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D E S I G N E R G E RA L D P O M E R O Y D E L I V E R S A S TAT E LY

BEACON HILL TOWNHOUSE

D E S I G N E R S P O T L I G H T O N C H A R L E S S PA D A Architect Mark Hutker Creates a Sense of Place and Family Refuge on Cape Cod Inspired Design and a Collector’s Eye Reign Supreme in Provincetown


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V O L U M E F I V E · FA L L 2 015

IN THIS ISSUE 11 Bibliophile Boston

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33

new to the bookshelf

Design

Design

mark hutker

gerald pomeroy

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44

52

Designer Spotlight

jesse carrier & mara miller

Designer Spotlight

Design

charles spada

pilot

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64

69 45

Culture & Cuisine

Style & Cuisine

white hart inn

by the book

Makers’ Guild Section

art ofauthor handwork in design

D E S I G N · S T Y L E · C U LT U R E · C U I S I N E Also in this Issue 5 Question & Answer with Michael Phillips 9 Dear Readers 26 Inspired Design and a Collector’s Eye Reign Supreme in Provincetown

On the Cover · Designer Gerald Pomeroy Delivers a Stately Beacon Hill Townhouse for Well-Traveled Clients Returning to Boston After Living in England · Page 33

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michael phillips Editor-in-Chief chesie breen Creative Director george krauth Design Editor caroline sholl Market Editor sarah mccarthy | Showroom Liaison mary lewey Contributing Photographers eric roth 路 william waldron Copy Editor mary ross Editorial Assistant ellie sohm Publisher kathy bush-dutton | Published by new england home 路 jamestown, l.p.

漏2014 Jamestown, L.P. All rights reserved.

Executive Editor

To advertise, please email Jill Korff at jkorff@nehomemag.com.

IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

ID BOSTON is the magazine of Boston Design Center, whose showrooms include: Ailanthus

Brunschwig & Fils

Downsview Kitchens

JANUS et Cie

Paris Ceramics

Allstone

Carlisle Wide Plank Floors

Duralee / HC Monogram

Jewett Farms + Co.

Phillip Jeffries

Ann Sacks

Century Furniture

EcoModern Design

Kerwin

Porcelanosa

Apure

Charles Spada

Edelman Leather

Key Office Interiors

Quadrille

Farrow & Ball

Kravet Fabrics

Ritz Associates

FDO Group

Lee Jofa

Robert Allen | Beacon Hill

Grand Rapids Furniture Company

Leicht Boston

Romo

M-Geough

Grange Furniture

Scalamandre

The Martin Group, Inc.

Hokanson

Masterpiece Framing

Schumacher

Baker Furniture Belfondo Berkeley House Blanche P. Field The Boston Shade Company / System 7

Christopher Peacock Home Contract Sources Cowtan & Tout Creative Materials New England Creative Office Pavilion / Herman Miller

The Bright Group

DiscoverTile

ICON Group

Merida

Brookline Village Antiques

Donghia

J.D. Staron

Osborne & Little

Steven King Decorative Carpets Studio 534 Tile Showcase Trianon Antiques United Marble Fabricators Venegas and Company Walters Wicker WaterSpot

Stark Carpet Corporation

Waterworks

Stark Fabric Furniture Wallcovering

Your German Kitchen

ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, BOSTON, MA 02210

Webster & Company


FADE DIGITAL WALLCOVERING PHILLIP JEFFRIES BOSTON • SUITE 526B, BOSTON DESIGN CENTER • 857-250-4340 PHILLIPJEFFRIES.COM


QUESTION & ANSWER WITH

MICHAEL PHILLIPS PLEASE SHARE SOME INSIGHT ON THE GOALS DRIVING DEVELOPMENT AT THE INNOVATION AND DESIGN BUILDING: One of the primary goals of the IDB is to facilitate innovation, and we believe that this is best achieved by creating a workplace that converges the best in design, architecture, manufacturing, technology, and creative all under one roof. We have created a 1.4-million-square-foot, fully integrated, 24-hour hub to support these industries. We know we have done our job when we see companies walk down the hall and form collaborations: experts seeking experts. In this issue, we are excited to profile the creative firm Pilot, an excellent example of our tenants being inspired by one another. WHAT TYPES OF IMPROVEMENTS CAN WE EXPECT TO SEE? This fall you will see a series of shipping containers arrive, signaling significant improvements in food and beverage and the arrival of several new tenants. Some of these include: Jubali, Mei Mei Street Kitchen, Roxy’s Grilled Cheese, Triangle Coffee, and Yankee Lobster Company. We’ll also welcome a variety of amenities like Niche Urban Garden Supply, a floral shop; Cut-Splice, a barbershop; and Drydock Exchange, a general store. We want people to wake up and be excited to go to work here. HOW DOES TRANSPORTATION FACTOR IN? The IDB is the single largest concentration of design-minded companies in New England and with that comes a need for transportation infrastructure. We have put a lot of focus into creating more transportation streams to the IDB. You will notice two Hubway stations, an onsite Zipcar, and shuttles to North and South Stations, in addition to the onsite MBTA Silver Line stations. Of course, some people ride an Erba Cycles bike to work or arrive by skateboard. That is what makes the mix so dynamic. For all inquiries, please contact Michael at mphillips@idbostonmagazine.com.

Michael Phillips President, Jamestown Executive Editor, ID BOSTON


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DEAR READERS We are very excited to welcome you to Boston Design Market, and to present the newest issue of ID BOSTON, which is chock-full of useful resources and coverage on the best design, style, culture, and cuisine New England has to offer. On the heels of summer, we visit Cape Cod to see a project by architect Mark Hutker. We love Mark’s work for its natural ability to blend seamlessly into place. Back in Boston, the ever-elegant designer Gerald Pomeroy turns out a Beacon Hill townhouse that perfectly embodies his impeccable taste. Relying heavily on Boston Design Center showrooms and New England antiques dealers, Pomeroy flawlessly executed a residence for clients who had been living abroad and wanted a home in Boston that would reflect their travel experiences and be a base for the next chapter of their lives. We asked the lion of Boston design and collecting, Charles Spada, to train his expert eye on the newly launched Market Stalls, and give us a behind-the-scenes look at the items that drew his praise. He also shows us one of his favorite projects in Boston. This month we partner with our friends at Dering Hall. They have tapped top interior designers from New England to participate in Wired & Inspired, a virtual showhouse that features digital room designs inspired by favorite movies, and exclusively features product from showrooms at the BDC. While visiting my daughter at boarding school, I came across the most delightful respite in Salisbury, Connecticut, the White Hart Inn. Unsurpassed in hospitality and cuisine in the area, the White Hart is the perfect bridge between Litchfield County and trips to the Berkshires to visit Brimfield in search of antiques. As you can see, the BDC is bustling with news and events. We thank you for your support, and as always, please be in touch: cbreen@idbostonmagazine.com.

Best,

Chesie Breen Editor-in-Chief, ID BOSTON


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BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

PARISH-HADLEY TREE OF LIFE AN INTIMATE HISTORY OF THE LEGENDARY DESIGN FIRM

By Brian McCarthy and Bunny Williams

In Brian McCarthy and Bunny Williams’ new book, 30 of the most renowned designers trace the history of the legendary interior design firm Parish-Hadley Associates and the influence of their collective work on the design industry as we define it today. For more than three decades, from the 1960s through the 1990s, Parish-Hadley set the standard for American style, their work gracing the homes of prestigious families like the Astors, the Rockefellers, and the Kennedys in the White House. In Parish-Hadley Tree of Life, the esteemed group of designers that worked for Parish-Hadley explore the impact of its glittering history and their time working for the firm, honing their personal styles and creative processes, illustrating what Williams describes in the introduction as the real driving force behind Parish-Hadley’s iconic designs: being “passionate about beautiful houses.” Published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2015 | www.abramsbooks.com

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ONCE UPON A PILLOW

A STORY OF HOME, DESIGN, AND EXQUISITE TEXTILES

By Rebecca Vizard with photography by Antoine Bootz

Once Upon a Pillow by Rebecca Vizard celebrates the stunning collection of pillows and accessories Vizard has custom designed with her innovative use of rare textiles. From embroidered metallic threads of ecclesiastical vestments to Venetian Fortuny draperies and Central Asian suzanis, her designs present a perfect balance of art and material culture. While her collecting forays frequently take her abroad, she often returns to her Louisiana roots to explore the region’s rich history and tradition of decorative arts for inspiration. Topflight designers Gerrie Bremermann, Barry Dixon, Matthew Patrick Smyth, and Suzanne Kasler regularly include her pillows in their interiors. Published by Pointed Leaf Press, 2015 | www.pointedleafpress.com

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ROOMS FOR LIVING

A STYLE FOR TODAY WITH THINGS FROM THE PAST

By Suzanne Rheinstein with principal photography by Pieter Estersohn

In Suzanne Rheinstein’s beautifully photographed second book, no detail is spared in revealing to readers the many ways traditional style can be both elegant and fresh. With chapters focusing on entrance halls, living rooms, dining rooms, retreats, powder rooms, bedrooms, and outdoor rooms, Rheinstein exhaustively shares her design philosophies for creating environments that are both welcoming and serene, encouraging guests to linger in the uniquely decorated spaces. The designer’s deliberate use of texture, color, and proportion are captured in both formal and more casual settings, demonstrating limitless opportunities for producing harmonious living spaces that are both sophisticated and chic. Published by Rizzoli, 2015 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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a luxurious destination for furniture, lighting, and accessories

M - GEOUGH

One Design Center Place, Suite 410 Boston, MA 02210-2313 T 617-451-1412 F 617-451-0065 www.m-geough.com


A R C H I T E C T M A R K H U T K E R C R E AT E S A S E N S E O F P L A C E A N D FA M I LY R E F U G E O N

CAPE COD words by chesie breen 路 photography by brian vanden brink Architecture by Mark A. Hutker, FAIA, Principal and Founder, and Charles E. Orr, AIA, LEED AP Principal Interior Design by Richard Hallberg and Keith Brownfield, Richard Hallberg Interior Design Landscape by Reed Hilderbrand 路 Construction by C.H. Newton Builders, Inc.

A new hexagonal turret offers a private refuge, part of the master suite.

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When Mark Hutker visited the Boston Design Center to speak about his recently published book, A Sense of Place: Houses on Martha’s Vineyard and Cape Cod (Monacelli Press), he shared some valuable insight about raising children. He explained that the more educated they become, the farther from home they tend to go. As an architect, he strives to create houses that will recapture them. He inscribed my book, “CHESIE, BUILD ONCE, WELL!” and marked it with his graphic signature. Mark begins his process by asking clients for diaries of their imagined perfect day in their new home and from there he begins to define life patterns. These layers combine into structures that adhere to what he calls an “ethic of restraint” and, true to his inscription, are built for future generations. The project featured here is no exception. The client who now inhabits this house grew up summering on an idyllic enclave on Buzzards Bay. When a nearby property on a majestic waterfront point became available, they acted quickly. “The existing threestory shingle house wasn’t a significant piece of architecture, and it was completely inadequate for the family’s needs, but it was a meaningful landmark in town and the community loved it,” explains firm principal Charles Orr. The architects wanted to respect this sentiment while producing a house suitable for modern needs where its new family could cultivate and harvest memories of their own. Interior designer Richard Hallberg created intimate interiors that dovetail seamlessly with the understated nuances of the architecture. Perhaps the most coveted of all is the wife’s hexagonal nook, which remains her private space. As Hutker said at the end of his talk, “If you can’t dream it, you can’t live it.”

RESOURCE KEY 1 A guest room with ample storage options. 2 From the new and deliberately informal front door, there is a view through the house to the water. Opposite The living area in the pool house.

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The screened porch functions as a second living room.


Freestanding mirrors frame the view from the bathroom. For privacy, the bottom zones of the double-hung windows turn opaque at the flip of a switch.

A soft palette in the master bedroom balances the serene sunset views.

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MARK HUTKER’S SOURCES 5 FA V O R I T E T H I N G S A B O U T

CAPE COD 1 Corner Cycle – bike riding with my peloton 2 Falmouth Green – the triangular village green that has been the town center since 1756 3 Clam Shack at sunset 4 Playing golf at Woods Hole Golf Club 5 6am swim at Wood Neck Beach

5 FA V O R I T E T H I N G S A B O U T

MARTHA’S VINEYARD 1 Polly Hill Arboretum 2 Anything to do with Ag Hall, the community around it, and the fair 3 Swimming on Eastville Beach or Lambert’s Cove 4 The combination of the low-brow Chappy Ferry juxtaposed against the yachts in Edgartown 5 Vincent House – the oldest house in Edgartown

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Join us at the design event of the season!

THE NINTH ANNUAL NEW ENGLAND DESIGN HALL OF FAME AWARDS AND GALA

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INSPIRED DESIGN

AND A COLLECTOR’S EYE REIGN SUPREME IN PROVINCETOWN

words by chesie breen · photography by william waldron Architecture by Stephan Jaklitsch · Interior Design by Richard McGeehan

When conjuring the historic district of Provincetown, MA, traditional Cape Cod-style architecture leaps to mind. Not so in the case of this impossibly chic house belonging to a Marc Jacobs executive. A stylish mahogany and glass façade fronts the sea, and eclectic interiors make it covet-worthy to anyone with a collector’s eye. Architect Stephan Jaklitsch teamed up with interior designer Richard McGeehan to turn traditional upside down. The client is an avid collector and made it clear from the onset that he wanted to live with the things he loves. The guiding principle seems to be that art, furniture, and objects must coexist to form perfect continental divides. Whichever way your taste leans, you could be happy on either side. In the living room, reproduction Paul Laszlo chairs and a sofa covered in Holly Hunt leather intermingle with a 1955 Myron Stout painting and a Nepalese rug from Rug & Kilim. A wall of green slate, a tile fireplace, and a mahogany tongue-and-groove paneled ceiling offer singular architectural moments. The foyer is canary yellow, the pantry azurean blue, the kitchen pistachio green, and the dining room the color of raspberry sherbert. It sounds jarring, but is actually symphonic. Blue and white antique Chinese pottery is at home beneath a painting by Hawthorne in the dining room. Nothing takes itself too seriously and there are no gimmicky traps. The word eclectic gets overused, but if ever there was a true definition of the term, this house is it.

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D E S I G N E R G E R A L D P O M E R O Y D E L I V E R S A S TAT E LY

BEACON HILL TOWNHOUSE

F O R W E L L -T R A V E L E D C L I E N T S R E T U R N I N G T O BOSTON AFTER LIVING IN ENGLAND

words by chesie breen 路 photography by robert benson, susan harter, eric roth & amy wilson Architecture by Hickox Williams Architects 路 Construction by F.H. Perry Builder Interior Design by Gerald Pomeroy Interiors 路 Landscape by Gregory Lombardi Design

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1 RESOURCE KEY 1 Upholstery from Webster & Company. Coffee table from Niermann Weeks. Lamps from Vaughan. Ceramics from David Neligan. 2 Lighting by Dessin Fournir. 3 A pair of Christopher Spitzmiller lamps flanking the sideboard. Wing chairs from Hickory Furniture. Lantern from Vaughan. Asmara rug from Stark. Opposite A three-story mural hand painted by Susan Harter anchors the house.

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room, stately architecture dovetails beautifully with traditional This historic 1800s brownstone on Boston’s Beacon Hill is home decorating techniques. “I reached into my bag of old guard to a couple with adult children and grandchildren who had been decorating tricks and made them fresh,” says Pomeroy. living abroad in England and were returning home. They called upon esteemed designer Gerald Pomeroy to help them create a The antiqued mirror in the center arch draws the eye in, creates home that would celebrate their rich travels. Pomeroy worked depth in the room, and offers warm reflection. The client had with architect Patrick Hickox to devise a gracious purchased the sideboard, dining table, and footprint that is anchored around a stunning foyer side chairs in England. Pomeroy and his clients with a regal, spiral staircase that stretches from made many trips to Essex where they acquired We wanted to make a top to bottom. an impressive arsenal of antiques from David

statement up front but one

Neligan and Alexander Westerhoff. “As we started to talk about the way the house that would unfold with should unfold, the image of Auntie Mame’s The living room took its cues from a pair of elegance and subtlety. Beekman Place townhouse immediately sprang Coromandel screens flanking the sofa. Pomeroy to mind. We wanted to make a statement up worked with Webster & Company to design the front but one that would unfold with elegance and subtlety. We upholstery and a coffee table was found at Niermann Weeks. began by commissioning the muralist Susan Harter to hand paint The mirror and end tables are from Alexander Westerhoff. The a mural of the couple’s travels around the world. The pastoral curtains are made in a Schumacher silk and feature a goblet pleat landscape sweeps down the staircase from the master suite, with a relaxed pullback. The windows overlook Louisburg Square, around the dining room, and down to the ground floor to the so Pomeroy added privacy sheers that would also allow light to husband’s office,” says Pomeroy. filter through. Wanting the mural to be biographical in nature, Pomeroy asked the clients to bring in photos of the places they had traveled. Harter chose a unifying color palette. She used a rich beige glaze and layered in soft blues and seafoam greens, colors found in nature. Pomeroy wanted the mural to set the tone for what to expect in the house. Continuing into the oval-shaped dining

The kitchen and breakfast area overlooking the terrace gardens are decorated in blues, beiges, and a whisper of mauve. The island is made from mahogany with a marine varnish. The mosaic backsplash was designed with Tile Showcase. The doorways accommodate mirrored transoms to bounce light and enhance the overall airy feel of the house.

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This house was very much about the process. Pomeroy developed a trusted partnership and vision with his clients. Many great talents and resources blended together to create this lasting home. “These clients are very sophisticated and drawn to traditional antiques, which meant that the rooms needed to accommodate large case pieces, especially in the master bedroom. Great thought went into creating a footprint that would unfold, allowing them to collect. This was far more important to them than large closets,” shares Pomeroy. A secretary from Alexander Westerhoff and a convex period mirror from David Neligan hold court amongst a soft color palette. Fabrics from Schumacher and Rogers & Goffigon were chosen for texture and tone more so than for color. A custom Asmara rug from Stark covers the wood floors. The four-poster bed is Pomeroy’s own design. With grandchildren visiting, Pomeroy opted for twin beds in the guest room and hung a group of prints found at The Martin Group above them. A pair of milk glass lamps from Blanche Field rests on a skirted bedside table. The gardens were designed by Gregory Lombardi Design and were included as one of the 12 gardens on the Hidden Gardens of Beacon Hill Annual Tour. The Sutherland teak furniture was found at Webster & Company. “The furniture has a French influence, which is unexpected for outdoor silhouettes and works nicely with the large espaliered trees,” says Pomeroy. This house was very much about the process. Pomeroy developed a trusted partnership and vision with his clients. Many great talents and resources blended together to create this lasting home. Pomeroy is also proud to say the project won the prestigious Bulfinch Award for interior design.

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A four-poster bed designed by Gerald Pomeroy. Custom Asmara rug from Stark.


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RESOURCE KEY 1 An alcove creates sanctuary around the tub in the master bath. 2 The historic 1800s brownstone faces Louisburg Square. 3 The master sitting room features lighting from Charles Edwards, a period convex mirror from David Neligan, and a secretary from Alex Westerhoff. Opposite A collection of prints from The Martin Group hangs above twin beds in the guest room.

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GERALD POMEROY’S BLACK BOOK BOSTON DESIGN CENTER Blanche P. Field Brookline Village Antiques Charles Spada Farrow & Ball FDO Group/Lee Jofa The Martin Group Schumacher Tile Showcase Webster & Company ANTIQUES Marcoz Antiques, Boston Available at Market Stalls at Boston Design Center

David Neligan Antiques, Essex Available at Market Stalls at Boston Design Center

Andrew Spindler Antiques, Essex Alexander Westerhoff Antiques, Essex RESTAURANTS The Bristol @ The Four Seasons Coppa Petit Robert Bistro Toscano Beacon Hill Ocean @ Cape Arundel Inn, Kennebunkport, ME SHOPPING Barbour Brooks Brothers L.A. Burdick Handmade Chocolates Drinkwater’s Cambridge Farm & Fable Formaggio Kitchen Neiman Marcus SERVICES Jordan the Tailor Fiona Sinclair @ Vidal Sassoon

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Mirror and sconces from Vaughan.

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Wallpaper from Phillip Jeffries.


There is nothing more powerful than light in establishing mood and atmosphere in any environment.” ~ Doreen Le May Madden Award-Winning Certified Lighting Designer;Atmospheric Strategist

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J E S S E C A R R I E R A N D M A RA M I L L E R

HIS & HERS Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller met in their senior year at the Fashion Institute of Technology, and have since become the husband-and-wife design team known for their bold mix of timeless and contemporary design. The new book Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors (Vendome) showcases the pair’s versatile range of styles that always remain refined and sophisticated, while at the same time light and fresh. Anna Wintour writes in her foreword to the book, “These are homes whose high style comes from a very human-scaled sense of warmth and joy.” This joy comes straight from Carrier and Miller, celebrated for their spirited and charming nature. After years working for a number of AD100 top firms, they launched their own, Carrier and Company Interiors, in 2005. Since then, their work has graced an array of residences, including sprawling country houses and an apartment in a converted New York printing plant, as well as the homes of Town & Country editor-and-chief, Jay Fielden, fashion designer Jason Wu, and actress Jessica Chastain. When Architectural Digest named Carrier and Company to the AD100 list, they noted the duo’s reputation for “spicing the appropriate with the strikingly unusual.” Their interiors are a brilliant mix of highs and lows, old and new, that set off their neutral palettes and subtle patterns impeccably. The couple makes it their personal mission to reflect their clients’ unique artwork, collections, and tastes. Carrier and Miller create spaces specifically for the people who will inhabit them, editing and curating the spaces to fresh, personalized perfection.

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DESIGN

SPOTLIGHT ON CHARLES SPADA Sun Filled with Views The 19th-century Chinese barber’s chair seems to have been made for the spot!

words by charles spada · photography by eric roth portrait by raymond forbes I am a great fan of recycling worthy old buildings, saving them from the wrecking ball, giving them new life. One such building, a retired limestone-clad pumping station, has recently undergone a complete facelift, repurposed as luxury condominiums. The French Beaux-Arts architecture overlooking a vast reservoir seemed more in keeping with a museum to house art than to have spent most of its life in municipal service. The exterior restoration work is to be admired; but alas, in the end the interiors, like most modern construction, fell short. The new condominiums—neat, vanilla boxes—lacked any hint of craftsmanship or architectural detail and delivered only minimal storage. Since my client purchased the apartment during the pre-construction phase, we were able to make changes to the floor plans to suit their needs. From the original open floor plan, I created a small but welcoming entrance foyer, a hub to the living and bedroom areas. A painted 19th-century solitary Chinese barber’s chair sits in the foyer below an exuberantly carved and gilded 18th-century mirror. The open kitchen that once looked directly onto the living room was enclosed, and the new wall separating the two rooms offered much needed space for additional cabinetry. The living room benefited as well, gaining an extended wall and the formality it lacked before looking directly into the kitchen. The extended wall now accommodates art and better furniture placement.


A soft, neutral palette throughout the apartment prevails, overlooking spectacular water views.


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The master suite, the largest room in the apartment, is—by today’s standards—huge. The deep and wide space easily accommodated the addition of a large floor-to-ceiling, multi-purpose island cabinet, which defines the sleeping area. The island houses an entertainment center, bookshelves, and concealed storage, front and back. A discreet dressing area behind the island leads directly to the master bathroom. I opted to design and build much needed storage units throughout, including multi-drawer, wall-hung night tables, in both the master and guest suites. The tables, both serviceable and attractive, float above the floor. I used a mix of textures in the same mocha color from Coraggio for the custom headboard and frame, wall upholstery, seating, and curtains. The soothing, single color of the fabrics combined with the slight variations in textures, makes for a warm and inviting inner sanctum.

The walls in the guest room, a light and sunny spot, are upholstered in off-white, purposely narrow-cut, linen panels. The headboard and frame are upholstered in Marvic Textiles chenille brocade. Wall-mounted custom night tables flank the bed. Swiss cotton hung at the windows diffuses and softens the southern light that pours into the room. The combined sitting and dining room overlooks pleasant and immediate views of the reservoir. Here, as throughout the apartment, the custom upholstery is tailored to the scale of the room. More wall-mounted cabinetry flanks each side of the fireplace, while a large tufted ottoman in Edelman caramel leather serves double duty as both coffee table and footstool. Due to the intimate scale of the room, I purposely kept a restful, neutral palette, taking cues from the pale limestone hearth and fire surround.

Opposite: 1 A vase of happy tulips complements the neutral. 2 The island in the master suite displays the Buddha, a favorite piece of the client. 3 The kitchen is filled with light, perfect for growing potted herbs and topiaries. 4 A powerful black and white painting by Mark Schoening was purchased during an exhibit of his work at the DeCordova Museum in 2008. Above: The master bedside tables float above the floor on cashmere upholstered walls.

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A custom credenza of borrowed design divides the dining and living areas, and is lacquered in a white as soft as satin. The gentle curves and lines are purposely left unbroken leaving the surface free of knobs or pulls. The doors operate by discreet touch latch. The custom zebrawood dining table expands to seat 12. The chairs are upholstered in the same caramel leather as the ottoman. A dual purpose bar unit and full height mirror reflects the room, opening up an otherwise uninteresting wall. The bar, designed for additional serving with convenient storage below, houses table linens, china, glass, and silver. The windowless study off the dining area was originally planned as a walk-in closet, which was quickly eliminated to create a home office/study. The wall-mounted desk, unhampered by intrusive legs, seems to float while surrounded by three-quarter height cabinets that accommodate the day-to-day household affairs behind closed doors. The kitchen, after necessary structural changes, became a more unified and dedicated work area. Where it was once wide open to the reception and in full view of the living room, it is now a functional, dedicated workspace in a mix of the simplest design elements and materials: matte-white cement tile floors and the raised white tile backsplash enhance the clean lines of the sophisticated wood cabinets, enhanced all the more by the matte charcoal stone counters. In the end I accomplished what I had set out to create: a warm and welcoming nest, a retreat worthwhile to come home to roost.

A snow white lacquered credenza does double duty as a sofa table. I love the intricate movement in the dining chairs.

Every home requires a quiet study area!


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EYE ON COLLECTING

CHARLES SPADA SHOPS THE MARKET STALLS Rounding out the myriad offerings at the Boston Design Center is the Market Stalls—a dedicated, most welcomed 10,000-square-foot antiques pavilion in a newly designed, contemporary setting. Worth a visit! 1 RESTORATION RESOURCES: Factory Bucket, Ideal Garden Planter, 20th century 2 RESTORATION RESOURCES: Exceptional Patina, American Grain Bin, circa 1900 Lift Top, Single Plank Construction, with 4 Interior Compartments 3 M-B HOME: Faux Bamboo Armchair, American, 19th century 4 DEVONIA ANTIQUES: Set of 12 Hand Painted Fish Plates and Fish Platter, circa 1900 5 EUROPEAN COUNTRY ANTIQUES: Painted Pine Linen Press, English, 19th century

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6 RESIDE: Tue Poulsen and Willy Beck Coffee Table, Handmade Ceramic Tiles, Teak Base 7 DAVID NELIGAN ANTIQUES: Napoleon III Gilded Rope Stool 8 DAVID NELIGAN ANTIQUES: Faux Bois Gilt Wood Mirror, Arts and Crafts Period, circa 1880 9 MODHAUS: Still Life, Signed: Erlichman, 1960 10 MARCOZ ANTIQUES: Silver Leaf, Four-Panel Paravent, and a Pair of French Louis XV Fauteuil, Gray Paint 11 DEVONIA ANTIQUES: Spode Copeland, circa 1900 Crushed Lapis Chinoiserie Platter, Set of 5 Plates | A.H. WILLIAMSON: Vintage Set of 12 Floral Hand Painted Dinner Plates; 6 Moser Art Deco Stripe Goblets; Venetian Candlesticks and Epergne, circa 1920

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12 WATER AND MAIN: Field Bench, American, circa 1920 13 RESTORATION RESOURCES: Vermont Marble Garden Urn, circa 1910 14 AMERICA DURAL: Mid-Century, Zebrawood Credenza with Painted Interior Tray Drawers, Tambour Doors 15 WATERHOUSE: Blue & White Peonies, Oil on Panel

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PILOT

F O C U S O N I N N O VAT I O N A N D D E S I G N AT T H E I D B

words by chesie breen photography by mark mahaney & eric levin

THE TEAM Pilot: Bill Concannon and Chris Ford, Founders Design: Creative Office Pavilion, Jenna Ketchen Architecture: Hudson Design Group Construction: New England Design Associates Hand Painted Signage: Kenji Nakayama

THE PRODUCTS herman miller: Aeron (task chairs) Canvas Beam (benching workstations) Canvas Group Based (marker board and tack board screens) Sense (freestanding tables) Setu (stools) Tu Storage (filing and storage)

other: Izzy+ (Nemo Bars) Davis (conference table) SitOnIt, Torsa (conference table and office seating) Fixtures (office tables)


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One of the goals behind the Innovation Design Building is to create purposeful dialogue and collaboration between neighbors. When Pilot, a highly creative studio that built their reputation doing consulting and asset development for brands, intellectual properties, and consumer products such as Universal Studios’ Jurassic World, Hasbro Toys, and Star Wars, was bursting to expand they turned to their neighbors at the IDB. First they needed more space, so Jamestown presented them with an option to expand their existing 2,100-square-foot operation into an adjacent 3,000-square-foot space. With a footprint in place, they walked down the hall and spoke to their seventh floor neighbors at Creative Office Pavilion/Herman Miller. Pilot was founded by Bill Concannon, a graphic designer by training, and Chris Ford, an illustrator. The two firmly believe they produce more creative work through collaboration—and

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they have the results to prove it. They learned this while working together at Hasbro in the early 2000s. Side-by-side, their skillsets complemented and enhanced each other’s. They found the more they integrated their processes, the more positive and successful the work became. Several awards followed and the decision was made: It was time to apply creativity to the bottom line of business. They were asked to refresh a popular Hasbro electronic game and with the new packaging the brand saw a 500 percent increase in sales. When the time came to launch their own studio, Concannon and Ford found the IDB to be the perfect embodiment of what they wanted Pilot to represent. We sat down with Concannon and Ford to learn more about their creative process and the story behind working with their neighbors at the IDB.


WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THE IDB? “Back in 2005, when it came time to find an office space, we knew we wanted to be in Boston, but more importantly we wanted to be in an area that captures the spirit of Boston. We felt that the Seaport District was ideal because it exemplified the hardworking nature that we identify with as New Englanders. The growth of the area was unbelievable to witness and we’re happy to see that both Pilot and the IDB are growing along with it.” — Chris Ford “The core of our work is applying design to brands, and we desired a location that had a focus on current design trends. The IDB being located on the waterfront was a huge plus as well.” — Bill Concannon

WHAT ATTRACTED YOU TO CREATIVE OFFICE PAVILION? “From day one of the company, we vowed to never have any chair that wasn’t the best. We spend more time in them than on our mattresses at home. So, we started working with Creative Office Pavilion and Herman Miller by getting Aeron chairs. When it was time for our studio expansion we didn’t have to think twice about whom to partner with for furniture. Jenna Ketchen at Creative Office Pavilion understood our vision for the studio and executed it flawlessly.” — Chris Ford

WHY WAS THE COLLABORATION SO SUCCESSFUL? “All creative projects increase their opportunity for success when partners listen to each other. Creative Office Pavilion clearly listens to the folks that live with the products they represent. Creative Office Pavilion practices good listening, and therefore can imagine the proper solution and the products to support the vision.” — Bill Concannon


SHARE SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF DESIGNING THE STUDIO: “Working together for over ten years, we knew exactly what our studio needed to be. It was only a matter of timing: When would we be in a position to pull it off? It was exciting and very rewarding to be in a position to reinvest in our company with a new space. It was an indicator that our hard work was paying off by providing us with proper tools. Your studio space and furniture are critical tools, and our work and efficiency has tremendously improved with our new studio. We involved everyone that works at Pilot in the ideation of our space layout. Our goal was to be inclusive of crew ideas for workspace. Although the final design is very focused, there are touches of individual concepts that worked their way into the layout. Working with the professionals from other disciplines was very rewarding. We fully appreciated learning the science of lighting and engineering that goes into space development.” — Bill Concannon

THIS PROJECT WAS A GREAT EXERCISE IN TEAM BUILDING. HOW DID YOU MANAGE THE DIFFERENT PIECES? “Seeing all the teams come together to build the studio we knew we always wanted was great to be a part of. We asked every Pilot employee to design their ideal studio, and then we were able to take an idea from each and have it work seamlessly within the space. The architects at Hudson Design Group were instrumental in designing it in a way that New England Design Associates could execute during the build-out.” — Chris Ford


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C U LT U R E & C U I S I N E

WHITE HART INN Quintessential New England Charm, Cuisine, and Comfort

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The White Hart Inn is nestled near the Berkshires in the town of Salisbury, CT. It has been a town institution since it first opened around 1800, but after a recent renovation and remodeling, the 16-bedroom hotel has become a coveted destination. On Labor Day 2014, the historic establishment was reopened by its new group of owners, including writer Malcolm Gladwell; Annie Wayte, the chef behind the Nicole Farhi restaurants in Manhattan; and Redbook editor-in-chief Meredith Rollins and her husband Conley. Decorated by Matthew Patrick Smyth, the White Hart’s rooms are elegant and luxurious with plush beds and leather ottomans, accented by hardwood floors and original fireplaces. Guests may be tempted to curl up and settle in for the night with the giant flatscreen TVs, but it’s worth it to take an exploratory walk around the hotel—which features artwork by Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, and Terry Winters—and to stop by the Tap Room for a bite to eat. The Tap Room is the inn’s original tavern and the décor has remained untouched down to the wallpaper. Executive chef and hotel co-owner, Annie Wayte, has revamped the menu with dishes influenced by her British background, including Scotch eggs, fish and chips, and shepherd’s pie. An emphasis on local ingredients makes classic recipes taste fresh and new. Wayte has been known to offer a daily toast special that features whatever toppings currently inspire her from boxes of local veggies dropped off by friends from the village. The inn hosts a series of talks and events year-round to lure in the local community. Gladwell helped curate the calendar of guest speakers for what he calls “Literary Evenings,” drawing upon local talent—Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Stephen Sondheim all live or work in the Litchfield County area. These evenings take place in the Tap Room, and harken back to times when the classic colonial manor was the centerpiece of the town’s social life. Now, 200 years later with a new dose of comfort, the White Hart Inn is ready to thrive again.


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RESOURCE KEY 1 The lobby area and its renovation by Bill Katz. 2–3 Guest rooms and suite decorated by Matthew Patrick Smyth. 4 House-made pâté. 5 Classic English fare with a modern flair. 6 Chef and co-owner Annie Wayte with her chef de cuisine Paul Pearson.

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STYLE

BY THE BOOK

PRÊT-À-PARTY: GREAT IDEAS FOR GOOD TIMES AND CREATIVE ENTERTAINING Written by Lela Rose, Published by Rizzoli Fashion designer Lela Rose’s guide to entertaining breathes new life into elegant classics. Lush photographs accompany her ideas and recipes for creating easy and enjoyable events. Rose gravitates toward a bright palette and modern glamour. Featured events range from a couples’ cook-off to an elegant silver-and-white Christmas dinner, all approached with a brilliant dose of chic. Guests will be dazzled by the unexpected touches that perfectly reflect Rose’s principal entertaining philosophy: Create your own occasions to create your own fun. Design your ladies luncheon as an afternoon tequila tasting. Celebrate your latest philanthropic efforts with an outdoor dinner at a rooftop garden in Brooklyn. Prêt-à-Party offers innovative suggestions for planning captivating events, while directing the modern hostess toward the unconventional, the stylish, and the entirely enjoyable hostessing style Rose demonstrates so well.


Ecorce, Sabah, Icelandic Wood

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Exclusively at:

One Design Center Place | Suite 242 | Boston, MA 617-261-9660 www.webstercompany.com

The future of wallcoverings since 1975


CUISINE

BY THE BOOK

FOOD GIFT LOVE: MORE THAN 100 RECIPES TO MAKE, WRAP AND SHARE Written by Maggie Battista, Photography by Heidi Murphy, Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt In Food Gift Love, Maggie Battista, food writer and founder of Eat Boutique, shares her secrets to giving the gift of food. She features recipes a step beyond the typical batch of cookies or jar of marmalade, including shareable delicacies like candied jalapenos, apple galette, and fig rosemary jam. Battista’s tips walk you through every step of the process all the way through tastefully wrapping and packaging your handcrafted treats. With this guide, you can easily create a gift both chic and heartfelt for anyone from a friend in need of some comfort to a new neighbor being welcomed into town. The recipes in Food Gift Love will help you share the joys of food with the people you care about, and create treats that nourish relationships, too.


A N E XC E R P T. . .

FIG ROSEMARY JAM 1 Wash, de-stem, and slice the figs into quarters. 2 If you’re preserving/canning your jam for long-term storage, start with step 2a. If you’re

This jam is inspired by late September days in northern California. The wine harvest is in full swing, the rosemary is heady, and the figs are fat, juicy, and bursting from the trees. Figs are also more affordable in peak season, and I often want to buy them all. During my visits, I borrow a pot from a friend and source jars at the hardware store. In a short afternoon, relaxed and enjoying some local red wine, I make souvenirs for all my friends. This recipe is effortless, especially if you skip the canning part. But preserve at least one jar for later when you’ll want to enjoy this perfect memory of late summer in a jar. The takeaway here is that time improves most things—just like wine—and a little counter time coaxes the sweetness from the figs and allows you some time to enjoy your wine (or take care of other things).

not preserving the jam, you can skip to step 2b. a. Sterilize your canning jars and prepare your water-bath-canning pot. b. Place a small plate with 4 to 5 small spoons in a flat space in your freezer. 3 Add the figs, sugar, and zest to a large, nonreactive bowl or the nonreactive pot you will

use to cook it in. Stir to combine and let sit at room temperature 1 hour or up to several hours. You may also pack them in a sealable container and store in the fridge up to 2 days before proceeding. 4 Place the mixture in a nonreactive pot that’s both wide and deep (a 10-inch or 12-inch

diameter is ideal) and set it over medium-high heat. Add the rosemary and lemon juice. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat slightly, to just above medium. Cook at a low but rolling boil until all the moisture has evaporated and you’re left with a very thick, hot syrup. 5 During the first 20 minutes of cooking, your jam will have large bubbles and create some

foam—do not stir the jam during this stage, let it continue to cook past the foaming stage. 6 At the 20-minute mark, start watching your jam closely as it will be ready within the next

10 minutes or so. Stir it every few minutes to keep things moving and prevent burning. Begin checking for doneness. 7 Here are the signs that your jam is ready: the large bubbles have become very tiny; the

INGREDIENTS 3 pounds (about 30) ripe Mission figs 3 1⁄2 cups (about 1 1⁄2 pounds) granulated sugar 3 (4-inch) strips lemon zest 1 (6-inch) sprig rosemary 1⁄ 2

cup fresh lemon juice

mixture looks glossy and shiny; the mixture begins to thickly coat the back of your spoon and the bottom of the pan; and the mixture has darkened slightly in color. If all signs point to done, conduct a spoon test. 8 Remove from the heat to slow down the cooking each time you test the jam. Place 1

teaspoon of the mixture on 1 of your frozen spoons and quickly return to the plate in the freezer. After 2 minutes, check to see if the jam has thickened on the frozen spoon by rocking it from side to side. If it’s very loose and runny, return to medium heat and keep boiling the mixture. When your jam barely moves on the spoon, it’s ready. It will continue to thicken as it sits. When it’s ready, remove from the heat and do not stir it any further. Carefully remove and discard the rosemary sprig. 9 If you’re not preserving/canning the jam, allow the mixture to cool and then store in the

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT Kitchen scale, 8 quarter-pint glass jars with airtight sterilized lids, Wide-mouth funnel

G I F T W RA P Masking tape, Glue (I prefer Mod Podge), Glitter, Fig leaf (optional), Washi tape

fridge up to 4 weeks in a sealed container. 10 If you are preserving the jam, ladle your jam through a funnel into your prepared jars,

leaving 1⁄4 inch of headspace. Tap the jar a few times to loosen any air bubbles. Wipe the rims and seal carefully, as the jars will be hot. If you’re canning according to my waterbathcanning directions, place the jars in a single layer in your pot of boiling water. Once the water bath boils again, process these jars 10 full minutes. Store up to 1 year in a dark pantry. 11 Gift Wrap: Once the jar has cooled completely (at least 24 hours after making), place a

piece of masking tape around the lower 1⁄2 inch of the jar. Apply glue below the tape line on the jar. Sprinkle with glitter and turn upside down to dry. Once dry, adhere a small fig leaf (if using) to the jar with washi tape.


INTRODUCING

Now open at the Boston Design Center: the all-new Market Stalls, a vintage, antique, and modern wares marketplace that embodies the shift of this once design trade-only building into a progressive, all-inclusive design resource. This 10,000 square foot boutique-style market features high-quality pieces sourced from around the globe, representing an eclectic mix of period furniture, lighting, and art from the 17th to 20th centuries. The BDC is also home to several other antiques showrooms located throughout the building. For hours and a complete list of dealers, visit us at bostondesign.com.

BOSTON DESIGN CENTER

1 DESIGN CENTER PLACE


MAKERS’ GUILD Appreciating the Art of Handwork in Design

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F R A N C E S PA L M E R Since 1987, Frances Palmer has been creating functional art in the form of ceramic pottery. Trained as an art historian, Palmer worked as a printmaker before she found her calling as the potter she is today. Her vases come in whimsical and classical designs; dishes, cake plates, platters, and pitchers are available with floral trims and other patterns; and the Cambridge Ware collection exhibits an intricately marbled design. Palmer’s pieces can be used in everyday life, and are perfectly suited to sharing special meals and moments. No matter how large or small, the design is thoughtful and elegant. The organic shapes betray the labor and careful design that went into each piece, displaying a special beauty in their uniqueness. It feels meaningful to own an item created by Palmer because of the craftsmanship evident in all her art. Palmer’s pieces are treasures for the everyday, meant to be lived with and enjoyed. www.francespalmerpottery.com

L’ O B J E T & F O R T U N Y Proust declared Mariano Fortuny’s famous Delphos gown as “faithfully antique and markedly original.” The new collaboration between Fortuny and L’Objet stays true to that philosophy, introducing a new perspective to Fortuny’s traditional prints on modern plates, flatware, and home accessories. Maury and Mickey Riad acquired the Fortuny brand in 1988 and have devoted themselves to reinvigorating the timeless prints. Their partnership with the luxury tabletop company does just that; the products are perfectly in-line with Mariano’s vision. L’Objet’s designer Elad Yifrach spent two years immersing himself in the archives of the original designer, taking great care to ensure that each piece invoked his signature style— even the pleats of the Delphos gown are referenced. Colored in jewel tones paired with warm browns and stark white plus ample gold and platinum, the line glitters with old-school glamour and striking, exotic motifs, adding luxury and style to the chic modern table. www.l-objet.com | www.fortuny.com


TA Y L O R J O H N S T O N As the horticulturist behind the gardens at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Taylor Johnston needed workwear that was durable enough to withstand digging in the dirt, yet chic enough to reflect the innate sense of style exhibited in the gardens she creates. Johnston has worked everywhere from flower farms and botanic gardens to private estates, and was resigned to rely on a uniform of ill-fitting clothes culled from the men’s rack. That is, until a run-in with Bill Cunningham—and a photograph of herself published in the New York Times—inspired her to take more pride in how she dressed herself for work. And thus, Gamine Co. was founded. Gamine Co. presents the edited collection of workwear goods for women that Johnston could never find—so she went and created it herself. The collection features tailored silhouettes and natural fabrics, while highlighting American utility in every piece. This workwear is different: It is beautiful, and designed for women who want to look chic while digging in the dirt. www.gamineworkwear.com

NICHE URBAN G A R D E N S U P P LY Niche Urban Garden Supply is a city dweller’s lush oasis. The urban garden center has a well-curated selection of plants and accessories available to inject green into every aspect of your life. Whether you are thinking of your office or home, planting inside or out, their design services will reveal and celebrate the beauty of each season. Their consultation services will help you discover “your niche” and maximize the indoor or outdoor charm of any space. The shop’s specialty is container gardening, featuring an assortment of pots and vessels, many of which are locally crafted. The shop also offers workshops for the budding gardener, ranging in topics from seed starting to container garden design, allowing even the newest green thumb to find their calling, right in the heart of Boston. www.nicheboston.com


FORÊT DESIGN STUDIO The ladies behind Forêt Design Studio, the Somerville, MA, floral and event styling company, consider themselves “concept-driven” designers, beginning their design process by identifying an inspirational feeling or mood and shaping it into a thoughtful and imaginative reality. The best friends behind the studio, Rose Mattos and Erin Heath, are self-taught florists who create events with the naturally elegant aesthetic they both love. Mattos is the director of operations and production, and describes herself as “detail extraordinaire” and an “astrological vault.” Heath is the creative director, as well as “color shaman” and “textile magpie.” With their behind-thescenes designer, “garland queen” Kara Laviolette, they form a whimsical three ready to arrange any event. While their conceptual process may seem organic, they take deliberate care to work with local growers to craft “seed to table arrangements” with each client’s specific needs in mind. Their mutual love of seasonal flowers, fruiting branches, ripening berries, and turning acorns inspires every moment, large and small. Even a simple bouquet exhibits a wild harmony in its unconventional mix of flowers and other natural treasures. Forêt’s elegant and rustic style is all their own, but what truly sets them apart is how the team approaches each challenge with the same attention and love they put into the friendship that started it all. www.foretdesignstudio.com

DE GOURNAY AT W E B S T E R The Portman Design draws inspiration from an existing late 18th-century oriental bedroom at the members’ club Home House in London. The design combines the popular Chinoiserie themes of large birds and delicate butterflies, which dart through the stems of a bamboo forest. The scene maintains the naive character of the original paper being executed in the Chinese manner without regard for perspective. www.degournay.com


I S L E S F O R D B O AT W O R K S The unique experience of building boats with children from the South Bronx served as a catalyst for Islesford Boatworks co-founder Brendan Ravenhill, who also leads the L.A.-based Brendan Ravenhill Studio. While working as boatbuilding educator for the nonprofit Rocking the Boat, Ravenhill taught inner city youth in the construction of traditional lapstrake boats. Throughout the experience, he was struck by how the leadership skills and sense of community his students gained through boatbuilding could also be applied in their urban environment. Afterward, Ravenhill moved to the town of Islesford off Little Cranberry Island in Maine to work year-round in lobstering. During this period, Ravenhill designed and built the barn and woodshop that Islesford Boatworks currently calls home. Ravenhill had spent his childhood summers in Islesford, where he first fell in love with the bustle of the waterfront. The town’s livelihood centered around the ocean, fostering a distinctly marine way of life. Yet as the years passed, Ravenhill watched as the waterfront changed and marine-related professions dwindled. In 2006, he and his family were inspired to launch Islesford Boatworks, with intentions to engage the community in the traditional art of wooden boatbuilding and help support the local waterfront. Since then, Ravenhill has spent eight years sharing his passion, instructing over 250 individual students, and engaging approximately 30 children per summer in a six-to-eight-week-long program devoted to the craft of boatbuilding. Each year, Islesford Boatworks has expanded to suit the needs of the community. Ravenhill has developed more advanced woodworking programs for older students, and established a Summer Camp Collaboration Program providing area camps the opportunity to visit the shop for a day of hands-on instruction. Through these programs, the Ravenhill family has breathed new life into the traditions of the seaside community of Islesford and helped revive the waterfront in the process. www.islesfordboatworks.org


ON OUR RADAR Go-to resources and vendors that should be in every designer’s black book

MITCHELL GOLD + BOB WILLIAMS

Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams at the helm.

Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams is a renowned 26-year-old lifestyle furniture brand best known for comfortable, stylish, and valueconscious slipcovered and upholstered furniture, case goods, lighting, accessories, bed linens, and a carefully edited collection of wall art designed to provide comfort—for everyone. In addition to the Boston signature store location on Berkeley Street, there is a new, larger and expanded store in Natick, and a third New England location in Burlington opening in fall 2015. The company has an extensive and expanding retail presence with 26 signature stores in key markets throughout the U.S., plus additional locations scheduled to open annually, as well as four international stores. We asked them to share a bit of their story. “Eleven years ago, Steve Elbaz and Andrew Terrat of Terrat Elms approached us with the idea of opening a Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams store in Boston. At that time, we had already established our brand in other markets and Andrew, a high-end Boston-based interior designer, frequent buyer, and huge fan of our line, saw great potential in bringing our brand to the Boston area. We were all for the idea and in 2004, opened the first Boston-area signature store. The success of that one location launched a second location in Natick, and we soon realized the demand for our product outside the city limits. The Natick store recently re-opened in a new 10,000-square-foot space, and we’re on the heels of opening a 9,000-square-foot signature store in Burlington this fall.” “It is clear the Boston customer values the quality, comfort, and quintessentially American style sense we offer. As our collection evolves with a 70s modern muse, we continue to define and re-define modern home furnishings through a delicate balance of mixing updated design elements with clean and classic silhouettes. Through a modern lens, we have been able to capture the comfortable side of modern that New Englanders can appreciate.” “We’re excited to continue our style leadership in the marketplace with customers already familiar with us and those who may not be.” www.mgbwhome.com

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ON OUR RADAR Go-to resources and vendors that should be in every designer’s black book

BACK BAY SHUTTER New England designers have Back Bay Shutter at the top of their resource list and will attest that they make some of the best shutters in the marketplace. Measurements are always precise and all custom handcrafted shutters are sanded and spray finished by hand. The company also installs and provides maintenance service. They specialize in interior wood shades, shutter design, shades and blinds, and Lutron Electronics. “At Back Bay Shutter Company, we’re neurotic, we’re perfectionists, and we’re totally passionate about our work. We offer the highest quality interior shutters and shades on the market. And when it comes to installation, we’re prompt, professional, and precise. That is why designers in New England work with us. We’re Back Bay Shutter Company, a designer’s best friend.”

L Shutters filter light while allowing privacy. Photo by James R. Salomon. R A paneled room designed by Bierly-Drake. Photo by Sam Gray.

www.backbayshutter.com

M-GEOUGH This trusted showroom on the fourth floor of the BDC represents a diverse group of exceptional furniture and lighting manufacturers, and offers a distinct mix featuring traditional and contemporary styles, as well as 18th- and 19th-century reproductions and antiques. M-Geough is also representing the Dakota Jackson line in New England, allowing them to reach a more contemporary audience. “At M-Geough, we strive to provide a wide variety of high-end products for interior design clients, our knowledgeable salespeople are committed to providing the best customer service possible, and we represent trade-only manufacturers who share a passion for excellence in meeting our clients’ product needs.” www.m-geough.com L Dakota Jackson GUI dining table featuring an arched partial sunburst pattern with a polished macassar ebony veneered top, a crescent-shaped bentwood pedestal base, and polished stainless steel accents. R A. Rudin rounded tight back lounge chair. This Jeff Andrews-designed rounded tub chair is self-welted, framed, and requires seven yards of plain COM.

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ON OUR RADAR Go-to resources and vendors that should be in every designer’s black book

CUTTING EDGE HOMES Cutting Edge Homes provide single source accountability, giving new meaning to the concept of one-stop shopping. They carefully guide their clients through every step of the design process from site evaluation and permitting to architecture and interior design to construction and landscape. The firm has done extensive market research on what discourages potential clients from large-scale home renovations. Many do not know where to start, can’t envision the results, worry it will take too long, and that budgets will run over. Knowing these fears and finding solutions for these concerns has allowed Cutting Edge Homes to provide an invaluable service. “Our all-inclusive approach at Cutting Edge Homes is surprisingly straightforward: We customize your investment with the utmost attention to quality and detail with an uncompromising level of service at phenomenal value. This begins with listening to our clients’ vision and needs, and then executing that vision to yield a truly exceptional product on time and on budget. We carefully guide our clients through every step of the process, constantly striving toward a timeless elegance that will withstand passing trends. Our people have a passion for building—we work in the industry not because we have to, but because we love helping our clients achieve the homes of their dreams,” says Sean Cutting, President, Cutting Edge Homes, Inc. www.thinkcuttingedge.com

T The kitchen optimizes ocean views while meeting the clients’ needs for an entertainment kitchen with modern amenities and ample storage. B The entry is flooded with front-to-back light. Subtle millwork was chosen to avoid distracting from the view.

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custom furniture

lighting • rugs • tabletop • mirrors • planters + urns including an ever-evolving collection of artisan work

objects of desire

for the home INSIDE + OUT 1000 pleasant street, belmont, ma 02478

inquiries 617.993.3347

artefacthome.com


L

eading Edge

The Leading Edge Drapery works with designers to create boutique, couture, discriminating, luxurious, award-winning elements. We pride ourselves on designer/workroom relationships. 603.437.8629 | THELEADINGEDGEDRAPERY.COM

The Leading Edge won 1st place in the Ingenuity Workroom Competition, Bedding and Pillow category, International Window Coverings Expo; Las Vegas, Nevada. Owner Julie Wood is a member of the WFCP and current vice president of the WCAA’s national board.


PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS cover page

pages forty-four to fifty-one

Photo by Robert Benson

Spotlight on Charles Spada

page five Question & Answer with Michael Phillips Portrait by Patrick Heagney page nine Dear Readers Portrait by Eric Roth pages eleven to fifteen Bibliophile Boston Page 11 photo by William Waldron

Photos by Eric Roth Market Stalls photos courtesy of Charles Spada pages fifty-two to fifty-seven Pilot Photos by Mark Mahaney and Eric Levin pages fifty-nine to sixty-three Culture & Cuisine: White Hart Inn Photos by John Gruen pages sixty-four to sixty-seven

Page 12 photo by Roger Davies / Trunk Archive

Style & Cuisine

Page 15 photo by Pieter Estersohn

Page 64 cover art and photos courtesy of Rizzoli

pages seventeen to twenty-three

Page 66 cover art courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; photo ©2015 by Heidi Murphy

Mark Hutker Photos by Brian Vanden Brink

Page 67 photo ©2015 by Heidi Murphy

Inspired Design

Page 67 excerpted from Food Gift Love, ©2015 by Maggie Battista; reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; all rights reserved

Photos by William Waldron

pages sixty-nine to seventy-three

pages thirty-three to forty

Makers’ Guild

Gerald Pomeroy

Photos courtesy of each maker with selects as follows: page 69 bottom right by White Loft Studio; page 72 top by Cambria Grace Photography; and page 73 top and bottom by Shaina DeCiryan

pages twenty-six to thirty-one

Photos by Robert Benson, Susan Harter, Eric Roth, and Amy Wilson page forty-two & forty-three His & Hers Photos courtesy of The Vendome Press and by Christopher Baker, Jesse Carrier, Francesco Lagnese, Zach DeSart, Marco Ricca, Peter Margonelli, and Robert Brantley

pages seventy-four to seventy-six On Our Radar Photos courtesy of each vendor with selects noted within each caption


The first and final critical steps in my client projects involve the expertise of Michelle and Wayne Southworth. We always consult with MWI on the suitability of the upholstery fabrics for future cleaning and protection. At the project’s conclusion, MWI treats carpets, area rugs and upholstery to prevent soiling. The result is a comfortable, stress-free environment for our clients to enjoy. KATHIE CHRISICOS C H R I S I C O S I N T E R I O R S L LC

MWI Fiber Shield

®

The Finest Fabric & Carpet Care

25 Years In

busIness

MWI Fiber-Shield® 516 East Second Street, Suite 3 Boston, MA 02127 Boston- (617) 439-8790 Hingham- (781) 740-8790 mwifibershield.com


WWW.WEBSTERCOMPANY.COM I 617.261.9660


ID Boston Magazine Vol. 5  
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