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PANORAMA’s GUIDE TO

COLONIAL BOSTON

Go beyond the Freedom Trail by checking out these area sites where the Hub’s British and revolutionary past comes alive BY SCOTT ROBERTO

Minute Man National Historical Park

This where it all began. Consisting of the battlefield sites of Lexington and Concord where rebels first skirmished with the redcoats on April 19, 1775, this 900-acre park also houses several Colonial Era structures, including a tavern. The historic buildings and the visitor centers (one of which re-opens in March) are closed for the season, but the park is open dusk to dawn. Concord and Lexington, 978-3696993, nps.gov/mima

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PANORAMA

Central Burying Ground

Established on Boston Common in 1756, this historic cemetery is the final resting place of revolution-era British soldiers, American patriots, painter Gilbert Stuart and composer William Billings. Boylston Street, 617-635-7361, boston.gov

Phipps Street Burying Ground

Soldiers from King Philip’s War (1675–1676) and university namesake John Harvard are buried in this cemetery opened in 1630. The site is open by request only. Phipps and Rutherford streets, Charles­town, 617-635-7361, boston.gov

TOP PHOTO: COURTESY OF MASS. OFFICE OF TRAVEL & TOURISM; BOTTOM RIGHT PHOTO: ED JOHNSTON/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Panorama Magazine: March 12, 2018 Issue  

Hoop Madness. The NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament Storms Boston's TD Garden.

Panorama Magazine: March 12, 2018 Issue  

Hoop Madness. The NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament Storms Boston's TD Garden.