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BOSTON ARTS ACADEMY 2012-2013

Impact

REPORT


Boston Arts Academy, a pilot school within the Boston Public Schools, is charged with being a laboratory and a beacon for artistic and academic innovation. Boston Arts Academy prepares a diverse community of aspiring artist-scholars to be successful in their college or professional careers and to be engaged members of a democratic society. Leadership and Governance, 2012-13 Administration Anne R. Clark, Headmaster Kathleen Marsh, Artistic Dean / Joy Bautista, Academic Dean / Mónika Aldarondo, Creative Director Edgar Vasquez, Dean of Students / Charmain Jackman, Director of Clinical Services

Board of Trustees

Tony James, Chair / Mary L. Lentz, Vice Chair

Sara Ofosu-Amaah, Clerk, ex officio / Mónika Aldarondo / Chris Bratton / Ginny Brennan Ann Carter / Robert Chambers / Jeff Colby / Katherine DeMarco / David Eppstein Lauren Gileau / Sandra Gordon / Richard Grubman / Jennifer Harris / Lisa Link Tess Mandell / William McLaughlin / Farhad Nanji / Robert Orchard / Lee Pelton Mary Regan / Amy Ross / Eve Smith Rounds / Katherine Sloan / Cheryl Smith Jim Supple / Cassandra Wallace / J. Curtis Warner, Jr. Consultants William F. Thompson, Consultant to the Board / Richard Rudman, Counsel to the Board

BAA Foundation

Richard Grubman, President

Richard Rudman, Vice President / Ann Carter, Treasurer / Rick Tagliaferri, Executive Director

ProArts Consortium Berklee College of Music / Boston Architectural College / The Boston Conservatory / Emerson College Massachusetts College of Art and Design / School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

City of Boston

Honorable Thomas M. Menino, Mayor

Boston Public Schools

Dr. Carol R. Johnson, Superintendent

Boston School Committee

Michael O’Neill, Chair / Alfreda J. Harris, Vice-Chair

John Barros / Meg Campbell / Rev. Dr. Gregory G. Groover, Sr. / Claudio Martinez / Mary Tamer


Dear Friends, We are delighted to present you with Boston Arts Academy’s 2012-13 Impact Report. With this report, we usher in a new era at Boston Arts Academy (BAA), with new leadership at both the Headmaster and the Board levels. We are honored to be serving BAA in our new roles, and we look forward to guiding the school through its “Second Act.” In these pages, you will see the impact that BAA has on its students, faculty, families, and the larger community. At the beginning of 2012-13, we reflected on our mission and values and re-committed to the central role of the arts in our school. Since 1998, we have worked hard to develop a model of change that harnesses the transformative power of the arts to help our students reach their greatest potential. This year, we began to set a new direction for BAA, moving the school forward to higher levels of achievement. To that end, we engaged in a strategic planning process from which several goals emerged, resulting in new initiatives that promote innovation and efficacy, expand our impact, and share the power of an arts-based education beyond BAA. One of our goals is to increase career and technical education opportunities for students to better prepare them for college and a range of occupations. We made significant headway in this area by establishing a design and visual communication curriculum, expanding our technical theatre pathway, and piloting a fashion technology pathway. Off-campus internships, expanded elective and master class offerings, and new student leadership opportunities are all in development. Many teachers took on new leadership roles this year. We redesigned the school’s structure to better support teaching and learning, family engagement,

and the creation of innovative curricula and strong community partnerships. We are proud to have a school where teachers can imagine a change that will better support their students, propose the change, and see it enacted. All of this would mean nothing without the extraordinary efforts of our students. Students won numerous awards in the arts, presented alongside faculty at educational conferences, and connected with students in South Africa, France, Qatar, and Washington, D.C. We are very proud to report that 98% of the Class of 2013 was accepted to college with almost 3 million dollars in scholarships. Our alumni are having an impact on the Boston Public Schools as artist-teachers through our Center for Arts in Education’s Alumni Creative Corps. This program, and others from the Center, expanded access to the arts in many Boston classrooms. Finally, the entire BAA community worked together to demonstrate the importance of a facility that fosters students’ artistic and academic growth. We are hopeful that a facility that meets BAA’s needs will soon be on the horizon. We hope you enjoy learning more about our students, our vision, and what lies ahead for Boston Arts Academy. Our deepest gratitude goes to all of you who support us in educating Boston’s next generation of Artists, Scholars, and Citizens. Sincerely yours,

Anne R. Clark Headmaster

Tony James Chair, BAA Board of Trustees

Contents 2 . . . . Our Students 4 . . . . Year in Review 6 . . . . Artists 8 . . . . Scholars 10 . . . Citizens

11 . . . . Wellness 12 . . . . Center for Arts in Education 14 . . . . Boston Arts Academy Foundation 16 . . . . Supporters and Partners

2012-2013 Impact Report / 1


Our Students Students in 2012-13 / 420

Dance Music

84

68 + 88

Ethnicity

15%

36%

White

Hispanic

44% Black

Visual Arts

60% Female

88 92

Gender

40% Male

Instrumental Vocal

Theatre

2% Asian 2% Mixed/Other 1% Native American

65% receive Free or Reduced Price Lunch, Defined for the 2012-13 school year as $29,965 (free) or $42,643 (reduced) annual income for a family of four.

4% 1%

2013 MCAS Results

English Language Arts

Advanced / Proficient / Needs Improvement / Failing

All public school students in Massachusetts are assessed using the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test. Students must pass this standardized test in order to graduate from high school. BAA students are tested in English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science and Technology/Engineering.

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28%

68%

109 BAA students

How many scored Proficient or Advanced? 95% of BAA students 79% of Boston Public School students 91% of Massachusetts students


Residency / Boston Arts Academy’s student body comes from every neighborhood in Boston. Charlestown 1% Downtown 3%

Allston/Brighton 4%

Jamaica Plain 7% West Roxbury 5%

Roslindale 9%

for 2013-14 School Year East Boston 5%

822 Applicants

144 Accepted

South Boston 2%

Fenway Kenmore 1% Mission Hill 2%

Recruitment

Roxbury 10% Dorchester 33%

129 Freshmen / 13 Sophomores / 2 Juniors What kinds of schools did our accepted students come from? Boston Public Schools

Mattapan 7%

11% Charter 7% Public Schools

outside of Boston*

76%

6% Parochial & Private

* All admitted students must be residents of Boston in order to enroll

Hyde Park 11%

4%

Advanced / Proficient / Needs Improvement / Failing

7%

Science and Technology/ Engineering

9%

Math

107 BAA students

31%

22%

40%

How many scored Proficient or Advanced? 71% of BAA students 64% of Boston Public School students 80% of Massachusetts students

110 BAA students

33%

54%

How many scored Proficient or Advanced? 58% of BAA students 42% of Boston Public School students 49% of Massachusetts students

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Year in Review

In the Summer Water Studio, a collaboration with TERC funded by the National Science Foundation, students, faculty, and artists investigate local water usage.

Renowned jazz musician Wynton Marsalis gives a master class for BAA students and our partners, Berklee City Music Program.

(l to r) Founding Artistic Dean Fernadina Chan, former CoHeadmaster Carmen Torres, and Founding Headmaster Linda Nathan celebrate at an event honoring Linda’s service to BAA.

BAA gets a new coat of paint, courtesy of 200 volunteers from the band Dispatch, City Year, Calling All Crows, Deloitte, and the Boston Public Schools.

Students participate in Design Comes Alive, an interdisciplinary art and science program produced in partnership with TERC and supported by the National Science Foundation.

Arts Dean Kathleen Marsh and Center for Arts in Education Executive Director Linda Nathan accept the Outstanding Arts School Award presented to BAA by Arts Schools Network, an international organization.

Bill Schawbel, 2013 recipient of BAA’s annual Apollo Award, displays the beautiful sculpture designed for him by Boston artist Niho Kozuru, symbolizing illumination and innovation.

Anne R. Clark Named New Headmaster Following an extensive nationwide search, founding faculty member Anne R. Clark was named Headmaster of Boston Arts Academy in February, 2013. Anne helped to open the school in 1998, shaping the school’s innovative curriculum as founding Academic Dean. She brings a wealth of teaching and leadership experience to the Headmaster position, as well as a passionate belief in the transformative power of the arts. Anne’s vision is to further develop BAA as a model for change by promoting the fundamental role that the arts play in the lives of our students. Working closely with faculty, students, family members, and the community, Anne is committed to creating an equitable school where students can reach their full potential by learning in and through the arts.

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Students create arts-based community service projects for their Senior Projects. Community members serve as volunteer judges, awarding funding to the top projects.

Grammy Award winner Mark O’Connor performs with BAA music students at the 2013 BAA Benefit Gala at Northeastern University’s Blackman Auditorium.

Hope Boykin and Belen Pereyra (BAA ‘05, not pictured) of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater conduct a dynamic master class for BAA dance students.

Our 2013 Elma Lewis Graduates with Distinction proudly represent the school with E. Barry Gaither, Director of the National Center for AfroAmerican Artists.

Theatre students present two sold-out performances of RENT, BAA’s first musical in over 10 years, at Emerson College’s Semel Theatre.

Students and teachers from the Lycée Joliot Curie in France visit BAA’s Peers Educating Peers class.

Diane Paulus, Artistic Director of the American Repertory Theater, addresses the Class of 2013 at BAA’s graduation ceremony the day after winning two Tony Awards.

Going Forward In these pages you will read about Boston Arts Academy’s many accomplishments over the past year. While we celebrate those accomplishments, we also wish to recognize that the school faced several challenges, outlined below. We hope this gives you a deeper understanding of the school, of the issue of accountability in public education, and of the importance of the arts in our students’ lives.

MCAS Testing The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) has developed a system to level schools based on a group of indicators connected to the MCAS exam; schools are scaled and the lowest 20% are designated “Level 3.” In 2013 BAA was designated a Level 3 school. However, in 2013 BAA met or exceeded every target the state set for the school except one. In addition, the percentage of BAA’s African American and Latino students who scored Proficient or Advanced on the Math MCAS exceeded district performance averages by twenty percentage points. BAA students with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) scored Proficient or Advanced at a rate double to that of the district.

Facilities Our building at 174 Ipswich Street does not adequately meet the needs of our dual arts and college preparatory curriculum. In 1998, when the school first opened, the facility was declared to be a temporary home. For the past

several years, our Board, administrators, and community members have been working in earnest to find a new home that will allow the school to realize its full potential. In that time, we have worked with the City of Boston and the Boston Public Schools on numerous proposals. In 2012-13, we worked with the school district to submit a Statement of Interest to the Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA) for funding. The Statement of Interest was first submitted to the Boston School Committee, which named it a priority. The Boston City Council approved the Statement of Interest and is very supportive of our renovation needs. Families and Students spent countless hours advocating for BAA’s facilities need. By attending numerous School Committee and City Council meetings, as well as gathering over 800 signatures for a petition. We are constantly looking for the best possible facility solution for our students, and are hopeful that our efforts will result in a facility that meets our educational needs.

2012-2013 Impact Report / 5


Artists

Scholars Citizens Dance / 84 Students

The arts are central to Boston Arts Academy’s mission. The School was founded on the conviction that arts and academics are equally important to student development and achievement. At Boston Arts Academy students express their artistic identities in ways that provide a connection to their academic work. Our students choose to major in one of four arts disciplines: dance, music (instrumental or vocal), theatre, or visual arts. All arts majors prepare students for entry into college-level programs, and develop career-related skills.

Classical ballet, modern dance, jazz, tap, hip hop, Afro-Haitian dance – all are available to dance students at BAA. The rigorous curriculum includes choreography, dance history, healthful living, dance production and technology, all of which prepare students for post-secondary dance training and professional careers. The curriculum helps students develop discipline, technical skills and expression, while challenging their creativity and critical thinking skills. Alumni of the program include company members of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, BH2 (Ballet Hispanico), Deborah Abel Dance Company, Impact Dance Company, and a winner of the FOX-TV show SoYou ThinkYou Can Dance. In 2012-13, our students had numerous performance opportunities, learned from outstanding guest artists, and challenged themselves to participate in the new Honors Dance class. Students were thrilled to work with noted choreographer Nathan Trice who set his work Conversations on BAA students, which they premiered at the Springfest Dance Concert. Students also performed Dance Department Co-Chair William McLaughlin’s SPEAK at The Dream at 50 Arts Awards honoring the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

Music / 68 Instrumental + 88 Vocal Students

Now in its fifth year, the Spirituals Ensemble explores the evolution of the African-American choral music tradition. This auditioned group of 28 sophomores, juniors, and seniors is directed by teacher Tyrone Sutton, who also serves as Director of Music at Boston’s historic Charles Street A.M.E. Church. Mr. Sutton believes that the Ensemble, “helps our students become confident performers who develop a real sense of empathy and community with one another.” The Spirituals Ensemble performs at numerous community events, including the Boston Public Schools Martin Luther King Day event, Boston School Committee meetings, and events at Children’s Hospital. In 2012-13, the group performed for the first time at the Massachusetts Instrumental and Choral Conductors Association Festival, and won a Gold Medal. The Ensemble was also honored to perform with Grammy Award-winning jazz musician Don Byron at MIT. The future is definitely bright for the BAA Spirituals Ensemble.

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Both instrumentalists and vocalists find their home in Boston Arts Academy’s Music Department. The rich program of study includes concentrations in classical, jazz, and music technology, with a strong foundation of music theory, history, and technique for all students. Exploring a wide variety of musical experiences, students discover the connection between music and community and use music as a lens for viewing life and the world. BAA musicians are in demand as performers at community, corporate, and municipal events. 2012-13 was an exciting year for our music students as they performed all over the city, as well as at regional and national festivals, bringing home several awards. The BAA Spirituals Ensemble won a gold medal for their performance at the Massachusetts Instrumental and Choral Conductors Association Festival, and participated in the Ithaca College High School Gospel Music Festival in Ithaca, NY. The Jazz Choir won second place in their category at Berklee College of Music’s High School Jazz Festival. This is the largest high school jazz festival in the country. All BAA classical ensembles performed two concerts at Northeastern University’s Blackman Theater in May: one public concert, and one for the BAA Benefit Gala. The students were honored to perform with noted fiddler and composer Mark O’Connor and composer/conductor Darin Atwater.


Our students met over 20 visiting artists this year through master classes, performances, and exhibitions. BAA was honored to host such noted artists as jazz musician Wynton Marsalis; fiddler and composer Mark O’Connor; composer/conductor Darin Atwater; choreographer Nathan Trice; Hope Boykin and Belen Pereyra (BAA ‘05) of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater; Diane Paulus, Artistic Director of the American Repertory Theatre; Actors’ Shakespeare Project; Theater Offensive; film and television actor Kevin Chapman; the cast of A.R.T.’s The Glass Menagerie, including Zach Quinto; printmakers from Artist Proof Studio in Johannesburg, South Africa; visual artist Rick Lowe; and visual artist/scientist Todd Siler.

Theatre / 88 Students

Visual Arts / 92 Students

Creating young inventive artists who are concerned with artistic excellence, cross-cultural understanding and social change is the mission of the BAA Theatre Department. The program nurtures and challenges students through a highly rigorous pre-conservatory curriculum. Essential foundational skills in acting are combined with courses in technical theatre, directing and playwriting, emphasizing that theatre is a collaborative art form. Alumni of the program have gone on to perform with numerous professional theatre companies, stage manage on Broadway, and write and direct their own professionally-produced plays.

The visual arts curriculum is designed to help students develop a deeper understanding of concepts in art while building their formal skills. The department strives to create a rigorous and encouraging environment in which students demonstrate a strong work ethic, produce quality work, and are articulate when discussing their art and the art of others. Visual arts students regularly win Gold Keys in the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Awards, participate in Art All State, and win scholarships to study at the Oxbow School in California and the Putney School in Vermont.

In 2012-13, the Theatre Department presented 4 mainstage shows, including RENT, BAA’s first musical in over 10 years. Our students performed for sold-out crowds at the Semel Theatre at Emerson College for two nights in January. The past year also saw the implementation of a new technical theatre and design curriculum pathway. A small group of juniors and seniors were immersed in set design, learning to draw, draft, make models, and construct sets. We look forward to expanding this program in future years.

A record number of exhibitions were held in 2012-13, including nine exhibitions in the Philip and Sandra Gordon Gallery and other BAA spaces. The Department also continued its participation in Photosynthesis, a collaboration between BAA, Winchester High School, and the Griffin Museum of Photography. 2012-13 marked the eighth year of this successful partnership. Visiting artists were a wonderful source of inspiration for our students this year. Printmakers from Artist Proof Studio in Johannesburg, South Africa shared their knowledge and artistic vision as part of an ongoing partnership between our school and their organization.

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Artists

Scholars

Citizens

Academics at Boston Arts Academy include a full college-preparatory course load, including humanities, mathematics, science, and a world language. By integrating the arts into our academic classes we emphasize interdisciplinary thinking and project-based learning. Throughout the curriculum, a special emphasis is placed on the development of writing skills. The combination of arts and academics creates a powerful curriculum that prepares students to respond to the challenges of the 21st century.

Humanities / a combination of language arts, philosophy, history, and social studies.

World Languages

Learning Center

• In the spring, two 9th grade Humanities classes had a unique opportunity to correspond with students at Artist Proof Studio in Johannesburg, South Africa. The correspondence began by email, then culminated with two video chat sessions where the students exchanged their own works of resistance art. This was a powerful example of a cross-cultural exchange, as BAA students shared their work with other artists halfway around the world, and discussed social issues and art’s potential for affecting change.

• Professor and Salvadorian poet Susana Reyes worked with Spanish 4 and Spanish 5 students for a week, helping them write poetry in Spanish.

• 100% of juniors with Individualized Education Plans passed the English Language Arts MCAS test as 10th graders.

• All Humanities 4 students were invited to attend a screening of artist Mickalene Thomas’ short film Happy Birthday to a BeautifulWoman: A Portrait of My Mother at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA). This is the third year that our seniors have visited the ICA to enrich their study of aesthetics.

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American Sign Language, Arabic, and Spanish

• In collaboration with the Theatre Department, Spanish 4 and 5 presented a public performance of Poemas Con Niños by the Cuban author Nicolás Guillén. This was the initial effort of a longterm project to introduce Spanish and bilingual presentation to BAA. • Based on the continued and enthusiastic support of our Arabic program a Level 3 class was added this year.

BAA’s home for special education services.

• All students with Individualized Education Plans graduated with Boston Arts Academy Diplomas. • A new Math 10 course was piloted in partnership with the Learning Center for students needing extra math support. This full-year collaborative class model was created to help us assess students’ ability to use their skills across content areas.


Literacy Development Initiative At Boston Arts Academy we believe that all of our students must be able to express themselves as artists, scholars, and citizens. Therefore, literacy development is a school-wide priority at Boston Arts Academy. Thirty-five percent of our students enter high school reading below grade level. Our Literacy Development Initiative succeeds in strengthening students’ reading and writing abilities. Through Seminar classes, the Learning Center, the Summer Reading Program, Literature Circles, and more, BAA students get the support they need to develop their literacy skills. Professional development for teachers this year focused on working with English Language Learners (ELL). Consultants provided training sessions for the entire faculty on improving English language development for non-native speakers. Forty percent of our students come from homes where English is not their primary students; it is important that we help the ELL students among this population improve in their spoken, reading, and written language skills.

Post-tests were administered in February of 2013 to a representative sample of students with significant reading challenges. 85% improved by at least one grade 85% level at the end of one full year in the program. In addition, analysis of the data from 2010 to 2012 reveals a steady decline in the percentage of students simply maintaining their skills and a steady increase in the percentage of students who improved their word reading skills by one or more full grade levels. Improving one grade level is a significant gain for students who have not been making annual grade gains in their reading. Such a gain indicates that the literacy intervention has in effect put the students back on track.

STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics Boston Arts Academy has been a leader in imparting the arts across the academic curriculum, giving students the opportunity to use their artistic skills in all of their classes. STEAM takes an interdisciplinary, arts-integrated approach to math and science classes, creating learning experiences for students that blend these different disciplines together instead of teaching them as separate subjects.

This year, our 9th grade engineering classes participated in a second year of Design Comes Alive, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation through our partner TERC, a not-for-profit education research and development organization. BAA invited three artists to conduct two-week residencies at the school, allowing students to combine their artistic strengths with sound, light,

and mechanical engineering. The artists – BAA alumnus Duke Atkinson, percussionist and writer Jennifer Dorris, and teachers from ProGo Learning – provided students with real-life examples of how the sciences and the arts are intertwined and essential to critical and creative thinking. Our STEAM teachers did much to further the STEAM approach to teaching and learning by presenting their work at numerous national and regional educational conferences over the year, including the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics conference in Denver; the Coalition of Essential Schools Fall Forum in Providence, RI; the Creating Balance Conference in San Francisco; and the BAA Summer Institute for Arts in Education.

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Artists Scholars

Citizens

We believe in teaching our artist-scholars to be engaged members of their communities. Because of that citizenship is a core component of our curriculum. 100% of our students propose and develop a arts-based community service project. Students are encouraged to use the arts as a vehicle for social change through their Senior Grant Project, Community Service Day, advisory-led service projects, and student-led groups and clubs that focus on service. Boston Arts Academy prepares graduates to be arts and creative leaders, who bring real and lasting benefits to their communities. Graduating Class of 2013

On June 10, 2013, Boston Arts Academy held its 13th graduation ceremony at Citi Performing Arts Center’s historic Shubert Theatre. We were delighted to return to the Shubert, the site of the school’s first graduation ceremony in 2001, and look forward to continuing our partnership with Citi Performing Arts Center. The 76 graduates of the Class of 2013 were inspired by the words of commencement speaker 2013 Tony Award Winner Diane Paulus, Artistic Director of the American Repertory Theater, and student RICO speaker Meghan O’Loughlin. Honorees

98%

of 2013 Graduates accepted to college

$2.8M

included Edmund Barry Gaither, Executive Director of the Museum of the National Center for Afro-American Artists; Kenneth Leibler, retired chairman of the Boston Stock Exchange and BAA’s long-time financial literacy volunteer; and literacy consultant/designer of BAA’s successful reading initiative, Dr. Isabel Phillips. The graduates were presented by Valedictorian Ana Lemus and Headmaster Anne R. Clark.

in scholarships & financial aid, including 1 Posse Scholar & 4 full-tuition scholarships

Senior Projects

All BAA seniors participate in Senior Project – the school’s capstone experience. Seniors demonstrate their graduation credentials by creating a service project that uses their artistic training to address an identified need in the community. Students write grant proposals and give oral presentations to a review panel consisting of educators, artists, business and non-profit leaders, and BAA supporters. Students who are selected as finalists present their projects to a second review panel, and the top-rated students receive funding to implement their projects. Emily Catalfamo, one of the senior project finalists, created a documentary film titled CanYou Hear Me? to educate the hearing community about what it means to be deaf. The film addresses communication access barriers and ways to break down these barriers in order to promote understanding between the deaf and hearing communities. Emily’s film has been screened at Northeastern University, Tufts University, and at BAA. Now a freshman at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., Emily feels that her film succeeds in helping to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds.

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For me, this project meant taking one step towards raising awareness about equal access. As the audience watches my film I hope to show them a perspective they’ve never looked through before…. When this happens the audience comes to a realization that, “There is a problem and there are ways I could easily fix it.”


Wellness Class of 2013 College and Career Choices Art Institute of Boston Barry University Becker College Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Berklee College of Music Boston University Bunker Hill Community College Career Training Centre College Colby Sawyer College Dean College Eastern Nazzarene College Emerson College Empire Beauty School Fitchburg State University Gaulledet University George Mason University Gordon College Johnson and Wales Kentucky State University Massachusetts College of Art and Design Mitchell College Mount Ida College North Carolina School for the Arts Norwich University Providence College Regis College Rhode Island College Rutgers University Salem State University Santa Clara University Sarah Lawrance College Suffolk University University of Hartford/ Hartt School University of Maine University of Massachusetts Boston University of Massachusetts Dartmouth University of the Arts University of the District of Columbia Westfield State University Wheelock College

Student health and wellness is a top priority at BAA. Our Student Support Team (SST) provides a wide range of services so that every student can be successful. Offering on-site nursing services, mental health counseling, family counseling, peer mediation, student support groups, and special services for students with a range of disabilities, SST works closely with students, teachers, and families to support students’ needs. In 2012-13, the Student Support Team (SST) supported students in the following ways:

• Provided 1,976 individual counseling sessions for over 120 students. • Provided 78 psycho-educational, interpersonal, identity, and support group sessions to 109 students. • Administered wellness screenings to 139 incoming students to determine appropriate levels of support services. • Conducted peer mediation and conflict resolution in 20 incidents involving a total of 51 students. • Conducted 85 family sessions supporting 61 students. • Conducted 36 crisis assessments of 31 students.

Health Services: • Conducted 363 height, weight, and vision screenings. • Completed 1,609 physical exams and 1,338 psycho-social histories and assessments.

Through the Boston Public Health Commission: • 107 students received one-on-one counseling for sexual health concerns. • The Making Proud Choices curriculum, focused on sexual health education, was administered to 143 students in seven classrooms. • BPHC Health Educators participated in four science classes, serving 61 students. Topics included anatomy, birth control, and STDs. • BPHC Health Educators also collaborated with math classes and led a class for ninety-nine students that used exponents to teach about the spread of infections diseases. In 2012-13, the Student Support Clinical Team included two fulltime BAA clinicians; one clinician from Children’s Hospital who was on-site four days per week; one clinician from South Shore Mental Health who was on-site one day per week; three graduate interns from Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Prevention Sciences Program and Simmons College; and one Psychiatry Fellow from Children’s Hospital who was on-site for one half-day per week.

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Center for Arts in Education A beacon for artistic & academic innovation The Center for Arts in Education serves as a beacon for the transformative power of an arts-based education. Using Boston Arts Academy as a successful model for urban public schools, the Center advocates broadly for the inclusion of the arts as a core component of the K-12 curriculum. The Center develops programs that increase access to arts-based education for students throughout the Boston Public Schools, disseminate effective arts-based curricula, and provide high-quality arts-based professional development for educators.

The Center hosted 138 visitors to BAA from the United States and abroad in 2012-13, welcoming visitors from the Boston area, as well as from California, Colorado, western Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Vermont. International visitors came from India, Indonesia, the Netherlands, Qatar, South Africa, and Sweden. Imagine, Innovate, Advocate, the 2013 Summer Institute for Arts in Education, brought 50 educators from Boston, Chicago, Hartford, Portland (Oregon), Providence, Washington, D.C., France, India, and Qatar to BAA. Along with 42 BAA teachers, participants engaged in workshops about STEAM (artsintegrated science, technology, engineering, and math) and Peers Educating Peers (PEP), a growing international network of schools that use peer education and collaboration to empower students, break down cultural barriers, and connect students to their local and global communities.

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Center staff and BAA faculty members provided consulting services for several schools and districts over the course of the year, including Boston Public Schools; Artist Proof Studio in Johannesburg, South Africa; Chelsea High School; Heritage School in New Delhi, India; Noel Community Arts School, Denver, CO; Nute Middle/High School, Milton, NH; and Renaissance Community School for the Arts, New Bedford, MA. Center Executive Director Linda Nathan, Center Fellows Ramiro Gonzalez and Mark Lonergan, BAA faculty members, and students presented at numerous conferences and educational events over the past year, sharing BAA’s best practices. Speaking engagements over the past year included the Coalition of Essential Schools Fall Forum, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, ASCD, District and School Assistance Centers Collaboration Institute, Boston University, Colgate University, and New England Conservatory, among others.


The Alumni Creative Corps (ACC), trains Boston Arts Academy alumni to support art teachers in Boston Public Schools, increasing access to arts-based education for more students, and providing alumni with mentorship opportunities and workforce development. The Center trained 17 BAA alumni as teaching artists, preparing them to work in Boston Public Schools classrooms. Our alumni worked in eight Boston schools: Boston Green Academy, Dever-McCormack K-8, Dorchester Academy, Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School, Edwards Middle School, Higginson-Lewis K-8, Josiah Quincy Elementary School, Margarita Muniz Academy, and the Orchard Gardens Pilot School. ACC members served 300 students in grades pre-K-12 over the course of the year.

17

ACC Members

300

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providing arts in BPS Schools K-12 Students access to

Alumni Creative Corps Member Mayra Hernandez

Mayra Hernandez (BAA ‘05) was one of the first alumni to sign up for the Alumni Creative Corps (ACC) program when it began in 2011. Mayra, a dancer who graduated with a BA from Smith College, taught at Boston Green Academy, Dorchester Academy, Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School, and Boston Arts Academy during the 2012-13 school year. With students ranging in age from kindergarten to high school, Mayra’s goal was to expose her students to various types of movement, including modern, jazz, hip hop, African, salsa, and improvisation. Through ACC, Mayra discovered that she loves sharing and teaching her craft to others. She feels that ACC makes a real difference in schools and classrooms by giving students new opportunities and extra support and encouragement. “I was able to use my passion and craft to provide my students with the opportunity to try something new and work outside of their comfort zone. I was able to challenge my students, encourage them, and provide them with support both in and out of dance. I developed relationships with all of my students, and let them know that I was interested in their success and achievement.” Mayra is now serving as ACC Program Coordinator, where she guides other BAA alumni who share her passion for arts education.

The Center was honored to be named the steward of the National Artist Teacher Fellowship (NATF) program, designed and previously administered by the Surdna Foundation of New York City. NATF supports the artistic revitalization of arts teachers in public schools. This grant offers arts teachers the opportunity to immerse themselves in their own creative work, interact with other arts professionals, and stay current with new practices. Beginning with a convening of 2012 Fellows in October. A total of 65 arts teachers from 39 U.S. schools applied for the 2013 round of fellowships, of which 20 were awarded. 80% of the applications were from first-time applicants, including two Title 1 schools. This program is made possible through the generous support of the Surdna Foundation.

Students often learn best from each other. Peers Educating Peers (PEP) promotes student teaching as among the most effective ways for students to demonstrate their understanding and share their passion with their peers. In a PEP class, students develop lessons about local history based on their own research. They teach these lessons to their peers from their own school and other schools in the PEP network through “expeditionary learning” techniques that break free of the traditional classroom. This year, a total of 90 students participated in PEP from Boston Arts Academy; Washington Latin Public Charter School in Washington, D.C.; Al admin Wakra and Musab admin bin Omair in Doha, Qatar; and Lycée Joliot Curie in France

2012-2013 Impact Report / 13


BAA Foundation Though communities throughout the country recognize the importance of the arts in student development and achievement, arts programs remain among the first to be cut and the last to be funded, especially in the public school setting. Boston Arts Academy established the Boston Arts Academy Foundation in 1999 to ensure that the arts forever remain in Boston Arts Academy. The Foundation bridges the gap between the school’s public allocations and the true cost of a full arts and college-preparatory curriculum, which includes at least 2.5 hours of arts instruction a day. Private donations go to pay for the school’s core arts faculty positions, arts adjuncts, production costs, and art supplies not covered by public funding. And this additional investment is delivering huge returns. We are grateful for the generosity of individuals, foundations, corporations, government agencies, and community organizations that provide essential resources so that Boston Arts Academy can continue to nurture the lives, artistic expressions, and ambitions of over 420 students of Boston.

Annual BAA Benefit Gala Over 350 guests gathered for the 15th Annual BAA Benefit Gala on May 21, 2013 to support the work of Boston Arts Academy. Chaired by Sandra and Philip Gordon and Mike Douvadjian and Lynne Brainerd, the event was held at Northeastern University’s Curry Ballroom, then moved to the beautiful Blackman Auditorium for a wonderful (left to right) Apollo Award Honoree concert and a celebration of Apollo Award honoree Bill Schawbel. BAA’s music stuBill Schawbel, with Carmen Tordents wowed the audience as they performed res, Benefit Chairs Sandy and Phil Gordon, Headmaster Anne Clark, with Grammy Award-winning fiddler Mark Founding Headmaster Linda Nathan, O’Connor and composer/conductor Darin and Superintendent Carol Johnson. Atwater. In accepting the Apollo Award, Bill Schawbel reaffirmed the many reasons for supporting Boston’s only public high school for the arts. He ended his remarks by generously pledging a $75,000 challenge match in support of next year’s BAA Marathon runners. We are very gratified to report that $658,884 in gifts and commitments were raised at the Benefit.

14

Boston Marathon Over the past three years, Boston Arts Academy has been proud to be an official charity of the Boston Marathon. In that time, our team of dedicated runners has raised over $275,000 for the school. In 2013, the 16 runners of Team BAA raised $100,280 from over 800 generous donors. While the events of April 15, 2013 will stay with all of us in Boston, we were fortunate that our runners, their families and friends, and BAA staff and students were all safe. Those runners who were prevented from crossing the finish line will have the opportunity to participate in the 2014 Marathon. We are grateful to that Boston Athletic Association (the other BAA!) for honoring Boston Arts Academy as an official Marathon charity.


Revenue / $5,748,635 * 62%

July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013

Public Funds $3,591,252

38%

External Fundraising $2,157,383

Includes Boston Public School allocations, Title 1, Federal Perkins Grant, and Massachusetts DESE Expanded Learning Time (ELT) Grant* funding.

47% Individual Support

43% Foundation Support

*ELT Grant is applied for and managed by the BAA Foundation.

7% Fees 2% Reserves 1% Corporate Support

Expenses / $5,748,635 * July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013

82% Salaries

6% Center for Arts in Education 4% Special Projects 3% Instructional Supplies 2% Fundraising Costs 1% Administrative Costs 1% Information Technology 1% Outreach Programs *Preliminary, unaudited results.

2012-2013 Impact Report / 15


DONORS On behalf of the students, faculty, and staff, the BAA Foundation gratefully acknowledges the following individuals and organizations that have contributed to our school during the 2012-13 school year. Gifts listed were made between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013. While great care has been taken to include donors and list them correctly, the Foundation apologizes in advance for any errors. If your name has been omitted, or if your name has been listed incorrectly, please call us at 617.308.0700 so that the necessary corrections can be made. THANK YOU!

Fay M. Chandler Richard Grubman and Caroline Mortimer The Ruth Ray Hunt Fund at the Women’s Foundation of Colorado, Swanee Hunt, Trustee

Linde Family Foundation JoAnn McGrath Jack and Elizabeth Meyer Allison and Roberto Mignone Faith and Glenn Parker Elizabeth and Robert Pozen Ralph Bradley Prizes, Eleanor Goud Eve Smith Rounds and Jonathan Rounds Richard Rudman and Karen Greenberg Schrafft Charitable Trust Jim Supple and Mary McDonald Wellington Management Foundation

$25,000 to 49,999

$5,000 to 9,999

$100,000 and above Terry and Eva Herndon Qatar Foundation International The Surdna Foundation Anonymous

$50,000 to 99,999

Doe Family Foundation The Klarman Family Foundation Krupp Family Foundation Christopher and Sally Lutz Liberty Mutual Pritzker Pucker Family Foundation Dan and Sue Rothenberg Rowland Foundation Shippy Foundation William and Juliana Thompson

$10,000 to 24,999 Abrams Foundation Anonymous Cabot Family Charitable Trust Ron and Ronni Casty The Clowes Fund Cogan Family Foundation Michael and Barbara Eisenson Sandra and Philip Gordon Horizon Beverage Company Anonymous Ken and Marcia Leibler Mary and Robert Lentz

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Anne and Peter Brooke Rick and Nonnie Burnes Berkshire Partners, Kevin and Julie Callaghan Charles and Virginia Clark Clipper Ship Foundation Linda and Michael Frieze

Hunt and Diane Harris Family Foundation, Jenn Harris, Trustee Karen Kames and Christopher Gaffney Florence Koplow Judith and Douglas Krupp Chuck and Susie Longfield The Alchemy Foundation Farhad and Karen Nanji The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Sue and Bernie Pucker Rasky Baerlein Strategic Communications, Larry Rasky, President, Ann Carter, CEO Red Sox Foundation Jonathan Roberts Roy A. Hunt Foundation Susan and Robert Schechter Anonymous Tiny Tiger Foundation


$2,500 to 4,999 Gordon, Liza and Robbie Bemis, in memory of Jane Marrow City of Boston Employee Campaign Michael Douvadjian and Lynne Brainerd Alan Dynner Cesar and Gabriela Hernandez Fay Lewis Joyce Linde Lyle and Anne Micheli Mill River Foundation Linda Nathan and Steve Cohen Pioneer Investments Dorothy and Jerome Preston, Jr. Adelard A. Roy and Valdea Lea Roy Foundation Steven Samuels and Ami Cipolla Alfred and Gilda Slifka Arthur and Dora Ullian Susan Werbe and John Bates

$1,000 to 2,499 Mark Andreasson The Atlantic Philanthropies Director/Employee Designated Gift Fund Robert Beal Karen Bressler and Scott Epstein Catherine and Paul Buttenwieser Ann Carter and Philip Jameson Brian and Ellie Chu Frederic and Barbara Clifford Michael and Joan Contompasis Deborah and Timothy Diggins

Judith and John Felton Donna and David Frieze Tamar and Kenneth Frieze Dozier and Sandy Gardner Dr. Carl George Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg Wyc and Corinne Grousbeck Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Anthony James and Wanda McClain Claire Mallardi Kristin and Paul Marcus The MathWorks Abigail Johnson and Christopher McKown Jo Frances and John Meyer John Monks Jr Anonymous Sara and Nii Ofosu-Amaah The Paul and Edith Babson Foundation Jonathan and Amy Poorvu Peter and Suzanne Read Wendy Shattuck and Samuel Plimpton Ellen Slaby and Bruce Richardson Patricia and David Squire Dan and Leslie Sullivan Carol and Elliot Surkin Elizabeth Taylor and Tim Barclay Sandra Urie and Frank Herron Marcia Walsh and Eric Block J. Curtis Warner Jr. Wilson Butler Architects Donald Winter

The Wolk Family and the Cross Country Group

$500 to 999

Linda and Mark Borden John and Jane Bradley Ruth and Shelly Bramson Eos Foundation David Eppstein and Deborah Foster Karen and David Firestone Rosalind E. Gorin and Matthew Budd, M.D. Grantham, Mayo, Van Otterloo & Co. LLC James and Carol Herscot Georgia Johnson Adrienne and Chris Kimball Bernice Krupp Harris Krupp Bara Levin Matthew LiPuma and Cathy Moylan Ruth Littlechild Katherine and Richard Lowe Doris Lowy and Paul Zigman Harriet Lundberg Massachusetts College of Art Foundation Charles Merrill Susan Passoni and Malcolm McDonald Bruce Price Bradley Russell and Jayme Ierna Mark and Marie Schwartz Greg and Michelle Shell Kim Sawyer and Robert Sherman Katherine and William Sloan Cheryl and Steve Smith Epp Sonin

Thank You to our Sponsors and Partners

THE

SCHAWBEL C O R P O R AT I O N

2012-2013 Impact Report / 17


DONORS

$500 to 999, cont. Francis and Sandra Stone Joan and Herman Suit Rick Tagliaferri and Jill Mackavey Ben and Kate Taylor Michael K. Tooke Emilie Welles

$250 to 499 Pam Allara Lee and Susan Berk Boston Carmen’s Union Local 589 Boston Cultural Council Community Labor United EdVestors Catherine England Corey Evans and Mark Horan Tmomas M. Feeley, Feeley & Driscoll, P.C. Fidelity Foundation Matching Gifts to Education Program Bink and Weezie Garrison Eleanor Goud Ellen and Steve Hoffman Dr. Carol R. Johnson Ellen Kaplan and Bjørn Bie Shirley and Jim Marten Dr. Robert and Jane B. Mayer Kathy and Jim McHugh Jenny Netzer and Ellis Seidman Sung Joon Pai and Jocelyn Stanton

18

Ellen and Thomas Payzant William Perkins and Mary Battenfeld Mary and Joseph Regan Robert and Ruth Remis Susan Rittscher Joshua Rubenstein and Jill Janows Doris Howell-Samuels and Anthony Samuels Marjorie Schaffel and Peter Belson Joan and Lawrence Siff Margot Stern and Terry Strom Deborah Tarantino Lynne Vadala-Doran and Jim Doran Laura Weisberg and David Wong

Up to $249 Jill and James Ackerman Barbara Ann Affinito Monika Aldarondo Abdi Ali Marie and Jim Allen Laurie Alpert and Barry Weiss Edna Alvarado David and Estelle Andelman Michael Ansara Dr. and Mrs. W. Gerald Austen Beth Balliro and Joe Douillette Betty and Arthur Bardige Joy Bautista Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Begley Eleanor Bemis

Douglas and Cheryle Biggar Linda Black Laura Blacklow and Peter Fougere Boston Latin School Association Sonya Brown Stephanie Burgess Katy Burns Linda B. Cabral Herbert and Dorothy Carver Robert Chambers Maha Chourafa Anne R. Clark and Christopher Monks Kenneth and Virginia Colburn Deborah Constantine Lou Corsini Andrea d’Amato and Michael Schofield Shella Dennery Kitty and Mike Dukakis Barrington S. Edwards Brenda S. Engel John and Katherine Esty Gail and Bill Fine Dan French, Center for Collaborative Education Deborah Lang Froggatt Howard Gardner and Ellen Winner Orietta Geha Ernestine Gianelly Lenore Glaser Rebecca S. Guenther Janet Guerra


Calos Gutierrez Maria K Hansson Elin and John Harris Neil and Lona Harris Harvard University Community Gifts Campaign Susan Hayes and Chris Mullen Tom Hehir Susan Heideman Linda Hill and Roger Breitbart Sophia Hinshelwood HMFH Architects Inc. Robert J. and Phyllis E. Hoffman Jane Wegscheider Hyman, PhD Mary Eliot Jackson Ibeth Jaime Allyssa Jones KPMG Stephen Buck and Dawn Kramer Roger and Myrna Landay Susan A. Landers Carol and Alan Lisbon Dennis and Joelle Maguire Jan M. Sprawka and Theresa Malo-Sprawka Jennifer and Kevin Mann Kathleen Marsh and John O’Brien Gail Mazur Beatriz McConnie Zapater Microsoft Matching Gift Program Annette Miller Beth Miller

Anonymous Jackie Moran Emily Neill P.E.O. Chapter EG Joyce and Bruce Pastor Ellen M. Poss Joseph and Tania Powers Judy and Donald Quinn Adrienne and Mitchell Rabkin Chris Rifkin Steven M. Rothstein Peter Norris and Amy Rugel Helen and Jenny Russell Mary Rutkowski and Gideon Ansell Jen and Scott Salman Corinne Schneider School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Digna Scott Marc Seiden Eileen Shakespear Freema Shapiro Leila Simon Hayes Joe Ann Smith Robert Sperber Susan Squire and David Hirshey Andrew St. John Gail and David Stryker Michael and Annlinnea Terranova Toai Thach Joan and Edwin Tiffany

Deborah Tucker Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Tucker Nan Tull and Frank Wezniak Mirna Vega-Wilson Susan Vernick Dorothy Walsh and Andrew Celley Tom and Jacqueline Wang Janie Ward Ellen Weiner and Michael Peck David Weinstein and Laura Foner Sandy Weisman Wells Fargo Foundation Educational Matching Gift Program Elaine B. White Women in Development of Greater Boston Francis and Judith Wright

2012-2013 Impact Report / 19


DONORS

LINDA F. NATHAN FUND FOR TEACHERS

On March 11, over 330 friends of BAA, including Keynote Speaker Robert Pinsky, came together to celebrate Founding Headmaster Linda F. Nathan in the beautiful lobby of the Citi Wang Theater. Our deepest thanks go to all whose efforts helped to raise over $100,000 for the Linda. F. Nathan Fund for Teachers. The income from this permanently-endowed fund will be used in perpetuity to help pay for summer professional development courses and programs of study for Boston Arts Academy teachers. $50,000 Challenge Match Donor Anonymous

$5,000 and above Ron and Ronni Casty Jim Supple and Mary McDonald

$2,500 to 4,999 Fred Levin and Nancy Livingston The Alchemy Foundation Kenneth and Marianne Novack Dorothy and Jerome Preston, Jr. Richard and Susan Smith 1990 Charitable Trust Eve Smith Rounds and Jonathan Rounds Richard Rudman and Karen Greenberg, M.D. Anonymous

$1,000 to 2,499 Debbie Arles The Boston Conservatory Theodore H. Cutler Family Charitable Trust Sandra and Philip Gordon Emily Kahn McCall & Almy, Inc. Linda Nathan and Steve Cohen Soo Hwan Pai and Moon-Hee Yoo Anne L. Peretz

20

Sue and Bernie Pucker Anonymous Samuels & Associates Elizabeth Taylor and Tim Barclay Ralph Winter

$500 to 999 Jane Holmes Bernstein The Boston Foundation, Paul S. Grogan The Charlotte Foundation Anna and Peter Davol Paula Fazli Giovanni and Jolie Greci John W. Humphrey Paul Kopperl Anne and James LaPlante Julia Livingston Faith and Glenn Parker Ed Redlich Prudence Steiner Murray and Marilyn Waldman

$250 to 499 Frederic Alper Charles and Jeannette Atkinson Anita Balliro Lee and Susan Berk

Amanda Bowen and Fred Sutton Michael Douvadjian and Lynne Brainerd Emerson College Robert and Iris Fanger Eleanor Goud Marian and Winlow Heard Sarah and Winston Hindle Anthony James and Wanda McClain Martha H. Jones Carol Kinsley Denise Korn David Lapin, Community Music Center of Boston Michael Lee Doris Lowy and Paul Zigman Massachusetts College of Art Foundation Nancy and Richmond Mayo-Smith Alexander Meiklejohn Dr. and Mrs. Micheli The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Kitty Pell Harold Pratt Bruce Price Peter and Suzanne Read Martha and Tom Sieniewicz Josiah and Joyce Spaulding, Jr. Rick Tagliaferri and Jill Mackavey Michael Thompson and Theresa McNally


$250 to 499, cont. Wheelock College Anonymous

Up to $249 Lawrence Aaronson Cynthia and Yoshiharu Akabane Mónika Aldarondo Tricia and Dave Aldrich Abdi Ali Pam Allara Meg Anderson Smoki Bacon and Richard Concannon Nicole Bahnam Beth Balliro and Joe Douillette Krystal Banfield Mary Barnett Lynn and Stephen Baum Joy Bautista Ken and Linda Beardsley Beate Becker Susan R. Berger Kim Berman Judy and Alan Bernstein Linda Black Laura Blacklow and Peter Fougere Steve Blossom Lawrence Blum Birgit and Charles Blyth The Fenway Alliance Steven and Linda Brion-Meisels Barbara Brown Christina Brown Jan Waldman Brown Sonya Brown Katy Burns Tino Cadet Zadina Cadyma Margaret Campbell Marlon Carey and Emily Buckbee Wendy Dunning Carter Herbert and Dorothy Carver Ilene Carver Fernadina Chan Mirko Chardin Deborah and Michael Charness Laurie Chassin Pria Chatterjee Maha Chourafa Anne R Clark and Christopher Monks

Mary and David Clarke Maura Clarke PeeJay Clarke and Jessica Lider Matt Clauhs Francesca Colletti Harry Collings Sandra Copman and Ken Burdulis Afton Cotton Amy and Ethan d’Ablemont Burnes Sue Dahling Sullivan Pixita del Prado Hill Katherine DeMarco Elena and Ted Dodd Deborah Donahue-Keegan Kim Draper Betsy Drinan Mary Driscoll Dorothea V. Engler David Eppstein and Deborah Foster John and Katherine Esty Corey Evans and Mark Horan Diane Fiedler and Peter Agoos Lorraine Fine Judy Flam and George Ulrich Laura Flaxman Marilyn Ford FRED Forum Deborah Lang Froggatt Diane and Arthur Fulman Gill Garb and Colin Sieff Ayla Gavins Nadine Gerdts Elizabeth Brodbine Ghoniem and Ahmed Ghoniem Ernestine Gianelly Mark Goldberg and Phyllis Emsig Ramiro G. Gonzalez Henry Goodrow Martha Gray and Jerel Cathey Kevin Grogan David Gute and Ann Tousignant Chris Harris Stephen Hauge Jane Haughney George Hein Maarten Hemsley Sharon Hessney Albert Holland Christine and Charles Hughes Maria Ialuna

Nicole Ireland Haydee Irizarry Emi Iwatani Charmain Jackman and Jeff Lahens Elena James Allyssa Jones Joyce Kazanjian Anonymous Katharine Kilbourn and Scott Shear David Knight Cleo Knight-Wilkins Carol T. Korty Patricia Krol Rosanna LaBonte Shawn LaCount Diana Lam Theodore Landsmark Francesca Lion Tom Loeser Katherine and Richard Lowe Harriet Lundberg Linda and Steven Luz-Alterman Peggy Lynch Hannah MacLaren Esteniolla Maitre Kathleen Marsh and John O’Brien Shirley and Jim Marten Peter McCaffery Ronald and Maureen McCaffrey Beatriz McConnie Zapater John McDonough Deborah Meier Jo Frances and John Meyer Beth Miller Myron Miller Janet Miner Heavenly Mitchell Mill River Foundation Margaret and William Morton Frannie Moyer Hubert Murray Hy Murveit and Leslie Airola-Murveit Larry and Leslie Myatt Geoffrey G. Nathan, Esq. Heather Nelson and Larry Kolodney An Nguyen Bill Nigreen Nina Nolan Vera Nordal Jayne Ogata and Matthew Bernstein

2012-2013 Impact Report / 21


DONORS LINDA F. NATHAN FUND FOR TEACHERS Up to $249, cont. Ryan Oliver Catherine Opoix Donald and Barbara Oppenheimer Roslyn and Stuart Orkin Oriana Packer Sung Joon Pai and Jocelyn Stanton Myran Parker-Brass Valerie Pastorelle Henry Paull Ellen and Thomas Payzant Belen Pereyra Roberta and Terry Perlin Carmel Perrone Isabel Phillips and Peter Ramsey Leslie Pine Paul Pitts Cicy Po Vincent Precht Lisa Pred-Sosa Bruce Price Nancy Purbeck John and Mary Quinn Leonard Rappaport James and Marchelle Raynor Peter and Suzanne Read Carrie Redlich Mary and Joseph Regan Duncan and Sarah Remage-Healey Andrea Riedy The Right Question Institute

22

Alexis Rizzuto Kay George Roberts Kathy Rochefort Susan Rodgerson Vanessa Rodriguez and Devin Mann Larry Rosenstock Barbara Salisbury Doris Howell-Samuels and Anthony Samuels Luz Santana Marjorie Schaffel and Peter Belson William Schechter Molly Schen Janna Schwartz Marc Seiden Anonymous Libbie Shufro Martha and Tom Sieniewicz Genevieve Simon Nancy Sizer Katherine and William Sloan Cheryl and Steve Smith Joan Soble Cecilia Soriano Josiah and Joyce Spaulding, Jr. Robert Sperber Emilie D. Steele Van Stefanakis Liza and Keith Stern Tracy Strain and Randall MacLowry Gail and David Stryker Daniel Sullivan

Katherine Sullivan Rick Tagliaferri and Jill Mackavey Guy Telemaque Michael Thompson and Theresa McNally The Walnut Hill School Maura Tighe Carmen Torres Miren Uriarte Lynne Vadala-Doran and Jim Doran Jennifer Varekamp Mirna Vega-Wilson Carla Walsh Janie Ward Anonymous J. Curtis Warner Jr. Beth Warren Ellen Weiner and Michael Peck Laura Weisberg and David Wong Susan Werbe and John Bates Wheelock College Matthew Wilson Anonymous Edmond and Dr. Deborah Wu Blaine Yesselman Virginia and Mark Zanger


In Kind Donations and Services In addition to generous contributions, Boston Arts Academy is grateful for the many in-kind services and donations provided by the following organizations and individuals: Michael and Kohar Allen AXA Equitable Barbara Levkowicz Bob Sinicrope Boston Arts Academy Board of Trustees, Tony James, Chair Boston Arts Academy Council of Advocates, Sandy Gordon, President Boston Arts Academy Family Council Boston Ballet, Eve Rounds, Trustee and Zakiya Thomas, Director of Education and Community Initiatives Boston Center for the Arts Boston City Council Boston Classical Orchestra Boston College School of Social Work Boston Lyric Opera Boston Playwright’s Theatre Boston Psychoanalytic Society Boston Public Library Boston Red Sox Boston Unversity Brain Gravel Broadway Across America Brookline High School Calling All Crows Carlos I. Gutierrez Celebrity Series of Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston Citi Performing Arts Center, Josiah Spaulding, President City Year Color Magazine Constellation Energy Dana Farber Cancer Institute Dispatch DLA Piper, Richard Rudman, Partner

Dr. Glorai White-Hammon and Reverand Ray Hammond Dr. Isabel Phillips Eastern Standard Edmund Barry Gaither EdVestors, Laura Perillle, Executive Director Eliot Hotel, Dora Ullian Ezra “Eddie” Shammay Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel Fay Chandler Fresh City Gail Mazur Harvard University Graduate School of Education Hawthore String Quartet Howard Frazin Hunt Alternatives Fund, Swanee Hunt Huntington Theatre Company Jessica Daniel Jim Schantz Joanne Kaliontzis Jocelyn Ajami and James Sugden John Barnes and Josianne Hudicourt Joyce Cohen Kenneth Leibler, KRL Investment Associates La Verdad Landsdowne Street Pub Lauren Howard Linda Beardsley Linsey Onishuk, City of Boston Liza Voll Lombardo’s Lyons Management Group Marian L. Heard MASCO, David Eppstein Massachusetts 2020 Massachusetts Film Office Massacusetts Institute of Technology, Gayle M. Gallagher and Martha Eddison Sieniewicz Maureice Vanderpol Max Ultimate Catering, Dan Mathieu and Neal Balkowitsch, Owners Mayor Thomas M. Menino McCall Almy, Mary Lentz Michael Blanchard

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Nancy and Joseph Serafini Northeastern University Phyllis Bretholtz Pucker Gallery Rasky Baerlein Strategic Communications, Larry Rasky, President, Ann Carter, CEO Restaurante Cesaria Reuning & Sons Violins Reyna Grande Richard Grubman and Caroline Mortimer Robert Pinsky Ronald Mevs Russell C. Teebagy Sandra and Philip Gordon Sarah Mayper Shorey, Krentzel, and Dalgin Families Simmons College Stanhope Framers Susan Berger Susan Freidman Susan Werbe Sweet Caroline’s The Boston Foundation, Paul Grogan, President The Fram Gallery The House of Blues Foundation The ProArts Consortium: Berklee College of Music, Boston Architectural College, The Boston Conservatory, Emerson College, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston The Yard House Thomas Oboe Lee Tufts University Twig Florist William F. Thompson Wilson Butler Architects

2012-2013 Impact Report / 23


PARTNERS Community Partners Boston Arts Academy is proud that our students are represented in outstanding arts and community organizations throughout the City of Boston. Our community partners provide important resources for our students such as enrichment programs, internships, curricular support and other vital services. During the 2012-13 school year, BAA partnered with: Arts and Business Council Act 2 Actor’s Shakespeare Project American Community Schools Anna Myer and Dancers Articulation Artist Proof Studio Artists for Humanity ArtWorks for Kids Berklee City Music Program Berklee College of Music, Roger Brown, President Boston Area Health Education Center Boston Athletic Association Boston Center for the Arts Boston Classical Orchestra Boston Cultural Council Boston Neighborhood Network Boston Partners in Education Boston Police Department Boston Public Library Boston Public Schools Boston Public Schools Arts Office Boston Red Sox Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston Pops Boston University: African Studies Center, REACH Program, Tanglewood Institute, Dance Theatre, Creative Scholars Boston Youth Fund Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston Brandeis University, New Rep Theatre Broadway Across America Calling all Crows Capoeira Casa de la Cultura, Center for Latino Art Catalyst Conversations Celebrity Series of Boston

24

Charles River CIT Program Charles Street AME Church Childrens Hospital Neighborhood Partnership Citi Performing Arts Center, Wang Theatre and Shubert Theatre City Year Collective Next Community Music Center Boston Company One Concord Academy Summer Stages Constellation Energy Contropose Dance Company Cooking Matters Deloitte Department of Children and Families Diablo Glass Dispatch Emerson College, Lee Pelton, President Emmanuel Music Facing History and Ourselves Fenway Alliance Fidelity FutureStage Griffin Museum of Photography Harvard University: Crimson Summer Academy, Graduate School of Education, Office of the Arts, American Repertory Theatre, School of Public Health Hispanic Writers Week Project Huntington Theatre Company Hyde Square Task Force Institute of Contemporary Art Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre Lemuel Shattuck Hospital Louis Brown Peace Institute Lyric Stage Massachusetts Advocates for Arts, Sciences, and Humanities Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Dawn Barret, President Massachusetts Cultural Council Massachusetts General Hospital MassCreative Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Museum of Science, Boston New England Conservatory New England Spirituals Ensemble Northeastern University OrigiNation Cultural Arts Center Oxbow School

Peer Health Exchange Putney School Roxbury Center for the Arts at Hibernian Hall School for the Museum of Fine Arts, Chris Bratton, President Simmons College Sociedad Latina Spontaneous Celebrations State Street Corporation Swensenrud Depressions Prevention Iniative at Children’s Hospital Technology Goes Home TERC The Boston Architectural College, Ted Landsmark, President The Boston Conservatory The Boston Conservatory, Richard Ortner, President The Boston Foundation Theatre Offensive Tufts University, Office of the President and Department of Education Urbano Winchester Public Schools, Winchester High School


2012-13 Council of Advocates The Council of Advocates is a diverse group of community, educational and business leaders whose common goal is to support the mission and advance the success of the school. Members of the Council of Advocates act as well-informed ambassadors for the school, advocating for it in the broader community, contributing to its financial strength and providing ongoing advice to the Leadership, Trustees, and the community. Sandra Gordon, President Pam Allara / Imad Atalla / Craig Bailey / Phyllis Betholtz Roger Brown / Paul Buttenwieser / Ronald Casty / Harry Collings / Michael Contompasis Jessica Hoffmann Davis / Michael Douvadjian / Ernest Dudley / Iris Fanger / Gail Flatto Kay George Roberts / Rev. Gregory Groover / Rev. Dr. Ray Hammond / Rev. Dr. Gloria White-Hammond Christopher Harris / Liz Harris / Jackie Jenkins-Scott / Cleo Knight-Wilkins / Denise Korn Shawn LaCount / Ken Leibler / Nancy Livingston and Fred Levin / Kathy Lowe / Jose Masso Peter McCaffery / Dr.Yannis Miaoulis / Robin Morgan / Caroline Mortimer / Jermaine Myrie Alexandra Oliver-Davila / Richard Ortner / Myran Parker-Brass / Ellen Payzant / Jonathan Poorvu Suzanne and Bernie Pucker / Elizabeth Reilinger / Marita Rivero / Lois Roach / Emilie Steele Francis and Sandra Stone / Rosalind Thomas-Clark / Dora Ullian / Susan Werbe Linda Whitlock / Tony Woodcock

2012-13 Family Council School-Family partnerships are critical to the success and achievement of our students. All parents/caregivers of BAA students are members of the Boston Arts Academy Family Council. The goal of the Family Council is to develop strong communication and support for all families. BAA would not exist without the support of our students’ families. We need your continued energy and support as we continue to fulfill our mission of educating Artists, Scholars and Citizens! Ginny Brennan, Co-Chair / Amy Ross, Co-Chair / Cheryl Smith, Co-Chair

2012-13 Impact Report Editorial Team Anne R. Clark, Akshata Kadagathur, Duncan Remage-Healey, and Rick Tagliaferri Writer

Ellen Weiner

Design and Layout Photography

David Dines

MĂłnika Aldarondo, Craig Bailey, Michael Blanchard, Phyllis Bretholtz, Akshata Kadagathur, Liza Voll, and Robert Torres


Dance Music Theatre Visual Arts Boston Arts Academy A Public High School for the Visual and Performing Arts 174 Ipswich Street Boston, MA 02215 617.635.6470 www.bostonartsacademy.org facebook.com/bostonartsacademy twitter.com/bostonartsacad

Boston Arts Academy Impact Report 2012-13  
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