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Recognizing the need for grants that are intentionally designed to assist small area non-profit organizations in better serving LGBTQ Bostonians, Pride established the Community Fund in 2014.

Members of the community engaged the panelists with questions Dr. Van Bailey discusses their experience of the dynamic intersection between race, gender identity, and masculinity. Credit: Boston Pride. related to intersectional issues. Credit: Boston Pride.

amined the way that gender is treated in communities of color, explaining "I'm not saying whether or not [the policing of gender roles] is more prevalent in queer communities of color, but as far as the visibility of it—for sure. The depictions of our relationships are very binary, when ours are not, but we don't talk about it." Dr. Tat expressed outrage at the lack of protection for transgender Bay Staters, as "[w]e're not where we fucking should be with trans rights in the state of Massachusetts.” She noted, “[s]eventeen states have public accommodations for trans people; we were the first state to legalize gay marriage, but we are way far behind when it comes to trans people.” Despite the transphobia that she has encountered, and the lack of protections in Massachusetts, Dr. Tat believes that being transgender has been the best thing that ever happened to her. The panelists agreed that the public accommodations bill, currently before the Massachusetts State Legislature, does not go far enough in protecting transgender people, because it only applies to a certain category of spaces, not all spaces. Dr. Tat indicated that there is a disconnect within the larger LGBTQ community, as lesbian, gay, and bisexual people often lack education about transgender issues. She emphasized that “ally” is also a verb, so allies need to stand actively in solidarity with the communities of which they express support. Boston Pride set its strong allyship with local LGBTQ-affirming groups into action this year. Recognizing the need for grants that are intentionally designed to assist small area non-profit organizations

in better serving LGBTQ Bostonians, Pride established the Community Fund in 2014. A portion of ticket proceeds from the 2014 and 2015 Back Bay Block Parties and the 2015 Jamaica Plain Block Party were designated for the fund. In 2016 partial ticket proceeds from both these events will once again be dedicated to the Fund. In 2015, the inaugural year of Fund awards, Boston Pride was pleased to receive numerous applications from a diversity of LGBTQ non-profits. Most applications were submitted by youth-focused organizations and those dedicated to serving people of color, two segments of the community that Boston Pride is committed to supporting. To ensure a transparent and unbiased process, the grant recipients were selected by an independent review panel. A total of $17,633 was awarded to eleven organizations (of which to date nine have accepted their funding). One grant recipient, the Lesbians of Color Symposium (LOCS) Collective works collaboratively with communities of color and allies to eliminate disparate access to resources by local LBTQ women of color. The LOCS Collective used their award to assist with the costs of their annual symposium, held in March, which featured keynote speaker Dr. Kaila Adia Story, whose academic research focuses on the intersections of race and sexual orientation. Thanks to the tangible support of the Community Fund, another group serving queer people of color, New England Professional Queer WoMen of Color (PQWOC), will officially incorporate as a

Congratulations On Another Successful Boston Pride Week.

Thank You For All Of Your Hard Work Speaker of the House Robert A. DeLeo

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2016 Boston Pride Guide  
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