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Intersections Introduction137 Intersection Design Principles 138 Multimodal Intersections 141 Intersections and Street Types 148 Placemaking at Intersections 151 Intersection Geometry 157 Crosswalk Design 171 Guidelines for Crosswalk Installation 175 Signalized Intersections 185 Transit Accommodations at Intersections 195 Bicycle Accommodations at Intersections 205

IV. Intersections

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Boston Complete Streets Guidelines

2013

Boston Transportation Department


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Intersections and Street Types Intersections with Parkways and Boulevards

The design of an intersection should reflect the context of converging Street Types, surrounding land uses, and the neighborhood identity. Key elements of an intersection, such as lane and curb alignments, crosswalk locations, and bicycle accommodations, vary in design and configuration depending on the function of the street and role of the intersection in the surrounding neighborhood. For example, Dorchester Avenue, a Neighborhood Main Street in most sections, has been improved with new plazas and wider sidewalks at main intersections, such as Peabody Square and Andrews Square, to support a lively pedestrian realm with retail shops and restaurants.

Parkways and Boulevards are characterized by longer block lengths and consistent design elements along the length of the corridor, and require special consideration at intersections. Where Parkways and Boulevards cross other Street Types, it is important that the character of the former be maintained. For example, Commonwealth Avenue, one of the Boston’s most well-known Boulevards, intersects many Neighborhood Residential Streets; however, throughout the length of the corridor and at crossings the character of the Boulevard is maintained.

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Urban design elements on Downtown Commercial, Downtown Mixed-Use, and Neighborhood Main Streets, should take precedence over design features on Neighborhood Connector, Residential, and Industrial Street Types. Intersections that transition from one Street Type to another should alert all users of the change in the character of the roadway through obvious and intuitive design features. Intersections of the following Street Types involve important types of transitions and design considerations.

148

Boston Complete Streets Guidelines

2013

Boston Transportation Department


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Intersections between Neighborhood Main Street and Neighborhood Connector

When other Streets Types intersect Neighborhood Residential Streets, the design of the intersection should reflect the change in use of the street. Users approaching the Residential Street should recognize a change in the roadway towards a slower speed environment. Treatments such as raised crossings and curb extensions can help facilitate slower speeds, and visually demarcate the change in Street Type.

As Neighborhood Connectors approach Neighborhood Main Streets, an increase in pedestrian and bicycle activity should be expected and must be considered in designs. Gateway treatments, traffic calming measures, and the creation of inviting spaces should characterize intersections between Neighborhood Connectors and Neighborhood Main Streets.

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Intersections with Neighborhood Residential Streets

Boston Transportation Department

2013

Boston Complete Streets Guidelines

149


4_4: Intersections and Street Types