Issuu on Google+

Quality Improvement Plan 2005


Reverefor Council Families and Children The Revere Council for Families and Children (RCFC) is a local Community Partnership Council under the leadership of the Revere Public Schools. Its membership includes early care and education professionals from child care, family child care, Head Start, and public school programs. The RCFC is committed to building a comprehensive, collaborative network of family-centered services that is sensitive to family needs and builds upon community strengths and resources. Associated Early Care and Education, Inc. Family/Child Care Program – Chelsea Beachmont Arts &’ Educare, Inc Network

CAPIC

Collaborative Psychotherapy

For Kids Only

North Suffolk Mental Health

Office of the Mayor

Revere Public Library

Intergenerational Mentor Program from the Revere community

Chelsea/Revere Family

■ ■

Even Start

Healthy Families – ROCA

Kiddie Koop of Revere, Inc.

Revere Community Partnerships for Children ■

Early Childhood Associates, Inc.

Harbor Area Early Intervention

Foundations Early Intervention

Department

CAPIC Head Start

MGH Revere Cares

Revere Family Network Revere Public Schools

Tri-City Housing

Healthy

Parents from the Revere Community

■ ■

Revere Police ■

Team-Ups

Family Child Care Providers

Parents from the Revere communityAssociated

Early Care and Education and the Boston EQUIP Model


Based on the belief that children’s first learning experiences are the foundation for success in school and adult life, the RCFC’s primary role is to: ■

Develop a comprehensive system linking children and families with existing social and human service agencies that is equally accessible to all families;

Offer comprehensive professional development and support programs for early childhood providers and other human service agency representatives;

Implement parent education programs that help families develop a greater capacity to educate their children;

Serve as an ongoing policy and planning body for new early childhood and family centered programs;

Advocate for expanded resources to better serve families and children; and

Move all programs to an Even Start model providing family literacy for all families.

Insure developmentallyappropriate curriculum and practices in all early care and education programs;

Develop home-school partnerships;

Implement the Massachusetts Early Childhood Program Standards and Guidelines;

For more information about the Revere Council for Families and Children, call us at 781-485-2719.


Associated Early Care and Education and the Boston EQUIP Model Associated Early Care and Education, Inc. is a direct service provider serving primarily low-income children in the Greater Metropolitan Boston area through its six center-based programs and three family child care networks. Associated’s mission is to lead through experience, as educators and advocates, in urban early education of children from birth, in partnership with their families and communities. Associated and a community-based advisory of early care and education providers, advocates, and policymakers

established the Boston Early Education Quality Improvement Project (Boston EQUIP) in 1995 in an effort to improve the quality of early care and education services in Boston. After completing its first survey of licensed center-based child care, family child care, public pre-school programs, and after-school programs, Boston EQUIP’s advisory established benchmarks in five key areas of quality improvement – accreditation, facilities, teacher education and training, teacher salaries, and parent engagement. Since that time, Boston EQUIP has surveyed Boston’s licensed early care and education and school-age child care programs four times – in 1997, 1999, 2001, and most recently in the winter of 2004, and has used the data to leverage legislative change and financial investment in improving the quality of early childhood programs.

Associated’s mission is to lead through experience, as educators and advocates, in urban early education of children from birth, in partnership with their families and communities.


Revere’s Commitment to Quality In 2002, Associated Early Care and Education, Inc. received a grant from The F. B. Heron Foundation to replicate the Boston EQUIP model in another local community, and integrate it with efforts to measure quality at the program and child levels. Associated partnered with the Revere Public Schools and the Revere Council for Families and Children because of their existing and ongoing commitment to improving the quality of early care and education programs at all three levels: the child, the program, and the community. The child:

The program:

In 2001, the Revere Public Schools partnered with Associated to develop a child outcome measurement system for its public schoolbased early childhood classrooms. As a part of this process, Revere developed educational benchmarks for children’s development in math, language arts, and science based on the Massachusetts Department of Education’s Curriculum Frameworks for Pre-Kindergarten. Revere provided training to its early childhood teachers in observing and recording child development indicators and using that information to assess the progress of children in the early childhood classroom.

Through a partnership between the Revere Council for Families and Children and Associated, the RCFC has made a commitment to helping center-based providers and other early care and education programs achieve national accreditation through the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

The community: In its new partnership with Associated, the Revere Council for Families and Children adapted the Boston EQUIP model and went through a process of setting long term goals for quality improvement in Revere’s early care and education services – a vision that builds upon the goals the RCFC had already established for itself and its members.


Setting Revere’s Early Care and Education Benchmarks To establish its long-term quality improvement goals and interim benchmarks, the Revere Council for Families and Children worked with Associated Early Care and Education and Early Childhood Associates, Inc. to create a vision for early care and education services in Revere in 2005 and 2008. After choosing the quality improvement areas of accreditation, community collaboration, and serving diverse children – priorities that had been raised repeatedly in the RCFC’s planning and evaluation process – members took a close look at Revere’s current status in each area. This scan of the “baseline” revealed that in an area like accreditation, there were existing data which gave a complete picture of the community’s level of success. In the other two areas, community collaboration and serving the needs of diverse children, baseline data were much more difficult to establish and success will be much more difficult to measure. The bench-

marks established in each of the three areas reflect the relative concreteness and measurability of the quality improvement areas selected by the Council members as its priorities. After reviewing existing baseline data, Revere Council for Families and Children members reflected on their vision for Revere’s early care and education quality in the future. With that vision in the forefront, participants established interim steps toward that vision – the benchmarks described in this report.


Next Steps It is important to have a vision, and to develop steps for getting there. By setting benchmarks in three priority areas of early care and education quality, Revere continues to make progress. Revere is committed to providing quality services to families and children and plans to use its benchmarks as a roadmap for planning and investment as it proceeds into the 21st century.

“Developing benchmarks as a Council was a nice way of having everyone be a part of our goals. I think people work harder to achieve goals that they are invested in.� Participant in the 2002 Revere Council for Families and Children


Currently in Revere:

Two of the nine licensed centers in Revere (one a Head Start program), and all three Early Childhood Program sites operated by the Revere Public Schools are accredited.

BENCHMARKS

Accreditation Benchmarks

Accreditation will have been achieved and/or maintained in: ➔ The three Revere Public School Early Childhood Program sites; ➔ One Head Start program; ➔ One additional licensed center; and Four family child care programs.

By 2005:

By 2008:

All previously accredited centers, Head Start programs, and Revere Public Schools Early Childhood Program sites will have maintained accreditation; ➔ Two school-age programs will have completed self-assessment using appropriate accreditation standards. and ➔ Six family child care programs will have achieved accreditation through the National Association for Family Child Care.


Community Collaboration Benchmarks Collaboration is critical to the success of an early care and education community in meeting the needs of families and children yet it is often intangible and difficult to measure. There is some evidence, however, that community collaboration in Revere could improve.

BENCHMARKS

Because community collaboration was an area of quality that the Revere Council for Families and Children had identified and prioritized in its planning and evaluation process, the Revere early childhood community has made a commitment to achieving and documenting progress in this area. While the goals may be less quantifiable, these “action” benchmarks are no less critical to the overall quality improvement of early care and education in Revere.

By 2005:

By 2008:

The Revere early care and education community will have: ➔ Engaged six businesses in the community with the Council; ➔ Gained a commitment from all of these business partners to support the development of a resource guide and “tracking” book in which families can document their use of various early childhood programs and services.

The Revere early care and education community will have published and distributed 250 resource guides and tracking books to parents throughout the city.


Serving Diverse Children Benchmarks Like many cities in America, Revere’s population is in a constant state of change. It speaks a variety of languages, comes from a variety of cultures, and has a variety of needs related to its young children’s education. According to 2000 U.S. Census data, 9% of individuals in Revere speak Spanish as their primary language at home, 5% speak an Asian or Pacific Island language and 13% speak another language other than English. One of every five individuals in Revere was born outside the United States, with more than a third of those born in Latin America, and 22% born in an African country. It is not surprising, then, that the Revere Council for Families and Children has made serving the city’s diverse children – not only racially and linguistically diverse, but diverse in terms of their educational and developmental needs – one of its highest priorities.

Currently: 21% of parents believed that the programs serving their children supported families from other cultures or those who are learning a second language.


BENCHMARKS

By 2005:

By 2008:

➔ Teachers and providers will attend at least one training per year in developing skills and curriculum to support cultural sensitivity, diversity awareness, and working with secondlanguage learners. ➔ Classrooms and family child care homes will be print-rich environments which reflect the majority of languages spoken by the children and families they serve. ➔ 40% of parents will be aware that programs are providing services that support families from other cultures and those who are learning a second language. ➔ All preschool children will understand and enjoy the diversity of their peers as demonstrated through play and conversation.

➔ Teachers and providers will attend at least two trainings per year in developing skills and curriculum to support cultural sensitivity, diversity awareness, and working with second-language learners. ➔ In addition to the print rich environment classrooms and family child care homes will have multicultural materials and books which reflect the cultural diversity of the community and the majority of languages spoken by the children and families they serve. ➔ All parents will be aware that programs are providing services that support families from other cultures and those who are learning a second language. ➔ All preschool children will continue to understand and enjoy the diversity of their peers as demonstrated through play and conversation.


Garfield Community Magnet School 176 Garfield Avenue Revere, Massachusetts 02151


2005 Revere Quality Improvement Plan - Full Report