Anything and everything. BOULDER WEEKLY


Can’t make it to GABF? Go to your local taproom instead

T

he Great American Beer Festival is a beer-drinker’s playground — thousands of beers from hundred of brewers. But for those who didn’t get a pass to this weekend’s festivities in Denver, you can still sample what Boulder County producers will be pouring at GABF this year; stop by and try. 12DEGREE BREWING: Cactus Juice / Soleil Saison / Treachery / Velour Fog / Walter’s White 12Degree’s Treachery is a golden strong ale — 8 percent ABV — that’s crisp, fruity and refreshing. It’s won several World Beer Cup and GABF medals.

by Matt Cortina

AF / Mango-Guava Gose / Peanut Butter Porter / Purveyor of Chaos NEW PLANET BEER: Blonde Ale / New Planet Seclusion IPA / New Planet Tread Lightly Ale / Pale Ale ODD13 BREWING: Bubblestar Princess / Codename: Superfan / Haole Bartender / Quartermaster Keys / Stainless Aged Coconut Saint Newcole OSKAR BLUES: Can-O-Bliss / COB DIPA / Dale’s Pale Ale / Death by Coconut / Lemm On / Mama’s Little Yella Pils / One-y / Saloon Juice / Swiss Guard

AVERY BREWING CO.: Bon Bon Cerise / Cucumber Hibiscus Sour / Double Barreled Maple Stout / Pacer IPA / PB & J Stout

PUMPHOUSE BREWERY: Artillerie / Base Camp Milk Stout / Cocoa Frambozenbier / Cucumber Kolsch / Ejector Seat IPA

BEYOND THE MOUNTAIN BREWING CO.: Basil Saison / BTM IPA / Freckle / Prima Mexicana / Sour Shakedown Party with Blackberry / St. Alphonso

TWISTED PINE BREWING COMPANY: Billy’s Chilies / Ghost Face Killah / Luppulo Maximo / Pathfinder / Patio Pounder Spur an endorphin rush by sipping a glass of Ghost Face Killah, made with six peppers, including the infamous bhut jolokia.

BJS RESTAURANT & BREWHOUSE: BJ’s Whiskers Bourbon Barrel Stout / Brewhouse Blonde / Committed Double IPA / Heavenly Nutty Brewnette / Hopstorm IPA / Monarch Bay Double / Hazy IPA / Piranha Pale Ale / Razz-Jerry Tart / BJ’s Tequila Quad BOOTSTRAP BREWING: Backfire / Cherry Gose / Insane Rush / Lush Puppy / Wreak Havoc BOULDER BEER: 40th Anniversary Ale / Hazed & Infused / Pit of Destiny / Shake Chocolate Porter / Spaceman Double IPA FRONT RANGE BREWING COMPANY: Blackhawk Black IPA / Piney Ridge Dunkel / Prairie Fire Helles / Sonnebahn Berliner Weisse / St Nigels’ Doppelbock LEFT HAND BREWING COMPANY: Barrel Aged 25th Anniversary / Chai Milk Stout Nitro / Colorful Colorado / Fade to Black, Volume 1 / Flamingo Dreams Nitro / Milk Stout Nitro / My Fav IPA / Oktoberfest / Sawtooth Ale / Wheels Gose ‘Round / White Russian Nitro Left Hand’s White Russian Nitro is for “strikes and gutters; ups and downs.” The coffee, vanilla and chocolate notes really tie this stout together.

UPSLOPE BREWING COMPANY: Shot 44 Double IPA / Batch 1000 / Brown Ale / Citra Pale Ale / Craft Lager / English Porter / Festbier / Foeder-Aged Golden Sour / German Style Pilsner / Lychee IPA / Pumpkin Ale VERY NICE BREWING COMPANY: Calmer Than You Are / Logical Fallacy / Monk’s Phunk VISIONQUEST BREWERY: Apricot Berliner / Industrial Park Politics / Kamaji / Raspberry Sour / Saison Parfait / Space Jam The Industrial Park Politics is a delightfully juicy, hazy IPA with El Dorado, Citra, Azacca and Mosaic hops. WEST FLANDERS BREWING CO.: Holy Wit / It Was All A Cream / Juiced Up / Stoned Perseverance / Trippel Lutz WIBBY BREWING: Home Team Pilsner / Lightshine Helles / Moondoor Dunkel / Pilsner / RIPL / Wibtoberfest WILD WOODS BREWERY: Butternut Brown Ale / Chardonnay Barrel Belgian Golden Strong / Oktoberfest Lager / S’mores Stout

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CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: I know

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: In 1956, the U.S. federal government launched a program to build 40,000 miles of high-speed roads to connect all major American cities. It was completed 36 years later at a cost of $521 billion. In the coming months, I’d love to see you draw inspiration from that visionary scheme. According to my analysis, you will generate good fortune for yourself as you initiate a long-term plan to expand your world, create a more robust network, and enhance your ability to fulfill your life’s big goals.

people of all genders who periodically unleash macho brags about how little sleep they need. If you’re normally like that, I urge you to rebel. The dilemmas and riddles you face right now are very solvable IF and only IF you get sufficient amounts of sleep and dreams. Do you need some nudges to do right by yourself? Neuroscientist Matthew Walker says that some of the greatest athletes understand that “sleep is the greatest legal enhancing performance drug.” Top tennis player Roger Federer sleeps 12 hours a day. During his heyday, world-class sprinter Usain Bolt slept 10 hours a night and napped during the day. Champion basketball player LeBron James devotes 12 hours a day to the rejuvenating sanctuary of sleep.

TAURUS

LEO

Hey has some good advice for her fellow Bulls, and I think it’ll be especially fresh and potent in the coming weeks. She says, “Replacing ‘Why is this happening to me?’ with ‘What is this trying to tell me?’ has been a game changer for me. The former creates a hamster wheel, where you’ll replay the story over and over again. Victimized. Stuck. The latter holds space for a resolution to appear.”

pioneer in bringing dance into films as a serious art form. He made 31 musical films during the 76 years he worked, and was celebrated for his charisma, impeccable technique, and innovative moves. At the height of his career, from 1933 to 1949, he teamed up with dancer Ginger Rogers in the creation of 10 popular movies. In those old-fashioned days, virtually all partner dancing featured a male doing the lead part as the female followed. One witty critic noted that although Astaire was a bigger star than Rogers, she “did everything that Fred Astaire did. She just did it backwards and while wearing high heels.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, you may soon be called on to carry out tasks that are metaphorically comparable to those performed by Rogers.

BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES

APRIL 20-MAY 20: Taurus-born Youtube blogger Hey Fran

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: “The soul has illusions as the bird

has wings: it is supported by them.” So declared French author Victor Hugo. I don’t share his view. In fact, I regard it as an insulting misapprehension. The truth is that the soul achieves flight through vivid fantasies and effervescent intuitions and uninhibited longings and nonrational hypotheses and wild hopes — and maybe also by a few illusions. I bring this to your attention because now is an excellent time to nurture your soul with vivid fantasies and effervescent intuitions and uninhibited longings and non-rational hypotheses and wild hopes.

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Actor and dancer Fred Astaire was a

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: Your number one therapy in the coming weeks? Watching animals. It would be the healthiest thing you could undertake: relax into a generously receptive mode as you simply observe creatures doing what they do. The best option would be to surrender to the pleasures of communing with both domesticated AND wild critters. If you need a logical reason to engage in

this curative and rejuvenating activity, I’ll give you one: It will soothe and strengthen your own animal intelligence, which would be a tonic gift for you to give yourself.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: I envision the next 12 months as a time when you could initiate fundamental improvements in the way you live. Your daily rhythm 12 months from now could be as much as 20% more gratifying and meaningful. It’s conceivable you will discover or generate innovations that permanently raise your long-term goals to a higher octave. At the risk of sounding grandiose, I predict you’ll welcome a certain novelty that resembles the invention of the wheel or the compass or the calendar.

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: Every time my birthday season comes around, I set aside an entire day to engage in a life review. It lasts for many hours. I begin by visualizing the recent events I’ve experienced, then luxuriously scroll in reverse through my entire past, as if watching a movie starring me. It’s not possible to remember every single scene and feeling, of course, so I allow my deep self to highlight the moments it regards as significant. Here’s another fun aspect of this ritual: I bestow a blessing on every memory that comes up, honoring it for what it taught me and how it helped me to become the person I am today. Dear Libra, now is an excellent time for you to experiment with a similar celebration.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Modern literary critic William Boyd declared that Aquarian author Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was “the best short-story writer ever,” and “the first truly modern writer of fiction: secular, refusing to pass judgment, cognizant of the absurdities of our muddled, bizarre lives and the complex tragi-comedy that is the human condition.” Another contemporary critic, Harold Bloom, praised Chekhov’s plays, saying that he was “one of the three seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre.” We might imagine, then, that in the course of his career, Chekhov was showered with accolades. We’d be wrong about that, though. “If I had listened to the critics,” he testified, “I’d have died drunk in the gutter.” I hope that what I just said will serve as a pep talk for you as you explore and develop your own original notions in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: “Depression is when you think there’s nothing to be done,” writes author Siri Hustvedt. “Fortunately I always think there’s something to be done.” I offer this hopeful attitude to you, Scorpio, trusting that it will cheer you up. I suspect that the riddles and mysteries you’re embedded in right now are so puzzling and complicated that you’re tempted to think that there’s nothing you can do to solve them or escape them. But I’m here to inform you that if that’s how you feel, it’s only temporary. Even more importantly, I’m here to inform you that there is indeed something you can do, and you are going to find out what that is sooner rather than later.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Pisces-born Dorothy Steel didn’t begin

her career as a film actress until she was 91 years old. She had appeared in a couple of TV shows when she was 89, then got a small role in an obscure movie. At age 92, she became a celebrity when she played the role of a tribal elder in Black Panther, one of the highestgrossing films of all time. I propose that we make her one of your inspirational role models for both the coming weeks and the next 12 months. Why? Because I suspect you will be ripening fully into a role and a mission you were born to embody and express.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: “How inconvenient to be made of desire,”

writes Sagittarian author Larissa Pham. “Even now, want rises up in me like a hot oil. I want so much that it scares me.” I understand what she means, and I’m sure you do, too. There are indeed times when the inner fire that fuels you feels excessive and unwieldy and inopportune. But I’m happy to report that your mood in the coming weeks is unlikely to fit that description. I’m guessing that the radiant pulse of your yearning will excite you and empower you. It’ll be brilliant and warm, not seething and distracting.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE


about the word vagina. However, to many people, the word vagina has this connection because telling people that vaginas are dirty or gross or disgusting is a core tenet of the patriDear Dan: I’m a 26-year-old woman in archy. Vulva and clitoris have sadly been a two-year relationship with a 32-year-old along for this societal shame-driven ride. I man. I love him and we live together. He can see how a heterosexual man might recently revealed that he thinks the word have trouble with the word vagina because “vagina” is disgusting. He he has received that mesROMAN ROBINSON likes the word “pussy,” but saging since birth.” “vagina” turns him off and But just because we can he hates when he hears the see how your boyfriend word. I think this is ridicumight have developed a lous, immature, and, honestproblem with the word, ly, a bit insulting. I am proud VALUE, doesn’t make your of my vagina — I love it, and boyfriend actually having a I love what we do with it problem with the word okay. together. I don’t have a “There’s an issue when hang-up with names for a grown man finds the word parts. He assures me he vagina disgusting,” said Dr. loves my pussy, but vagina Gunter “I am curious if her is a word that grosses him boyfriend’s inability to say out. Am I crazy to be a bit upset about this vagina is a ‘bedroom-only’ phenomenon or terminology conflict? an ‘everywhere’ phenomenon. If it’s bed—Vaginas Always Love Useful room-only, maybe she can help him work Erections up to using the word by introducing it more. Exposure therapy! However, if his disgust Dear VALUE: “First of all, VALUE is at the word is an ‘everywhere’ phenomecorrect,” said Dr. Jen Gunter, an ob-gyn non, then I can appreciate how that is a and author. “There is nothing disgusting sticking point for VALUE. I wrote a whole

BY DAN SAVAGE

book, The Vagina Bible, for this very reason. If he read it and appreciated how not saying the word vagina has been oppressive for women, maybe it might help? Again, exposure therapy!” Follow Dr. Jen Gunter on Twitter @DrJenGunter. The Vagina Bible is on sale now — and on the New York Times best-seller list! Congrats, Dr. Gunter!

being held than about intense sexual pleasure. He is disappointed that I am not receptive to his need for anal stimulation. I have told him he is free to find people online who will do this, or if it is so important to him to have a partner who does this, we can separate. He would prefer that I be more accommodating. —Absolutely No Anal Love

Dear Dan: My husband likes to give and receive enemas during sex. I was very inexperienced sexually when we met in our early 20s and very much in love. He introduced me to enemas, and I went along at first and almost enjoyed the novelty. But in time, it started to feel less appealing. After we had kids, there was less opportunity for this sort of thing, and I eventually realized I didn’t like anal play. The enemas began to feel physically and psychologically violating. He introduced anal plugs as an alternative, but I still felt violated and frightened whenever he put one in me. I went to a sex counselor who told me I had the right to say no. My husband began pursuing his anal interests alone. Now we’re both 68. My sexual drive has waned, but his has not. I don’t want to give up on the experience of PIV intercourse, but he doesn’t seem to understand that at this stage of life, sex for me is more about closeness and feeling loved and

Dear ANAL: You can and you should continue to say no to any and all sex play — anal or otherwise — that leaves you feeling violated and frightened, ANAL. You can also say, “I’d like a divorce,” to a man who has proven himself incapable of taking “no” for an answer decade after miserable decade. And while your offer to allow him to find anal playmates online falls under the “perfectly reasonable accommodation” header, ANAL, I’m more concerned with your unmet need for love and tenderness than I am with your husband’s unmet needs. To that end, I think you should go find a tender lover — right after you find yourself a kick-ass divorce lawyer. On the Lovecast: Why are bi women blazing so hard? Listen at savagelovecast.com. Send questions to mail@savagelove. net, follow Dan on Twitter @fakedansavage and visit ITMFA.org.

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BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Boulder CBD: An Oasis in a Strip Mall on 30th Street Everywhere you turn, there seems to be a new CBD product on the market. Consumers are thrilled with a new frontier of medicines that are not prescriptive, addictive or potentially damaging to internal organs with long-term use. In an effort to shed more light on CBD and hemp, in general, Boulder CBD has responded to some of the most commonly asked questions posed at the store at 1750 30th St. Why is CBD getting so much hype? Simply put, CBD is changing lives for the better. We hear success stories every day of relief from chronic pain, diminished anxiety and better stress response, long-awaited quality sleep, and much more. CBD presents a viable alternative to pharmaceuticals, and has none of the side effects or contraindications that come with prescriptive medicine. So, in spite of the trendiness, CBD is a legitimate remedy for many common ailments, and people are thrilled with the results they notice.

What makes Boulder CBD products special? All of our products are local and made from organically-grown hemp that is rich in CBD and third-party tested. We stand by the quality and transparency of every product in store. Why do people say CBD can do so many different things? To understand CBD and its many benefits, it’s important to discuss the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is a biological system present in all humans and animals. Its main responsibility is homeostatic maintenance, or balance. CBD supports the overall response of the endocannabinoid system to any imbalance. That’s why CBD can be of benefit in times of stress, pain, inflammation, anxiety, immune response, and more… if the body is facing an imbalance, it’s the endocannabinoid

system’s job to bring things back into balance. CBD supports that process, so its potential benefits are vast, and vary from person to person. Are CBD prices coming down? In a word, YES. The CBD market is new and some suppliers priced their goods as luxury items. However, we feel strongly that CBD should be financially accessible for everybody. It’s too beneficial to be cost-prohibitive. We shop the whole state to ensure that our prices are as competitive as possible. Which explains why we can offer 900mg tinctures for $36 and Cherry Wine hemp flower (12.13% CBD) for $5 per gram. BOULDER CBD IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK FROM 11AM-7PM AND IS LOCATED AT 1750 30TH STREET, UNIT 16, BOULDER. (720) 531-3159

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‘Godfather of pot science’ keeps Israel at the forefront of marijuana research by Seymour

T

oday, despite nation-wide legalization in Uruguay and Canada, Israel is the world leader in marijuana research. Here’s why: Israel has a cannabis research industry that’s been decades in the making, starting in the early 1960s when Bulgarian-born Holocaust survivor and chemist Raphael Mechoulam led a team of researchers at Herbrew University of Jerusalem to discover the existence of CBD, THC and other major cannabinoids. It was Mechoulam who first concluded that CBD could effectively treat epilepsy back in 1980 (right at the onset of the war on drugs, so it would be nearly 40 years before the rest of the world took notice of Mechoulam’s research... but I digress). Mechoulam codiscovered the human endocannabinoid system, the receptors that interact with cannabinoids like THC and CBD to produce medicinal or recreational effects (anxiety relief or a case of the giggles, for instance). On top of that, Mechoulam found that the human brain actually produces its own cannabinoids. “Scientists at the [National Institutes of Health] believe [cannabinoids] could alleviate dozens of illnesses, including schizophrenia, diabetes, cancer and multiple sclerosis, to name a few,” writes Chris Moore for a Sept. 27 feature in Merry Jane. “The revelation of this endogenous cannabinoid system essentially legitimized the study of a substance previously on the margins of scientific research.” Moore was writing about Mechoulam because the 88-year-old scientist recently discovered a way to create stable, safe, synthetic acid forms of THC and CBD (not

BOULDER COUNTY’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

to be confused with K2 or Spice, the synthetic cannabis street drugs that have reportedly sent users — even famous people like Demi Moore — into fevered, semiconscious convulsions… not that). Through his startup company EPM, Mechoulam and his team (comprised of university researchers from Israel, the U.K. and Canada, as well as scientists from two medical corporations) isolated potent, useful cannabis acids that are so unstable outside of the plant that they have proven elusive to replicate in a lab. The team was able to isolate CBD acid (CBD-A), which is a thousand times more potent than CBD at alleviating nausea and anxiety. It doesn’t take a genius to see the medical possibilities in that. Which brings us back to Israel, which provided the support Mechoulam needed to conduct his research. The Mediterranean nation’s government is very involved in medical marijuana research and development, with the world’s highest percentage of financial resources devoted to marijuana research, according to the Martin Prosperity Institute. As one of the first countries to legalize medical marijuana, Israel has been preparing, in a way, for the medical marijuana boom since the ’90s, with large, state-

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funded medical research facilities that have beckoned top pot researchers from around the world. Israel is only one of three nations (Canada and the Netherlands) that has a state-sponsored cannabis program for research. As such, Israel is growing a ton of weed. “Blessed with mild weather, lots of sunshine and sophisticated research-and-development sectors, Israel also has a tradition of educated farmers through the kibbutz system who can easily implement the ‘precision agriculture’ necessary for high production standards,” the LA Times wrote in May of this year. “Israelis have dedicated thousands of acres and millions of dollars to cultivating the plant under controlled conditions. Potential investors from as far away as China are visiting Israel to explore opportunities, which so far include nearly 100 start-ups producing cannabis-based medicines and other products.” While Canada is also making waves in marijuana research, numerous news reports make it clear the country is having a hard time keeping up with license applications to study the plant since legalization took effect in October 2018. The U.S., still mired in federal marijuana prohibition, has a long way to go to catch up.

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Bill would end financial aid ban for students with pot convinctions By Paul Danish

F

JOEL DYER

ollowing hard on the heels of last week’s landslide passage of the marijuana banking act by the U.S. House of Representatives — it passed 321 to 103 — two representatives have introduced a bill to end the practice of denying federal financial aid to college students with pot convictions. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Karen Bass of California and Rep. Danny Davis of Illinois, both Democrats, would repeal a federal ban on giving federal loans, grants or work-study aid to students who have been convicted for possession of or selling drugs. The bill would also prohibit the secretary of education from adding any question to federal financial aid applications about the conviction of an applicant for the possession or sale of illegal drugs. The act has already attracted 32 cosponsors. The act contains a “findings” section that focuses on the harm done to members of minority communities who are disproportionately arrested for marijuana offenses. It says the ban on financial assistance to students with drug convictions has discouraged minority students from even applying for financial aid. While it’s true that blacks and Hispanics are dispro-

portionately impacted by the ban, there is no shortage of white students who are likewise denied federal aid because of previous pot convictions. And despite the fact that recreational marijuana is now legal in 11 states and medical marijuana is legal in more than 20 others, there is no let-up in the number of people still being arrested for pot. (See next item) • • • • The number of people arrested in the U.S. for marijuana in 2018 — 663,367, according to the FBI — was actually higher than the number arrested in 2017 (659,700) and the number arrested in 2016 (653,249). In other words, nearly 2 million people were busted for pot in the last three years. Any of those arrests that turned into convictions rendered the person ineligible for federal educational aid. Nearly 92% of last year’s arrests, 608,775, were for possession alone. (Tom Angell of Marijuana Moment ferreted out the numbers for an article in Forbes.) The fact that more than 650,000 Americans a year are still being busted for pot despite major moves toward legalization at the state level shows that the war on drugs flies on — like a plane with a dead man at the

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• • • • Another week, another poll showing overwhelming support for legalizing adult use of marijuana, this one from Virginia. The poll of 1,000 adults, done by researchers at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, found that 61% of those surveyed said they supported “the legalization of marijuana for recreational use by adults in Virginia.” Thirty-four percent were opposed. The poll deserves attention for two reasons. The first is that support for legalization spiked by 22 percentage points from a similar poll taken in 2017, when only 39% of those surveyed favored legalization. Of course it’s possible that one of the two polls is an outlier, but if the most recent poll is accurate, it represents a dramatic shift in public opinion in a state that has been historically socially conservative. The second is that Virginia is one of two states that elects its state officials in odd-numbered years (the other is New Jersey), which means that voters will cast their ballots for members of the Virginia legislature in about five weeks. All 100 seats in the state’s House of Delegates and all 40 seats in the state Senate will be up for grabs. It’s unknown if marijuana has emerged as an issue in any of these races. But in light of the Mary Washington U. poll, it wouldn’t be surprising if it does. • • • • Captain Obvious, call your office. A paper published in Sexual Medicines Review that reviewed a number of animal and human studies of the effect of marijuana use on sex found that while consuming pot can lead to heightened libido and better orgasms, “…lower doses improve desire but higher doses either lower desire or do not affect desire at all.” It kind of works that way with alcohol too: A martini may get you in the mood; three or four just get you blotto.

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