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IN THIS ISSUE 8

10

Dear Readers

20

Bibliophile Boston

Design

chesie breen

pop-up bookstore

elkus manfredi

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46

48

Designer Spotlight

Design

Style

gary mcbournie

markham roberts & sandra nunnerley

kravet

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Culture

Cuisine

the dean hotel

design market luncheon

Makers' Guild Section

jean-charles de author ravenel

D E S I G N · S T Y L E · C U LT U R E · C U I S I N E Also in this Issue 5 Question & Answer with Michael Phillips

17 Sourcing Art in the Modern Age

On the Cover · Gary McBournie: The Reigning King of Boston Design · Page 29

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michael phillips Editor-in-Chief chesie breen Creative Director george krauth Design Editor caroline sholl Market Editor liz tawater Editor-at-Large john fondas Contributing Writer jennifer boles Copy Editor mary ross Publisher kathy bush-dutton Published by new england home 路 jamestown, l.p.

漏2014 Jamestown, L.P. All rights reserved.

Executive Editor

To advertise, please email Jill Korff at jkorff@nehomemag.com.

IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

ID BOSTON is the magazine of Boston Design Center, whose showrooms include: Ailanthus

Calvin Fabrics

Donghia

J.D. Staron

Osborne & Little

Allstone

Carlisle Wide Plank Floors

Downsview Kitchens

JANUS et Cie

Paris Ceramics

Ann Sacks

Century Furniture

Duralee / HC Monogram

Jewett Farms

Porcelanosa

Baker Knapp & Tubbs

Charles Spada

EcoModern Design

Kerwin

Quadrille

BelFondo

Edelman Leather

Key Office Interiors

Ritz Associates

Berkeley House

Christopher Peacock Cabinetry

Farrow & Ball

Kravet Fabrics

Robert Allen | Beacon Hill

Blanche P. Field

Contract Sources

FDO Group

Lee Jofa

Romo

The Boston Shade Company / System 7

Creative Materials New England

Grand Rapids Furniture Company

Leicht Boston

Scalamandre

The Bright Group

Creative Office Pavilion / Herman Miller

Grange Furniture

The Martin Group, Inc.

Brookline Village Antiques

Hokanson

Masterpiece Framing

Brunschwig & Fils

DiscoverTile

ICON Group

Merida

M-Geough

Schumacher

Steven King Decorative Carpets Studio 534 Tile Showcase Trianon Antiques United Marble Fabricators Venegas and Company Walters Wicker WaterSpot

Stark Carpet Corporation

Waterworks

Stark Fabric Furniture Wallcovering

Your German Kitchen

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QUESTION & ANSWER WITH

MICHAEL PHILLIPS THE JAMESTOWN TEAM IS RECEIVING ACCOLADES FOR BRINGING CREATIVE PROGRAMMING AND NEW ALLIANCES TO THE INNOVATION AND DESIGN BUILDING; TELL US WHAT WE SHOULD LOOK FOR. The Innovation and Design Building is pleased to welcome IIDA New England as a community partner by showcasing a special exhibition called “ADAPTAT1ON.” The show features the winning entries from their 2014 fashion show, and is currently available for viewing in suite 144 until the end of February. As an anchor in the community, we strive to identify and connect with exciting happenings in Boston and provide these worthy institutions with space to further promote their works. We have activated this first floor space as a rotating gallery in order to achieve this mission. “ADAPTAT1ON” kicked off with an opening reception for members of the design community and industry partners. The BDC will complement the exhibition with a 20x20xDesign PechaKucha-style panel featuring six winning entries from the “ADAPTAT1ON” fashion show. As a sponsor of Boston Design Week, March 19–29, we look forward to being the host of many exciting events. During this period, finalists from Design Showdown, the student design competition hosted by Design New England will deliver its final design pitch to a panel of judges in a Shark Tank-style program. Boston Home is also holding its “Best Places to Live Launch Event” during Boston Design Week to celebrate its March issue, featuring a panel on home renovation. WE UNDERSTAND SOME OF DESIGN’S BRIGHTEST LUMINARIES WILL BE VISITING THE BOSTON DESIGN CENTER IN THE COMING MONTHS; PLEASE HIGHLIGHT WHO WE MIGHT LIKE TO SEE. In February we welcomed John Danzer of Munder-Skiles, who many agree is the foremost authority on the history of American garden furniture design. His talk took us from inspired forms created for George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, and Edith Wharton’s The Mount right up to modern day designs applying techniques like 3-D printing that will ultimately revolutionize the way companies design and manufacture products.


We will welcome designer Markham Roberts in March for a lecture highlighting his new book Decorating The Way I See It. A reception will follow at Baker Furniture. In April, Century Furniture will host Bunny Williams. Many exciting lectures and appearances are planned so I encourage you to stay up-to-date through our website. For all inquiries, please contact Michael at mphillips@idbostonmagazine.com.

Michael Phillips President, Jamestown Executive Editor, ID BOSTON

ADAPTAT1ON In February the Boston Design Center partnered with IIDA to bring “ADAPTAT1ON� to Suite 144. Members of the design community and industry partners were invited to take a closer look at the 2014 fashion show winners.


Spring to Five!

Exciting changes coming to The Martin Group on the fifth floor this Spring!

Visit our new website to see our new look & new lines.

www.martingroupinc.com

THE MARTIN GROUP, INC. | ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE, SUITE 515 | B OSTON, MA 02210 | 617.951.2526


DEAR READERS Welcome to the winter issue of ID BOSTON. We are pleased to feature Boston’s very own master of design Gary McBournie on our cover this month. Gary never disappoints on the color scale and we welcome the vibrancy and rich hues that are his trademark, especially during these chilly months. Our feature on the history of Kravet takes me back to last summer when Caroline Sholl and I had the pleasure of sifting through their archives that span not just Kravet, but more recently acquired brands like Lee Jofa, Brunschwig & Fils, and GP & J Baker. Looking ahead to spring, we will welcome designer Markham Roberts to the BDC along with Sandra Nunnerley, who are profiled on our “His” and “Hers” pages. If you missed Boston Design Market last fall, take a look at the pop-up luncheon the Jamestown creative team conjured in conjunction with Capers Catering. “Makers' Guild” pays a visit to the seaside studio of collage artist extraordinaire JeanCharles de Ravenel. As we transition through these winter months, we welcome your input and submissions. We have already received quite a few strong projects and are planning many more features on the valued showrooms and brands at the Boston Design Center. So! Please be in touch with ideas: cbreen@idbostonmagazine.com.

Best,

Chesie Breen Editor-in-Chief, ID BOSTON


BOSTON DESIGN M A R K E T FA V O R I T E S

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1 Nina Campbell at JANUS et Cie 2 Dakota Jackson at M-Geough 3 The Serena & Lily Pop-Up Shop 4 Lynda Simonton and Karin Lidbeck-Brent from New England Home magazine at Venegas and Company

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EX LIBRIS

BIBLIOPHILE BOSTON Pop-Up Bookstore Boston Design Market at the Boston Design Center brought many new features to the building resulting in over 1,000 registered visitors each day. Pictured above is the pop-up bookstore curated with titles from Assouline, Brattle Book Shop, and Design Museum Boston. This loft-like space became an ideal backdrop for book signings with celebrated designers like Gary McBournie, Alex Papachristidis, and Leontine Linens Founder Jane Scott Hodges. Downstairs, JANUS et Cie hosted a rollicking party to open the market and toast designers Nina Campbell and David Kleinberg.

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NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

The living room in Falaise's home "Boury," an eighteenth-century house in the Ile-de-France

LOULOU DE LA FALAISE Edited by Ariel de Ravenel, Written by Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni, Foreword by Pierre Berge

Loulou de la Falaise is the first monograph to celebrate the life and work of this style icon, who became the embodiment of French chic. Muse to Yves Saint Laurent, and renowned for her daring, Bohemian style and joie de vivre, Loulou de la Falaise greatly influenced Parisian haute couture. But what caught our eye most were the photos of the effortlessly chic interiors. They weren’t so much decorated, but rather a collage of the way Loulou lived her life.

Published by Rizzoli, 2014 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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NEW TO THE BOOKSHELF

The Agnelli living room at "Il Convento," a sixteenth-century convent in Corsica

MARELLA AGNELLI By Marella Agnelli and Marella Caracciolo Chia

Marella Agnelli’s book, a riveting collection of personal memoirs and anecdotes, offers an unprecedented tour through her homes and gardens that have been the stage of her beloved family and many friends. During the 50 years of her marriage to Fiat industrialist Gianni Agnelli, Marella has collaborated with the world’s most acclaimed architects, designers, and gardeners to create multiple homes. With Italian interior design legend Renzo Mongiardino — who worked on her New York apartment alongside a young Peter Marino — to Stéphane Boudin of Maison Jansen, Gae Aulenti, and Alberto Pinto. She also collaborated on gardens with luminaries like Russell Page and Madison Cox.

Published by Rizzoli, 2014 | www.rizzoliusa.com

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SOURCING ART IN THE MODERN AGE Though there is no substitute for visiting art galleries and attending fairs in person, we are finding exciting ways to refine your search, learn about new ventures, and seek the help of a consultant. On the following pages we share four groups that are changing the way we collect, view, tour, research, and learn about art. If you are an art lover, these resources are invaluable.


ARTLIFTING

ARTSY

Social advocate Liz Powers graduated from Harvard with a grant in hand to start art therapy groups in women’s shelters around the city of Boston. She was well versed in the social benefits of art therapy programs and soon came to realize that selling art could be even more transformative for these women and others like them. With this in mind, she founded ArtLifting, a social enterprise solution designed to empower homeless, disabled, and disadvantaged artists by providing a professional gallery to sell their work. ArtLifting offers original paintings, drawings, and prints created in the art therapy programs Liz helped build.

Artsy is a must visit site for anyone interested in learning about art, including where to see it and how to collect it. Its mission is to make all the world’s art accessible to anyone with an internet connection. The site is an invaluable resource for students and educators, as well as those who want to preview gallery shows, museum exhibitions, and art fairs taking place around the globe. Artsy also supplies information on the auction bidding process, listing step-bystep instructions.

Last fall, the Boston Design Center’s Grange Furniture showroom partnered with ArtLifting to create an exhibition featuring work from local homeless and disabled artists. More than 30 original pieces were shown, representing 20 artists. ArtLifting also produces prints from original work so the art can live on indefinitely on their website. artlifting.com

While sitting at your desk, you can jump from Art Basel in Miami to a roundup of the best exhibitions in 2014 to an overview of 21 of France’s best museums including the Louvre. artsy.net


ARTBINDER

V O LT Z C L A R K E

ArtBinder, an iPad and iPhone app launched by Alexandra Chemla, offers art dealers a critical tool for disseminating visuals and inventory information at art fairs around the world. Previously, dealers would assemble cumbersome binders full of images to carry to fairs. Working at Gavin Brown’s Manhattan gallery and having to do just this, Chemla sought a digital solution. She asked around, discovered one didn’t exist, and filled the gap by developing ArtBinder.

The Manhattan art scene with its hectic maze of white walled static galleries and pushy sales approaches can be daunting for a collector. Manhattan-based contemporary art consultant Blair Clarke has created an alternative approach by establishing a salon life with her family of artists. Clarke has focused on cultivating and launching the careers of talented emerging artists in the global marketplace. She has developed close relationships with each, making it seem all the more like one big extended family.

ArtBinder creates portfolios that can be easily presented and emailed. More than 300 leading galleries are now using Chemla’s app, and she recently received over $3 million in venture capital, allowing her to introduce a new extension to the app that allows galleries to share their collections with the general public. artbinder.com

This highly personal salon style approach has resulted in a welcoming environment that collectors flock to. She also works with a wide range of interior designers to help them build collections for clients. Clarke and her husband, Alistair, the Worldwide Head of English and European Furniture at Sotheby’s, host numerous events at home, such as lectures, artist talks, dinners, and fashion collaborations. She has created an all-encompassing world centered on art that feels right at home. Clarke should be on every collector’s speed dial. voltzclarke.com


Elkus Manfredi designed a flexible, collaborative, live/work/ play environment for the new headquarters of Brightcove, an innovative world leader in the creation of cloud-based video tools and applications for mobile devices. Photo by Jasper Sanidad.

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DESIGN

ELKUS MANFREDI ARCHITECTS Editor-in-Chief Chesie Breen sat down with Elizabeth Lowrey, Principal and Director of Interior Architecture, to learn more about the international, award-winning architecture firm photography credits noted within each caption


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Brightcove Office

1 The Brightcove workplace offers multiple types of collaborative space, including a variety of conference rooms and open “war rooms” for brainstorming, with all-around writable surfaces. Photo by Jasper Sanidad.

The Elkus Manfredi Architects profile page reads, “The work on which we have built our reputation is first and foremost about collaboration. Our clients are our partners, their missions our own.” Your reputation speaks for itself and easily attracts solid work, but once you have secured a client, what are some techniques you apply to making yourselves one and the same in the process?

Elkus Manfredi is revered for its topnotch talent pool, savvy management, and industry experience. You personally invest a lot of time making sure your client is confident at the center of the process and believe it is an essential ingredient to success. Can you share some ideas on how to build client confidence?

This is a relationship based on trust, and we have to earn that trust. We do that by listening and repeating back what we hear — in a design vocabulary — until we are certain the client feels that they have truly been heard. At that point we can begin to experiment together, we can dream with the client, we can say, “And what if…?” Our experience across different industries and within specific industries throughout the country enables us to anticipate situations and motivations, and to know what might work and what might not work so well. So we can avoid pitfalls while taking the client’s vision to another level that excites and stimulates them with fresh ideas. We often hear: “I’ve never thought of that before!” By listening, having an open mind, fully grasping our client’s aspirations and vision, and applying our experience to guide the process while freeing the client to dream, we are able to develop the trust that allows us to take the journey through the project together with our client.

Elkus Manfredi Architects was founded 1988 and has since built long-term relationships with the nation’s most distinguished developers, corporations, and institutions. What resources and practices did you apply to build this side of your business?

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It all starts with listening, coming to the table with an open mind, a fresh sheet of sketch paper, to absorb and immerse ourselves in the client’s vision for the project. We bring no preconceived ideas — we don’t approach with a recipe. We walk in our client’s shoes rather than dictating what should be. We are also very rigorous about understanding the client’s criteria for success, which is different in every case. Some want the project to be on the cover of a magazine. For some clients, success might be about budget and timing. The one thing we know is that it’s never the same twice. In every case, we strive to find what is unique about this client, this project.

It’s not so much about resources and practices. It’s about chemistry — like in any relationship, there needs to be a mutual appreciation of values, mission, etc. That said, we work very hard to be a trustworthy counselor, a creative guide, and a proven implementer over time. We try to offer stability, reliability, and a creative well that never runs dry. We are also extremely cognizant of the sensitivity of some of our clients’ work. It sounds simple, but one fundamental of all our relationships is that we deeply value and respect the confidence and trust placed in us by our clients.


Elkus Manfredi has shaped some of the most important planning and design projects in the world. Focusing on Boston, what type of impact can an architecture firm have on shaping a community? Please mention a few projects in Boston that have especially enhanced the city and its neighborhoods, and speak to your expertise in placemaking.

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Liberty Wharf

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The Grove

An architecture firm can have an enormous impact on shaping a community. Think about Howard Elkus’s Copley Place in 1983 and what it did for its surrounding neighborhoods, reconnecting and revitalizing them to repair a major hole in Boston’s urban fabric. Copley Place’s system of pedestrian pathways knit together Copley Square and the South End, transforming what was a forbidding, broken environment into a bustling hub of activity. That project was a pioneer, a prototype mixed-use environment that has influenced urban development all across the country. Elkus Manfredi is now coming back to Copley Place, designing the Neiman Marcus renovation and the residential tower above it. The Fenway is another example. Elkus Manfredi started working with Steve Samuels 15 years ago, looking at the fabric of the neighborhood, meeting with the neighborhood over and over again, building consensus and credibility that spurred a new vision for the Fenway and set zoning precedents that would affect development of the entire area. Out of that desolate sea of parking lots and gas stations, the new “Main Street” that the Fenway lacked was created, uniting the estranged residential and commercial neighborhoods into one enlivened mixed-use destination. Right next to Fenway Park, our recent restoration of the former Howard Johnson Hotel into The Verb Hotel was one of our Fenway projects that demonstrates the mix and the fact that rejuvenating and reenvisioning an existing structure is sometimes the right answer. We’ve worked for over 20 years with Emerson College as they relocated their campus to Boston’s downtown Theater District. That has involved a lot of restoration and repurposing of historic buildings on very challenging sites, the most recent being Emerson’s Paramount Center. That is a Swiss watch of a mixed-use project, combining the renovation of the gorgeous Paramount Theatre with a dormitory, classrooms, studios, offices, a black box theater, and a restaurant — all wrapped up in one amazing package. Howard Elkus and David Manfredi recently received the very first President’s Award for Excellence from the Boston Preservation Alliance for their contributions to the city. Liberty Wharf was one of the first projects to be completed in the Seaport and is another example of true placemaking. Completed during the economic downturn several years ago, it strengthened the critical mass of urban activity that helped to stimulate further growth in the Seaport. It’s a win-win because it unites commercial uses — five restaurants and two floors of office space — with benefits to the public: a broad open boardwalk that completes an important missing portion of Boston’s Harborwalk.

2 Set on a new pier in Boston Harbor, Liberty Wharf combines three buildings containing five restaurants, office space, a half-acre of outdoor decking and public boardwalk, and a series of touch-and-go docking slips. Its mixed-use program brings restaurant goers, office users, and the public to the waterfront, and completes an important missing portion of Boston’s Harborwalk. Photo by Peter Vanderwarker. 3 Next to Hollywood’s famed Farmers Market, The Grove is the premier urban pedestrian retail center in the country, focused not only on creating powerful retail statements, but also top-quality, welcoming, family-oriented public spaces for all to enjoy. In a city that largely ignores those on foot, every design element of The Grove works to build a strong and spirited celebration of the pedestrian experience. This is placemaking at its best. Photo by Ronald Moore and Associates.

An example of a placemaking project we are currently working on in Boston is Ink Block. Composed of four residential buildings on the former site of the Boston Herald, Ink Block is bringing mixed-use residential, retail, and a new Whole Foods to the edge of the South End, and will make that neighborhood a more robust place. Another dynamic example is how New Balance is transforming a part of Brighton from a light industrial neighborhood into a dynamic mixed-use center of health and wellness with a sports complex, plus residential, hotel, and office uses, lots of pedestrian-friendly open space, and activity of all kinds. Outside Boston, we’ve done a wide range of placemaking work, from The Grove in Los Angeles with Rick Caruso, to the retail podium of Time Warner Center and currently Hudson Yards in New York City, both with the real estate firm Related Companies. As you may know, Hudson Yards is currently under construction at the open-air Hudson rail yards. Elkus Manfredi is responsible for almost a million square feet of indoor and outdoor destination retail, which will combine with housing, commercial space, and a spectacular park, all linked to the Hudson River waterfront and the High Line.

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Jamestown Office

1 Drawing on the wharfside industrial aesthetic of the Innovation and Design Building, the new offices of Jamestown at 21 Drydock Avenue use the high ceilings and windows to flood the space with natural daylight and views of the working harbor. Raw natural materials warm the workspace, while an abundance of glass creates a sense of spaciousness. Photo by Jasper Sanidad. 2 Each office floor of Vertex Pharmaceuticals greets employees with a centrally located “living room� featuring a coffee bar, adjacent conference rooms, and hoteling stations that enable scientific staff to work in close creative collaboration. Photo by Chuck Choi.

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Vertex Pharmaceuticals Headquarters

Elkus Manfredi has also earned a reputation for pioneering the placemaking movement. The same is true of Jamestown, making it all the more interesting that we have chosen one another as partners. I know why Jamestown engaged Elkus Manfredi to complete architectural work on the Innovation and Design Building, but what were the deciding factors in relocating your firm to our building?

We wanted to be able to practice what we preach: that collaboration equals innovation. For us as a firm, that meant we all wanted to be on one floor. The Innovation and Design Building was the perfect place for that to happen: 55,000 square feet, filled with natural daylight, high ceilings, and a happy buzz of activity. Being on one floor has been transformational to our practice, not to mention having neighbors like MassChallenge, who are leaders in their industries, and co-locating next to the Design Center itself, which makes it easier for us to do our work. Being part of the pulse of the waterfront and seeing Boston grow before our eyes makes us feel even more connected to our city. Another huge deciding factor was that Michael Phillips of Jamestown painted a vision that we couldn’t resist. We believe that Jamestown can make the Innovation and Design Building one of the most interesting, program-rich, creative design environments in the country. Jamestown is masterful at the curation of tenants; they know how to bring together the right people to get the right energy happening. It’s like a great host who knows how to create the perfect guest list for a party. Working with Jamestown to create this new environment is a wonderful opportunity for Elkus Manfredi. To live in the midst of it at the same time is the icing on the cake.

Sustainability and environmental preservation are words that rightfully continue to gain momentum. Do sustainability and environmental impact apply to all your projects and are there standouts you would like to mention?

Everything we plan and design is about doing the right thing for our environment, whether or not a project is designed to be LEED-certified. We do design a lot of LEEDcertified spaces: Dassault Systèmes’ headquarters is certified LEED Platinum; Van Ness, currently under construction in the Fenway, is designed for LEED Gold; and our building at 150 Second Street in Cambridge is the first commercial lab project certified Platinum under LEED v3 in New England. More broadly, projects like those at The Fenway and Ink Block — where people are coming back to the city — mean fewer cars and a smaller footprint per person.

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Jamestown Office

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The Verb Hotel

1 The kitchen area of Jamestown’s new offices features a long communal granite table and broad granite wall. It’s a natural gathering place where employees have coffee, eat lunch, entertain clients, and celebrate company achievements together. Photo by Jasper Sanidad. 2 Elkus Manfredi Architects’ renovation of a former 1959 Howard Johnson Hotel, as well as the design of its mid-century-inspired interior architecture and furniture, makes The Verb a relaxed oasis in the city, a place where families, hipsters, locals, and visitors to Boston’s nearby universities and medical centers alike can stretch out, smile, and enjoy themselves. Recent accolades for The Verb Hotel include an Innovation Award in Historic Preservation from the Retail Design Institute and a Best of Year honoree with Interior Design magazine. Photo by Adrian Wilson.

Elkus Manfredi has transformed rundown retail centers into vibrant mixed-use destinations. Jamestown is respected for its commitment to applying the same philosophy to many of the projects in our portfolio. Give us a bird’s-eye view of what goes into this planning and redevelopment process.

As an extension of the above, what do you most consider when rebranding a property?

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The Grove, The Fenway — before we ever drew a line, we met with the neighborhoods. That is probably the single most important element of any project. Whether it’s mixed-use urban planning, corporate architecture, university housing, whatever — listening is, and must be, the first step. Engaging those who will be affected by the project allows them to help create ideas, share in the process, and build consensus. We work hard to always be transparent, honest, and respectful. On the one hand, we learn a lot about what matters, and on the other hand, the process helps people embrace change. After and during that process of engagement, we develop concepts, always working with alternatives, to narrow down the fundamentals. Then we develop the design in detail, always working closely with the client and engaging impacted stakeholders in the process.

Everything is about the experience. What experience is the team trying to create for the user — which could be a neighborhood, a hotel guest, a resident, a corporate employee, etc. There are many factors that go into the equation, but in the end, once we have truly defined the experience we are looking for, we create the environment to support it in every way — a place that fosters the right energy. Working with Jamestown on the Innovation and Design Building, the mission is to host innovative companies and further nurture their innovation by creating an overall environment of collaboration. It’s exciting work!


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GARY MCBOURNIE THE REIGNING KING OF BOSTON DESIGN

words by chesie breen · portrait by nathan coe interior photography by gordon beall Gary McBournie enters a room with sophisticated elegance and a Cheshire cat grin. This reigning king of New England design and celebrated author of Living Color unabashedly declares, “Orange is my favorite neutral.” McBournie also created a boldly graphic and vibrantly colored line of punchy fabrics inspired by his love of the islands, aptly called Antilles Designs. Though Boston is home, Nantucket looms large. A student of art and an inveterate traveller, McBournie attended The New England School of Art in Boston before going to work for the highly regarded Richard Fitzgerald. As a young apprentice, his work took him to Europe where he fell under the spell of architecture created by the Adam brothers in England, and the magical interiors and gardens of Chartres and Versailles in France. In 1992 he branched out on his own by starting Gary McBournie Inc., where these iconic destinations continue to act as muses and inspire his enviable portfolio of work. As a child, McBournie pored through the pages of National Geographic magazine, dreaming of far away places and adventures. He also spent hours watching movies from the 1930s and ’40s, admiring them for the elegant lifestyles they portrayed and the fancifully designed sets. Dyslexic, he gravitated toward images rather than words, and had a father with the prescience to realize that a big box of art supplies would serve him better than a stack of books. On these pages we look at three recent projects that illustrate McBournie’s singular style. Gary opens up his black book to share his preferred resources at the Boston Design Center and around Boston, as well as his favorite haunts on Nantucket.

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PROJECT ONE BEACON HILL

1 2 RESOURCE KEY 1 The living area of Gary’s Beacon Hill apartment features a linen-wrapped coffee table from ICON Group and cowhide rug by Stark. Custom-upholstered chairs encircle an antique library table. 2 Cabinets that extend to the ceiling, integrated appliances, and a creamy Vermont marble countertop combine to make a petite galley kitchen appear larger. A mirrored backsplash completes the illusion, and adds light to the room. Decorative accessories from the Marché aux Puces in Paris soften the space and create a butler’s pantry aesthetic. Opposite An abstract painting of Dutch tulips by Kevin Paulsen hangs over a 19th-century buffet purchased in Paris. A collection of mercury glass candlesticks, wooden boxes, and other treasured objects invite guests to take a closer look. Lounge chairs, upholstered in Venetian Satin by Classic Cloth, provide a convenient spot for quiet conversation or reading.

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PROJECT ONE BEACON HILL

In the master bedroom, chocolate brown walls are juxtaposed with white Frette linens and an orange throw. The headboard and bed skirt feature a David Hicks weave from Lee Jofa adding visual interest and sophistication. A sepia watercolor by Boston-born artist Wendy Artin, represented by Gurari Collections, is surrounded by a collection of intaglios framed by Lussier Lajoie.


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PROJECT ONE BEACON HILL

A square-arm sofa, designed by Gary and upholstered in Folia Aberdeen Sand, is piled with pillows featuring fabrics from China Seas, Classic Cloth, and Jim Thompson. A custom shade from Blanche P. Field gives a glazed pottery lamp new life, and asymmetrically hung artwork offers a focal point.


GARY MCBOURNIE'S BLACK BOOK BOSTON DESIGN CENTER CARPETS Stark Merida FABRICS The Martin Group FDO Group/Lee Jofa/Brunschwig & Fils Studio 534 Scalamandre Donghia

FRAMER Lussier Lajoie RESTAURANTS No. 9 Park Sportello Artu Gaslight South End Buttery MEN’S CLOTHING Ralph Lauren Ermenegildo Zegna

ANTIQUES Charles Spada Antiques

MEN’S SHOES

BATH & PLUMBING Waterworks

MEN’S ACCESSORIES

OUTDOOR JANUS et Cie

TAILORING

Ferragamo

Hermes

Newbury Tailoring Co.

LAMPSHADES Blanche P. Field

HAIR SALON

PAINT Farrow & Ball

LINENS

Beaucage

Pratesi Linens on the Hill Frette DRY CLEANING Anton’s Cleaners

AROUND TOWN

ART GALLERIES Lanoue

ANTIQUES Antiques on 5 Marcoz Stephen Score Autrefois

DTR Modern Barbara Krakow Gallery HOME DESIGN SHOP Kristin Paton Interiors

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PROJECT TWO NANTUCKET


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RESOURCE KEY 1 Industrial-style light fixtures and apple green cabinet interiors spice up a classic white Nantucket kitchen. The large commercial hood announces to all who enter that a serious cook rules this galley! 2 An antique Biedermeier butler’s chest lends an air of sophistication and elegance to the entry foyer of this gracious summer home. A custom runner from Stark invites houseguests to their bedrooms on the upper level. Opposite Off the kitchen, an oil painting by Nantucket artist Mike Butler hangs above the fireplace in an informal seating area. A tufted rolled-arm sofa covered in a striped Jane Shelton fabric faces a slatted coffee table, custom crafted by Boston-based woodworker Abbas Shah. Embroidered pillows and a geometric hooked rug from Stark inject the room with moments of color and pattern.

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PROJECT TWO NANTUCKET

To set the tone of the guest cottage’s living room, Gary slipcovered a sofa in an old-world floral print from Lee Jofa with an aqua Pierre Frey cotton for the welt. The rustic console, purchased at one of the lively Rafael Osona auctions held each summer, displays a green ceramic lamp found at the Lion’s Paw, another island favorite.


GARY MCBOURNIE'S BLACK BOOK ON NANTUCKET ANTIQUES Sylvia Antiques & Four Winds Craft Guild Atlantic Coastal East End Gallery Antiques Depot John Rugge Antiques Shop HOME ACCESSORIES Bodega SPACE The Lion’s Paw Nantucket Looms Flowers on Chestnut Janis Aldridge, Inc. RESTAURANTS Black-Eyed Susan’s Le Languedoc Bistro The Ships Inn Restaurant Topper’s at The Wauwinet The Chanticleer The Boarding House

BOOKSTORE Mitchell’s Book Corner STATIONERY/CARDS Parchment Nantucket SHIPPING The UPS Store GARDENER Hither Creek Gardener REAL ESTATE AGENT Linda Bellevue, Nantucket Real Estate CAR RENTAL Nantucket Island Rent A Car BAKERY Petticoat Row Bakery FERRY SERVICE Hy-Line Cruises

FLOWERS Flowers on Chestnut CHOCOLATE Nantucket Chocolatier GLASS Dane Gallery ART GALLERIES Old Spouter Gallery East End Gallery Gráficas Robert Foster Fine Art Art Cabinet Nantucket

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PROJECT THREE BACK BAY

This Back Bay apartment’s vibrant library is highlighted with an antique Hepplewhite chair upholstered in fuchsia silk moiré from Brunschwig & Fils and sofa pillows covered in an assortment of Manuel Canovas fabrics. A custom-made bronze coffee table with “animal legs” adds a bit of whimsy.


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PROJECT THREE BACK BAY

1 RESOURCE KEY 1 A vintage sconce paired with a colorful backplate is mounted on a jewel-striped fabric wall covering designed by Gary and printed by Peter Fasano. A pair of custom silk shades by Blanche P. Field trimmed with green French ribbon complete the composition. 2 In the guest bedroom, an extravagant display of magenta and orange toile from Manuel Canovas complements a coordinating stripe from Schumacher and a geometric print from Lee Jofa. Fresh white bedding from Matouk introduces a crispness to the ensemble. Opposite The master bedroom celebrates a love of color and pattern. Lacquered raspberry walls create a perfect backdrop for the headboard covered in a chinoiserie print by Manuel Canovas and bed skirt fabric in a custom stripe. To ground the scheme, Gary designed the Tibetan carpet in a geometric pattern similar to the Greek frieze motif on the bed linens.

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PROJECT THREE BACK BAY

A suite of outdoor furniture from JANUS et Cie, covered in a variety of fabrics to complement the interior, offers an ideal spot to view the Boston skyline.

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MARKHAM ROBERTS

HIS 2 R O B E R T S ' FA V O R I T E S

New York-based interior designer Markham Roberts has earned a reputation as one of the top decorators of his generation. After training under the legendary Mark Hampton for six years, he started his own firm in 1997. Roberts’ vast portfolio of work is heralded in his first book, aptly titled, Markham Roberts: Decorating The Way I See It (Vendome Press). Taking readers step-by-step through the design process, Roberts structures the book as he would a project, beginning with the basic interior elements — floor plan and furniture layout, color palette and fabric schemes — before working his way up to furniture selection and accessories. From East Coast to West Coast and numerous locations in between, we see his diversity and sophistication as a decorator.

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A Markham Roberts interior delivers confident style and an eye for refinement. He boldly juxtaposes layers of pattern and color in a fresh approach to classical design. Roberts strives to create beautiful rooms in which, quite simply, his clients will be happy and happy they are.

1 Roberts in the study he designed for the Kips Bay Decorator Show House, 2014 2 Southampton living room 3 His dog Harriet 4 Curved stair hall in New York 5 Detail of Roberts’ Kips Bay Decorator Show House study 6 An enclosed porch overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca, northwest of Seattle 7 Roberts’ new book from Vendome Press

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N U N N E R L E Y ' S FA V O R I T E S

New Zealand-born designer Sandra Nunnerley has studied architecture in Sydney and art history in Paris and London. Before opening her own design firm in New York in 1986, she worked at the famed Marlborough Gallery. She followed the early advice of the late decorating legend Chessy Rayner, who advised her to stay small, stay unique, and stay high-end. Juxtaposing inexpensive mementos with important, collectable pieces by Jacques Adnet and Jean-Michel Frank, Nunnerley’s rooms are at once quiet and striking, much like the designer herself. Her book Interiors: Sandra Nunnerley was recently published by powerHouse Books.

1 Nunnerley runs a design studio in New York 2 Monochromatic seating area framed by mirrored tables and a Richard Serra painting 3 & 4 Highlights of Nunnerley’s living room: Kenneth Noland painting, Khmer sculpture c. 945, and Jean Royère chandelier 5 Ethiopian chair of carved wood juxtaposed with a 1970s Italian plexiglass console and Kaz Oshiro canvas 6 Subtle tableau couples a Carlo Bugatti chair with a Murano lamp and artwork by Kim MacConnel

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Brunschwig & Fils’ Zhen Velvet sits atop the document that inspired it, a 19th-century, warp-dyed ikat woven in France. The Archives, which holds more than 12,000 documents of varying origins, is a vault of tokens from the company’s rich past, including the Johnson & Faulkner pattern books from 1902 (shown right).


STYLE

KRAVET A Family Company Rich in History with Dedication to Preserving the Most Revered Brands in Textiles words by chesie breen ¡ photography by julia robbs Most of us know Kravet for the company it is today — a fifth generation family business that transformed itself from a small fabric house into a global leader and steward to its enviable roster of acquired brands that include Lee Jofa, GP & J Baker, and Brunschwig & Fils. To fully appreciate Kravet’s position as an industry leader in the to-the-trade home furnishings business, we must take a closer look at the rich family history that has guided the company for close to a century. Samuel Kravet, a tailor from Russia, arrived in New York in 1903 with only a sewing machine and the clothes on his back. He set up shop on the Lower East Side of Manhattan making suits for the upper class, known as the carriage trade. He would begin each suit on a muslin model and then call on his clients in their homes for fittings and fabric selection. During these visits, he encountered wives who were choosing fabrics for curtains and trimmings for tiebacks. Astutely, Kravet saw an opportunity to expand his tailoring enterprise. He began to bring along an assortment of buttons, elastics, and zippers for apparel, and tiebacks, tassels, and trimmings for home furnishings when calling on his wealthy clients. Until this point, Kravet had been operating his business based on a business-to-consumer model. When home furnishings entered the mix, he made a pivotal choice to court the emerging trade consumer, paving the way to transform his establishment into a business-tobusiness operation. This led to the official founding of S. Kravet in 1918.


1 RESOURCE KEY 1 This stack of vintage Brunschwig & Fils wallpaper books, which serves as a reference for current design inspiration, reflects collections that were introduced between 1964 and 1974. 2 During the Victorian age, a system of bells with attached “bell pulls” was used for communication between the masters and servants of a household. This late 19th-century example is composed of hand-blown glass beads, and is likely European in origin. 3 The oldest document in the Archives is a Coptic Egyptian tapestry-woven panel created during the 5th century AD. Textiles of this age are very rare; existing examples were preserved through the centuries due to the aridity of the region. Opposite An important component of the Brunschwig Archives is “the stacks”: standard samples of every print and woven produced since before World War II. This irreplaceable resource allows the design team to reimagine iconic, vintage designs for today’s use. As Zelina Brunschwig famously stated, “Good design is forever.”

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the world: Lee Jofa. The next company to join the Kravet family While carving out his niche in the trimmings business, Samuel was GP & J Baker. Known for superior hand-screened printing, Kravet was also building a family that included four sons, who they also possessed the largest private textile archive in the were committed to follow their father into the business. In 1923 world. Designers set to work reinterpreting archived designs by they joined the company under the name of S. Kravet & Sons, introducing fresh grounds and updated colors and in 1924 began selling fabric. Subsequently, that today resonate for both U.S. and overseas the profession of interior design was gaining markets. momentum and the Kravets recognized a The company still operates distinct need. In response, they created the first Another defining acquisition came in 2011 with under its founding principles, corporate showroom to service what was now Brunschwig & Fils. Internationally renowned believing in delivering their strongest customer base, helping develop for a legacy of timeless design, exceptional exceptional customer a to-the-trade model. quality, and superb craftsmanship, Brunschwig

service, quality product, and

& Fils also brought its archive of over 10,000 Two world wars transpired, and a third vast selection. documents. ID BOSTON had the rare pleasure generation joined the ranks with Samuel’s of exploring this collection housed in museum grandson Larry Kravet entering the business in quality facilities at the company’s Long Island headquarters. 1949. The company prospered during the postwar housing boom, We were invited to join Ellen Kravet, a member of the fourth and in the 1960s Kravet entered the export business to meet generation, and Kravet Archivist Sarah Heinemann, to tour the a rising demand for decorative fabrics in other countries. The facility and spend an afternoon poring through hundreds of company name also evolved to Kravet Fabrics, Inc. Needing more document fabrics, trimmings, and hand blocks. Experts would space, they moved the corporate headquarters to Long Island and agree that the Kravet archives rival those at the Victoria & Albert began an expansion program for opening showrooms nationwide Museum in London. to showcase product and service clients in key markets. The company and its infrastructure continued to grow with the Today Kravet is represented in over 100 countries. The company introduction of furniture in the early 1990s. still operates under its founding principles, believing in delivering By the 1990s, the Kravet brand was firmly established in America and gaining force internationally, and the family entered a period of expansive stewardship of English brands. They began by acquiring one of the oldest and most esteemed fabric houses in

exceptional customer service, quality product, and vast selection. At Kravet, family values nurture growth. And, where is the fifth generation? Visit the Kravet showroom at the Boston Design Center to find out.

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RESOURCE KEY 1 These wooden hand blocks were once used to print the ground color of Nympheus. The negative space shown here would accommodate blocks of the major design elements, such as the bird and water lilies. The coloration shown was created by Thomas O’Brien for Lee Jofa’s Heritage Collection. 2 Nympheus, the Latin name for water lily, is one of GP & J Baker’s most popular and recognizable designs. The English document, created by William Turner circa 1915, is housed in the Baker Archives. Pictured here are various colorways of the print on linen. 3 Hollyhock, Lee Jofa’s most iconic design, has been printed continuously since the 1920s. There are 38 hand blocks per repeat. In 1955, Hollyhock was described in the British journal “Design” as “The most beautiful chintz on the market.” 4 A partially completed sample of Hollyhock reveals the hand-blocking process. Blocks for the finest details include thin strips of metal pounded into a wooden base, which are inked and printed on top of the flat, colored planes. 5 A renewed taste for 17th-century crewel-embroidered designs flourished in England in the early 20th century, partly related to the popularity of the Arts and Crafts movement. Pictured here is the original panel (above) and Cosimo Crewel, Lee Jofa’s interpretation for the Oscar de la Renta II Collection (below).


This sampling of resist and discharge prints includes French and English examples created between 1760 and 1800, early 20th-century reproductions, and Ralph Lauren Home’s Antibes Batik, distributed through Kravet.

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RESOURCE KEY 1 During the late 19th and early 20th century, flame stitch (or bargello) needlework designs rose in popularity, characterized by their “flame-like” patterning. The center example was a gift to the Brunschwig Archives by designer David Easton. 2 An array of cast-off wooden blocks from a French printing mill mingles with intricate metal blocks purchased by Scott Kravet on a visit to India. Opposite Scott Kravet’s travels around the globe have brought new ethnic textiles to the predominantly French and English holdings of Brunschwig & Fils and Lee Jofa. These fabulous Uzbek tassels were acquired in Istanbul. Traditional embroidered textiles known as “saye gosha” were used to suspend bedding against the yurt walls of nomadic tribes. Decorative embellishments, such as these tassels, were incorporated for aesthetic pleasure and to display one’s status within the community.

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C U LT U R E

THE DEAN HOTEL Providence’s Coolest Design & Cultural Destination

The Dean Hotel has firmly established itself as the hub of Providence’s historic Downcity neighborhood. The force behind this 52-room hotel in a 1912 landmark building is Providenceborn Ari Heckman, who is also the genius behind ASH NYC, a Brooklyn-based interior design and real estate development firm. Heckman credits trips to the Boston Design Center as one of the early influences in his life, which ultimately led to an education at the College of Architecture, Art and Planning at Cornell University.

collecting 20th-century furniture sourced from Belgium, the Netherlands, and Paris, and blended it with custom-designed pieces from ASH. He was also committed to the idea of reinventing the American economy by tapping into the creative resources of local artisans and craftsmen to add nuance and dimension to the design elements. Blending design with good business practice and social collaboration is the founding benchmark of ASH and now The Dean.

For such an eclectic city with so many young people focused on design, Heckman found that there was no hotel reflective of Providence’s personality. With this in mind, he went to work designing a space that would speak to this base. He started

With a beer hall, coffee shop, and Moroccan lounge karaoke bar, The Dean is more than just a fun place to stay — it is transforming the creative scene in Providence and earning rave reviews from design aficionados for its carefully crafted design aesthetic.

All images courtesy of The Dean. IDBOSTONMAGAZINE.COM

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w w w. gr e g p r e m ru . c o m Capturing New England’s Fi n e s t H o m e s

Heather Vaughan Design


CLEAR COMFORT SPRING COLLECTION 2015

BOSTON | NATICK | BURLINGTON: OPEN FALL 2015 | MGBWHOME.COM FEATURING: KAZAN CHAIR


CUISINE

DESIGN MARKET LUNCHEON Jamestown Creative and Capers Catering Collaborate to Offer a Pop-Up Luncheon During Boston Design Market With more than 1,000 registered guests attending Boston Design Market daily, Jamestown president and ID BOSTON executive editor Michael Phillips challenged the team to develop a pop-up luncheon that would provide guests with delicious, gourmet cuisine in a chic environment. The first item on the agenda was to identify the ideal catering partner — and we found that in Capers Catering. From there, ID BOSTON creative director George Krauth and his team went to work designing a restaurant-style space that would embrace the building’s shipping roots in the Seaport in a large, open warehouse-like setting. Each day brought a unique prix fixe menu with wine plus a lot of smiles and camaraderie.


MAKERS' GUILD Jean-Charles de Ravenel: Master Style Arbiter and Collage Artist Jean-Charles de Ravenel and his wife Jackie lived a nomadic life between Paris, London, New York, and Portugal before deciding to make their home in Lyford Cay. Both are members of the International Hall of Fame Best-Dressed List compiled by Vanity Fair, and together they have entertained a celebrated list of friends from around the world. The two now live a charmed and inspired life tucked into a grotto-style house overlooking the turquoise waters of the Bahamas, where Jean-Charles, a master collage artist, keeps a studio with a big glass wall looking out to sea. His collages are each unique in composition and comprise period documents, antique maps, and various mementos. Many are storyboards of one of his interests: travel, history, or art. Others are commissions from a long list of bold-faced names. His work has been exhibited at The Chinese Porcelain Company in New York and at Hollyhock in Los Angeles.

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PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS cover page

page forty-six

Photo by Gordon Beall

His

pages five & six Question & Answer with Michael Phillips Portrait by Patrick Heagney Photo by Ben Gebo Photography pages eight & nine

1 Portrait by Nelson Hancock 2 Photo by Nelson Hancock 3 Photo courtesy of Markham Roberts 4 Photo by Nelson Hancock 5 Photo by Nelson Hancock 6 Photo by Nelson Hancock 7 Photo courtesy of Vendome Press

Dear Readers Photos by Ben Gebo Photography

page forty-seven Hers

pages ten to fifteen Bibliophile Boston Page 10 photo by Ben Gebo Photography; page 13 photo by Jean-Francois Jaussaud and page 15 ©François Halard; page 13 and 15 photos courtesy of Rizzoli pages seventeen to nineteen

1 Portrait by Richard Corman 2 Photo by Giorgio Baroni 3 Photo by Miguel Flores-Vianna 4 Photo by Miguel Flores-Vianna 5 Photo by Giorgio Baroni 6 Photo by Giorgio Baroni 7 Photo courtesy of powerHouse Books

Sourcing Art in the Modern Age

pages forty-eight to fifty-seven

Page 18 photo by Ben Gebo Photography (left) and ©Tru Studio/Stocksy United (right); page 19 photo by ouh_desire/Shutterstock.com (left) and photo courtesy of Blair Clarke (right)

Style: Kravet Photos by Julia Robbs pages fifty-eight to sixty-three Culture: The Dean Hotel

pages twenty to twenty-six

Photos courtesy of The Dean

Elkus Manfredi Architects Photo credits noted within each caption

pages sixty-six & sixty-seven Cuisine: Design Market Luncheon

pages twenty-nine to forty-five

Photos by Ben Gebo Photography

Gary McBournie: The Reigning King of Boston Design Portrait by Nathan Coe Photos by Gordon Beall

pages sixty-eight & sixty-nine Makers' Guild Photo courtesy of Jean-Charles de Ravenel


MICHAE L J. LEE PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL J. LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

MICHAEL J. LEE PHOTOGRAPHY

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