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DESTINATION MIDCOAST MAINE


MIDCOAST MAINE

DESTINATION MIDCOAST MAINE

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ven those who have seen the wild grandeur of Maine’s rocky coast for themselves should see it through the lens of the great painters it has inspired. Winslow Homer’s storm-lashed surf, Childe Hassam’s sundrenched gardens and luminous seas, Rockwell Kent’s images of Monhegan Island, Andrew Wyeth’s early watercolor seascapes, works by Thomas Cole, Edward Hopper, George Bellows and others have shaped our perceptions of this dramatic and beautiful shore. Yet even with these images in mind, nothing compares to seeing the coast in person, and when you combine that with visits to galleries along the way to see how contemporary artists perceive it, a trip through MidCoast Maine becomes an art pilgrimage. US Route 1 is the often winding road that ties the coastal towns and villages together, and you will return to it again and again as you head north from Portland to explore MidCoast Maine. Much of the route is within sight of the sea, and you’ll cross innumerable estuaries and tidal inlets—the smell of salt water clinging to every breeze. Route 1 cuts across the tops of a series of long irregular peninsulas, each of which is worth exploring to find painter-worthy little fishing harbors, many with lobster shacks where you can stop to savor fresh-caught seafood at picnic tables right on the wharf. Begin your art odyssey in Falmouth, just north of Portland, right on Route 1 at Elizabeth Moss Galleries. Dedicated to spotlighting Maine’s role in American art, Elizabeth Moss represents 32 artists in a variety of styles, many of whom take their subjects and inspiration from coastal Maine scenery and themes. Look for Donald Stone’s highly impressionistic interpretations of fishermen at work, and see how realist painter Peter Gough’s seascapes and boat studies catch the play of light on water. Marguerite Lawler’s pastels and watercolor capture the varied planes, colors and textures of the rocky coastline. The brilliant, luminous colors of coastal scenes in limited-edition Phoebe Porteous metal prints are achieved by infusing dyes into the surface specially coated aluminum sheets. With the variety and quality of the works exhibited here, it’s easy to understand why Elizabeth Moss Galleries was named one of the top 500 Galleries in North America by Blouin

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Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, ME. Image courtesy of morguefile.com.

International’s website, ArtInfo. Brunswick is worth a stop for the excellent Bowdoin College Museum of Art, whose collections include multiple paintings by Winslow Homer and Rockwell Kent. If your trip includes October 21st and 22nd, don’t miss the Annual Brunswick Arts & Crafts Show, produced by the

United Maine Craftsmen. Founded in 1969, the organization has 300 members working in glass metal, ceramics, photography, wood, fiber and other media. The Brunswick show is one of several annual exhibitions and sales of United Maine Craftsmen’s works. August 4–6 is the Flaherty Farm Arts & Crafts Show in Scarborough;

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MIDCOAST MAINE September 9 is the 16th Annual Fall Festival of Arts & Crafts in Westbrook. November 4–5 sees the 29th Annual Bangor Arts & Crafts Show, November 11–12 will be the 36th Annual Augusta Arts & Crafts Show. The Annual Thanksgiving Arts & Crafts Show in Brewer is November 24–26 and the 40th Annual Holiday Arts & Crafts Show is in Portland December 2–3. Route 1 bypasses downtown Bath, but you should stop by if you’re there on a weekend, when there’s usually something happening at The Chocolate Church Arts Center. This performing and visual arts center offers live performances, gallery exhibitions, lectures and workshops, along with two free concert series in the summer. Free open-air concerts at Gazebo in Library Park during Bath Heritage

Days on Saturday, July 1 feature Porch Lights (Acoustic Americana Duo), The Howligans (Rock and Roll), Pretty Girls Sing Soprano (Vocal Harmonies, Rock, Folk, Country, Bluegrass) and The Scott Davis Quartet (Jazz) in back-to-back performances beginning at 11am. Free Saturday evening Waterfront Concerts in July and August will include Strangely Possibles (Indie, Blues), Pan Fried Steel (Steel Band), Big Chip Trio (Jazz, Blues, Soul) and DuPont Brothers (Folk) in July and four more groups in August. Farther north on Route 1, not far past the bridge in Wiscasset, look for the right turn onto Route 27, which will take you to Boothbay Harbor. On the way is the Boothbay Railway Village, where for the entire month of August the Maine Coast Stone Symposium celebrates the

art, history and culture of Maine’s stone industry. Along with educational programs, and the exhibit Built with Stone: The Story of Granite, Slate, and Limestone in Maine, a 10–day sculpture symposium will look at the ties between technology, industry and the creative world. Commercial quarrying and stone working has been active in Maine since the early 1800s, and the state has produced the granite for some of America’s most important buildings and monuments (including the Pentagon, and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery). The industry influenced transportation and other facets of the state’s economy, and Maine artists and artisans still use this natural resource as a medium for their work, employing many of the traditional stone-working techniques.

SAY WOW CENTER FOR MAINE CONTEMPORARY ART ROCKLAND, MAINE

| CMCANOW.ORG

Christine Lafuente

338 main street rockland maine 04841 (207) 542-9895 www.carverhillgallery.com

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MIDCOAST MAINE Farther on, in the village of Boothbay, follow Corey Lane, turning right on Barters Island Road and crossing onto the island to find Mathias Fine Art. The gallery specializes in museum-quality paintings, original prints, photography and small sculpture by contemporary artists, both well established and those whose work shows exceptional promise. Showing here this summer, from June 30 to September 3, is Genetta McLean’s Abundance, a suite of oil-on-panel works on the ancient theme of xenia, or fruitful abundance. The work is reminiscent of Renaissance still life painters, using the same methods and materials. Also presented here are Gitte Keller’s serene abstract canvases, Michael Culver’s richly colored abstract/expressionist paintings and Chris Alexander’s realist graphite drawings and land-

scape paintings, reminiscent of the 19th-century English landscape artists. Paul Feyling’s photographs capture the night sky and misty evenings on Barters Island, along with the vibrant colors of coastal sunsets and the infinite tones of sky and water. Mathias Fine Art is open by appointment. From the resort town of Boothbay Harbor, farther down Route 27, you can take a ferry to Monhegan Island, home to an artists’ colony even before the early 1900s, when painter Rockwell Kent built a studio here. The squaremile of rocky island has no cars or paved roads, is accessible only by boat, battered mercilessly by Atlantic storms and beloved by visitors who return year after year for its wild beauty and isolation. The Monhegan Museum of Art & History is located in the historic Monhegan Light

Station and is open from June 24 to September 30. Exhibits highlight the island’s natural, cultural and artistic heritage, as well as works by artists who have worked on Monhegan, including William Partridge Burpee, Rockwell Kent, Andrew Winter and others. Rockwell Kent’s studio, which was subsequently owned by artists Alice Kent Stoddard and James Fitzgerald, displays the museum’s paintings by Fitzgerald. Each summer the museum showcases a particular artist or a period of Monhegan’s artistic history, displaying materials from their collection along with works loaned by private collectors. The 2017 show is Reckoning with Nature: Andrew Winter at Monhegan Island. Winter visited, painted and later lived on the island from the 1930s until his death in 1958. He

PETREA NOYES

Petrea Noyes, Cat Woman, 38 x 38", mixed media on canvas.

www.petreanoyes.com www.artcollectormaine.com

Turtle Gallery Fine Art, Sculpture, & Contemporary Craft for 35 years Rt 15, Deer Isle, Maine 207 348.9977 Open: May 27 Ð Oct 8 Tues Ð Sat: 10 Ð 5:30 Sun: 2 Ð 6; closed Mon theTurtle Gallery.com

View from Greenhead Lane oil by Jeff Loxterkamp

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Loxterkamp exhibit: July 9 Ð August 5, 2017

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MIDCOAST MAINE John Walker, Swept In, 2017, oil on canvas, 84 x 66". Signed by the artist, verso, with title and date. Courtesy of Alexandre Gallery, New York. On view at Center for Maine Contemporary Art.

is known especially for his seascapes of lobstermen hauling traps and for his landscapes of Monhegan covered in snow. The opening party is on Sunday, July 2, from 4–6 p.m. “Watercolor is an ideal medium for the plein air painting I do in the summer on Monhegan Island,” says Kate Cheney Chappell, who spends the month of August painting there each year. Among her favorite subjects is the play of waves lapping at the granite ledges and the patterns of sea life and debris caught in the rock crevices. Her other favored technique is the collagraph, prints made from marking into and imbedding objects in a plate coated with soft gesso. She welcomes the public to her studio/gallery at Monhegan’s Deadman Cove on Thursdays in August or by appointment, as part of the island’s long tradition of open studios. She is represented on Monhegan by the Lupine Gallery and is part of the ongoing “Women Artists of Monhegan Island” shows at the Island Inn and Monhegan House. Elsewhere in Maine she is represented by Mast Cove Galleries in Kennebunkport, and is part of the Peregrine Press 25th anniversary exhibit at the Haystack Gallery in Deer Isle this May and June. Returning to Boothbay Harbor, backtrack on Route 27 to Route 1 and continue north. In Damariscotta, stop at River Arts on Main Street to see the photo-based paintings of Petrea Noyes. Working from her own collection of more than 11,000 antique family and found photographs, she scans the images—often figures, horses, boats or beach scenes—and reworks them digitally, resizing, cropping, changing colors and textures with a drawing tablet. “I let the piece lead me,” she says. Many of her subjects recall ghosts of summers past in ethereal tones. When she is satisfied with her new painting, she prints it in black and white or color on canvas, before treating the surface and adding finishing touches in paint pens and gesso. You can also see her work at the Portland Art Gallery on Middle Street in Portland. From Damariscotta follow Route 215 north to Route 213, following it alongside Damariscotta Lake for just under five miles. Turn right onto

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Punk Point Road (Fire Road 316) to find the Joseph A. Fiore Art Center at Rolling Acres Farm, a program of Maine Farmland Trust that connects the two creative worlds of farming and art. For centuries artists have celebrated and recorded the beauty of agricultural landscapes, and art is a powerful means of communicating the ways in which humans are connected to the land. The Fiore Art Center puts this creative connection in the context of farming, through exhibitions in their gallery, educational events, residencies for artists on the working farm and research to develop ecologically sustainable farming practices. The beautiful 130-acre property overlooks the lake, which you can reach by a lane behind the farmhouse and connected barn. The statewide Maine Farmland Trust preserves farmland, supports farmers and advances the future of farming, and you can also learn more about it at their gallery in Belfast, later in the tour. Continue north on Route 215, turning right onto Route 32 to Waldoboro, where you’ll find the Heywood Gallery in the historic brick Governor’s Mansion in the heart of the village. Pastel artist Anne Heywood paints realistic landscape, still life and pet portraits in color palettes that capture the subjects’ character and mood. Her vivid plein air studies record the simple scenes around her coastal home: the setting sun on grass-banked mudflat at low tide, mists rising from a field at dawn, trees silhouetted against sunset-painted clouds, the frothing wake of a boat on the early morning sea. Among

other honors, she has been named an Eminent Pastelist, a prestigious designation bestowed by the International Association of Pastel Societies. Along with her landscapes and still lifes, Heywood paints custom dog portraits. You can see samples of these, as well as her other works and limited edition prints at her gallery, which is open by appointment and on the second and fourth Friday and Saturday afternoons from July through September, and the evenings of the second Saturdays in June and October in conjunction with ArtWalk Waldoboro. Also in a historic building in Waldoboro, this one a restored 1850s bank, is wood sculptor Philippe Guillerm’s studio and gallery. His light-hearted and meticulously crafted sculptures most often involve musical instruments; the clarinet and the curvaceous lines of the violin are favorite themes that Guillerm riffs in ever-changing and infinitely whimsical ways. His imaginative and highly refined sculptures may deconstruct a violin or open one with a key like a sardine can, or hang it Dali-like over

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MIDCOAST MAINE

Visit tillmancrane.com Tillman Crane photography

a rod. Or it might appear to be playing its own strings with the bow grasped in the scroll of its bent neck. A clarinet might be tied in a knot, entangled with a piece of driftwood or coiled like a snake. His works can be found in museums, airports and galleries in Europe, South America and the Pacific Islands, as well as the United States and Canada. In the summer he works in his Waldoboro studio, which is open Tuesday through Friday. Route 1 continues north to Thomaston, where 26 Split Rock Cove is an artist’s retreat that offers art and writing workshops, studio space and apartments for creative writers and artists. Sandy Weisman, formerly of the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, opened the small artist collaborative in 2010. Workshops this summer

include Abstracting the Landscape, a Fresh Point of View July 28–30, which will inspire artists to see beyond a literal view, finding in it a series of abstract relationships so they can capture the essence of a landscape and represent it in fresh ways. An Artist Book Making Intensive Workshop August 4–6 explores the almost unlimited potential for creating works of art in book form, either as limited editions or one-of-a-kind expressions that can combine words, art and bookbinding techniques in unique forms. Past workshops have explored photographing the coastal landscapes, alternative photographic processes, creating illustrated journals, writing poetry, painting techniques and even iPhone/iPad photography. Amid the nicely preserved 19th-century brick mercantile buildings of downtown Rockland,

JUNE 20 thru SEPT 3 2017

10 MATHIAS DRIVE TREVETT ME 04571-3131 Telephone: 207 - 633 - 7404 Five scenic miles from Boothbay Center

PLEIN AIR LANDSCAPES

Platinum & palladium prints 19th century materials bleneded with a 21st century aesthetic

Open Late June–Mid October M–Su 11–5 & by appointment

80 Main Street,

Stonington, Maine 207.367.2368 | 207.367.2777 jahoy1@gmail.com

www.jillhoy.com August: Jill Hoy, a tide of light at Portland Art Gallery

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MIDCOAST MAINE three galleries are close to the Farnsworth Art Museum. Carver Hill Gallery shows contemporary works in a variety of media, representing more than 20 emerging and established painters, sculptors and other artists. The gallery opened its 2017 season by spotlighting works of two new painters, Eleanor Miller’s realistic plants and wildlife in ethereal abstract settings, and Christine LaFuente’s still lifes and seascapes, noted for capturing the play of light in bold wide brush strokes. Some of the other works featured in the downtown Rockland gallery include abstract watercolors and acrylics by Tom MacConnell, Robin Reynolds’ brilliant and evocative floral fantasies, abstracts by David Estey, and Megan Hinton’s abstracted landscapes that capture in watercolor the ways varying light changes our perception. Fine art, craft and design all merge at Craft on Elm Street, a collection of fine contemporary crafts by more than 20 artists working in Maine today. No lines are drawn between art and craft, and all craft traditions are presented as works of art along with painting, drawing and photography. “The Maine perspective offers a point of view and reference to the national art and craft culture, “explains founder and curator Barbara Michelena. Unlike traditional art galleries, work shown in this 19th-century carriage house is arranged to show how objects in clay, jewelry, fiber and wood can interact with art in daily life. This season opened with a new collection of geometric layered paper collages by Abbie Read exploring color, texture, shape and design, and wood-fired pottery pillow vases by

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Jody Johnstone, inspired by her apprenticeship in Japan. Both artists are from the immediate Rockland area. Also on Elm Street, the Gautschi Center is an art gallery and education center designed to inspire individual discovery. Founded by Swiss artist Brigitte Gautschi, whose paintings are shown here, the gallery has the mission of supporting people in their creative development. They do this through a variety of individual and group art classes and workshops that will help students learn to express themselves artistically. Along with Gautschi’s paintings, characterized by their blend of realism and surrealism, are works of several local artists in sculpture, home decor and jewelry. The Gautschi Center hosts receptions during the summer Arts in Rockland

(AIR) First Friday Art Walks, and during the event on Friday evening, July 7, Maho Hisakawa and Nathan Hillman of Windfern Ensemble, will be performing classical music on the flute and viola in the center’s courtyard. The newest addition to Rockland’s downtown arts district is the Center for Maine Contemporary Art, CMCA, opened this year in a sparkling new building. Designed by architect Toshiko Mori, the center provides dedicated exhibition space for work by contemporary artists with Maine connections, along with an ArtLab classroom and a courtyard for displaying larger outdoor works. Through August 23 the CMCA’s Counterpoint exhibition features work of Maine artists Jenny Brillhart and Sara Stites, exploring the concept of light moving over time

PHILIPPE GUILLERM GALLERY 882 Main Street - Waldoboro, ME 207-701-9085 Tuesday-Friday 10am-4pm philippeguillermgallery@gmail.com

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MIDCOAST MAINE in the context of a studio environment. Through October 22 Reel to Real features early videos and drawings by video art pioneer William Wegman, who began experimenting with the new medium in the 1970s. Artist John Walker’s abstract paintings of the view from his property at Seal Point, Maine, will be on exhibit through October 29, a retrospective that includes paintings and small works on paper created at Seal Point over the past 20 years. Only a few minutes’ drive north on Route 1 is Camden, where like Rockport, you’ll find the graceful hulls and tall masts of Maine’s Windjammer fleet of sailing ships. The entire area is a favorite for artists and photographers, among them Tillman Crane, whose distinctive platinum photographs can be seen at Tillman Crane Photography, on Pearl Street. Made from the salts of platinum and palladium, platinum prints have a matte finish and more gradual tonal change from black to white, giving them a softer contrast and a deeper, richer feeling. Because the emulsions are mixed and applied by hand, no two prints are exactly alike. Tillman collaborates to create one-of-a-kind handmade books of prints, and will teach a workshop on “Spirit of Structure” focusing on the Olson House, made famous in Andrew Wyeth’s Christina’s World, and Montpelier, the Henry Knox Mansion, September 10–15. Stop in Camden for an espresso at Zoot Coffee, a small locally owned coffee house that exhibits the works of local artists. Each winter there is a community show, and on August 1 Zoot Coffee will present a solo show, Smart Phone

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Collages by Kenny Cole. Cole’s collages stem from his wooden Dummy Smart Phones, created as window installations that have been shown elsewhere in Maine. The process is unique, based on 3½-inch by 2-inch cut-outs from magazines, the dimension of an iPhone screen. The cut-outs are made randomly through multiple layers of magazine pages, then selected, combined and arranged. Cole then paints in and around them to create thought-provoking narratives that examine technology and inter-connectivity. The show will remain at Zoot Coffee for the whole month of August. Route 1 continues north to Belfast, where the Maine Farmland Trust Gallery on Main Street joins the Fiore Art Center (above) in celebrating farming through art and connects the two creative worlds. Art shown there captures the vibrancy of Maine’s farms and farmers, their relationship to the earth, the crops they grow and animals they tend. Gallery purchases, membership and donations all support the important work of helping people understand the promise of farming, and protecting Maine’s agricultural heritage and rural landscapes. Contemporary sculptor and artist J.T. Gibson lives and works on his farm in Morrill, Maine, just west of Belfast. His sculptures examine cultural motifs and symbols that exist in the areas between purpose and the abstract. They often refer to recognizable figures or objects, perhaps tools or machine parts, giving the impression of something familiar, yet elusive. His bronze bowls are made by sand molding, using a pattern shell that is destroyed in the hand casting process, so

each has its own unique markings and finish. Gibson’s sculpture is shown at Corey Daniels Gallery in Wells, on the southern Maine coast, and you can see his totemic bronze sculpture at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art in Ogunquit, also on the south coast. After passing through Bucksport, leave Route 1 to follow Route 15 south into Blue Hill, where the artist-owned Cynthia Winings Gallery showcases contemporary work by established and emerging artists. The bright and uncluttered gallery space is devoted mostly to paintings—figurative, abstract and narrative—with some sculptural works. Through July 15 a group exhibition, Light Source, will be shown, with an opening reception on Sunday, June 25. Visual Impressions, from July 18 to August 18 with an opening reception on Sunday, July 23, will feature works by Tom Curry, Hélène Farrar, Douglas Florian, Mark Little, MP Landis and Lari Washburn. Viewfinders, from August 20 to September 16 features Jenny Brillhart, Brita Holmquist, Buzz Masters and Ingrid Ellison, with an opening reception Sunday, August 20. Endless Summer, featuring gallery artists, begins on September 19 and runs through the close of the season on October 9. Artist talks are held on the first Friday of each month at 5:30pm. On October 6 the First Friday talk will be a children’s program. Continue on Route 15, crossing the bridge onto Deer Isle, where The Turtle Gallery exhibits paintings, sculpture and fine contemporary crafts in a two-story 1876 barn, the adjacent Centennial House Gallery and outdoors in sculpture gardens. Paintings by more than 20

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MIDCOAST MAINE artists and prints by as many more encompass all styles, including mixed media works by Margaret Rizzio and Maine landscapes in pastels by Sandy Wadlington. There are ceramics, glass, a wide selection of jewelry, wood turning by Chris Joyce, photography, metal arts and hooked rugs by Mary Ann McKellar. A show beginning in June focuses on bronzes by Treacy Ziegler, gouaches by Karl Schrag, paintings of Susan Mangam and glass by Gabriel Greenlaw and David Jacobson. The exhibition beginning on July 9 features a black and white print show, portraits of women by Barbara Sullivan and works of other artists. August and September shows feature paintings, mixed media and constructions, as well as new works by Paul Heroux, Sondra Bogdonoff and Alice Spencer.

Continue south on Route 15 to Stonington, where the Jill Hoy Gallery sits at the waterfront. Jill Hoy’s plein air landscapes and seascapes capture the way sunlight picks out the varied colors of rocks and ledges, her bold brushstrokes capturing their planes and angles in unexpected tones of blue, orange, purple and pink. And yet taken as a whole these reflect the exuberance of a summer day in Maine, and the sharp contrasts between light and shadows seen in the early morning or late afternoon when colors seem their most intense. Her free-flowing style in oils is especially adept at capturing the riotous gardens that thrive in the seaside climate. Flowers come alive under her brush, whether in a vase or blowing in the summer breeze against the wall of a summer cottage. Hoy’s giclée prints—bold

images of hayfields, mountains and waterfront scenes—are printed on archival rag paper. The editions of 30 to 50 are individually numbered, titled and signed. Return to Blue Hill and follow Route 172 through Surry and into Ellsworth. Just as you rejoin Route 1, you’ll find Courthouse Gallery Fine Art, in Ellsworth’s historic courthouse and registry of deeds. These two beautifully restored 1830s Greek revival buildings comprise more than 4500 square feet of exhibition space, plus a sculpture park on the sweeping lawn. The gallery represents contemporary artists, sculptors and photographers who are living or working in Maine. The opening show includes recent works by two dozen gallery artists, and at the end of June a Judith Leighton retrospective opened,

Heywood Gallery

Anne Heywood, Morning, pastel, 14 x 16.75"

featuring the work of American Realist

Anne Heywood

anne@anneheywood.com | anneheywood.com 921 Main St., Waldoboro, ME | 508.982.6166

1st Annual

FLAHERTY FAMILY FARM ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW

August 4th - 6th

Friday - Saturday 10am - 4pm Sunday 10am - 3pm Buy local...buy Made in Maine, Delicious Food, Free Parking

Flaherty Family Farm ~ 123 Payne Rd., Scarborough, ME United Maine Craftsmen ~ 207-621-2818 www.unitedmainecraftsmen.com UMC is a non-profit organization

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ART GALLERY

Paintings Sculptures Home Décor Handcrafted Gifts Jewelry

EDUCATION CENTER Workshops Seminars Private Lessons 8 Elm Street, Rockland, ME 04841 (207) 701-2270

www.gautschicenter.com

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MIDCOAST MAINE also featuring recent works of Susan Amons and Philip Koch, and Philip Barter’s Oasis. On July 12 is the launch and signing of Carl Little’s new book Philip Barter: Forever Maine, in conjunction with a solo exhibition of Philip Barter’s works at the gallery. From July 22 through August 13 there will be solo shows of William Irvine and John Neville, with recent works of Philip Frey and Jeffery Becton. Subsequent shows begin on August 16 and September 14 respectively, and a gallery talk on October 12 will feature William Irvine and Mark Bell discussing how they make ceramics together. North of Ellsworth, follow Route 3 onto Mount Desert Island, where it joins Route 102. When they separate again, follow Route 102 into Somesville. The Gallery at Somes Sound shows

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paintings in impressionist, abstract and realist styles, sculpture and fine handmade furniture, all by contemporary artists of national standing. During the month of July the gallery pays tribute to Joellyn Duesberry in Reflections of Maine, richly colored abstract landscape paintings that celebrate her summers in Maine. The opening reception on July 1 is held in conjunction with the opening of a second show that features the artist/craftsmen of the New Hampshire Furniture Masters Association. The gallery is particularly involved with the traditions of fine furniture making as practiced in the studio furniture movement, dating back to the 1960s, and will feature the juried works of this organization, which includes nearly two dozen makers from New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts and Vermont.

Works shown will include those of Brian Reid, a master woodworker based in midcoast Maine, His unique furniture features traditional dovetail joinery, hand-rubbed oil finishes and rare woods that include bog oak and bog yew. Maine continues to inspire artists, whose work and creative genius is nurtured and encouraged by a culture where art is admired and valued. This in turn attracts more working artists and fine artisans and more galleries where their works can reach appreciative audiences. This lively art environment promises to go on flourishing and growing, inspiring new generations to become masters of their art, just as it will inspire you to see more of their work—and the magnificent coastal scenery that is its muse. —Barbara Radcliffe Rogers

Workshops, Live/Work Space for Artists and Writers, Studio Rentals

Workshops include: Abstracting the Landscape—an oil painting workshop with Julie Houck, and Artist Book Intensive with Abbie Read, Cynthia McGuirl, and Sandy Weisman, plus Poetry of Place with Barbara Helfgott Hyett.

26splitrockcove.com

SOUTH THOMASTON, ME Overlooking Mussel Ridge Cove

F i n e A rt | S t u d i o F u r n i t u r e 1112 Main St., Somesville, ME | 207-244-1165 w w w. g a l l e r y at s o m e s s o u n d . c o m Donald Demers, Convergence, 22 x 30", oil on canvas.

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Destination Midcoast Maine  

Art New England - July / August 2017

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