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DESTINATION CAPE ANN, MA


CAPE ANN, MA

DESTINATION CAPE ANN, MA

Sailboats on Essex River. Photo: Arlene Taliadoros. Courtesy of Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce.

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ape Ann was created when glaciers scraped over the landscape, leaving rocky moraines and granite ledges. The craggy coastline stands sentinel against the occasional onslaught of pounding waves. Its shore, punctuated by sheltered harbors and expansive stretches of glistening white sandy beaches, beckons visitors year-round. In addition to its natural beauty, Cape Ann boasts a vibrant and diverse art scene that opens a window into the rich historical and artistic legacy of the region. Cape Ann is also an easy drive north from Boston, east from the Berkshires and is under an hour from the New Hampshire border. Map your route to connect with Route 128 or choose the more scenic Route 127 with its glimpses of the ocean, islands and stately homes. Route 127 takes you directly to Manchester-by-theSea—setting of the Academy Award-winning

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movie of the same name. The MBTA Commuter Rail train stops in Manchester, Gloucester and Rockport—each within walking distance of shoreside attractions. (Be sure to check the train schedule at mbta.com, as maintenance is planned for this summer.) When you arrive in Manchester-by-theSea, you can picnic at Masconomo Park and watch the sailboats and small fishing craft glide in and out of the harbor, walk to Singing Beach—named for its “whispering” white sand—or stroll through the picturesque town center, where you can visit Gladstone Antique and Contemporary Fine Jewelry. Co-owners/ designers Elaine Souza and Charles Gladstone will introduce you to their eclectic collection of antique and custom-designed modern jewelry, including unique gemstones and estate pieces collected during their world travels. Alongside

fine jewelry repair and client consulting, they offer periodic exhibitions by local artists. “We like to think of our space as one where we bring art and jewelry together,” says Souza. Christopher Pullman’s Seaforms is on exhibit through August 27. These paintings illuminate Pullman’s perspective of his ocean-centric surroundings, in particular with his “crab” series. With delicate brushwork, he creates realistic paintings that blend opaque and translucent marks to stunning effect. If you are in Manchester-by-the-Sea on Saturday, August 5, stop by The Festival by the Sea. Its home base is Masconomo Park, but the many arts and crafts vendors spill out onto the grounds of Town Hall, Reed Park and the sidewalks throughout the small town center. Easily walkable, it is an enticing way to spend an afternoon. More than 100 arts and crafts

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CAPE ANN, MA vendors are expected this year, and Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce CEO Ken Riehl expects more than 2,000 attendees. “This festival has grown exponentially, and it really is a familyfriendly event. It’s a great way to spend the day with the kids and expose them to the arts, crafts, music—and of course, food!” From Manchester-by-the-Sea, continue north on Route 127 to reach Kettle Cove Lane, an industrial park housing the Northeast Art Workshops and Retreats, a haven for working artists. This tucked-away space for professional painters and hobbyists draws upon worldrenowned artists as workshop leaders and mentors of master classes for artists hoping to advance their skills. The large, paint-splattered interior and high ceilings are flooded with light

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making it an ideal space for creativity. “We want to rejuvenate your creative spirit in a supportive atmosphere where you can pursue your personal artistic growth,” says owner/director Kat Masella who will lead three-day encaustic workshops in July, October and November. Participants are limited to 10 per workshop, so be sure to check for availability. Over the Annisquam River lies Gloucester, the country’s oldest fishing port, settled in 1633. For nearly 300 years, Gloucester’s fleet of fishing schooners harvested the riches of the ocean. When the sea cooperated, this dangerous work rewarded sea captains with a good living and security for their families. The iconic Gloucester Fisherman’s Memorial tells the other story, though, and commemorates the more than

10,000 fishermen who have died at sea. These days, the diminished fishing fleet proudly struggles to maintain endangered fisheries, while striving to make a living in the traditional way. Learn about this maritime history and more with Gloucester HarborWalk, a self-guided audio/video tour. Generations of painters and sculptors— including Fitz Henry Lane, Edward Hopper and Marsden Hartley—have been drawn to the luminous quality of light that is a trademark of the region. Today, visitors can experience the continuation of this vibrant arts scene with the Gloucester Waterfront Festival—the biggest arts and crafts festival on the North Shore with an expected 20,000 visitors over two days (August 19 and 20). The setting is the stun-

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gold, Moroccan ceremonial jewelry, African quartz, amethysts, exotic pearls—all fashioned into arresting one-of-a-kind pieces from the very bold to the very refined. In addition to jewelry, Side Street offers ceramics, hand-blown glassware, unique décor and a small collection of paintings—this summer including works by Kate Nordstrom and Grace Anne Warn. Side Street is a feast for the senses. A short walk along Rocky Neck will bring you to Madfish Wharf, jutting out into the protected waters of Smith Cove. Madfish Wharf exemplifies an art colony with its warren of artist studios, some with live/work spaces. Be sure to stop in to meet painter Regina Piantedosi. Piantedosi has wasted no time since she embraced painting several years ago. Her

approach is that of an explorer—she reaches beyond the predictable, working in mixed media including glass on canvas, encaustic, acrylic, pencil, metallic surfaces and papyrus. “My limit is my imagination—and that has no limits. That’s why I have my own gallery—no rules,” laughs Piantedosi. Her work spans myriad styles and subject matter although her signature motif is a series of boat paintings. Yet these are no ordinary boats—they are ghostly, solitary craft in a horizonless sea. She explores the stillness around us to impart a magical quality to her paintings. Meander back toward the causeway and you’ll come to the nexus of artistic activity on the Neck: the Cultural Center at Rocky Neck. Located in a carpenter-gothic building

Oil pastel on paper, 22 x 26". Artist Caleb Rulli.

ning Stage Fort Park, high above beautiful Gloucester Harbor. Browse more than 150 arts and crafts vendors and enjoy myriad musical attractions. Hungry seafood lovers will rejoice at the return of boiled lobster dinners and lobster rolls. “We revived this attraction by popular demand. What could be a better adjunct to your Gloucester experience than our trademark lobster?” asks Riehl. While in Gloucester, head to the Harbortown Cultural District downtown and stop by Beth Williams Studio. Williams creates handmade glass beads. She studied in Venice, Italy, and brings the Venetian glass-making tradition to her ornate modern designs—fashioning necklaces, earrings, pendants and decorative objects from the multi-colored beads she makes. Her palette is a kaleidoscope—every hue you can imagine, and more. This is a working studio and gallery: if you are lucky, you can see Williams as she uses the “lamped-work” technique to blow her delicate glass beads—much to the delight of her visitors. A short drive from the Harbortown Cultural District you will come upon East Gloucester, location of The Gloucester Stage Company. This intimate theater, co-founded by acclaimed playwright Israel Horovitz—who remains artistic director emeritus—was created as a “safe harbor for playwrights and new plays.” Today, Gloucester Stage continues to delight and surprise with its awarding-winning productions. This summer, don’t miss The Rainmaker (July 14–August 5) written by N. Richard Nash and directed by Robert Walsh, and Horovitz’s own Out of the Mouths of Babes (August 11–September 2). “You will be sweetly and happily entertained,” says Rex Reed of the New York Observer. The bevy of Gloucester’s artistic activity continues on Rocky Neck, America’s oldest art colony. Opulent, exotic, sumptuous—these are just a few of the adjectives that come to mind when you walk through the door—itself a work of art—of Side Street Gallery on Rocky Neck Avenue. Designers/owners Mary Hughes and Caro-Gray Bosca have operated this spectacular jewelry gallery for 24 years. “We call it a ‘global kitchen’—we source unusual, rare pieces from antiquities to exquisite gems from all over the world,” say Hughes and Bosca. There is nothing ordinary at Side Street Gallery—there are diamonds of every hue, Peruvian opals, 18–24 carat

Hershey Frame Shop Caleb Rulli Gallery

18 Railroad Ave. Rockport MA 01966 978-546-2655 | crulli@hersheyframeshop.com hersheyframeshop.com | calebrulli.com

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CAPE ANN, MA constructed in 1877, the Cultural Center was a meeting-house for the community. Later, it was used for religious services until the Rocky Neck Art Colony purchased it in 2012. Today, energized by the zeal and hard work of the Neck’s artist community, and abetted by a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Center is the focal point of the Rocky Neck Cultural District. This nonprofit organization encompasses three distinct programs: the Cultural Center, Gallery 53 and the Goetemann Artist Residency. “We are a community-based arts organization, not an art association,” says executive director Suzanne Gilbert Lee. “We connect creativity with community.” The Center is open year round and typically mounts nine exhibits a year plus periodic cultural events. This summer,

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Artists, Drawings, and Paintings runs through August 6. The Rocky Neck Art Colony also supports the Rocky Neck Historic Art Trail—a selfguided walk through artistic highlights on the Neck. Gallery 53 is a cooperative fine arts and crafts gallery run by Art Colony members. Open from May through October, Gallery 53 presents six shows each summer. A short drive along Atlantic Avenue, also known as the Back Shore, will bring you into Rockport, a picture-postcard seaside village— site of what is reputably the most-painted iconic structure in the country—Motif No. 1. Enjoy walking all over town popping into shops, galleries, and eateries—all within sight of serene Rockport Harbor and the breakwater that protects it from the vagaries of the open ocean.

A great way to begin your time in Rockport is by meeting Bob and Jill Whitney Armstrong at their unique space, iartcolony. As the Armstrongs describe it, “It’s a space for creators and collectors to convene.” Influenced by Asian sensibilities and other spiritual perspectives, iartcolony explores independent, idealistic and irreverent contemporary and ancient art forms from all over the world. iartcolony presents This is It, an exhibit of eclectic paintings, artifacts, and inspirational pieces on view in July and August. This boutique group show of stellar contemporary artists is the definitive representation of the Armstrong’s bold yet contemplative curatorial aesthestic. Looking for the perfect frame for your newly-acquired work of art? Be sure to visit Caleb Rulli and Melissa Cooper at Hershey Frame Shop. Rulli is an expressionist painter and a master picture framer and is astute in gold leafing as well as understated framing techniques. He is expert in pairing frame styles with the period of your artwork and will recommend a frame that complements your painting, document, photograph or memorabilia—whether ornate and gilded or sleek and modern. Rulli and Cooper will take meticulous care of your artwork in a clean, secure environment. Hershey Frame Shop is your go-to place for art conservation, archival framing techniques, acid-free backing and matting, UV blocking glass and other trusted methods to ensure the longest life for your treasured artwork. Cape Ann requires an extended stay and Rockport offers many options. Check out, rather, check into the Linden Tree Inn. A short walk to Main Street and Bearskin Neck—as well as to both Front and Back beaches—the Linden Tree Inn is perfectly located. On-site parking— a plus in Rockport—is provided. A Victorian home built in 1850, the Linden Tree Inn offers 12 comfortable rooms each with private bath, and four spacious rooms with efficiency kitchens in the carriage house. Innkeepers Tobey and John Shepherd attend to every detail to ensure your comfortable stay—including a full breakfast featuring Tobey’s famous scones. A brief stroll toward the water along Broadway leads you to the Lantana House—a charming Victorian close to everything. Stroll down to Dock square, T-Wharf and Bearskin Neck, take in the sailboats, small fishing craft and of course, Motif No. 1. The Lantana House

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CAPE ANN, MA boasts a relaxing covered front porch and an expansive deck. This B&B offers seven rooms all with en suite baths, and provides a continental breakfast with locally-baked breads and pastries. The Lantana House is decorated with paintings by local artists, immersing you in a complete Rockport experience. The Pleasant Street Inn is another welcoming Victorian inn close to everything. Innkeepers Lynne and Roger Norris have welcomed guests since 1985. This inn offers eight rooms, a separate carriage house and beautifully-landscaped grounds. Your hosts provide a generous continental breakfast and a spacious lawn and front porch that invite you to relax and chat with other travelers. Periwinkle Cottage is another attractive option for visitors who want a homey feel. The cottage offers two townhouse units, each with two floors, a kitchen outfitted with all the essentials, a common laundry and grill, and a beautiful garden. “It’s a home away from home,” says innkeeper Rosemarie Cenenundolo, who operates the cottages with her husband Guy. Periwinkle is open year-round and requires a two-night minimum. The Seven South Street Inn enjoys views from a short walk up the hill overlooking Rockport Harbor and the ocean beyond. Innkeepers Debbie and Nick Benn offer a step up from typical B&B fare. They won Yankee Magazine’s Editor’s Choice for Best Country B&B for 2017. This award-winning inn caters to all types of dietary preferences and restrictions. Enjoy a four-course breakfast with choices of

savory eggs, sweet pancakes and more. Glutenfree options are always available. Seven South Street Inn offers nine rooms, all en suite, and every room has access to outdoor space. There is a seasonal pool and the inn provides parking passes to Cape Hedge and Long beaches. A short drive from the heart of the Rockport village, off the beaten track, and you’ll find the Seafarer Inn, on lovely Marmion Way. Located right on the shore, the Seafarer is a beach house that is casual yet elegant. It commands gorgeous views of Straitsmouth Island and its lighthouse, and from there a vista of the open ocean, including Boston’s skyline. Sunrises will astound, and the beach access is yours to enjoy. The Seafarer Inn offers six rooms, and a full breakfast buffet so you’ll be well-fortified for your excursions. If you are feeling fit, embark on a leisurely 20-minute walk by the shore to the village. Innkeeper Chris Roenker recommends it: “The walk is contemplative and relaxing—you will feel invigorated.” If you entered via 128, drive out of Rockport via 127 south (Granite Street) towards the village of Lanesville. On your right, just beyond Pigeon Cove, you will come upon the Emerson Inn. The Emerson is a stately hotel with a full bar, pool, dining room and the more casual Pigeon Cove Tavern, with on-deck dining and fabulous ocean views. This historic property, built in 1846 and updated several times since, retains its historic architecture and ambiance, while providing modern amenities. The inn is notable for its location, excellent service and

exceptional culinary experience. As you wind your way around the island, head north towards Halibut Point State Park and Folly Cove. At Folly Cove, you will cross back over the town line to Gloucester. Do not miss Flatrocks Gallery, near Lanesville. Unlike most galleries that are clustered in the center of town, Flatrocks is in a bucolic, garden setting—and the garden itself is an integral part of the gallery. Co-curators Anne-Marie Crotty and Cynthia Roth emphasize community—Lanesville is a quirky and wonderful enclave of Gloucester— and Flatrocks Gallery reflects that sensibility. “Flatrocks Gallery is not elitist. It is about people sharing their humanity, energy, and spirit,” say Crotty and Roth. The gallery backs up against Dogtown Common, the wild and wooded interior of Cape Ann, site of the first settlement of Gloucester in the 1600s. Dogtown has inspired painters from Marsden Hartley to renowned sculptors Walker Hancock and Paul Manship. Flatrocks mounts a Manship-themed show from July 6 through August 6. As your gallery-hopping visit winds down be sure to linger at nearby Lanescove—a short step from Flatrocks Gallery. The sunset view from Lanescove can only be described in superlatives, as countless artists can attest. As you travel from whence you came, memories of your sojourn to Cape Ann—a trove of art, culture and beauty— are sure to linger like the colors of a summer evening’s sky over the water. Perhaps you’ll try your hand at painting it?

—Judith Brackley

HUGHES-BOSCA Side Street Gallery 17 Rocky Neck Gloucester, MA hughesbosca.com

73 Rocky Neck Ave. Unit #2, Gloucester 617-548-3726 | reginapiantedosi.com

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Destination Cape Ann  

Art New England - July / August 2017

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