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Boulder County ’s Tr ue Independent Voice / FREE / www.boulderweekly.com / January 10-16, 2 019


contents THE ANDERSON FILES: What would Molly do? by Dave Anderson

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New campaign seeks to educate both sides when it comes to identity theft by Angela K. Evans

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Changing lives with freshwater access in South Africa by Will Brendza

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CU Boulder language project aims to give nonbinary Hebrew speakers the words they need by Caitlin Rockett

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departments 5 THE HIGHROAD: How far-out is Trump’s war policy? 7 LETTERS: Signed, sealed, delivered, your views 23 ARTS & CULTURE: Beethoven, Bartok, Beach and Barber part of a varied spring concert series 25 BOULDER COUNTY EVENTS: What to do and where to go 32 WORDS: ‘With a Coat’ by Dante Di Stefano 33 FILM: International Film Series returns 35 THE TASTING MENU: Four courses to try in and around Boulder County 44 DRINK: Tour de brew: I HOP IPA 47 ASTROLOGY: by Rob Brezsny 49 SAVAGE LOVE: Men and women 51 WEED BETWEEN THE LINES: Cannabis and Seasonal Affective Disorder 53 CANNABIS CORNER: More tales from the depths of the desk Boulder Weekly

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Publisher, Stewart Sallo Associate Publisher, Fran Zankowski Director of Operations/Controller, Benecia Beyer Circulation Manager, Cal Winn EDITORIAL Editor, Joel Dyer Managing Editor, Matt Cortina Senior Editor, Angela K. Evans Arts and Culture Editor, Caitlin Rockett Special Editions Editor, Emma Murray Contributing Writers, Peter Alexander, Dave Anderson, Will Brendza, Rob Brezsny, Michael J. Casey, Paul Danish, Sarah Haas, Jim Hightower, Dave Kirby, John Lehndorff, Rico Moore, Amanda Moutinho, Leland Rucker, Dan Savage, Josh Schlossberg, Alan Sculley, Ryan Syrek, Mariah Taylor, Christi Turner, Betsy Welch, Sidni West, Tom Winter, Gary Zeidner SALES AND MARKETING Retail Sales Manager, Allen Carmichael Account Executives, Julian Bourke, Matthew Fischer Market Development Manager, Kellie Robinson Advertising Assistant, Jennifer Elkins Mrs. Boulder Weekly, Mari Nevar PRODUCTION Art Director, Susan France Senior Graphic Designer, Mark Goodman Graphic Designer, Daisy Bauer CIRCULATION TEAM Dave Hastie, Dan Hill, George LaRoe, Jeffrey Lohrius, Elizabeth Ouslie, Rick Slama

January 10, 2019 Volume XXVI, Number 22 As Boulder County's only independently owned newspaper, Boulder Weekly is dedicated to illuminating truth, advancing justice and protecting the First Amendment through ethical, no-holdsbarred journalism and thought-provoking opinion writing. Free every Thursday since 1993, the Weekly also offers the county's most comprehensive arts and entertainment coverage. Read the print version, or visit www.boulderweekly.com. Boulder Weekly does not accept unsolicited editorial submissions. If you're interested in writing for the paper, please send queries to: editorial@boulderweekly.com. Any materials sent to Boulder Weekly become the property of the newspaper.

690 South Lashley Lane, Boulder, CO, 80305 p 303.494.5511 f 303.494.2585 editorial@boulderweekly.com www.boulderweekly.com Boulder Weekly is published every Thursday. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. © 2019 Boulder Weekly, Inc., all rights reserved.

the

Highroad How far-out is Trump’s war policy? by Jim Hightower

Boulder Weekly

welcomes your correspondence via email (letters@ boulderweekly.com) or the comments section of our website at www.boulderweekly.com. Preference will be given to short letters (under 300 words) that deal with recent stories or local issues, and letters may be edited for style, length and libel. Letters should include your name, address and telephone number for verification. We do not publish anonymous letters or those signed with pseudonyms. Letters become the property of Boulder Weekly and will be published on our website.

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I

f you think our government’s war policy has become out-of-this world cuckoo, consider the spaciness being proposed by the cosmonauts on Spaceship Trump. Spending nearly $700 billion a year on maintaining the five branches of the U.S. war machine (not counting the costs of actually fighting all the wars they get into) is not enough they now tell us. So prepare to soar — militarily and budgetarily — into a boundless war theater

where none have gone before: Yes, outer space! It seems that Captain Trump himself woke up one morning in June and abruptly announced that he was bored with the fusty old Army, Air Force, etc., so he wanted a shiny new sixth military branch to play with [space music sound effects] — a “Space Force” to carry America’s war-making power to a cosmic level. His loyal lieutenant, Mike “YesMan” Pence promptly saluted, calling Trump’s whim “an idea whose time has come.” America’s military leaders rolled their eyes at this folly, but they’ve since snapped to attention and are preparing to launch Cap’n Trump’s grandiose space dreams. In a melodramatic speech, Pence declared that the new Space Command will “seek peace, in space as on Earth.”

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work — and to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown — visit www.jimhightower.com.

Hmm... that’s not very comforting. However, he says he’s thrilled that Trump’s Space Force will be led by a four-star general, have its own bureaucracy with a multibillion-dollar budget, have a separate division to funnel money to corporate war contractors, and have its own snappy uniforms. Won’t all that look great if Trump ever gets that big showy military parade he’s been demanding as a tribute to his leadership as a cocktailroom warrior. The Trumpeteers gush that this extraplanetary extravagance will attract “America’s best and bravest” to serve as “warfighters.” Of course, their privileged families won’t have to fight in any of the space wars they’re dreaming up for other families to fight. This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly. January 10 , 2019 5


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the anderson files What would Molly do? by Dave Anderson

T

hese days, I wonder what Molly Ivins would think of today’s politics. Those of us who were fans called her Molly even if we never met her. In Boulder, she participated in CU’s Conference on World Affairs, provoking guffaws and drawing huge crowds. Molly Ivins was a perceptive commentator and hilarious satirist with a Texas twang. A syndicated columnist and writer for numerous national magazines, she was most well-known for explaining that state’s politics with colorful anecdotes. Molly died of breast cancer at age 62 on Jan. 31, 2007, shortly before Barack Obama formally announced he was running for president. She had been impressed by Obama’s speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention and thought he should run. The year before, she wrote that, “Sen. (Hillary) Clinton is apparently incapable of taking a clear stand on the war in Iraq, and that alone is enough to disqualify her (to be president).” Most likely had she lived longer, Molly would have also been disappointed in Obama. She gave George W. Bush the nicknames “Dubya” and “Shrub.” She covered the corrupt and reactionary goings-on at the Texas state legislature, remarking that, “All anyone needs to enjoy the state legislature is a strong stomach and a complete insensitivity to the needs of the people. As long as you don’t think about what that peculiar

body should be doing and what it actually is doing to the quality of life in Texas, then it’s all marvelous fun.” For all her jokes, she was serious about holding the powerful accountable. Her analysis of how politicians get away with scapegoating the vulnerable seems incredibly relevant in Trump’s America: “The trouble with blaming powerless people is that although it’s not nearly as scary as blaming the powerful, it does miss the point... Poor people do not shut down factories. Poor people are not in charge of those mergers and acquisitions in which tens of thousands of people lose their jobs so a few people in top positions can make a killing on the stock market. “If we can make ourselves believe that poor folks are responsible for their own problems, then the rest of us are absolved of any responsibility for them... The reason we like to blame the victim is because if it’s not the victim’s fault, why then, it could happen to anybody. It could even happen to you. And that is scary. “I believe all Southern liberals come from the same starting point — race. Once you figure out they are lying to you about race, you start to question everything.” She was afraid that we were losing our democracy: “Oligarchy is eating our ass, our dreams, our country, our heritage, our see THE ANDERSON FILES Page 7

Boulder Weekly


the anderson files members. Molly would have been ecstatic when she read the winter issue of the The American Prospect with the Justin Miller article on Texas and the Bob Moser article on “A New South Rising.” Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn, who is up for re-election in 2020, is quoted as saying: “Texas is no longer, I believe, a reliably red state. We are on the precipice of turning purple, and we’ve got a lot of work to do to keep it red, because we lost, we got blown out in the urban areas. We got beat in the suburbs, which used to be our traditional strongholds. And if it wasn’t for the rural areas of the state where Senator Cruz won handily, (the Senate race against Democrat Beto O’Rourke) might not have turned out the way it did.” Up in heaven, Molly is celebrating and urging us to fight on. As she said once down here on Earth: “So keep fightin’ for freedom and justice, beloveds, but don’t you forget to have fun doin’ it. Lord, let your laughter ring forth. Be outrageous, ridicule the fraidy-cats, rejoice in all the oddities that freedom can produce. And when you get through kickin’ ass and celebratin’ the sheer joy of a good fight, be sure to tell those who come after how much fun it was.” This opinion column does not necessarily reflect the views of Boulder Weekly.

There are many things I would rather do with my time than respond to the self-congratulatory words of an old man who uses condescension and crude insults to compensate for his profound lack of understanding and inability to form a cogent argument. Yet, after reading both Michaela Mujica-Steiner’s article about her activism at the U.N. Climate Summit (Re: “Déjà vu at U.N. Climate talks,” Guest column, Dec. 13, 2018) and Paul Danish’s open letter attacking her (Re: Danish Plan, Dec. 20, 2018) for her work, I find it necessary to say my piece. As a fellow millennial activist, I believe it is important to call out falsehood whenever I see it. And Danish’s article is rife with it. Danish’s embarrassment of an article makes his ignorance of our Constitution clear. He would do well to re-read the First Amendment, which Boulder Weekly

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THE ANDERSON FILES from Page 6

democracy, our justice and our tax code... Either we figure out how to keep corporate cash out of the political system or we lose the democracy.” She said the fight isn’t easy, noting, “The thing about democracy, beloveds, is that it is not neat, orderly, or quiet. It requires a certain relish for confusion.” Molly described herself as a populist. She would have been outraged that so many mainstream pundits call Trump a populist and then claim genuine populists like Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Sherrod Brown sound like Trump. Molly was an early and fervent opponent of Bush’s war in Iraq. In her last column, written a few weeks before she died, she urged people to end the war. Bush had called himself “the decider.” She disagreed: “We are the people who run this country. We are the deciders. And every single day, every single one of us needs to step outside and take some action to help stop this war. Raise hell. Think of something to make the ridiculous look ridiculous.” The wars go on, unfortunately, but people have been raising hell against the Trump administration since the very beginning — from the Women’s Marches to the blue wave in last November’s election. The Congressional Progressive Caucus had 78 members before the midterms and now it has 96

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protects Mujica-Steiner’s right to express political dissent and pressure her government through non-violent protest. She is fully within her rights to “peaceably assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Calling her an “authoritarian bully” is pathetic and laughable. She is no authoritarian, but rather an engaged citizen advocating for the world she and her generation will inherit. This is not something to be ridiculed, but to be commended. Bypassing Danish’s convoluted opinions on nuclear energy, the core difference between Mujica-Steiner’s and Danish’s views on environmentalism boils down to this: Danish wrongly puts the onus of responsibility for climate change on the individual consumer, whereas Mujica-Steiner understands that climate change is a systemic issue see LETTERS Page 8

January 10 , 2019 7


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letters LETTERS from Page 7

which can only be addressed through strategies of systemic change. Whereas Danish shames an activist when she flies to advocate for the interests of her generation’s future in a critical and potent political space, Mujica-Steiner wisely knows to place the blame not on members of the working class, but on the extractive system itself and the wealthy ruling class who selfishly perpetuates it for their own profit and gain. The reality is that 71 percent of global fossil fuel emissions are caused by only 100 corporations. We must face the hard truth that no amount of cutting back on driving, turning off our lights or using reusable straws in our daily lives will save us if our politicians remain in the pocket of the oil and gas industry. As United States citizens, the single most critical thing we can do to stop massive climate change catastrophe is not “going green” in our personal lives, but disrupting and pressuring our politicians through mass collective action. This is exactly what MujicaSteiner is doing in her work. There is a single sentence in Danish’s article that rings true. He is correct when he says that how we choose to address climate change is our call to make, not his. He speaks with all the arrogance and defensiveness of a man who knows his time is up and his beliefs are a dying breed, and his socalled “argument” amounts to little more than “sit down and be quiet, young lady.” In light of willful ignorance such as his, I am even more grateful that it is my generation of skillful and engaged activists such as Mujica-Steiner, and not his, who are helping to lead this vital fight for our world. Theo Spain via internet

Politicians’ first day on the job We did our best to welcome the new “blue wave” at the capital on Friday morning, Jan. 4. A group of 100 or so engaged citizens of Colorado Rising (the group that spearheaded Prop 112) made a point to be there at 7:30 a.m. to let the incoming elected officials know that their constituents were still fighting for our right to clean air, clean water and a chance to raise our children in a country that was supposedly a democratic institution. Fracking is our key issue, it ties into every misuse of resources that we are currently facing. The fact that this “new blue wave” that we are supposed to see as a new insurgency didn’t have the balls to walk up the steps and acknowledge our presence, does not bode well for our future. Like all good politicians,

they scurried around to the side doors. Now that they are elected officials they can’t be bothered by the riff raff, all except Jonathan Singer. Hats off to him... he was there with us, standing on the steps. The other progressives? Scurried around the corners. Martha Mcpherson/Boulder

Trump’s accomplishments 1) Separated thousands of children from their parents at the Mexican border. 2) Authorized the use of tear gas across the border against Honduran refugees. 3) Launched a full-frontal attack on the free press and the intelligence community calling them “fake news” and corrupt. 4) Worst perpetrator of lying and fake news in any presidency. 5) Took the word of Vladimir Putin over our own intelligence on proven Russian spying after which Putin announced a new missile that can penetrate our defense system. 6) Implemented tariffs on steel imports affecting closure of some GM plants and losing valuable foreign agricultural sales due to Chinese retaliation. 7) Continued to ignore the presence of climate change and the realities that are occurring world-wide while doubling down on the failing coal industry. 8) Cited for influence-pedaling in Washington and at Mar-a-Lago. 9.)Fired knowledgeable federal officers while his reckless trade wars and ignorance of basic fiscal principles helped reduce stock market levels in December by 20 percent, or the highest point drop since the great depression. 10) Shut down the government to appease his ego and loyal constituency over a useless wall that will not stop the people who are trying to get here illegally. 11) Regularly proffered hate, fear and lies to Americans, using vicious language not unlike that once used by Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany. In 1960, John F. Kennedy announced that America would endeavor to be the first country to put a man on the moon. Kennedy’s bold vision became a reality 10 years later and united our people together in greatness. In 2016, Donald J. Trump announced he would make America “great again” and start by building a medieval wall between us and Mexico, which instantly divided our country between the reactionary and the enlightened reducing our image to that of a third-world renegade. Tom Lopez/Longmont Boulder Weekly


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Everyone’s a victim

New campaign seeks to educate both sides when it comes to identity theft

by Angela K. Evans 10 January 10, 2019

I

n 2004, Luz Gonzalez filed her taxes and got her refund, just like she had done every year since becoming a permanent resident and getting a Social Security number at age 19. But three months later, she received a letter from the IRS accusing her of not reporting $23,000 of income and telling her she owed the government $4,000 in taxes and fines. “When you get a letter from the IRS, it’s scary,” says Gonzalez, who quickly realized she was a victim of identity theft, most likely because she had lost her ID at a nightclub the year before. Gonzalez called the IRS and told them someone else was using her identity to work. In turn, the agency told her to file a police report, fax it in, and the extra income and associated fines would be cleared from her record. “But I was intrigued about who did it, I wanted to know,” she says.

Boulder Weekly


She went to the Social Security Administration Heckers says. Medicaid, disability, housing and SNAP Security Administration, Colorado Department of and found out that someone was using her identity to benefits can all be canceled if someone’s reported Labor, law enforcement and other agencies, a process work at a nearby Taco Bell. What’s more, they had income suddenly increases because someone else is that can take anywhere from a week to six months or given an address, which was close to Gonzalez’s North using their Social Security number to work. While the more. Denver home. majority of the time (Heckers estimates 75 percent) “It has such a costly impact on victims,” “So I went,” she says, admitting it probably wasn’t it’s one person fraudulently using one social security Dougherty says. “Similarly for undocumented immithe smartest idea at the time. When she got there, she number, CBI has seen as many as 13 or 14 people grants who are simply trying to work, it can be a felosays there were a lot of people hanging out but the using one number to work. ny offense and the consequences that that carries are woman using Gonzalez’s identity wasn’t at home. She “It can really escalate for a victim into something pretty significant, especially when you consider our assumes most of them were undocumented. that is not only disruptive in their life but can be real- current immigration approach in this country. For She told the guy who answered the door, “Look, I ly life-threatening for them,” Heckers says. example, the threat of deportation.” don’t want any problems, but I’m Luz Gonzalez and a “If they are kicked out of housing and off of Such is the case for Ingrid Encalada Latorre, who girl in this house is using my information. Tell her to Medicaid, and let’s say they have a caregiver that has been in sanctuary at the Unitarian Universalist stop, because I already did a police report and I don’t comes to their home every day through Medicaid that Church of Boulder (UUCB) for more than a year, know what’s going to happen. Just tell her to stop.’” helps them get up and get dressed and take their fighting a deportation order that is a result of a 2010 Then Gonzalez left and never tried to find the medications, maybe help them with their oxygen, and conviction for using falsified documents. woman again. all of that is canceled, and their oxygen resource is Latorre, who emigrated from Peru in 2000, spent “I’m an immigrant, so I do understand her. I Angela K. Evans her first few years in Colorado without neceswas without a Social for many years so I know sary documents to get a job and getting paid how it feels,” says Gonzalez, who is now a natuunder the table for her work. By 2003, she was ralized U.S. citizen. “A lot of people don’t know tired of the instability that came with this kind what it’s like to not have a Social and want to of work, so when she heard she could just go to work.” Denver and pay $100 for documents including According to the most recent statistics availa Social Security number, she began considerable from the Federal Trade Commission’s ing it. Consumer Sentinel Data Book, Colorado ranks “It was also a little bit scary because I didn’t 13th in the nation for reported identity thefts, know who these people were or what risks I with a total of 6,051 reported in 2017. Boulder was taking,” she says. “But as I started to ask County alone had 442. Employment and taxmore questions, everyone kept telling me that related fraud accounted for 27 percent of everyone is doing it so I thought if everyone is reports, second only to credit card fraud. While doing it maybe it’s not that much of a risk after there are a variety of reasons why a person may all.” use someone else’s identity to work, anything Ingrid had a friend drive her to Denver in from tax evasion to a having a criminal record, search of a guy her friends told her could help. “Anecdotally, it is more often someone who is She only had an approximate location and none undocumented,” says Hazel Heckers, victim of the phone numbers she was given ever assistance coordinator with the Colorado worked. After driving around for awhile, Ingrid Bureau of Investigations (CBI) identity theft met up with a guy who took her photo and told and fraud unit. her to come back in a couple of hours. When “I look at this as a casualty of our immigrashe returned, he had a green card and Social tion policy in this country,” says Boulder Security card ready for her. County District Attorney Michael Dougherty. “I knew it could either be a dead person, or “There are people who commit identity theft a real one, or a made up one,” she says. “But the because they just want to buy a new flat screen people you buy it from, they don’t tell you anyor buy a new car, and they are just out to defraud peo- canceled and their medical thing, they just tell you how much it is and if Luz Gonzalez has been ple. Then you have these cases, where someone is just treatments are canceled and you want it and they leave the rest up to you.” a victim of identity theft, but she also can trying to work and just trying to make a living here in they can’t go to the pharmaSo Latorre bought the documents and empathize with this country. And I think those cases are really tragic.” cy... immediately started working at a nursing home undocumented immigrants who use Proliferation of identity theft and fraud cases are “You could see how it in Evergreen, despite how nervous she was to identifying documents at least in part due to increased access to personal use them. could kind of snowball.” to work. information through technology, no longer bound by “They look fake, they don’t even look real Additionally, the emoproximity and personal interaction. In short, identity but really the companies that are hiring you, tional and psychological theft has “become easier to commit,” Dougherty says. they don’t care because who else are they going impacts can have long-lasting “Gone are the days when a guy has to approach a man effects on victims of identity theft, Heckers says. The to hire? Who else is going to do these heavy jobs but in an alley with a knife saying, ‘Give me your wallet.’” us?” she says. Latorre started as a dishwasher, cleaning victims CBI works with experience a range of emoOnline breaches in security hit an all time high in mountains of dirty dishes for the 120 residents at the tions that are typical of any other type of victimiza2017, according to a report from Javelin Strategy & facility. Although the work was extremely difficult and tion or trauma: depression, anger, anxiety, etc. Some Research, which has been tracking identity theft since people even start to suffer from insomnia or become she often thought about quitting, she eventually set2003. The report also states that, while credit card tled in, moving her way up to assistant cook and then suicidal after having their identity stolen. fraud and account takeovers continue to rise, Social cook over the seven years she worked there. “People who are victims of identity theft or fraud Security breaches are now the most common form of “To have a consistent paycheck every two weeks experience the same trauma reactions that people of identity theft for the first time, accounting for 35 per- any other crime do; they have been violated,” Heckers gave me a lot of security and relief,” Latorre says. She cent of all cases in 2017. was finally getting paid minimum wage, “which was says. “It may not have been their physical person, but As identity theft continues to grow nationwide, it their core, their identity has been violated. They suffer more than before,” and she was eligible for worker severely impacts its victims, affecting everything from benefits like overtime and workman’s comp. consequences whether financial or other from what’s financial aid and student loans to credit scores and Then in 2010, at 6 in the morning, she was arresthappened and it can be pretty devastating in their access to public benefits. ed at work after the woman whose identity she was lives.” A majority of the victims CBI works with suffer Heckers and her team at CBI assist victims in corthe cancellation of benefits as a result of identity theft, recting the record by working with the IRS, Social See IDENTITY Page 12 Boulder Weekly

January 10, 2019 11


IDENTITY from Page 11

using reported it to law enforcement. ties in the first place, then sell them on the street to and assault. “I felt really bad and have since repented because immigrants. In order for a case to qualify for restorative justice, this woman was needing government benefits. And “We always want to try to work up the chain to two main criteria must be met: one, the offender has that’s really not fair,” Latorre says. “If our positions make sure that it’s not simply the person who wants to take responsibility for the crime and acknowledge had been switched and I was the one with the Social to work that is being prosecuted but rather the indithat it caused harm to others, and two, the victim has Security number, I would never want someone else to viduals who are more aware of what’s happening and to be willing for the case to go through the restorative use it. I felt really bad about that.” are trying to take advantage of people,” Dougherty justice process and not press charges. The arrest led to a felony charge, jail time, years says, although this can often be challenging or even “It really is dependent on the person who’s experiof probation and thousands of dollars in restitution impossible. enced harm,” McGoey says. Restorative justice always fines to both the government and the victim. It also “I know that sometimes the person who is comlooks at “meeting the needs of victims and making alerted Immigration and Customs Enforcement mitting the crime is a victim as well,” Heckers admits. sure it doesn’t cause them additional harm.” (ICE) and Latorre has been fighting a deportation Although she’s apologized publicly for using Although restorative justice can be an alternative order for years as a result. She’s been in sanctuary at someone else’s identity to work, Latorre has been to criminal charges in the case of identity theft, UUCB for more than a year, and in Denver and Fort unable to talk with the victim in her case. But the McGoey says, often the harm is substantial for a vicCollins before that, in order to stay with her two new campaign is an attempt to rectify the harm she tim, with far-reaching consequences that the offender U.S. citizen children. She’s petitioned the governor caused. often can’t help repair. for a pardon in order to expunge her record and LCJP has only seen a few cases of identity Joel Dyer obtain some sort of legal status, but those theft, and at least one such effort was successful. requests have been denied, her most recent plea In that case, the victim’s Social Security number left unanswered before Gov. Hickenlooper left had been sold when he was a child and only office this week. after he became an adult did he find out about Now, while in sanctuary, Latorre wants to help it. Both the victim and the offender went other immigrants to keep from making the same through a successful restorative justice process, mistakes and suffering the same consequences she McGoey says, without going into more specific has endured. Through a new public service camdetails. paign, ¡No Mas Chuecos!, she’s enlisting help “In most restorative justice cases, the comfrom people like Gonzalez and Dougherty, among mon need or request from a victim is to hear others, to help spread the word and educate the from the offender that they won’t ever do this immigrant community not only about the effects again,” McGoey says. “The victim just often of identity theft on the victims but the possible wants to hear the offender say, ‘I’ve learned from repercussions for immigrants as well. this, I see that there were consequences from my “There are actually victims behind these actions and I won’t ever put anyone else in the actions and there are actually people behind these same position that I put you in.’” numbers, and I want the community to underIt can be a powerful tool for all parties involved stand that there are other ways to go about this,” to sit in the same room and understand that there Latorre says. “You can work with your communiare actual people behind both the crime and the ties, work with your governments and you don’t Social Security number. have to do what I did.” “From my perspective, what can really be A large part of the campaign is educating the powerful about restorative justice for identity immigrant community and connecting them with theft is just for the victim to sit across from the resources to avoid using falsified or stolen docuoffender and see them as a human and for that ments in order to work. It encourages people to seek offender to see the victim as a human,” McGoey “It’s important for me Ingrid Encalada Latorre legal help, apply for a Colorado driver’s license, which to do my part to continue says. “Often in these dialogues, it’s just the is launching the ¡No doesn’t require a Social Security number, or get an chance for them to meet and talk to each other fixing the system and conMas Chuecos! campaign to educate Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to that is the most transformative.” tinue preventing more victhe community not only file taxes. Gonzalez for one doesn’t hold it against the tims from being harmed about the effects of identity theft on the “Until we solve the immigration problem in this woman who used her information to work at from this,” she says. victims but also the country, we’re going to continue to have cases like Taco Bell, empathizing with her need to work Latorre is also working possible repercussions for immigrants as well. this,” Dougherty says. “We have created this situation and support her family. with the Longmont where people feel trapped into committing this act, Gonzalez immigrated to Colorado from Los Community Justice and it’s a crime under Colorado law. Still I recognize Partnership (LCJP) in an effort to see how restorative Mochis, Mexico, in 1988, her stepfather having they don’t have a lot of options. We need to do as justice could be used in identity theft cases, either as a received amnesty under President Ronald Reagan. But much as we can to help immigrant communities she didn’t get her green card right away, and by the way of mediating between victims and offenders or in understand what other means [are available to] obtain lieu of criminal charges. time she was 16 she felt the constraints that come lawful employment.” without having a Social Security number. “A lot of the way our legal system works, it just Identity theft “doesn’t have to [result in criminal “It’s another life, when you have a Social,” she looks at what somebody did that broke the law and charges], the victim does have a right, though, to press how do we punish them because they broke the law,” says. “It’s another life.” those charges,” Heckers says, adding that criminal Still, even if you are sympathetic to the offender’s says LCPJ executive director Kathleen McGoey. charges in an identity theft case are fairly rare for a motivations, it’s stressful to know that at any point “Whereas restorative justice says how did the choice variety of reasons, including simply not being able to someone could be using your identity. It happened that led to the violation of the law affect human relatrack down the offender after they’ve left a particular again to Gonzalez in 2007. When she filled out the tionships and really focuses on what can be done for job or “sometimes they just stop using” the docuapplication for an apartment, the building managepeople, whether they are documented or not.” ments. Additionally, in Colorado at least, the prosecument said she was already in their system, despite the LCPJ works with the Longmont Police tion has to prove that the person using the documents Department. The most common cases the department fact that she had never previously lived there. knew that they belonged to a real person. “Somebody has [my Social Security number] out refers to restorative justice involve vandalism, theft, Rarer still is finding the people who steal identitrespassing, arson, burglary and sometimes harassment there,” she says. “It’s scary,” 12 January 10, 2019

Boulder Weekly


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boulderganic Changing lives with freshwater access in South Africa by Will Brendza

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hen Norman Mthethwa arrives back to his village in South Africa, he’s got a tight schedule and a lot of work to do. After spending the better part of a year developing his organization, Drop in Sea, through Watson Institute’s incubator program at Chautauqua, Mthethwa is champing at the bit to get down to business. A community of nearly 10,000 people, Mthethwa’s village, Boschfontein, (and all of South Africa, as he points out) is in the midst of a water crisis. It’s estimated 5 million people don’t have access to clean drinking water, while 14 million don’t have access to safe sanitation. Additionally, the country has experienced years of climate change-induced drought causing severe water shortages in major cities like Cape Town. In many rural areas, like Boschfontein, access to fresh drinking water is severely limited, not only because of geography or climate — but also by broken wells and boreholes in disrepair. They know where the water is, they just can’t access it. “Water is the source of a lot of challenges,” Mthethwa says. “Yes, education is important, but if you’re not healthy, you can’t learn. If you get sick from the water you drink, health, education, innovation, all of those things are affected.” Mthethwa experienced this water crisis first-hand growing up in Boschfontein.“In my house we only used to get water on the weekends,”

Mthethwa describes. “If you didn’t save up water in those two days you were screwed for the whole week. And if you didn’t, that meant you had to go to school, come back, take a jerry can, go find a stream and then carry it back.” And even then, he says, a lot of the time the water that he would collect was unsanitary and required a lot of boiling. “I don’t want the next person coming after me to feel that, to experience that,” Mthethwa says. “I want to change it.”

starting to think about how he could address water scarcity in his village and make an impact on his community. But it wasn’t until he graduated with his degree in business that Drop in Sea became the forefront of his focus. He entered Drop in Sea into a pitch competition and earned his first $1,000 in funding. From there he applied to Watson Institute’s incubator program, which aims to help nextgeneration innovators and social entrepreneurs amplify their impact through social ventures and projects. Courtesy of Drop in Sea It was a long shot, Mthethwa says. For a kid from South Africa, the chances of getting into Watson and the logistics of organizing such a trip if he did, seemed like insurmountable challenges. “But, I made it happen,” Mthethwa says, surprising even himself. He arrived in Boulder in January 2018, with his budding pet pilot project and an inexhaustible drive to push it forward. “I gathered a team of other people who have a personal connection to the mission, and also differing experiences and expertise,” Mthethwa explains. He registered Drop in Sea as an When he was in high school he NGO in June and started fundraising became involved with Imagine right away. If they were going to serve Scholars, an after-school youth develeveryone in Boschfontein, Mthethwa opment initiative that aims to empow- calculated they were going to need at er young leaders. They helped least $3,000 to do it. Mthethwa get scholarships and attend “Some of the money has been comcollege at the University of Pretoria, ing in on individual donations, like which, he says, was a dream come true. people who really believe in our idea,” It was at university that Mthethwa Mthethwa says. started Drop in Sea as a side project, But the most significant contribu-

tion to their cause came from the Red Empress Foundation, which awarded Drop in Sea $2,967.68 to improve water access in Boschfontein in November. It was exactly the boost the organization needed. “When I got the grant I was over the moon,” says Mthethwa. “$3,000 or $4,000 is probably not a lot here in the States, but it will mean a lot to a lot of people in South Africa. There are lives that are going to be changed.” The holidays marked the end of Mthethwa’s time in Boulder, and the beginning of the real work. Now back in South Africa, he’s working to hire a drilling firm to start working on the wells. At the same time, he’s recruiting people from Boschfontein to act as the project liaisons with the community and who will learn how to repair and maintain the wells. The entire project life-cycle should only take about three weeks, he hopes. The end goal is autonomy, Mthethwa says. He wants to make sure that the community can support themselves, that they can learn how the pumps work, and then teach that to other people and continue to enjoy fresh, clean water. And he isn’t stopping with Boschfontein. When Mthethwa is finished with Drop in Sea’s work there, he’ll move onto the next community, and the next one after that. “Water is a world crisis, it’s not just South Africa or my community or anywhere else,” he says. It’s something we can all relate to and something everyone on Earth should care about. “Water is life.”

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January 10 , 2019 15


Courtesy of CU Boulder

The walls move outwards

buzz

CU Boulder language project aims to give nonbinary Hebrew speakers the words they need

Boulder Weekly

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by Caitlin Rockett

hen Lior Gross emailed Eyal Rivlin to ask about joining one of Rivlin’s Hebrew classes at the University of Colorado Boulder last spring, Rivlin noticed Gross had included nonbinary preferred pronouns in their email signature: they, them, theirs. It was a simple observation that could change the way 9 million Hebrew speakers around the world communicate. That email was the launching point for the Nonbinary Hebrew Project, an open-source project founded by Rivlin and Gross that creates a framework for a third gender construction in Hebrew. Hebrew — like French, Spanish and one-quarter of the world’s spoken languages — uses grammatical gender, categorizing nouns as male or female, but also gendering

adjectives and verbs according to the speaker’s gender. For people who identify as genderqueer, nonbinary or gender questioning, gendered language can greatly limit the way they express gender identity, which is to say nothing of the psychological effects such limitations impose. Gross says nonbinary Hebrew speakers sometimes alternate between gender constructions from sentence to sentence, or switch their constructions based on who they are speaking to. Others have created their own words and phrases with no rules to apply to the language overall. So Rivlin, an Israeli whose first language is Hebrew, asked Gross how they wanted to go about communicating in this “very binary” language. “Part of my teaching philosophy is to

Eyal Rivlin, a native Hebrew speaker from Israel, teaches Hebrew language in CU Boulder’s Program in Jewish Studies. Over the last year, Rivlin worked with nonbinary student Lior Gross to create a third gender construct in Hebrew.

see HEBREW Page 18

January 10 , 2019 17


Courtesy of Eyal Rivlin

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HEBREW from Page 17

make sure that every student feels safe and welcome and able to be fully themselves in my class,” Rivlin says. We’re sitting on the floor of his office in the University Club building, and Gross, back in Baltimore with their family after simultaneously earning their bachelor’s and master’s in ecology this December, completes our circle as a smiling, bespectacled face on Rivlin’s MacBook screen. “It’s a small class and highly interactive because it’s a language class,” Rivlin explains. “I actually get a diverse student body, whether it’s students who are not Jewish, students who are Muslim, Christian, auditors, people who are older, trans students. And so it’s important for me to create an environment where everybody wants to participate, everyone wants to come to class. So when I noticed Lior’s signature, I had a moment. I’d had trans students before that either identified as male or female, but how [can Hebrew work for] nonbinary [students]? It inspired me to actually be proactive before the semester began and really think about that.” Gross and Rivlin met up to discuss possibilities. Initial research showed incomplete workarounds, but there wasn’t a solid framework set up to handle nonbinary grammar and systematics in Hebrew. So Rivlin called family and friends back in Israel to ask if they had any experience with using nonbinary grammar — no luck there either. “My approach, with Lior’s inspiration and the need that arose in the classroom, was to say, ‘Well, what can we do? What actually is possible?’” Rivlin says. “Lior found some precedents in Spanish and so kind of using that information I wanted to create something that would feel organic and

Eyal Rivlin with student Lior Gross at Gross’ graduation in December 2018. Gross, who helped found the Nonbinary Hebrew Project with Rivlin, graduated with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in ecology.

fluid for native Hebrew speakers so it doesn’t sound jarring, so it makes sense; something that if you could explain it in a minute or less, anyone would be able to apply that if they know the language.” After some trial and error, using the classroom as a sort of laboratory, Rivlin and Gross created a third gender category by adding the “-eh” suffix to most words. “What I like about the suffix that we came up with is that the sound of it ... is associated with masculine endings, but the letter that we added to go with it is the letter H, which is associated with feminine endings,” Rivlin explains. “So in a way, when you look at it, it looks feminine but it sounds masculine. It holds both. It’s not a foreign sound and it doesn’t clash with other existing Hebrew rules. We looked at other possibilities and that one, when we applied it and experimented in the classroom and with each other, felt organic, it sounds good.” The new construction also has the added benefit of allowing Hebrew speakers to address a mixed audience in a nonbinary way, where previously the masculine plural would be the default. Gross sees the Nonbinary Hebrew Project as part of a global language revolution. “We started doing the project and I started learning more and it turned out there are a lot of things people were doing in other languages at the same time,” Gross says. “It was really cool to Boulder Weekly


see that there’s kind of a little bit of a revolution going on right now ... in English alone: What are these words, what are these labels, how do we talk about ourselves and how can we change the conversations we have based on the words that we can use? Then getting to apply that to other languages that we speak to try to hold more people... It’s just a whole wave of momentum that’s happening.” In the fall of 2017, the first school textbook promoting a gender-neutral version of French was released in France. Canada made its national anthem gender neutral just last year, and three provinces — the Northwest Territories, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Ontario — allow “X” on birth certificates. Sweden added the widely adopted gender-neutral pronoun hen to its dictionary in 2015. Germany put a working group together last year to find ways to modernize German to include gender-neutral language in a way that people could actually speak. For Gross, the Nonbinary Hebrew Project is a natural progression for a language whose history includes an almost 2,000-year period of non-use as a common spoken tongue. In a paper about the project, Gross calls the history of Hebrew “one of innovation and molding in order to fit the conventions of the era, especially in terms of attitudes towards gender.” In an op-ed for The New York Times in 2016, rabbi Mark Sameth lays out a compelling case in favor of gender fluidity and neutrality, based on the Hebrew Bible, read in its original language. “In Genesis 3:12,” Sameth writes, “Eve is referred to as ‘he.’ In Genesis 9:21, after the flood, Noah repairs to ‘her’ tent. Genesis 24:16 refers to Rebecca as a ‘young man.’ And Genesis 1:27 refers to Adam as ‘them.’” Even more fascinating is the fourHebrew-letter name of God — YHWH. Sameth says the word was “probably” not pronounced Jehovah or Yahweh, as Israelite priests would have read the letters in reverse as Hu/Hi, Hebrew for he/she. “Counter to everything we grew up believing,” Sameth writes, “the God of Israel — the God of the three monotheistic, Abrahamic religions to which fully half the people on the planet today belong — was understood by its earliest worshipers to be a dual-gendered deity.” Rivlin adds to this, recounting the story of God coming to Moses in the form of a burning bush: “When Moses asks God, ‘What should I tell people is your name?’ in Hebrew it’s ehyeh ’ašer ’ehyeh: ‘I am that I am,’” Rivilin says. “It’s Boulder Weekly

an ever-changing, ever-evolving name.” This is what is fundamentally most important to Gross: The history of inclusivity and gender subversion in the Jewish faith. From Gross’ perspective — and they aren’t alone — it’s built into the very DNA of Judaism. “I think that having this sense of mutual reciprocity and community is really important for understanding how, in a lot of different Jewish movements, there have been pushes toward inclusivity,” Gross says. “Again and again we

innovate and change. Two generations ago, their Judaism isn’t recognizable to us and our Judaism isn’t recognizable to the sages of the Talmud. And the rabbis who were writing the Talmud, their Judaism wasn’t recognizable to their contemporaries who were part of the temple cults. “It was said that on holidays at the temple, even though there was a certain size of the actual building, no matter how many Jews came there was always enough space for all of them because

the walls moved outwards,” Gross says. “We have the opportunity right now to do that through language and we have the opportunity to do that through all sorts of different types of accessibility and justice in our communities. The values are right there in our texts and our songs and the stories we tell our kids.” The Nonbinary Hebrew Project is an open-source offering. For more information, or to help add to the project, visit nonbinaryhebrew.com.

January 10 , 2019 19


20 January 10 , 2019

Boulder Weekly


overtones

I

Tony Bonacci

n his memoir, Nothing to be Afraid Of, novelist Julian Barnes immediately confides: “I don’t believe in God, but I miss him.” Throughout this meditation on mortality, Barnes laments the death of God in our increasingly secular world, because even as God’s executioners, we still long for something to believe in, for something to inspire us, for something that will ease the pain of being so wretchedly, mortally human. It’s a longing Tim Kasher can relate to. The frontman for indie rock outfit Cursive has made a career of publicly unspooling his relatable existential crises, often thematically, focusing on the dissolution of a marriage (his marriage, with some dramatic accoutrements) for the band’s breakthrough record, Domestica, in 2000, or the meaning of art in 2003’s critically acclaimed The Ugly Organ. It’s been six years since Cursive’s last album, I Am Gemini, a far-reaching concept album that explores the relationship between good and evil. But unlike the bulk of Cursive’s output, I Am Gemini is inaccessible, both musically and sometimes lyrically, requiring a 13-page booklet to lay out the characters for this kindof-sort-of rock opera. The album, while interesting in fits and spurts and indicanothing to do with an elected governtive of Kasher’s burgeoning interest in ment and everything to do with how we screenwriting, strays from the relatable govern ourselves. As historian Robert everyday miseries that makes other Zaretsky argues, there are solutions to Cursive albums so beloved. the crisis of Trump’s presidency — which Now there’s Vitriola, the band’s we have seemingly collectively dubbed an eighth studio album and a pleasant existential threat — but there are no solureturn to form — even if the subject tions to a true, Sartrean existential crisis, matter is anything but only more questions. pleasant. But sometimes — Vitriola loosely just sometimes — ON THE BILL: Cursive — examines burnout and belief in God looks like with Summer Cannibals, dread in the age of a pretty good solution Campdogzz. 9 p.m. Trump, without dropto the sucking void of Saturday, Jan. 19, Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., ping names or engagemptiness that Kasher Boulder. Tickets are $19ing in too much finsometimes feels, and he $20. ger-pointing. It also occasionally misses reunites the band with God, a bit like Julian original drummer Barnes. Clint Schnase and producer Mike “Wouldn’t that be a fucking delight Mogis, who worked on The Ugly Organ to just turn off my TV and not fucking care about anything anymore with it?” and, most recently, Cursive’s 2006 Kasher says over the phone recently. release, Happy Hollow. With Megan “You know what? Ignorance is bliss. I Seibe adding cello to the mix — the would love to continue being Catholic, first strings on a Cursive album since and I can handle going to church every The Ugly Organ — Vitriola finds the Sunday as long as I don’t have to think band in rare form. about what’s really going on. But I’m Despite allusions to current political and social turmoil, at the core of just... my entire life I’ve been somebody the album is a human searching for who’s been compelled to want to face meaning in a life that keeps reminding the truth.” him there is no meaning, only living. Part of “the truth” is that Cursive Because a real existential crisis has makes a damn good record when

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Upcoming Events & Entertainment Thursday January 10

COLLEGE RADIO “Classic Alternative” FREE ADMISSION

Condemned to be free

With their new record, Cursive returns to the relatable, existential misery that made them so beloved

Friday January 11

STONEBEAT INVASION “The Beatles & Rolling Stones Tribute”

Saturday January 12

SONIC ARCADE “80s Dance Party”

by Caitlin Rockett

Boulder Weekly

Kasher gets out of his own way and lets loose with his emotions. It’s also how Kasher avoids turning completely toward nihilism. “I find the most happiness in the moment of writing and in completing whatever it is I happen to be working on,” he says. “So then what I write about tends to generally be about the existentialism. But it’s funny: I suppose in the very process of writing about it that’s kind of the way I help curb it for myself. We’re all looking for some sense of meaning. Even the very writing I’m doing, I recognize it’s totally meaningless but I do it because it’s the closest I can get to myself... to self-actualization, I guess.” And he’s right, as far as Sartre or Camus or Zaretsky or Barnes could or can tell. Existential crises — the real kind, the internal kind with no solutions — are necessary to living a meaningful life. The sheer dread of it all pushes us to see through the lies we tell ourselves about how life is supposed to be and finally see how life really is. It’s beautiful and ugly, not always in equal measure, and it’s probably — possibly... maybe — all we’ve got. As Sartre once famously said, we are condemned to be free.

Wednesday January 16

BOURBON & BLUES WITH DELTA SONICS FREE ADMISSION

Thursday January 17

DUELING PIANOS “Have Fun, Be Loud, & Party”

Friday January 18

DEJA BLU

“Variety Dance”

Saturday January 19

MR MAJESTYK’S 8-TRACK REVIVAL “70s Rock”

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Amanda Tipton

a r ts & culture Takács Quartet will play “Three Bs” plus one

Beethoven, Bartok, Beach and Barber part of the varied spring concert series by Peter Alexander

T

he Takács String Quartet is offering music by to do something that we’re playing on the road, or “Three Bs” for their spring concert series in that we’re about to record.” Boulder — in fact, “Three Bs” plus one. That is exactly the case with the Beach Quintet, These are not the traditional “Three Bs” which the Takács will play again on tour in March of music history, Bach, Beethoven and and later record with pianist Garrick Ohlsson — who Brahms. Beethoven is there, but alongside him will be coincidentally will be in Boulder next week to perthe Hungarian Béla Bartók, the remarkable American form Rachmaninoff with the Boulder Philharmonic composer Amy Beach, and another American, Samuel (7:30 p.m. Jan. 19 in Macky Auditorium). Barber. A talented pianist and composer in the late 19th These composers and others will be featured and early 20th centuries, Beach was not allowed to across three different concert properform professionally while her husgrams, performed on Sunday afterband was living. She composed under noon and Monday evening pairs: Jan. the name “Mrs. H.H.A. Beach” until ON THE BILL: Takács 13–14, Feb. 10–11 and April 28–29. his death. She subsequently became String Quartet. Grusin Music As they often do, the quartet has known as Amy Beach and gained Hall, Imig Music Building, invited colleagues from the CU considerable renown as a pianist. 1020 18th St., Boulder. Tickets: https://cupresents. College of Music to join them on two Before joining the CU faculty, org/series/takacs-quartet/ and then the Takács Quartet, Rhodes of the programs; pianist Jennifer played with the Chamber Music Hayghe in January and baritone Society of Lincoln Center and Andrew Garland in February. Musicians from Marlboro. She performed many The guests bring with them pieces from outside works outside the standard repertoire, including the the quartet repertoire. With Hayghe the quartet will Beach Quintet. play the Quintet for piano and strings by Beach in “It’s lush and very Romantic and beautifully writJanuary. With Garland, the February program will ten for the piano,” she says. “I’ve played it quite a bit, feature songs with string quartet by Barber (Dover which is ironic because here I am the rookie [in the Beach) and Ned Rorem (Mourning Scene). quartet] and it’s the obscure quintet that I’ve played.” Beyond those pieces, the bulk of the music on the She also knows Garland from her earlier chamber three programs will comprise six works from the quarmusic career. “Andrew’s really wonderful,” she says. “I tet repertoire, two each by Haydn, Beethoven and Bartók, and the less known Edvard Grieg String worked with him before he came to CU, so in the Quartet. quartet I’m the only person who knows him well. Harumi Rhodes, the second violinist who joined When the quartet mentioned that he was in the books the Takács Quartet last year, says, “In Boulder we do a for this season, I was thrilled!” lot of collaborations, because the faculty is wonderful If Rhodes has a head start on the other members and we love playing with them. When possible, we try of the Quartet for non-standard pieces, the same is

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not true for the rest of the programs. “These guys have been playing Beethoven and Haydn and Bartók like 80 times a season for the past 25 years,” she says. “For me, that’s the new endeavor.” Bartók is particularly associated with the Takács Quartet, in part because the founders were all themselves Hungarian. But Rhodes sees the group’s identity as much more than nationality. “I think it has more to do with the aesthetic of the group,” she says. “Over many, many years the group has established a sound that is specific to the Takács Quartet, and even with member changes that aesthetic hasn’t changed. “It’s something that I think about all the time. I think about the sound of the group, I think about ways to enhance it. It’s not a matter of fitting in — it’s a matter of having a deep understanding and love for that core idea, and then taking responsibility to enhance it.” Rhodes is particularly excited about the programming across the three concerts. The quartet pairs by Haydn, Beethoven and Bartók represent the greatest string quartets of the classical, early Romantic and 20th-century eras, with Grieg, Beach and the two pieces with voice expanding that core. “I think it’s brilliant programming,” Rhodes says, while explaining that it was already in place when she joined the quartet. “It’s practical, aesthetically pleasing, intellectual, extremely emotional, it appeals to the music historian, it appeals to the person who knows nothing about music history — there’s so many layers and levels of programming that can reach so many different people. “With works by Haydn, Bartók and Beethoven, that’s what makes that music timeless.”

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FRI. JAN 11

THE ROCK AND ROLL PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS

ROOSTER & PARTY GURU PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

RUSS LIQUID

CHEWY&BACH, FUNKSTATIK SAT. JAN 12 JAMMIN’ 101.5 & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

THINK - A TRIBUTE TO ARETHA FRANKLIN

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RED NOT CHILI PEPPERS 40OZ TO FREEDOM THE GOONIES

THURS. JAN 17 BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

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THE CRYSTAL METHOD YOKO B2B IAM_JACK, SKEENA SAT. JAN 19 RADIO 1190 & BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENT

CURSIVE

SUMMER CANNIBALS, CAMPDOGZZ THURS. JAN 24 ROOSTER PRESENTS

BLACK TIGER SEX MACHINE HE$H, LEKTRIQUE FRI. JAN 25

SUN. JAN 13

THE MUSIC OF TOM PETTY FOR KIDS FRI. JAN 18 & SAT. JAN 19 PLANET BLUEGRASS PRESENTS

HOT RIZE

MICHAEL CLEVELAND, RED KNUCKLES & THE TRAILBLAZERS

TUES. JAN 22 BOULDER WEEKLY PRESENTS

THE SECOND CITY’S BEST OF SECOND CITY WED. JAN 23

BEATLES VS. STONES A MUSICAL SHOWDOWN THURS. JAN 24 97.3 KBCO PRESENTS

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AN EVENING WITH

BRETT DENNEN FRI. FEB 1 STAND OUT STAR OF AMERICA’S GOT TALENT THE LUCKY DRAGON TOUR

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FT. SPECIAL GUEST BRIDGET LAW

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HOSTED BY DJ VICTORY, DJ AMBITIOUS BOY

SAT. FEB 9

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SUN. MAR 17

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Boulder Weekly


Randal Slavin

Chris D’Elia: Follow The Leader 2019 Tour. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 14 and Wednesday, Jan. 16, Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030. Chris D’Elia is best known for his standup and starring role on the NBC comedy series ‘Undateable.’ His latest standup special, ‘Man on Fire,’ is now on Netflix. see EVENTS Page 26

events

NASA

SHAMANIC GONG BATH AND SOUL-CENTERED BREATHWORK EVENT.

9 P.M. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16, FOX THEATRE, 1135 13TH ST., BOULDER, 303-447-0095.

5:30 P.M. SATURDAY, JAN. 12, SPIRIT BUILDING, 4665 NAUTILUS COURT SOUTH, SUITE 100, BOULDER.

Akex Matthews

Wikimedia Commons

While only recently experiencing widespread popularity in the Western world, the practice of sound healing predates Christ. The Greeks reportedly used vibrations to aid digestion and induce sleep. Contemporary studies show that music lowers blood pressure, decreases pulse rate and assists the parasympathetic nervous system. This event, led by Nancy Wunderlich and Jim Lanpheer, will combine the sounds of gongs, Tibetan bowls, Peruvian bells, Native American flutes, hand pan and saxophone with specific breathwork to create a transformational experience. Tickets are $30 at bpt.me/event/3918628.

Boulder Weekly

LOS ANGELES VS. LONG BEACH: RED NOT CHILI PEPPERS, 40 OZ. TO FREEDOM.

LEONARD DAVID: MARS. 7 P.M. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16, CHAUTAUQUA COMMUNITY HOUSE, 900 BASELINE ROAD, BOULDER, 303-440-7666. Leonard David has been reporting on the future of the global space exploration program for more than 50 years. He’s the author of National Geographic Society’s 2016 book, Mars — Our Future on the Red Planet. During this Community House talk, David will speak to what the next decade may hold for global space exploration — in low Earth orbit, the Moon, Mars and beyond. Tickets are $12 ($9 for concert members).

If the winter blues are starting to catch up to you, this might be the pick-me-up you didn’t know you needed. The Red Not Chili Peppers are teaming up with 40 Oz. To Freedom to serve up a hot slice of ’90s nostalgia pie at the Fox. Channeling the funky psychedelia of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and the sun-bleached ska of Sublime, Red Not Chili Peppers and 40 Oz. To Freedom have both spent years touring the world and amassing fans in their own right. Warming the party up are Boulder-based time-traveling party warriors The Goonies. So go have fun, but do remember: It’s Wednesday... in 2019.

January 10 , 2019 25


events events

arts Ablaze — by Elsa Sroka. Abend Gallery, 1412 Wazee St., Denver. Opens Jan. 12. Through Jan. 26.

Michelle Lamb/UCAR Community Art Program

All Aboard! Railroads in Lyons. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons.

Michelle Lamb skillfully manipulates and arranges found objects, allowing a determined amount of original patina, shape, texture or inherent iconography to provide the “plot” for her story. These objects are the “characters,” adding depth and weight to her narratives as Lamb chooses whether to amplify them or to deconstruct their original context. Lamb’s sculptures will be on display in the UCAR Community Art Gallery at the NCAR Mesa Lab through February 2019.

Assemblage/Mixed Media/Sculpture — by Michelle Lamb. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through March 1. Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit.

Live Entertainment Nightly at our 1709 Pearl St location

DIOR: From Paris to the World. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through March 3. Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies. CU Art Museum, 1085 18th St., Boulder. Through May 2019.

THURSDAY JANUARY 10

PAPER MOONSHINE 8PM

EYES ON Julie Buffalohead. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building (Level 4), 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Feb. 3.

FRIDAY JANUARY 11

EYES ON Shimabuku. Denver Art Museum, Hamilton Building (Level 4), 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Feb. 3.

J.W. TELLER 8PM WYNN WALENT/ PAUL BEAUBRUN 9PM

Fossils: Clues to the Past. University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Paleontology Hall, 15th and Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing exhibit. Ganesha: The Playful Protector. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave. Parkway, Denver. Through Jan. 13.

SATURDAY JANUARY 12

THE SIMPLE PARADE 8PM WOUNDED BIRD 9PM

Google Garage. Museum of Boulder, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Ongoing, but activities change. Living with Wolves. Museum of Boulder at Tebo Center, 2205 Broadway, Boulder. Through May 20.

SUNDAY JANUARY 13

Matthew Pevear: Mastering the Art of French Cooking. BMoCA at Macky, Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado Boulder, 1595 Pleasant St., Unit 104, Boulder. Through May 5.

GARY WITTNER TRIO

FEAT. MARGUERITE JUENEMANN & KAHBU DOUG YOUNG 8PM MONDAY JANUARY 14

CLARE THÉRÈSE 8PM SAM BURNS 9PM TUESDAY JANUARY 15

JACK CAMPBELL 8PM LEAH WOODS 9PM WEDNESDAY JANUARY 16

JAZZETRY NIGHT!

FEATURING VON DISCO 8PM THURSDAY JANUARY 17

TIM OSTDIEK 8PM FINN O’SULLIVAN 9PM ZY’EV LEFT HAND 10PM FRIDAY JANUARY 18

JOHNNY & THE MONGRELS 8PM Happy Hour 4-8 Every Day THELAUGHINGGOAT.COM 26 January 10 , 2019

Mixed Media — by Tabitha Aaron. NCAR’s Mesa Laboratory, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. Through March 1. Pard Morrison: Heartmouth. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Sept. 1. penumbra — by Diane Martonis. Dairy Arts Center, McMahon Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Jan. 13. Roberta Restaino. Firehouse Art Gallery, South Gallery, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. Through January 29. Tara Donovan: Fieldwork. Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, 1485 Delgany St., Denver. Through Jan. 27.

Type/Cast — by Joel Swanson and students. Dairy Arts Center, Hand-Rudy & MacMillan Family Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Jan. 13. Where the Body Sits and Learns — by Benjamin Rogers. Dairy Arts Center, Polly Addison Gallery, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder. Through Jan. 13 Worlds Suspended in Reality. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder. Through Jan. 20. World War II Diary Transcribed at the Museum. Lyons Redstone Museum, 340 High St., Lyons. Ongoing exhibit.

EVENTS from Page 25

Thursday, January 10 Music Alex Theole Duo. 6 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914. Bear and the Beasts (Single Release). 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-291-1007. The Dollhouse Thieves. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-296-1003. George Nelson Band. 9 p.m. License No. 1, 2115 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-0486. Itzhak Perlman — with the Colorado Symphony. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. Kris Lager Band — with Winston Ramble, Extra Gold. 7:30 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Mark Cormican. 7:30 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Nekrofilth (Album Release). 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230. Paper Moonshine. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Open Bluegrass Pick. 6:30 p.m. St Julien Hotel and Spa, 900 Walnut Ave., Boulder, 970-214-1447. Events Cinema Program Screening: Brakhage. 7 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Ecstatic Dance. 7 p.m. The StarHouse, 3476 Sunshine Canyon, Boulder, 303-245-8452. GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Great Indian Novel. 4:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Happy Prince. 4:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org. Holiday Afternoon Tea. 2 p.m. Chautauqua Dining Hall, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. More times at chautauqua.com. International Sportsmen’s Expo. Colorado Convention Center, 700 14th St., Denver, 303-228-8000. Through Jan. 13. Luke Kimmes: Rediscovering North America. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Open Improv — Long Form. 7 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder, 303-443-3934. Out Boulder County Gender Support Group — Boulder. 7 p.m. Pride House, 2132 14th St., Boulder. Stock Show Kick-Off Parade. 12 p.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. Swimming With Men. 2 and 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.org.

Up Down Circus. 4 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 N. 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. More times at updowncircus.com. Friday, January 11 Music The Bad Engrish. 9 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-291-1007. Chris Dismuke. 7:30 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-645-1749. Crow Cavalier. 9 p.m. Globe Hall, 4483 Logan St., Denver, 303-296-1003. The Crystal Swing Band. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. Dream Feed. 9 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007. Drew Emmitt (Leftover Salmon) and UllrGrass All-Stars featuring members of Rapidgrass and more — with Coral Creek (Dead Set), Pick & Howl. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Dulcimer Concert at Swallowhill. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Finn O’Sullivan. 10 p.m. No Name Bar, 13131325 Broadway, Boulder. The Foggy Tops Bluegrass Band. 7 p.m. Großen Bart Brewery, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 214-770-9847. see EVENTS Page 27

Boulder Weekly


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theater Garland Photography

The Little Sisters of Hoboken are in dire need of funds and decide to put on a variety show. Here we meet Reverend Mother Regina, a former circus performer; Sister Mary Hubert, the Mistress of Novices; a streetwise nun from Brooklyn named Sister Robert Anne; Sister Mary Leo, a novice who is a wannabe ballerina; and the delightfully wacky Sister Mary Amnesia, the nun who lost her memory when a crucifix fell on her head. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse in Johnstown presents ‘Nunsense,’ Jan. 10 through March 3.

Annie Get Your Gun. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Jan. 27.

Nunsense. Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown. Through March 3.

Betrayal. Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Through Feb. 17.

The Pinter Plays: Early Classic Oneacts by Nobel Laureate Harold Pinter — presented by Germinal Stage. John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Through Feb. 2.

Blue Dime Cabaret. Denver’s Dangerous Theatre, 2620 W. Second Ave., Denver. Jan. 11, 18 and 25. Disenchanted!. BDT Stage, 5501 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. Opens Jan. 11. Through March 31.

Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway, Lakewood. Through Jan. 20. Shrek The Musical. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. Through Jan. 27.

Expires 1/31/19

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Xanadu. Denver Center for Performing Arts, Garner Galleria Theatre, 1101 13th St., Denver. Through March 31.

She Loves Me — presented by Performance Now Theatre Company. Lakewood

EVENTS from Page 26

Joey Alexander. 8 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic. 8:30 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

2019 Winter Wrkshops: Global Drum Solo and Zilling with Drumming. 11:15 a.m. A Living Arts Centre, 2231 S. Platte River Drive, Denver.

Hellgrammites. 7:30 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

888. 8 p.m. Marquis Theatre, 2009 Larimer St., Denver, 303-487-0111.

Lafayette Oatmeal Festival and 5K Walk/Run. 7:30 a.m. Center for Musical Arts, 200 E. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-0599.

Hello, Mountain (EP Release Show). 7 p.m. Syntax Physic Opera, 554 S. Broadway, Denver, 720-456-7041.

The Adam Lopez Trio. 4:30 p.m. The Tasty Weasel, 1800 Pike Road, Longmont, 303-776-1914.

The Mighty Twisters. 10 p.m. The Dark Horse, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-442-8162.

Integral Steps. 1 p.m. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette, 303-604-2424.

All About The Brass. 7 p.m. Grossen Bart Brewing, 1025 Delaware Ave., Longmont, 720-438-2060.

Miguel Espinoza Flamenco/Jazz Fusion and Michele Castro. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003.

J.W. Teller. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

A Bears Choice. 8 p.m. Oskar Blues Tap Room, 921 Pearl St., Boulder, 303-776-1914.

NightWraith. 9 p.m. Hi-Dive Denver, 7 S. Broadway, Denver, 303-733-0230.

The Pharcyde. 9 p.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023.

Colorado Chamber Players Gala 25th Anniversary Party and Concert. 7 p.m. Opus Two Hall, 9167 Davidson Way, Lafayette.

Opiuo. 9 p.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Russ Liquid. 9 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Sugar Moon. 7 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. A Tribute to Aretha Franklin. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Wynn Walent, Paul Beaubrun. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Events Evan Cantor, Guest Artist. 5 p.m. pARTiculars Gallery, 401 S. Public Road, Lafayette. Free Legal Clinic. 3 p.m. Lafayette Public Library, 775 W. Baseline Road, Lafayette, 303-665-5200. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. 8:45 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Versatility Dance Festival. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-444-7328. Warren Miller Film Screening to Benefit SafeHouse Denver. 6 p.m. Stoney’s Bar and Grill, 1111 Lincoln St., Denver, 303-302-6112. Saturday, January 12 Music Boulder Weekly

Colorado Rocky Mountain Fiddle Championships. 9 a.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. The Custom Shop Band. 6 p.m. Bootstrap Brewing Company, 142 Pratt St., Longmont, 303-652-4186. Earls of Leceister. 7:30 p.m. The Caribou Room, 55 Indian Peaks Drive, Nederland, 303-258-3637. Enchanted Winter Concert. 7 p.m. Nomad Playhouse, 1410 Quince Ave., Boulder. Freddy Jones Band Jesse Valenzuela (of The Gin Blossoms). 7 p.m. Soiled Dove Underground, 7401 E. First Ave., Denver, 303-830-9214. Get Your Ears Swoll. 7 p.m. The People’s Building, 9995 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 720-819-6680. Horseshoes & Hand Grenades — with Part & Parcel and special guests. 9 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Hugh Manatee, Zagriculture. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver, 303-291-1007. Jackson Cloud Odyssey. 8 p.m. The Wild Game, 2251 Ken Pratt Blvd., Unit A, Longmont, 720-600-4875. Jenn Cleary Solo Acoustic Show. 3:30 p.m. Salto Coffee, 112 E. Second St., Nederland.

Rhapsody in Brass. 7:30 p.m. Ellie Caulkins Opera House, 1101 13th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. The River Arkansas. 7:30 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Shamanic Gong Bath & Soul-Centered Breathwork Event. 5:30 p.m. Spirit Building, 4665 Nautilus Court South, Suite 100, Boulder. The Simple Parade. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Steveland Swatkins & The Positive Agenda — with a special tribute to Erykah Badu and D’Angelo. 9 p.m. Cervantes’ Other Side, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Think — A Tribute to Aretha Franklin. 8:30 p.m. Fox Theatre, 1135 13th St., Boulder, 303-447-0095. Thunder and Rain. 8 p.m. Swallow Hill Music, 71 E. Yale Ave., Denver, 303-777-1003. Tom Weiser Jazz Quartet. 7 p.m. Caffè Sole, 637 S. Broadway, Boulder, 303-499-2985. A Tribute to Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops. 7:30 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. see EVENTS Page 28

January 10 , 2019 27


Courtesy Topaz Hooper

words Topaz Hooper uses poetry to incite emotional and critical awareness in her audience. Her poetry touches on topics relating to her queer identity, politics, love, loss and world injustice. Her newest book, ‘My Mind’s Eye: Poetry and Visual Art on Social Justice, Philosophy and Identity,’ is her first published poetry book. See Hooper speak at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore on Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 6 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC SATURDAYS

8:00pm NO COVER 1/12 JACKSON CLOUD ODYSSEY

Thursday, Jan. 10 Brooke Bessesen — Vaquita. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver.

7:30 p.m. Su Teatro Cultural and Performing Arts Center, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver.

Ellen Mains — Buried Rivers. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Bookstore, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

Brittany Ackerman with Matty Glasgow — The Perpetual Motion Machine. 2 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver.

Friday, Jan. 11

Sunday, Jan. 13

Open Poetry Reading. 10 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver.

BAFS “Second Sundays” Poetry Workshop. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder.

Saturday, Jan. 12 Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 1628 16th St., Denver. Minor Disturbance Weekly Workshop + Open Mic. 1 p.m. Prodigy Coffeehouse, 3801 E. 40th Ave., Denver.

Sunday Night Poetry Slam. 7 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver. Monday, Jan. 14 So, You’re a Poet. 9 p.m. Wesley Chapel, 1290 Folsom St., Boulder.

A Typewriter Revolution — in collaboration with Buntport Theater Company. 1:30 and

1/19 5TH GEAR FUNK 1/26 THE WELL INTENTIONED 2/2 SONIC ARCADE 2/9 WENDY WOO BAND 2/16 STEVE MANSHEL 2251 KEN PRATT BLVD

LONGMONT CO 80501

720-600-4875

TheWildGameLongmont.com 28 January 10 , 2019

Tuesday, Jan. 15 Tattered Tales Storytime. 10:30 a.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Topaz Hooper. 6 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Weekly Open Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Innisfree Poetry Bookstore & Cafe, 1301 Pennsylvania Ave., Boulder. Lisa Gunshore — Enlightenment Pie. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Bookstore, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder. Wednesday, Jan. 16 Brad Meltzer — The First Conspiracy. 7 p.m. Tattered Cover Book Store, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Christine Caldwell — Bodyfulness. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Bookstore, 1107 Pearl St., Boulder.

EVENTS from Page 27

Xavier Wulf & Idontknowjeffery. 9 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Events 2019 National Western Stock Show. 9 a.m. National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver. See nationalwestern.com for a full schedule of events. Family Handmade Pasta Workshop. 1 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Folkloric Dancers. 3:30 p.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. Saturday Morning Groove. 10:30 a.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Saturday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Spanish/English Storytime: Read and Play in Spanish. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250.

Brunch Oddity: the David Bowie brunch, hosted by DJ Boyhollow. 10:30 a.m. Ophelia’s Electric Soapbox, 1215 20th St., Denver, 303-993-8023. Colorado Chamber Players French Program. 2 p.m. Canyon Theater, Boulder Public Library, 1001 Araphoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Colorado Rocky Mountain Fiddle Championships. 9 a.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. DU Lamont Faculty Recital — Joseph Galema, organ. 4:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-871-6499. Eggs Bacon & Joey presents Dr. Golden’s Take a Little Walk a Thon. 8 a.m. Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Ave Parkway, Denver. Gary Wittner Trio featuring Marguerite Juenemann and Kahbu Doug Young. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731.

2019 National Western Stock Show. 9 a.m. National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver. See nationalwestern.com for a full schedule of events. Boulder Comedy Show (2 shows). 7 p.m. Bohemian Biergarten, 2017 13th St., Boulder, 720-767-2863. Concert Series Presents: Colorado Chamber Players French Program. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. The Doctor from India. 5 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Folkloric Dancers. 4:30 p.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. Go Club for Kids & Teens. 2 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Hawaiian Hula Classes. 5 p.m. A Place to B, 1750 30th St., Unit 64, Boulder, 303-440-8007.

Tops Off To Broadway: A Burlesque Comedy. 8 p.m. The Clocktower Cabaret, 1601 Arapahoe St., Denver, 303-293-0075.

Mad Pow. 8 p.m. Lost Lake, 3602 E. Colfax Ave., Denver.

Versatility Dance Festival. 7:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-444-7328.

Music in the Galleries: Clay Quartet. 1 p.m. Clyfford Still Museum, 1250 Bannock St., Denver, 720-354-4880.

Western Views Book Club. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

The Music of Tom Petty for Kids. 11:30 a.m. Boulder Theater, 2032 14th St., Boulder, 303-786-7030.

Sunday, January 13

Takács Quartet: Haydn, Beethoven and Beach. 4 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008.

Music

Events

A Hike Through The Haunted Woods Of Jagged Mountain. 6 p.m. Jagged Mountain Craft Brewery, 1139 20th St., Denver, 720-689-2337. La Fille du Regiment: Vienna State Opera. 1 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Local Rodeo Royalty Clinic. 11:30 a.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977. More dates and times at nationalwestern.com. see EVENTS Page 30

Boulder Weekly


UPCOMING AT eTOWN HALL

Friday January 11

Think - TribuTe To areTha Franklin

FeaT kim dawson (maTador soul sounds), Jeremy salken (big giganTic), such, JoFoke, gabe mervine, mike Tallman (euForquesTra), nick gerlach (michal menerT), PeTer sTolzman & connor groscurTh (digg) w/ sPace orPhan

saTurday January 12

horseshoes & hand grenades w/ ParT & Parcel, morsel

Thursday January 17

summer camP on The road

Friday January 18

lucid vision & homemade sPaceshiP w/ borahm lee key-J seT (break science, PreTTy lighTs live), ToTem & sTill PoinT

saTurday January 19

Thursday January 10

grass For ThaT ass PresenTs

kris lager band

w/ winsTon ramble & exTra gold

Friday January 11

drew emmiTT (leFTover salmon) & ullrgrass all sTars FeaT members oF raPidgrass w/ coral creek (dead seT), Pick & howl

saTurday January 12

sTeveland swaTkins & The PosiTive agenda

w/ sPecial TribuTe To erykah badu & d’angelo FeaT kowan Turner, will Trask, ladamion massey, dan aFricano, luba, scoTT Flynn, vlad colesnicov, michelle sarah, devon rossman, sasha brown & brionne wrighT

w/ Jubilingo

wednesday January 16 re: search

govinda

Thursday January 24

40oz To Freedom

Thursday January 17

FeaT dJ FullmeTal w/ grassFed & Feed The dog

(sublime TribuTe) w/ Phour PoinT 0 (Phish TribuTe) & The greaT salmon Famine

Friday January 25

Friday January 18

everyone orchesTra

FeaT sTeve kimock, bill Payne (liTTle FeaT), naTalie cressman (Trey anasTasio band), Jeremy salken (big giganTic), george gekas (The revivalisTs), brian moss (sPaFFord), drew sayers & Parris Fleming (The moTeT) w/ los colognes

saTurday January 26

everyone’s dead

FeaT sTeve kimock, maTT buTler (everyone orchesTra), bill Payne (liTTle FeaT), george gekas (The revivalisTs), rob eaTon (dark sTar orchesTra) & Tim carbone (railroad earTh) w/ new orleans susPecTs PerForming The music oF liTTle FeaT

lesPecial w/ TurTleneck

saTurday January 19

zion-i

w/ Tvboo & Trixx

Friday February 8

ThriFTworks

w/ breTher (sam & billy oF PaPadosio), mikey Thunder & Jordan Polovina

Friday & saTurday January 25-26

dave waTTs birThday bash

Tuesday January 29

w/ adam “shmeeans” smirnoFF (leTTuce) FeaT Joey PorTer & garreT sayers (The moTeT), isaac Teel (Tauk), eric “benny” bloom (leTTuce) & casey benJamin (roberT glasPer exPerimenT)

w/ gooPsTePPa

wednesday January 30

saTurday February 9

FeaT an-Ten-nae

The greyboy allsTars wednesday February 13

comeThazine

w/ lil gnar & TnT Tez

Friday February 15

The caliFornia honeydroPs saTurday February 16

groundaTion sunday February 17

aqueous & big someThing wednesday February 20

yung gravy Friday march 1

norTh mississiPPi allsTars saTurday march 2

acTion bronson wednesday march 6

mike sTud

Thursday march 7

lil mosey

w/ Ponder The albaTross

Friday February 1

kid Trunks x craig xen FeaT coolie cuT, bass sanTana, Flyboy TaranTino & kin$oul

saTurday February 2

ynw melly

Tuesday February 5

7Th annual bob marley bday Thursday February 7

Jack cloonan band Friday February 8

greyboy allsTars saTurday February 9

sTring Jam

FeaT bill nershi (sci), neal evans (doPaPod), Joel searls (geneTics) & Josh shilling w/ ghosT Town driFTers

Tuesday February 12

shwayze

wednesday February 13

lee “scraTch” Perry & subaTomic sound sysTem Friday February 15

The indie Jam 500

brassTracks

saTurday march 9

FeaT members oF cycles, Tiger ParTy, mama magnolia, oTher worlds – exTended versions oF your FavoriTe indie rock songs w/ rush hour Train

Friday march 15

saTurday February 16

hoT buTTered rum & w/ ballyhoo! & kash’d ouT granT Farm TexT cervanTes To 91944 For TickeT giveaways, drink sPecials, discounTed TickeT PromoTions & more The exPendables

Max 15 Msg/Mo. Msg & data rates May apply text stop to opt out for our privacy terMs & service go to http://cervantesMasterpiece.ticketfly.coM/files/2014/03/cervantes-privacy-docuMent.pdf

2637 Welton St • 303-297-1772 • CervantesMasterpiece.com

Boulder Weekly

We'll kick off the evening with a Happy Hour in the eTown Cafe before heading into the Hall for a specially curated program of short films.

Thursday January 31

grass For ThaT ass PresenTs

wednesday February 27

31

BIFF Shorts!

armchair boogie & The higgs (laTe seT)

(dJ seT)

deTroiT love: carl craig & moodymann

Jan

re: search

FeaT wake uP and live w/ dubskin

saTurday February 23

Movie Night at eTown Hall

w/ chase manhaTTan, beak nasTy, mikey Thunder & Jordan Polovina

re:search

nighTmares on wax

And Monocle Band

re: search

The Funk sessions

JanTsen & digiTal eThos

26 Foxfeather

FeaT earThcry (FeaT mike healy)

Thursday February 7

w/ rexx liFe raJ, innaneT James & correy c

Homevibe & eTown present

wednesday January 23

bas

goldFish

saTurday February 2

Jan

w/ illuminaTi congo, Thin air crew, ninJa Phil, luke highTree, resonaTe & babah Fly

FeaT dave waTTs, lyle divinsky (The moTeT), ian neville (dumPsTaPhunk), JeFF Franca (Thievery corPoraTion), maTT JalberT (Tauk), sTeve waTkins, kim dawson, nick gerlach, gabe mervine, Tanya shylock & dan aFricano 1/25: Jaden carlson band 1/26: new breed brass band

Friday February 1

Raye Zaragoza

monday January 14

w/ kaminanda, haana, mikey Thunder & Jordan Polovina

whiTewaTer ramble

William 20 Fitzsimmons Jan

The hang FeaT Jessica Jones & Friends

John medeski’s mad skilleT w/ dandu

Radio Show Taping

Radio Show Taping

Feb

6

presented by The Colorado Sound & KGNU

LP

Joachim Cooder

1/27 Dissolve: Baroque + Spoken Word + Hip Hop Dance 2/25 Radio Taping: Shook Twins & more 3/5 Concert: Steve Polz

WHERE: eTOWN Hall 1535 Spruce Street Boulder, CO 80302 TICKETS: eTOWN.org

Book eTown Hall for your next event. Contact digger@etown.org January 10 , 2019 29


events EVENTS from Page 28

New Year Party and Meet the Artists — with The Brady Tarot and Ashelon Oracle. 2 p.m. Mercury Cafe, 2199 California St., Denver, 303-294-9258. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. 2:30 p.m. Barnes and Noble, 2999 Pearl St., Boulder. Reynolds Teen Advisory Group (TAG) Meeting. 2:30 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Monday, January 14 Music Blue Grass Mondays. 7:30 p.m. 12Degree Brewing, 820 Main St., Louisville, 720-638-1623. Clare Thérèse. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. The Hang featuring Jessica Jones and friends — with Jubilingo and special guests. 8 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Sam Burns. 9 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Takács Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Events “Mis Pininos”/Spanish Conversation for Kids. 4:15 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Ancient Earth: Fire from above, fire from below. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666. Babies and Board Books. 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Chess Club. 6:30 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Citizenship Classes. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Mondays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Drop In Aerial Foundations. 5:45 p.m. Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance, 3022 E.Sterling Cr. Ste 150, Boulder, 303-245-8272.

Ensiferum, Septic Flesh, Arsis, Vale of Pnath. 7 p.m. Oriental Theater, 4335 W. 44th Ave., Denver, 720-420-0030. Faculty Tuesdays: Erika Eckert, viola. 7:30 p.m. Grusin Music Hall, 1020 18th St., Boulder, 303-492-8008. Faculty Tuesdays: William Primrose in Song. 7:30 p.m. Imig Music, Music Theatre, Boulder, 303-492-6352. Jack Campbell, Leah Woods. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Tiny Library Concert: A.J. Fullerton. 7 p.m. History Colorado, 1200 Broadway, Denver, 303-447-8679. Events 2019 National Western Stock Show. 9 a.m. National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver. See nationalwestern.com for a full schedule of events. 3rd Tuesday Lunchtime Concert Series Presents the Amelie Quintet. 12 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. All Ages Storytime. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-4414250;10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Anime Club. 4 p.m. Louisville Public Library, 951 Spruce St., Louisville, 303-335-4849. Around the World Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder World Affairs Discussion Group. 10 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conscious Dance. 8 p.m. Alchemy of Movement, 2436 30th St., Boulder, 303-931-1500. Conversations in English Tuesdays. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

HWAM: Free Demo. 10 a.m. Harmony Music House, 2525 Broadway St., Boulder, 303-4447444. Jazzetry Night! featuring Von Disco. 8 p.m. The Laughing Goat, 1709 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-201-3731. Mark Padmore, tenor, and Paul Lewis, piano. 7:30 p.m. Newman Center for the Performing Arts, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, 303-388-9839. Re:Search featuring Govinda — with HÄANA, Mikey Thunder, Jordan Polovina and special guests. 8:30 p.m. Cervantes Masterpiece, 2637 Welton St., Denver, 303-297-1772. Young Dolph — The Role Model Tour. 7 p.m. Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St., Denver, 303-487-0111. Events 2019 National Western Stock Show. 9 a.m. National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver. BeeChicas: Rejuvenate! 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Boulder Arts Commission Meeting. 6 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Conversations in English Wednesdays. 10:30 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Flatirons Mineral Club. 6 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. La Fille du Regiment: Vienna State Opera. 1 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. Lap Babies. 11:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Lego Storytime. 4 p.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120. Leonard David: Mars. 7 p.m. Chautauqua Community House, 900 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-440-7666.

GED Preparation Class. 10 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Local Rodeo Royalty Clinic. 12 p.m. National Western Stock Show, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver, 303-296-6977.

Out Boulder County Gender Support Group Longmont. 6:30 a.m. Out Boulder County, 630 Main St., Longmont, 303-499-5777.

The Man Who Saved the World. 4:30 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826.

Monday Night Belly Dance Classes. 6 p.m. Tribe Nawaar Marketplace & Classes, Wwwtribenawaarcom, Boulder, 303-859-5599.

TED Talk Film: 100 Solutions to Reverse Global Warming. 10:30 a.m. Golden West, 1055 Adams Circle, Boulder, 303-939-0883.

Musical Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Monday Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100.

Tuesday Tapping at Upslope Brewing. 11 a.m. Upslope Brewing Company (Flatiron Park), 1898 South Flatiron Court, Boulder, 303-396-1898.

Drop-In Writing: Exploring Suspended Reality for Writers Experiencing Homelessness. 2 p.m. Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, 1750 13th St., Boulder, 303-443-2122.

Movement Mondays. 7 p.m. Free Motion Dance Studio, 2126 Pearl St., Boulder, 720-379-8299. Moving from Fear to Flow. 6 p.m. Boulder Circus Center, 4747 26th St., Boulder, 303-444-8110. STEAM Storytime. 10:15 a.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Toddler Time. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Tuesday, January 15 Music 2019 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Humanitarian Awards and Concert. 7 p.m. Boettcher Concert Hall, 1000 14th St., Denver, 720-865-4220. African Rhythm Songs for Moms, Pops and Babies. 4 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1419 Pine St., Boulder, 303-219-3005. 30 January 10 , 2019

Dang’O. 8 p.m. Larimer Lounge, 2721 Larimer St., Denver, 303-291-1007.

Youth Maker Hangout. 4 p.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100. Wednesday, January 16 Music Blues Night. 10 p.m. Pioneer Inn, 15 E. First St., Nederland, 303-258-7733. Disturbed. 7:30 p.m. Pepsi Center, 1000 Chopper Circle, Denver, 303-405-1100. Drop-in Acoustic Jam. 6 p.m. 300 Suns Brewing, 335 First Ave., Unit C, Longmont, 720-442-8292.

Pages and Paws. 3:45 p.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Roll with Me. 7 p.m. Dairy Arts Center, Boedecker Theater, 2590 Walnut St., Boulder, 303-440-7826. More show times at thedairy.rog. STEAM Storytime. 10:15 a.m. Meadows Branch Library, 4800 Baseline Road, Boulder, 303-441-3100. Teen Game Night. 6 p.m. NoBo Corner Library, 4600 Broadway, Boulder, 303-441-4250. Wobblers & Walkers. 9:15 a.m. Boulder Library, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, 303-441-3100; 10:15 a.m. George Reynolds Branch Library, 3595 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, 303-441-3120.

A Food Justice Tu B’Shevat Seder. 7 p.m. Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Ave., Boulder, 303-998-1900.

Boulder Weekly


SPRING 2019

GENERAL ADMISSION $8 / CU STUDENTS $7

THE IFS, BOULDER’S FIRST ARTHOUSE SERIES, SCREENS BOTH DIGITAL CINEMA AND 35MM FILMS ON REEL-TO-REEL PROJECTORS. FOR IN-DEPTH FILM REVIEWS OR TO SIGN UP FOR DAY-OF REMINDERS FOR TITLES YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS, GO TO: INTERNATIONALFILMSERIES.COM.

SHOPLIFTERS Winner of the Cannes film festival’s 2018 Palme d’or

TEA WITH THE DAMES

A thrilling doc by the filmmAkers behind “merU”

Great actresses Defy aGe anD aGeism

A yOuNG GIRL cOMES uNdER THE cARE OF A FAMILy OF SMALL-TIME cRIMINALS, ONLy TO HAvE THEIR WORLd TuRNEd uPSIdE dOWN

JUDI DENcH, MAGGIE SMITH, EIlEEN ATkINS, AND JoAN PloWRIGHT HAvE A SPoT oF TEA AND DIScUSS THEIR IllUSTRIoUS cAREERS

ALEx HOnnOLD bEcOMES THE FIRST PERSOn TO cLIMb THE FAMED 3000-FOOT wALL OF YOSEMITE’S EL cAPITAn wITHOuT ROPES OR SAFETY GEAR

TuE-WEd-THuR 1/15-16-17 7:00 PM

FRI-SAT 1/18-19 7:30 PM

2:00 PM OnLY

MuENZINGER

MUENZINGER

MuEnZInGER

$8 GA / $7 STudENT

VISCONTI IN VENICE

FREE SOLO

SunDAY 1/20

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

BURNING

THE QUAKE

MEOW WOLF: ORIGIN STORY

BATHTUBS OVER BROADWAY

Latest from south Korean director Lee chang-dong (“PoetrY”)

A NorwegiAN ActioN/thriller ANd sequel to “the wAVe”

DisenfranchiseD artists, punks, anD weirDos create a subversive DiY collective

big-budget broadway-style musicals created for trade shows and conferences

thIs EERIE MystERy-DRaMa cENtERs aRoUND a MaN BEcoMING thE thIRD whEEl to aN olD fRIEND aND hER UNsEttlING NEw BoyfRIEND

A GEoloGIsT RAcEs AGAINsT TIME To sAvE HIs EsTRANGEd wIfE ANd Two cHIldREN wHEN A dEvAsTATING EARTHQUAKE HITs oslo, NoRwAy

aRTISTS IN SaNTa FE cRack OPEN a PROFITabLE NIchE IN ThE aRTS INduSTRY WITh ThEIR IMMERSIvE, LaRGEScaLE ExhIbITS

TUEsdAy 1/29 7:30 PM

ThuRSdaY 1/31 7:30 PM

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

MuENZINGER

FIRST PERSON

THE HEIRESSES

SENSO

DEATH IN VENICE

NomiNated for a GoldeN lioN at the 1954 VeNice film festiVal

An AwArd-winning AdAptAtion of the thomAs mAnn novel

IN 1860S VENIcE, A wANTON cONTESSA lOVES AND bETRAYS AN UNScRUPUlOUS AUSTRIAN OffIcER

AN EMoTIoNAllY loST CoMPoSER bECoMES obSESSED WITH A YoUNG boY WHIlE SEEkING SElf-DISCoVERY IN VENICE

TUESDAY 1/22

WEDNESDAY 1/23

fRI-sat 1/25-26 7:00 PM

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

7:00 PM

$8 GA / $7 STuDEnT

7:00 PM

$8 Ga / $7 stUDENt

$8 GA / $7 sTUdENT

$8 Ga / $7 STudENT

WRiTER STEVE YOUNG TRAckS DOWN RARE MUSicAl SHOW AlBUMS, UNSEEN fOOTAGE, cOMPOSERS, AND PERfORMERS

fRi-SAT 2/1-2 7:30 PM SUNDAY 2/3 2:00 PM ONlY $8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZiNGER

35 mm

PRINT

CELEBRATING

FILM 3003: THE CINEMA OF JOHN CARPENTER

FIRST PERSON

STAN CINEMA STUDENT AWARD SHOWCASE

RARE FILM PRINTS FROM THE BRAKHAGE COLLECTION HOSTEd By SuRANJAN GANGuLy

SuNdAy 2/3 7:30 PM

New 4K digital restoratioN

fRI-SAT 2/8-9 7:30 PM SUNDAY 2/10 2:00 PM ONlY MON-TUe-weD 2/11-12-13 7:30 PM

“UlTIMATElY, IT’S A JOHN CARPENTER MOvIE: CONCERNED WITH GROUP DYNAMICS, UNHElPFUl AUTHORITY FIGURES, STRONG WOMEN, THE SINS OF THE PAST, AND THAT MOMENT WHEN HElPlESS ISOlATION SHADES INTO OUTRIGHT TERROR.” (NOEl MURRAY)

$5 GA / STUDENTS FREE

FREE AdMISSION

VAC 1B20

ATLAS 100

ANIMATION

THE FOG

MONDAY 2/4 7:00 PM

OSCAR SHORTS

$8 GA / $7 STUDeNT

WEDNESDAY 2/6 7:30 PM

MUeNZINGeR

OSCAR sHoRts SHORTS osCaR

DoCuMEntaRY LIVE ACTION FRI-sat FRI-SAT 2/22-23 2/15-16 7:00 PM 7:30 PM SUNDAY 2/17 sunDaY 2/24 2:00 PM onlY ONLY

CINEMA MAlENA SzlAM

A SHREwD cOMMENTARy ON clASS, DESIRE, AND THE lINGERING PRIvIlEGES Of PARAGUAy’S ElITE

VAC 1B20

MON-TUE 2/18-19 7:30 PM

$5 GA / STUDENTS FREE

$ $8 8 G GA a // $ $7 7 S sT tU uD DE EN nT t

MUENZINGER MuEnZInGER

AwArd-winning LgBT drAmA

MONDAY 2/18 7:00 PM

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

FILM 3003: THE CINEMA OF JOHN CARPENTER

THE THING John Carpenter’s personal favorite of his own work & first installment in his “apoCalypse trilogy” A RESEARcH TEAM IN THE ANTARcTIc IS TERRoRIZED bY AN EvIl oRGANISM THAT cAN TAkE THE foRM of ANY lIvING cREATURE

WEDNESDAY 2/20 7:30 PM

osCaR sHoRts

DoCuMEntaRY FRI-sat 2/22-23 7:00 PM sunDaY 2/24 2:00 PM onlY $8 Ga / $7 stuDEnt

MuEnZInGER

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

35 mm

PRINT Intro by Dr. SabrIna negrI CU CInema StUDIeS

A B I F F 2 018 E N C O R E !

AWARDWINNING TBAs

CELEBRATING

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

THE SOWER

STAN

LIYANA

FRoM FEBRUARy 25-28, WE’ll BE ScREENING MUlTIplE oScARNoMINATED FIlMS. plEASE chEck oUR WEBSITE FoR DETAIlS

Intro by Dr. SabrIna negrI CU CInema StUDIeS

French romantic drama set in 1851

RARE FILM PRINTS FROM THE BRAKHAGE COLLECTION HOSTEd By SuRANJAN GANGuLy

A celebrAtion of collective storytelling

WHEN A vIllAGE IS DEPRIvED Of MEN, THE WOMEN SWEAR AN OATH: SHOUlD ONE cOME, HE MUST bE SHARED by All

SuNdAy 3/3 7:30 PM

FIvE AFRIcAN oRPhANs wRITE ThE scREENPLAY FoR AN ANIMATED FEATuRE FILM usING ThEIR owN DARkEsT MEMoRIEs AND bRIGhTEsT DREAMs As RAw MATERIAL

MON-TUE 3/4-5 7:30 PM

FREE AdMISSION

ATLAS 100

suNDAY 3/3 2:00 PM oNLY

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

$8 GA / $7 sTuDENT

MuENZINGER

FILM 3003: THE CINEMA OF JOHN CARPENTER

BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA John Carpenter’s last big studio film was a Cult hit on home video A HARD-BOILED TRUCk DRIvER GETS CAUGHT IN A BIZARRE CONfLICT WITH AN ANCIENT CHINESE PRINCE TRYING TO BREAk THE CURSE THAT TRAPS HIM

WEDNESDAY 3/6 7:30 PM $8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

THE IMAGE BOOK

GENESIS 2.0

Winner of the first special palme d’or to ever be aWarded at cannes

A SundAnce AwArd winner from the director of “wAr PhotogrAPher”

A vAST ONTOlOGIcAl INqUIRy INTO THE HISTORy Of THE MOvING IMAGE By THE lEGENdARy JEAN-lUc GOdARd

doc aboUT ThE UNkNowN TERRIToRy of GENETIc ScIENcE, cloNING, aNd ThE EThIcS bEhINd ThIS bRavE NEw woRld

FRIDAY 3/8

7:30 PM

MONdAy 3/11 7:30 PM

TUESday 3/12 7:30 PM

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

$8 GA / $7 STUdENT

BE NATURAL: THE UNTOLD STORY OF ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ

IN 1895, LÉON GAUMONT’S 22-YEAROLD SECRETARY SUGGESTED USING HIS NEw INvENTION TO FILM STORIES AS wELL AS DOCUMENTARIES. BUT HER SUCCESSFUL 20-YEAR CAREER vANISHED FROM FILM HISTORY

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

$8 Ga / $7 STUdENT

MUENZINGER

35 mm

PRINT bIFF 2019 RUNS FEb 28 - MAR 3 CHECk bIFF1.COM FOR DETAILS

Intro by Dr. SabrIna negrI CU CInema StUDIeS

FILM 3003: THE CINEMA OF JOHN CARPENTER

IN MEMORIAM : BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI

FILM 3003: THE CINEMA OF JOHN CARPENTER

PRINCE OF DARKNESS

THE CONFORMIST

John Carpenter’s seCond installment in his “apoCalypse trilogy”

BERTOluCCI’S MaSTERPIECE aBOuT a wEak-wIllEd ITalIaN FaSCIST FluNky wHO TRIES TO aSSaSSINaTE HIS Old PROFESSOR

WEDNESDAY 3/13 7:30 PM

SaTuRday 3/16 7:30 PM

MUENZINGER

MuENZINGER

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Combines oil painting, digital drawing, and graphiCs animation to Create stunning and Constantly moving, vibrant, textured visuals A MODERN fAIRY TAlE fROM BRAZIl fOcUSED ON THE OPTIMISM AND DETERMINATION Of cHIlD PROTAGONISTS fAcING A GlOBAl EPIDEMIc

nominated for 3 academy awards 1972 new digital restoration

ThE ESSENCE OF SATAN IS DISCOvERED AND INFECTS A GROUP OF TEAChERS AND STUDENTS

THE DAUGHTER OF DAWN

TITO AND THE BIRDS

A long-lost film of KiowA culture mAde in 1920 oKlAhomA A RESTORED AND RARE SIlENT FIlM FEATURING A lOvE TRIANGlE INvOlvING A KIOWA cHIEF’S DAUGHTER AND ENSUING cONFlIcT bETWEEN KIOWA AND cOMANcHE vIllAGES

MONDAY 3/18 7:30 PM

SUNDAY 3/17 2:00 PM ONlY

FREE SHOW

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

$8 Ga / $7 STudENT

THEY LIVE A brilliAnt riposte to trickle-down theory mAde in response to reAgAnomics A WANDERER TRIES To fREE EVERYoNE fRoM MIND-coNTRoLLING ALIENS AfTER DIScoVERING A PAIR of SUNGLASSES THAT REVEAL THE WoRLD AS IT TRULY IS

WEDNESDAY 3/20 7:30 PM $8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

HAVE YOU SEEN MY MOVIE?

TRANSIT

Attention cinephiles And triviA geeks, this found-footAge extrAvAgAnzA is for you!

An AmAzing new germAn movie from the director of “BArBArA” And “Phoenix”

Director/eDitor Paul anton Smith uSeS footage from over a thouSanD movieS SPanning 80 yearS to Deliver a love letter to the magic of cinema

WheN A mAN fleeS fRANce AfTeR The NAZI INvASIoN, he ASSumeS The IDeNTITy of A DeAD AuThoR WhoSe PAPeRS he PoSSeSSeS

tHUrSdAY 3/21 7:00 PM

moN-TueS 4/1-2 7:30 Pm

$8 GA / $7 StUdENt

$8 GA / $7 STuDeNT

MUENZINGEr

mueNZINGeR

FILM 3003: THE CINEMA OF JOHN CARPENTER

IN THE MOUTH OF MADNESS

WOMAN AT WAR IcelandIc comedy from the dIrector of “of horses and men”

The Third film in John CarpenTer’s “apoCalypse Trilogy” inCludes many referenCes To h.p. loveCrafT and sTephen King WHIlE ON THE SEARcH FOR A MISSING NOvElIST, AN INSURANcE INvESTIGATOR SUFFERS FROM DISTURbING NIGHTMARES

HAllA DEclARES WAR ON THE AlUMINUM INDUSTRy bUT FAcES ADDITIONAl cHAllENGES WHEN HER ADOPTION OF A UkRAINIAN ORPHAN IS APPROvED

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

WEDNESDAY 4/3 7:30 PM

MUENZINGER

THUR-FRI-SAT 4/4-5-6

7:30 PM

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

FREE

SHOW

35 mm

lIve mUSICal aCCompanIment by the mont alto motIon pICtUre orCheStra SponSoreD by the College of mUSIC

PRINT Intro by Dr. SabrIna negrI CU CInema StUDIeS

IN MEMORIAM : NICOLAS ROEG

THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH DaviD Bowie’s first starring role in a major motion picture

Intro by Dr. SUranjan gangUly: Department of CInema StUDIeS & movIng Image artS

CELEBRATING

FIRST PERSON

WORD OF GOD

STAN CINEMA IRENE LuSzTIg

RARE FILM PRINTS FROM THE BRAKHAGE COLLECTION HOSTEd By SuRANJAN GANGuLy

A HUMANOId ALIEN cOMES TO EARTH TO PROcURE WATER FOR HIS dyING PLANET, bUT bEcOMES A WEALTHy cAPITALIST HOOkEd ON TV ANd GIN ANd TONIcS INSTEAd

SuNdAy 4/7 7:30 PM

SUNdAy 4/7 2:00 PM ONLy

ATLAS 100

FREE AdMISSION

A DAnish “ROYAL TEnEnBAUMs” LATE 1980S DENMARk: A FAMILy’S PATRIARch TRIES TO RULE hIS UNRULy ROOST ONLy TO FIND ThAT LIFE AND DEATh hAPPEN WhEN yOU’RE bUSy MAkING OThER PLANS

MONDAY 4/8 7:00 PM $5 gA / STuDENTS FREE

TUE-WED 4/9-10 7:30 PM

VAC 1B20

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

MUENZINGER

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MUENZINGER

35 mm

35 mm

PRINT

PRINT Intro by Dr. SabrIna negrI CU CInema StUDIeS

Intro by Dr. SabrIna negrI CU CInema StUDIeS

IN MEMORIAM : SCREENWRITER WILLIAM GOLDMAN

ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN

MISERY Rob ReineR diRects Kathy bates to oscaR gold

Democracy’s template for how to stop an out-of-control presiDent

W E L L E S

the lady FRoM shaNGhaI

O N ToUch of evIl

One Of the mOst celebrated films Of the 20th century

Rita HaywoRtH sHines in tHis gRipping film noiR

Charlton heston and Janet leigh are embroiled in a story of murder, kidnapping, and poliCe Corruption

a nEwSPaPER moGUl’S lIfE IS ExamInEd afTER hIS fInal woRd SEndS a joURnalIST down a PERSonal RabbIT holE

a seaMaN becoMes INvolved IN a coMPlex MuRdeR Plot wheN he Is hIRed to woRk oN a yacht

monday 4/22 7:30 Pm mUEnZInGER

MuENZINGER

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

MUENZINGER

INTROS

BY

BARRY LYNDON

tuesday 4/23 7:30 PM

wednesday 4/24 7:30 PM

thursDAY 4/25 7:30 PM $8 GA / $7 stuDENt

FRIDAY 4/26 7:30 PM

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

sAtuRDAY 4/27 2:00 PM ONLY

MueNZINGeR

MUenZInGeR

MuENZINGEr

MUENZINGER

MuENZINGER

MICHAEL

MEDIA SPONSORS

CASEY:

BOULDER

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35 mm

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FILM

CRITIC

$8 Ga / $7 STUDENT

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L E O N V I TA L I I N P E R S O N FILMWORKER

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

35 mm

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thE ADAPtAtION Of thAckERAY’s NOvEL fOLLOws A LIkEABLE IRIshMAN As hE chANGEs INtO A cONNIvING, MANIPuLAtIvE ROGuE

PRINT

RETEllING THE SToRY of THE CHRIST THRoUGH THE MUSICAl STYlINGS of THE 1970S

MUENZINGER

ThE STORY OF LEON VITALI, WhO LEFT hIS PROMISING AcTING cAREER TO bEcOME STANLEY KUbRIcK’S DEVOTED RIGhT-hAND MAN

35 mm

JOHN BELUSHI aND DaN aYkROYD STaR IN THIS JOHN LaNDIS cOMEDY aBOUT TwO BROTHERS TRYING TO SavE THE caTHOLIc HOME IN wHIcH THEY wERE RaISED

SUNDAY 4/21 2:00 PM oNlY

A hollYwooD DIrEctor EMErGEs froM sEMI-ExIlE wIth PlANs to coMPlEtE work oN AN INNovAtIvE MotIoN PIcturE

PRINT

Andrew LLoyd webber And Tim rice’s incompArAbLe rock operA, fiLmed enTireLy in isrAeL

SaTURDaY 4/20 7:00 PM

The exPlosIon of a caR boMb on The Us/MexIco boRdeR leads To an InvesTIGaTIon ThaT exPoses a coRRUPT aMeRIcan PolIce caPTaIn

35 mm

ArethA FrAnklin, rAy ChArles, JAmes Brown, And more titAns oF musiC Are All here

AN AFTERNOON WITH SHOWRUNNER FOR THE SIMPSONS

SUNDAY 4/14 2:00 PM ONLY

$8 GA / $7 STuDENT

Leon VitaLi, the star of “fiLMWorKer”, got his start With BarrY LYnDon, anD joins us for an encore engageMent

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JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR

SATuRDAY 4/13 7:00 PM

Stanley KubricK’S cloSeSt aSSiStant joinS uS tonight - in the fleSh!

$8 Ga / $7 sTUdenT

SPRINGFIELD CONFIDENTIAL

FRIDAY 4/12 7:30 PM

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

OrsOn Welles’ final bOW 40 years in develOpment

$8 Ga / $7 studeNt

$8 Ga / $7 STUdEnT

3 5 M M thE othEr sIDE of thE wIND

STA F F P I C K

THE BLUES BROTHERS

THE TRuE SToRY of Two REPoRTERS wHo foLLowED THE MoNEY AND uNcovERED THE wATERGATE ScANDAL

35 mm

O R S O N

IN MEMORIAM ARETHA FRANKLIN

WhEN A FAMoUS NovElIST IS REScUED bY AN AvID FAN, hE FINDS hIMSElF AT ThE MERcY oF hER FIERcElY DEMANDING ADMIRATIoN

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CITIZEn KanE

MIKE REISS IN PERSON

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FIRST PERSON

CELEBRATING

STAN CINEMA gRAd ShOw MONdAY 4/29 7:00 PM $5 gA / STUdENTS FREE

VAC 1B20

RARE FILM PRINTS FROM THE BRAKHAGE COLLECTION HOSTEd By SuRANJAN GANGuLy

SuNdAy 5/5 7:30 PM FREE AdMISSION

ATLAS 100

$8 GA / $7 STUDENT

35 mm

PRINT we anticipate many special tba s throughout april not appearing on this printed calendar. check our web site for details.


Public domain

With a Coat by Dante Di Stefano

I was cold and leaned against the big oak tree as if it were my mother wearing a rough apron of bark, her upraised arms warning of danger. Through those boughs and leaves I saw dark patches of sky. I thought a brooding witch waited to catch me up from under branches and take me, careening on her broom, to her home in the jaundiced moon. I looked to the roof of mom and dad’s house and wondered if the paisley couch patterns would change during the day. My brother peeked from a window and waved. When the bus came, I pawed away from the trunk, fumbled, and took my first step toward not returning.

American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright ©2016 by Dante Di Stefano, “With a Coat,” from Love is a Stone Endlessly in Flight, (Brighthorse Books, 2016). Poem reprinted by permission of Dante Di Stefano and the publisher. Boulder Weekly accepts poetry and flash fiction submissions at poetry@boulderweekly.com. Submissions must be 450 words/35 lines or less and be accompanied by a one sentence bio of the author.

32 January 10, 2019

Boulder Weekly


Cinema without borders International Film Series returns by Michael J. Casey

C

U-Boulder’s International Film Series isn’t just Boulder’s first art-house ON THE BILL: series; it also features one of the best International Film programs out there. From internaSeries. Various dates tional sensations to genre appreciaand times, Muenzinger Auditorium, 1905 tions, award-winners and retrospectives, IFS offers Colorado Ave., Boulder. the Boulder moviegoing faithful an opportunity to internationalfilmseries.com see the best of cinema, past and present, in the best possible light. Not an easy task in a market where streaming consumption is the name of the game. But while the streaming giants trumpet convenience as their greatest asset, IFS has another card up its sleeve: curation. Here are 50-plus features and shorts, handpicked from the annals of history alongside some of today’s best for your viewing pleasure. Take Shoplifters ( Jan. 15–17), the latest drama from Japan’s Hirokazu Kore-eda and the winner of Cannes’ top prize last summer. Or how about They Live (March 20), John Carpenter’s witty retort to Reaganomics and rampant consumerism? Separated by an ocean and three decades, those two movies might seem worlds apart, but funnily enough, they’re more alike than they’re different. Even better, They Live is part of a six-film series focusing on Carpenter’s works. CU Cinema Studies professor Sabrina Negri will introduce each film — including The Fog (Feb. 6), The Thing (Feb. 20), Big Trouble in Little China (March 6), Prince of Darkness (March 13) and In the Mouth of Madness (April 3) — with background, historical context and attention to Carpenter’s cinematic style. You’ve probably seen a few of these movies before, but not like this. Five of the Carpenter films will unspool on 35mm, as will seven other titles this semester. From Luchino Visconti’s 1971 elegiac Death in Venice ( Jan. 23), based on Thomas Mann’s iconic novel, to Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of William Thackeray’s 19th century satire, Barry Lyndon (April 27). As a bonus, Lord Bullingdon himself, Leon Vitali, will introduce Lyndon. It’s unclear what kind of acting career awaited Vitali after Lyndon, but that isn’t his concern. Vitali was too enamored with Kubrick to do anything else and devoted himself to becoming Kubrick’s right-hand man. You’ll find that baffling and fascinating story in the documentary Filmworker (April 26) with Vitali in person. In addition to Vitali, Mike Reiss, one of the original writers for The Simpsons, will also trek to Boulder to give a one-of-a-kind presentation, “Springfield Confidential,” on April 14. Then there are the tributes to those we lost in 2018: A showing of The Conformist (March 16) pays homage to director Bernardo Bertolucci; The Man Who Fell to Earth (April 7) celebrates the life of director Nicolas Roeg; screenings of Misery and All the President’s Men (April 12–13) showcase the work of recently departed screenwriter William Goldman; and The Blues Brothers (April 20), features the queen herself, Aretha Franklin. Peppered in between: films from Brazil, Tito and the Birds (March 17); Denmark, Word of God (April 9–10); Iceland, Woman at War (April 4–6); Norway, The Quake ( Jan. 29); South Korea, Burning ( Jan. 25–26) and more, too numerous to contain here. There will even be a special program of Orson Welles films (April 22–25), all presented on 35mm and introduced by me, Michael Casey. More on those later. For now, let’s just go to the movies. For titles, dates, times and more information, please visit internationalfilmseries.com. Boulder Weekly

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Boulder Weekly


Four courses to try in and around Boulder County this week

menu THE TASTING

Ty Cobb Salad Mad Greens Several locations in Boulder County, madgreens.com

Photos by staff

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‘Elote’ Brussels Sprouts Dos Santos 1475 E. 17th Ave., Denver, dossantostacos.com

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lote, or Mexican street corn, is delicious anyway you slice it. Grilled corn covered in cotija cheese, lime, spices and mayonnaise, the ubiquitous Mexican street food favorite is growing in popularity across the U.S. While its served seasonally (the summer months) at Denver’s Dos Santos, the restaurant recently had a winter version on the menu, featuring the equally ubiquitous Brussels sprout. Charred sprouts were smothered in lime, salt, spicy mayo and cotija cheese. The entire dish was creamy and spicy, charred and tangy, all at once, happily washed down with a house marg. $5.00.

ast casual restaurants have officially taken over the world, due in large part to their combination of freshness, affordability, convenience and healthfulness. Mad Greens checks all those boxes with their lineup of salads, bowls, wraps and more. We opted for their signature Ty Cobb salad recently, and left abundantly satisfied with the bowl of romaine lettuce, Southwestern chicken, avocado, bacon, red onions, hard-boiled eggs, tomatoes and blue cheese dressing. A balance of textures, flavors and temperatures, this is a salad that you might find yourself craving. $10.

Cold Brew Vietnamese Coffee Black Orchid Coffee 148 E. Rogers Road, Longmont, blackorchidcoffee.com

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he husband-andwife team behind Longmont’s Black Orchid Coffee is raising the bar for pre-made, bottled coffees. Their cold brew Vietnamese coffee tastes as good as anything you’d find in a high-end coffee shop. Beans for the blend are sourced from the lush central forest highlands of Vietnam, and Black Orchid secured a custom blend from a supplier in the region after sampling hundreds of coffees on a visit. You’ll notice the smooth texture of the coffee, and taste its nutty, earthy and rich chocolaty flavors. Prices vary.

Bumbleberry Pie My Mom’s Pies 201 Murray St., Unit C, Niwot, mmpies.com

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f you spot a pie made by Niwot’s My Mom’s Pies, you’re likely to stand above it and debate whether you should buy it or not. It’s too enticing to ignore. The flaky crust, the overflowing filling, the ramshackle crimping and hole punctures that let you know the pie really is homemade. Of course, we couldn’t pass over a recent pie encounter and snatched one of the bumbleberry variety. It’s a mix of strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, marionberries and raspberries. Tart, sweet and juicy, the filling makes for a perfect partner to the buttery, flaky crust. Prices vary.

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Boulder Weekly


nibbles

Wikimedia Commons

BY JOHN LEHNDORFF

ba l ck to grue ‘Can I have some more’ savory, spicy oatmeal, grits, congee and grains?

Boulder Weekly

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hanks to a last-minute reprieve, one of Boulder County’s quirkiest annual food events will take place as scheduled on Jan. 12. For the 23rd year in a row, you will be able to crown a bowl of oatmeal with more than 100 toppings. Quaker Oats — the event’s sponsor and raison d’être — had announced last year that it was ceasing its financial support.

After an outcry from locals and oatmeal enthusiasts who labelled the company as The Grinch who Stole the Porridge, Quaker Oats wisely rescinded its decision. The humble 23rd annual Lafayette Oatmeal Festival is highlighted by a fitness run and a hot oatmeal breakfast starting at 7:30 a.m. at Pioneer Elementary School. I attended the first Oatmeal Festival and a few see NIBBLES Page 38

January 10 , 2019 37


NIBBLES from Page 37

since, and the main attractions are the toppings. While there are a few non-sweet toppings including jalapeños, bacon, hot sauce and grated cheese, the vast majority of festival-goers take the opportunity to heap on the sweet stuff including berries, gummy bears, chocolate chips, crushed cookies, fresh fruit, dried fruit and nuts. It’s dessert for breakfast, a tradition Americans whole-heartedly embrace, but I wonder if it isn’t about time for an oatmeal dinner during mons Com the Lafayette Oatmeal Festival? While imedia ik grain-based bowls are jst becoming W a “thing” in the U.S., people across the globe have been asking for savory porridge for centuries. Long before shrimp and grits were found on Southwestern menus, maize gruel was a big fuel for Mesoamerican peoples. Global savory grain variations include grits variations like creamy polenta, couscous, risotto and Asian congee, the thin rice porridge made with green onions, m on s Com a i meats, eggs and vegetables. ed im One promising sign is New ik W York’s OatMeals, an eatery offering 30 sweet and savory bowls including the Croque Madame: oatmeal with diced ham, shaved gruyere cheese, nutmeg, salt, pepper, steamed milk and a poached egg. Other toppings range from bacon, Parmesan and pesto to balsamic glaze, sundried tomatoes and furikake, a dried-fishbased seasoning. I’m an unabashed, lifelong fan of the chewy, creamy, fruity melding that makes hot cereal such a winter pleasure. As a meal, hot cereal has a lot of appeal as it can be organic, locally sourced, high fiber, gluten-free, dairy-free, low-sugar, high protein and thrifty. I bake oven batches of hot cereal that include old-

fashioned oats but also a mix from a changing roster of grits, polenta, almond flour, quick barley, rye flakes, puffed millet and leftover steamed rice. Some of them need to be pre-cooked or pre-soaked. I use milk and sometimes juice or applesauce to make it and add banana, butter, cinnamon, vanilla, yogurt, dried plums, chopped roasted nuts and toasted unsweetened coconut flakes to add textural complexity. However, I also cook the same grain mixture without sweetness or dairy — sometimes with broth — and set it aside as a canvas for savory purposes. One of my favorites is the combo of creamy cheesy grains topped with eggs, smoked ham or turkey and sautéed onions, red bell peppers and such. Another classic is plain grains with unsalted butter (or toasted sesame oil), sliced green onions, soy sauce, black pepper and toasted sesame seeds — with or without steamed spinach, roasted winter squash and other veggies. Last summer, I made an exceptional batch of steel-cut oats with off-thecob grilled Colorado corn, diced peaches and goat cheese. The other night I used it as a base for a batch of chicken green curry. Other brunch variations include oatmeal rancheros — with all the usual ingredients — and grains topped with shakshuka — eggs poached in spicy, vegetable-studded tomato sauce. By the way, the most famous hot cereal reference in English literature is not a request for seconds on Cinnamon Brown Sugar Oatmeal with Dinosaur Eggs. When Oliver Twist said, “Please, sir, can I have some more?” in Charles Dickens’ classic novel, he was requesting more gruel, a savory soup. Dickens wrote that Twist was fed “three meals of

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thin (oatmeal) gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll on Sundays.”

Local food news

Chef Daniel Asher of Boulder’s River and Woods and Lafayette’s Acreage has opened Ash’Kara, 2219 W. 32nd Ave., Denver, serving modern Israeli and eastern Mediterranean fare such as oven-baked pita and chickpea and fava bean falafel with tahina ketchup. Ash’Kara joins chef Alon Shaya’s upscale Safta restaurant in Denver, which also showcases new cuisine from Israel. ... Also on my list of eateries that opened and closed in the past 12 months: The Morning Table opened at 6565 Gunpark Drive in Gunbarrel, and Lee Yuan Chinese Cuisine closed at 4800 Baseline Road. Coming soon: Queen’s Kitchen Noodle House. ... The 15th Boulder International Film Festival, Feb. 28-March 3, includes a CineCHEF Competition including teams of women chefs from Denver and Boulder featuring Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja), Corina Johnson (The Kitchen), Jessica Nowicki (Safta) and Sheila Lucero ( Jax). biff1.com/cinechef ... Boulder’s Dragonfly Coffee Roasters was recently named the 2019 Micro Roaster of the Year by Roast Magazine. In November, Forbes named Dragonfly one of the 12 Best Coffee Roasters in the U.S.

Taste of the week

My favorite taste over the holidays was a flashback to growing up in New England. I got a hankering for mincemeat pie and found a baker who makes them by special order: Karen DeVincenzo, who creates pies and other goodies for the Jamestown Mercantile. She hit the mincemeat pie sweet spot with a meat-free variation packed with candied orange peel, dried fruit, spices, brandy, pear, apple, cherries and walnuts in a flaky crust. It was perfect with a slice of extra sharp Cheddar.

Words to chew on

“I have trouble with toast. Toast is very difficult. You have to watch it all the time or it burns up.” — Julia Child John Lehndorff is a prep cook, former Executive Director of the American Pie Council, and host of Radio Nibbles on KGNU. Podcasts: news.kgnu.org/category/ radio-nibbles

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Boulder Weekly


Photos courtesy of Illegal Pete’s

community

TABLE

Living on burritos Illegal Pete’s Pete Turner pays his employees close to $20 per hour

by Matt Cortina

Boulder Weekly

P

ete Turner made international news a few years back when he refused to submit to outside pressure and change the name of his chain of burritoand-beverage joints, Illegal Pete’s. The name was borrowed from a book Turner read as an English major at University of Colorado Boulder, and paid homage to his father, also named Pete, who helped him launch the first Illegal Pete’s, and who died of cancer only two years later. Amid the hullaballoo of negative press, Turner was working on something radically positive at Illegal Pete’s, something that could change the way communities support criminally underpaid restaurant workers around the world: providing health care and a living wage for every employee. It was a lesson he learned from his father. “It was put into my head by my father,” Turner says. “He was terminally ill with cancer and he always made sure I had health care.”

Turner launched Illegal Pete’s when he was just 23, buoyed by the support from his father, family and friends. Being so young, Turner says that as the company has grown the employees have been his peers, and so he feels an obligation to take care of them, the way his father took care of him in Illegal Pete’s early days. see ILLEGAL PETE’S Page 42

January 10 , 2019 41


ILLEGAL PETE’S from Page 41

Now, 23 years after launching, Illegal Pete’s pays its employees $15 per hour, with an average of $4.72 per hour in tips, $3,800 per year in free food and drinks, paid time off and sick leave, and health care. The change has been years in the making. “After 15 years [in 2011], we were able to look forward and say, ‘What do we want this business to look like?’” Turner says. For the man who had a lot of help

starting his business and whose employees have all been peers, it turned out what he wanted his business to look like one where people took precedence. He noticed a lot of restaurants and competitors paying lip service to this concept, but there were few businesses taking action to support its employees. “Our industry says people are the most important. Well, let’s treat them like that,” Turner says. “Fast casual [restaurants] were leaders in sustainability,

in farming and disposables. OK, that’s great. We can feel good about pigs, cows and the forks we serve, but we’re not paying our staff enough to live on.” So he used a tool from MIT to determine living wage in Denver and Boulder and set a target for $17.25 per hour. In the years since launching its living wage initiative, Illegal Pete’s has gone from paying its employees $9 to $15 per hour, representing a $3-million investment in people.

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“That’s a big number that goes back into our communities,” Turner says. He points out research that indicates CEOs of major companies make about 350 times as much as their lowlevel employees. That represents a skewed value system that Turner says has led other businesses to think it’s standard for executives to make excessively more than the people who make their businesses run. As it turns out, though, paying employees a livable wage has helped Illegal Pete’s raise its bottom line. “I thought, most of all, it was good business,” Turner says. “We always treated people as well as we could. Our thought was if we redirect that top-line cash flow [as in executive pay] to our staff, it would grow our top line and pay for itself with efficiencies and strong ideas.” Turner says it costs Illegal Pete’s about $1,500 to train every new frontline employee — cooks, cashiers, bartenders, etc. — and $10,000 to replace a manager. By increasing benefits, Turner says the company has a turnover rate one-quarter of its competitors. Retaining employees also boosts employees’ investment in the company, and Turner says he’s gotten plenty of ideas of new menu items or tweaks to the customer experience from his longtime employees. It also boosts their attitudes, encouraging them to stick around, which reduces the need to constantly be hiring, a prospect that “depresses” Turner. “It breaks my heart when we lose an employee,” Turner says. “[Our industry] has these whole recruiting departments because we drive people out.” Turner has had to look at every line item on the company’s expense sheet over the years to make the wage adjustment possible, but in turn, he’s been able to increase revenue and expand. Turner says it’s also benefited his company to pay its employees a livable wage because the dining experience at Illegal Pete’s isn’t as much about the quality of its food — and to be clear, there’s nothing wrong with a Pete’s burrito — but about the experience of eating there. As more companies, particularly in the fast casual sector, switch to automation, there’s a new premium on hiring human beings that have the skills to work with and for other people. “If I’ve got robots making burritos, I’m out of business anyway,” Turner says. One in 10 Americans work in the food industry. Illegal Pete’s employees represent an infinitesimal portion of that workforce. But if Turner can make a livable wage work for his business, so can others, and if enough businesses buy in, then we might be start to reduce income inequality in this country. Boulder Weekly


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anuary marks I HOP IPA’s second anniversary of serving the drinking faithful of Broomfield, Colorado. That’s no small feat in a state crowded with taproom breweries, brewpubs and more sports bars than you can shake a stick at, but I HOP IPA — with a logo of a hop flower in place of the word — offers connoisseur craft drinkers a different experience. Here, one can sample through a wide range of styles from breweries near and far. It’s like going to a beer festival, without having to stand in line or worry about getting sunburned. Located in an unassuming strip mall across Lowell Boulevard from the Broomfield Commons Open Space — should you need to work up or walk off a sudsy session — I HOP IPA seats about 30, has four large TVs playing sports or movies and two video game stations. Card games and board games are also piled high along the bars. You’re welcome to bring outside food in with you, but should you forget, there is a wing shack a few doors down, or you can munch on I HOP IPA’s offering of salty snacks. But it’s the beer that brought you here, and despite the name, I HOP IPA offers plenty more than just India pale ales. With 20 taps from which to choose — and a few more in the can — drinkers can work their way from sours to weizenbocks and back. Taking a cue from the letters on the door, start with a classic West Coast-style IPA, 21st Amendment Brewery’s fantastic Brew Free! or Die. Balanced from start to finish, with an enticing color of deep gold, Brew Free offers a fresh hoppy aroma, a snappy mouth, a touch of stone fruit and citrus and a nice long finish. Bitterness is the key here, which balances out the malt and hides the alcohol, making Brew Free a quick quaff at 7 percent alcohol by volume. There are plenty more options should you stay in the IPA sandbox, but make sure to save room for Odyssey Beerwork’s Simply Red, an IPA brewed with pineapple. The color isn’t quite red — it’s closer to copper — and the nose is dank with hints of ripe fruit. The pineapple shows up most prominently in the mouth, but only mid-palate. Malt and hops start the experience, then fade into sticky pineapple before transforming into bitter hops to clean it all up. It’s a beverage in three acts. But while IPAs get all the attention, the best beer currently on tap hails from Kulmbach, Germany: Edelherb Pils from Kulmbacher Brauerei. It shouldn’t be a surprise a Bavarian brewery would excel in the pilsner department, but with so many American breweries toying with this style, you’d almost forget how good purity tastes. Crystal clear with earthy hops and honey malt, Edelherb Pils is the kind of beer that will make you glad you found your way to I HOP IPA.

Boulder Weekly


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astrology Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

ARIES

MARCH 21-APRIL 19: Computer-generated special

effects used in the 1993 film Jurassic Park may seem modest to us now. But at the time they were revolutionary. Inspired by the new possibilities revealed, filmmakers like Stanley Kubrick, George Lucas and Peter Jackson launched new projects they had previously thought to be beyond their ability to create. In 2019, I urge you to go in quest of your personal equivalent of Jurassic Park’s pioneering breakthroughs. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may be able to find help and resources that enable you to get more serious about seemingly unfeasible or impractical dreams.

TAURUS

APRIL 20-MAY 20: I’m a big proponent of authenticity. I almost always advise you to be yourself with bold candor and unapologetic panache. Speak the truth about your deepest values and clearest perceptions. Be an expert about what really moves you, and devote yourself passionately to your relationships with what really moves you. But there is one exception to this approach. Sometimes it’s wise to employ the “fake it until you make it” strategy: to pretend you are what you want to be with such conviction that you ultimately become what you want to be. I suspect now is one of those times for you.

GEMINI

MAY 21-JUNE 20: The students’ dining hall at Michigan

State University serves gobs of mayonnaise. But in late 2016, a problem arose when 1250 gallons of the stuff became rancid. Rather than simply throw it away, the school’s Sustainability Officer came up with a brilliant solution: load it into a machine called an anaerobic digester, which turns biodegradable waste into energy. Problem solved! The transformed rot provided electricity for parts of the campus. I recommend you regard this story as a metaphor for your own use. Is there anything in your life that has begun to decay or lose its usefulness? If so, can you convert it into a source of power?

CANCER

JUNE 21-JULY 22: If you grow vegetables, fruits and

grains on an acre of land, you can feed twelve people. If you use that acre to raise meat-producing animals, you’ll feed at most four people. But to produce the meat, you’ll need at least four times more water and twenty times more electric power than you would if you grew the plants. I offer this as a useful metaphor for you to consider in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should prioritize efficiency and value. What will provide you with the most bang for your bucks? What’s the wisest use of your resources?

LEO

JULY 23-AUG. 22: Modern kids don’t spend much time

playing outside. They have fun in natural environments only half as often as their parents did while growing up. In fact, the average child spends less time in the open air than prison inmates. And today’s unjailed adults get even less exposure to the elements. But I hope you will avoid that fate in 2019. According to my astrological estimates, you need to allocate more than the usual amount of time to feeling the sun and wind and sky. Not just because it’s key to your physical health, but also because many of your best ideas and decisions are likely to emerge while you’re outdoors.

VIRGO

AUG. 23-SEPT. 22: NASA landed its robotic explorer

Opportunity on Mars in January of 2004. The craft’s mission, which was supposed to last for 92 days, began by taking photos and collecting soil samples. More than 14 years later, the hardy machine was still in operation, continuing to send data back to Earth. It far outlived its designed lifespan. I foresee you being able to generate a comparable marvel in 2019, Virgo: a stalwart resource or influence or situation that will have more staying power than you could imagine. What could it be?

LIBRA

SEPT. 23-OCT. 22: In 1557, Welsh mathematician

Robert Recorde invented the equals sign: =. Historical records don’t tell us when he was born, so we don’t know his astrological sign. But I’m guessing he was a Libra.

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Is there any tribe more skillful at finding correlations, establishing equivalencies and creating reciprocity? In all the zodiac, who is best at crafting righteous proportions and uniting apparent opposites? Who is the genius of balance? In the coming months, my friend, I suspect you will be even more adept at these fine arts than you usually are.

SCORPIO

OCT. 23-NOV. 21: There’s a modest, one-story office

building at 1209 N. Orange St. in Wilmington, Delaware. More than 285,000 businesses from all over the U.S. claim it as their address. Why? Because the state of Delaware has advantageous tax laws that enable those businesses to save massive amounts of money. Other buildings in Delaware house thousands of additional corporations. It’s all legal. No one gets in trouble for it. I bring this to your attention in the hope of inspiring you to hunt for comparable situations: ethical loopholes and workarounds that will provide you with extra benefits and advantages.

SAGITTARIUS

NOV. 22-DEC. 21: People in the Solomon Islands buy many goods and services with regular currency, but also use other symbols of worth to pay for important cultural events like staging weddings and settling disputes and expressing apologies. These alternate forms of currency include the teeth of flying foxes, which are the local species of bat. In that spirit, and in accordance with current astrological omens, I’d love to see you expand your sense of what constitutes your wealth. In addition to material possessions and funds in the bank, what else makes you valuable? In what other ways do you measure your potency, your vitality, your merit? It’s a favorable time to take inventory.

CAPRICORN

DEC. 22-JAN. 19: In 1984, singer-songwriter John

Fogerty released a new album whose lead single was “The Old Man Down the Road.” It sold well. But trouble arose soon afterward when Fogerty’s former record company sued him in court, claiming he stole the idea for “The Old Man Down the Road” from “Run Through the Jungle.” That was a tune Fogerty himself had written and recorded in 1970 while playing with the band Creedence Clearwater Revival. The legal process took a while, but he was ultimately vindicated. No, the courts declared, he didn’t plagiarize himself, even though there were some similarities between the two songs. In this spirit, I authorize you to borrow from a good thing you did in the past as you create a new good thing in the future. There’ll be no hell to pay if you engage in a bit of self-plagiarism.

AQUARIUS

JAN. 20-FEB. 18: Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle

Book is a collection of fables that take place in India. Three movies have been made based on it. All of them portray the giant talking snake named Kaa as an adversary to the hero Mowgli. But in Kipling’s original stories, Kaa is a benevolent ally and teacher. I bring this to your attention to provide context for a certain situation in your life. Is there an influence with a metaphorical resemblance to Kaa: misinterpreted by some people, but actually quite supportive and nourishing to you? If so, I suggest you intensify your appreciation for it.

PISCES

FEB. 19-MARCH 20: Virginia Woolf thought that her

Piscean lover Vita Sackville-West was a decent writer, but a bit too fluid and effortless. Self-expression was so natural to Sackville-West that she didn’t work hard enough to hone her craft and discipline her flow. In a letter, Woolf wrote, “I think there are odder, deeper, more angular thoughts in your mind than you have yet let come out.” I invite you to meditate on the possibility that Woolf ’s advice might be useful in 2019. Is there anything in your skill set that comes so easily that you haven’t fully ripened it? If so, develop it with more focused intention.

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Dear Dan: I’m a woman in an open relationship of four years. I adore my partner. When we were first dating, it was casual and there were no ground rules. During that time, I slept with a guy without condoms after he cornered me in a by Dan Savage motel room. One of the biggest rules in my lessness is a potential consequence of current relationship is to use condoms with from all the STIs out there, so even if telling your partner how you were presother partners. My current partner has you did come down with something, sured into sex you did not want, then made it clear that he would consider your partner could have passed it to you’re lying to him now for the same exchanging fluids with you.) So cut yourself some © Rachel Robinson reason you went bare with that asshole someone else cheating. I’m slack, BUGS: You had back then: duress. worried he’ll somehow find unprotected sex under a out about that night in the sadly common form of Dear Dan: I’m a man in love with a motel room, and I feel bad duress. Fearing something woman half my age. We met shortly after keeping it a secret. If I tell much worse, you “agreed” I had to leave the city I was living in to him, there’s a chance that our to unprotected sex — you escape a toxic relationship. I know this relationship will end and I’ll agreed but didn’t freely be living in my car. What consent to unprotected sex. girl has feelings for me. My gut screams it. We also share a strange connection. It’s should I do? Too many men don’t something I know she feels. She simply —Burdensome understand that kind of can’t help being tied to the energy I’m Unbearable Guilt Sucks fear or the de-escalation feeling. A while back, I hurt her. techniques women are Dear BUGS: This thing happened forced to employ when they find them- Unintentionally, but it hurt just the same. I was still not over my ex and very — or this thing was done to you — selves cornered by threatening men — leery of ever experiencing that kind of before you made a commitment to your de-escalation techniques that can current partner, BUGS, and before include “agreeing” to but not freely con- pain in my heart again. The problem now is that this young woman won’t acknowlground rules were established. I’m senting to sex, unprotected or otheredge her feelings for me. She swears she assuming you got tested at some point wise. You’re under no obligation to tell never had feelings for me. We found ouryour current partner about that night, over the last four years; failing that, I’m selves alone one day, and her actions were as it took place before you established assuming neither of you has developed clearly indicating that she wanted to have your ground rules, so it’s not really any symptoms of an STI over the last four sex with me but her words prevented me of his fucking business. And if homeyears. (And condoms don’t protect us

SAVAGE

Love

from taking the opportunity. How can I reach this girl? She knows I love her. I know I’m not wrong. She wants what I want. This love is not something I chose and I’m beginning to resent it. —In Lasting Love Dear ILL: You are wrong. She does not want what you want. Your gut is lying to you. She is not in love with you. You do not share a connection. You need to listen to her words. She is not tied to the “energy” you are feeling. You have got to stop thinking with your dick. She was probably scared out of her wits when you managed to “find” her alone. You cannot reach this woman. She can sense your resentment and she’s afraid of you. In all honesty, ILL, I’m afraid of you. Just as this poor woman most likely fears becoming one of the many women murdered every year by men they’ve rejected, I fear being the messenger who got shot. But you asked for my advice, ILL, and here it is: Get into therapy. You need help. And my advice for her, if she sees this, is to do whatever you must to protect yourself — up to and including moving away. Send questions to mail@savagelove.net, follow @fakedansavage on Twitter and visit ITMFA.org.

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weed between the lines

by Sidni West

Cannabis and Seasonal Affective Disorder

A

re you depressed or are you just paying attention? I know this administration makes it difficult to tell the difference, but unfortunately, ski season is back and so is seasonal depression. Since you slept like five hours over the past three days, you might as well just not get out of bed. When you wake up confused as to where your phone and wallet are just pop a melatonin and roll back over. Ultimate IDGAF. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is an actual thing. It’s more than just the feeling of despair that hits me when I realize I’m still five months away from wearing crop tops and making out with hotties at Red Rocks shows. SAD occurs when the shorter, darker winter days mess with your body’s internal clock. The lack of sunlight can cause your serotonin levels to decrease and disrupts your natural sleep cycle. SAD can manifest in a wide range of symptoms, including fatigue, lack of concentration, feelings of hopelessness, lethargy, weight gain, feelings of unhappiness, reduced libido, less desire to be sociable and irritability. I blame it on all the big holidays and corresponding vacations being packed into the last three months of the year. We suspend ourselves in a fantasy world with bright lights and comfort food and presents, but then the glow fades and we’re left in a frigid black hole of January. It’s dark all the time and suddenly we’re all supposed to pretend like sobriety and working toward being a better human is fun. (It’s not.) And what’s the point of keeping plans with friends when you can curl

Boulder Weekly

up under a weighted blanket nest with Netflix and Postmates? So we’re all just stuck inside being isolated, fat, sad and broke until we get our tax returns. No one should think they are alone when they are faced with this struggle because so many of us go through it. If winter depression is significantly affecting your work, relationships or overall quality of life, speak to a professional. There are various treatments for SAD, such as medications, therapy, vitamin D supplements and light therapy. Prescribing antidepressants is the most common. However, if your symptoms are relatively mild, here’s how to stop being a sad puppy and reclaim your winter:

Use CBD oil religiously Remember in 2014 when white people discovered coconut oil and acted like it was a cure all for everything? Well, we’re doing it again with CBD oil, but it actually works. Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the 60-plus naturally occurring compounds found in all cannabis plants. It has been widely touted in the past couple years for its ability to reduce stress and alleviate depression. To be clear, CBD cannot cure depression. Rather, studies show that CBD interacts with the endocannabinoid system, a collection of cell receptors in the human body, which helps to regulate essential human functions such as sleep, appetite, mood, pain and pleasure, among other things. Similar to SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), CBD may boost signaling through serotonin receptors. When ingested in oil form, CBD

influences brain activity and one byproduct is the release of serotonin and dopamine throughout the body. Insomnia and anxiety are the two major symptoms of SAD that can be treated using CBD. It also helps treat physiological symptoms of anxiety, like nervousness, shaking and increased heart rate. Smoking or vaping CBD-heavy strains, like ACDC and Charlotte’s Web, delivers pain and stress relief without making you feel high or overstimulating your appetite.

Catch an energetic buzz I personally think that smoking weed is one of the best ways of making a miserable existence more tolerable, but it has long been thought that cannabis actually compounds the effects of SAD, as weed has often been labeled a mild depressant. However, certain strains can actually help you get out of bed when the dark sky tricks you into binge napping. As someone who struggles with fatigue, strong sativas have become an essential in my cannabis cabinet. I’ve found strains like Super Silver Haze and Green Crack actually lends energy rather than lethargy. Having energy gives you the motivation to move your body around and maybe even exercise, which also helps alleviate depression.

Get outside Sure, it’s tempting to stay inside to pout with your bong and space heater all day, but getting as much natural light as you can is imperative when it comes to fighting seasonal depression. If you get home after dark, change your schedule and go enjoy a walk and a joint during your lunch break instead — the Vitamin D from the sun will boost your energy. People suffering from SAD typically gain weight, which makes you more tired, which makes you want to stay inside — it’s an awful cycle. If you outline a schedule that enables you to consistently get outside and expose yourself to daylight, it will definitely help improve your mental outlook.

January 10, 2019 51


cannabis corner

by Paul Danish

More tales from the depths of the desk

H

ere are another two stories that bobbed to the surface of my desk and deserve to be retold. Scientists at McGill University in Canada established that the same brain-chemical system that mediates feelings of pleasure from sex, recreational drugs and food is also critical to experiencing musical pleasure. The work focused on the brain’s natural opioids instead of its natural cannabinoids — more research is needed, in other words — but it also used human subjects instead of mice. “This is the first demonstration that the brain’s own opioids are directly involved in musical pleasure,” according to cognitive psychologist Daniel Levitin, who was the senior author of the paper on the work, which was published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports. The McGill team selectively and temporarily blocked opioid receptors in the brain with the drug naltrexone, which is used in treating a number of addictions. The researchers then measured participants’ responses to music. They found that even the participants’ favorite songs no longer elicited feelings of pleasure. “The findings, themselves, were

Boulder Weekly

what we hypothesized,” Levitin said. “But the anecdotes — the impressions our participants shared with us after the experiment — were fascinating. One said: ‘I know this is my favorite song, but it doesn’t feel like it usually does.’ Another: ‘It sounds pretty, but it’s not doing anything for me.’”

Hopefully similar studies will be conducted on how endocannabinoids — the brain’s natural cannabinoids — are involved in musical pleasure. It’s pretty obvious they are involved; listening to music while high is one of the near-universally shared experiences of stoners. Teasing out which of the dozens of cannabinoids in pot contribute to music appreciation could suggest how

to optimize pot strains for concertgoers — and, who knows, maybe even different strains for Mozart and metal. • • • • And here’s a story that I totally missed last year. Remember when Mexico’s Supreme Court legalized marijuana at the end of October? It turns out that the Constitutional Court of South Africa did the same thing in September. The South African court ruled, “It will not be a criminal offense for an adult person to use or be in possession of cannabis in private for his or her personal consumption.” The ruling was unanimous and binding on the government, which had argued that marijuana was “harmful” to people’s health — evidently overlooking the fact that South African prisons ain’t exactly health spas. The three marijuana users who had brought the case, and who faced prosecution for using pot, argued that the ban “intrudes unjustifiably into their private spheres.” According to the BBC, the ruling focused “on the issue of privacy, and a person’s right to do as they please in their own home.” This appears to have a somewhat different basis than the one used by the Mexican Supreme Court, which ruled

that Mexico’s anti-marijuana laws violated a person’s right to “the free development of personality.” The latter is a right that is explicitly stated in both the Mexican Constitution and the UN’s Declaration of Human Rights. It’s unknown if the South African Constitution contains an explicit “right to privacy” clause. It is known that the United States Constitution does not have a clause protecting privacy. And given the cavalier way that both government and businesses, especially high tech businesses, treat people’s private information and intrude into peoples’s private conduct, it desperately needs one. The late CU anthropology professor John Greenway once suggested that different cultures sometimes play cultural ping-pong. The example he gave was Henry David Thoreau’s concept of “civil disobedience” being adopted by Mahatma Gandhi as “passive resistance” against British rule in India, and Gandhi’s passive resistance re-crossing the Atlantic and being adopted by Martin Luther King, Jr. to fight racial segregation in the U.S. The decisions by the Supreme Courts in both Mexico and South Africa in the marijuana cases show that the U.S. could learn some things from younger republics when it comes to protecting human rights if it has the wit to do so. And that when it comes to protecting privacy, the cultural pingpong ball is now in our court.

January 10 , 2019 53


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