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BORDER

FREE ISSUE 13, 2012

BORDERECO.COM

EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT TO CHOOSE!

The voice of your community

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY AND CITY OF NOGALES

ELECTIONS Vote


CANDIDATE LIST COUNTY ATTORNEY

COUNTY ASSESSOR

eco BORDER

COUNTY RECORDER

Director David M. Ramirez

Felipe A. Fuentes, Jr.

Alfonso Ochoa

George Silva

Suzanne "Suzie" Sainz

SUPERVISOR DISTRICT #1

SUPERVISOR DISTRICT #1

SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

SUPERVISOR DISTRICT #2

SUPERVISOR DISTRICT #3

Andrew Ibarra

Intern

SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE #2

Anna MontoyaPaez

Alfredo I. Velasquez

Olivia I. AinzaKramer

Mike Melendez

Rudy "Bugs" Molera SUPERVISOR DISTRICT #3

SUPERVISOR DIST #2

Hector "Gera" Gerardo

Art Director

Edgardo Muñoz Lafuente Over 15 years in media communications and operations. Worked with El Imparcial publishing company, El Diario de la Frontera, Alphagraphics, Wick Communications. Partner of internationally recognized media company, Border Media phone: (520) 223-7712 email: bordermedia@gmail.com

Jonathan Miranda

Manuel "Manny" Ruiz

Over 10 years in print and news media development, implemented and over saw a variety of products. Vast knowledge in print, tech and product development. phone: (520) 313-6113 email: borderecho@gmail.com

Celest Lopez - Freelance Writer Karina Castro- Administrative Assistant

Public Relations Luis F. Parra Alma Cecilia Parra

118 W. Ellis St. Suite #5 Nogales, AZ 85621 email: bordermedia@gmail.com Contributors Axel Holm, City of Nogales, Santa Cruz Sheriffs Department, Nogales Police Department, Mariposa Community Health Center, Nogales Unified School District, SCC Superintendent of Schools, Nogales Lions Club, Nogales Rotary Club,

Tony Estrada

Lee Jones

Bruce Bracker

Phil Damon

Liz Gutfahr

Eddie Rosas, Jr. CITY COUNCIL

SCC TREASURER

Caesar A. Ramirez

Joe D. Acosta

CITY COUNCIL

Marcia L. Moreno

Esther Melendez Lopez

Olga Valdez

Election season is upon us which means we’re going to start seeing candidates campaining all around Santa Cruz County. This issue focuses on what seems to be one of the most exciting elections in recent years. We give you important information about the candidates to help you make an informed decision before heading out to the polls. We hope you enjoy!

David Ramirez Matus

Edgardo Muñoz

ISSUE 13 2012 CONTENT

John Maynard

SCC SHERIFF

SUPERVISOR DIST #3

FROM THE EDITOR

FOURTH OF JULY IN SCC

Border Media, LLC. Chief Executive Offi fficcer: David Ramirez Matus Chief Operating Offi fficcer: Edgardo Muñoz Lafuente Board of Directors: Border Innovations

ED 27 ADULT GRADUATION

Statements and opinions expressed in all political advertising and editorial are solely those of the candidates and their affiliates, and may or may not be shared by the staff, management and/or Border Media, LCC. Border Media LCC, will and shall not be held responsible for these and any of these statements and/or opinions. copyright © 2012 Border Media, LLC all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the permission of Border Echo Magazine is prohibited. Any material produced is the property of Border Media, LLC. Any material published is not necessarily the opinion of Border Media, LCC and will not be held resposible. Border Echo Magazine accepts material from advertisers, clients, readers and various sources which are not necessarily the opinion of Border Echo Magazine in print or on Border Media Websites and will not be held responsible.

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2012 Border Echo

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PRIMARY ELECTION AUGUST 28, 2012 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS REQUEST FOR PERMANENT EARLY VOTING AVAILABLE PLEASE CONTACT THE RECORDER’S OFFICE FOR INFORMATION

ELECCION PRIMARIA 28 DE AGOSTO DEL 2012 ORDEN DE EVENTOS SOLICITUD PARA REGISTRO PERMANENTE DE VOTO ANTICIPADO DISPONIBLE PARA MAS INFORMACION FAVOR DE COMUNICARSE CON LA OFICINA DEL REGISTRO PÚBLICO

Tuesday- May 29, 2012 through Friday- August 17, 2012: Request for Early Ballots Accepted Request may be made in writing or verbally by contacting the Recorder’s Office at (520) 375-7990.

Martes, 29 de Mayo del 2012 a Viernes, 17 de Agosto del 2012: Se aceptaran solicitudes para votar anticipado.

Monday- July 30, 2012: Voter Registration Deadline To register to vote, please go to the Santa Cruz County Recorder’s Office or call to request a voter registration form. You may also register to vote online at: servicearizona.com. or co.santa-cruz.az.us/recorder. For qualifications, please visit our website or contact the Recorders office.

Las solicitudes deberán ser por escrito o verbales llamando a la Oficina del Registro Publico al (520) 375-7990.

Thursday- August 02, 2012 through Friday- August 24, 2012: Early Voting Available Santa Cruz County Recorder, 2150 N. Congress Dr., Suite 101, Nogales, Arizona (Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Friday, August 24, 2012 8 a.m.–5 p.m.) Early Ballots may be delivered to the Recorder’s Office and any polling place until 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. Monday- July 30, 2012:

Voter Registration Deadline

Friday- August 17, 2012:

Deadline to Request an Early Ballot by Mail

Friday- August 24, 2012:

Last day for Early Voting at the Recorder’s Office

Tuesday- August 28, 2012:

ELECTION DAY

Lunes, 30 de Julio del 2012: Último día para registrarse para votar. Para registrarse para votar favor de pasar a la Oficina del Registro Público o llamar para pedir la forma de registro de votante. Puede también registrarse por medio de internet a: servicearizona.com o co.santa-cruz.az.us/recorder. Para requisitos, por favor visite nuestro sitio web o comunicarse a la Oficina del Registro Público.

Jueves, 02 de Agosto del 2012 hasta el Viernes, 24 de Agosto del 2012: Votación anticipada estará disponible. Oficina del Registro Publico, 2150 N. Congress Dr., Suite 101, Nogales, Arizona (el lunes a jueves, 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. y viernes 24 de Agosto del 2012 de 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.) Votos anticipados pueden entregarse en la Oficina del Registro Público o en alguna de las casillas de votación hasta las 7:00 p.m. el día de la Elección.

Lunes, 30 de Julio del 2012: Viernes, 17 de Agosto del 2012: Viernes, 24 de Agosto del 2012: Martes, 28 de Agosto del 2012:

ASSISTANCE TO VOTERS: If You Are Disabled or Ill, You May Request the Special Election Board by Contacting Our Office MILITARY /U.S. CITIZENS LIVING OUTSIDE UNITED STATES: Information Available Online/Mail/Fax. Please Contact the Recorder’s Office for More Information

Último día para registrarse para votar Último día para pedir votación anticipada por correo Último día para votar por anticipado en la Oficina del Registro Público DIA DE LA ELECCION

ASSISTENCIA PARA VOTANTES: Si Usted Está Enfermo(a) o Incapacitado, Puede Solicitar al Consejo Electoral Llamando a la Oficina Del Registro Público. MILITAR Y VOTANTE DE ULTRAMAR: Información disponible en el Internet/Correspondencia/Fax. Por favor contacte a la Oficina del Registro Publico para mas información.

CUT AND SEND TO THE ADDRESS SPECIFIED BELOW

PERMANENT EARLY VOTING LIST REQUEST Check here if you wish to be included on the Permanent Early Voting List in order to automatically receive an early ballot by mail without having to request each time for each election. REGISTRATION UPDATE SECTION NAME: DATE OF BIRTH: RESIDENCE ADDRESS: MAILING ADDRESS: SIGN HERE: I swear or affirm under penalty of perjury that the above information is true and correct.

If you elect to be on the Permanent Early Voting List, please return completed request to: Santa Cruz County Recorder / 2150 N Congress Drive / Nogales, Arizona 85621 / (520) 375-7990

SUZANNE “SUZIE” SAINZ

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY RECORDER 2150 N. Congress Dr., Nogales, Arizona 85621/(520) 375-7990


In print, online or on the go, Border Eco keeps you connected to what’s happening in your community

THE IMPORTANCE OF VOTING IN THIS ELECTION

www.bordereco.com 118 West Elis Street, Nogales, AZ 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030

BY SUZANNE “SUZIE” SAINZ

The primary election is coming upon us very soon. August 28, 2012, is the date of the Primary Election. Some voters might think that the Primary Election is not as important as the General Election but it is because that is when a voter elects the candidate they want to represent their party or their choice. That is why it is important for all registered voters to exercise their voting privilege. Many people think their vote won’t count. As President Franklin Roosevelt once said, “Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the right to vote except the American people themselves and the only way they could do this is by not voting.” There isn’t any reason why we shouldn’t vote. Many times I hear voters say they are busy at work, can’t take the time off, or they did not hear about the election. That is why we have early voting for the convenience of the voter. The voter can come in to the recorder’s office to vote before the primary election, beginning Thursday, August 2,

2012 through Friday, August 24, 2012. Two other options are to make a request to have a ballot mailed to you for a single election and the other is the Permanent Early Voter List (PEVL) which entitles you to automatically receive an early ballot by mail for all the elections that you are eligible to participate. It sends a red flag to the voter that they are eligible to vote in the upcoming election. So vote your official

ballot and return it by mail (postage paid) or you may drop it off at the recorder’s office up to the day of the election or at any polling place on Election Day by 7:00 p.m. When you vote you feel a sense of involvement and responsibility toward your community. Especially, to find that the candidate or the issues at hand that you voted for has won. You feel it rewarding that you participated. We can make a difference by voting, it’s in our hands. “To make democracy work, we must be a nation of participants, not simply observers. One who does not vote has no right to complain.”---- Louis L'Amour (American writer, best-selling author, 1908-1988) It’s important to want to vote. It can also be instilled in you that it is your responsibility to vote. Like the old cliché goes-“it starts at home”. I remember my father taking me with him to go vote. And, when my sisters and I lived in Tempe in the 1970’s, my mother always reminded us when there was an upcoming election and we

HERE ARE THE ESTIMATES OF HOW MANY OF OUR AGE GROUP OF REGISTERED VOTERS VOTED IN THE 2008 PRIMARY & GENERAL ELECTION: AGE 18 YRS 19 – 25 YRS 26 - 35 YRS 36 – 50 YRS 51 – 65 YRS 66 – 75 YRS 76 – 100 YRS

08 PRIMARY ELECTION 14 158 324 1,051 1,896 1,128 639

08 GENERAL ELECTION 130 688 1,145 1,051 2,518 989 684

VOTING IS OUR FREEDOM TO CHOOSE. DON’T LET OTHERS CHOOSE FOR US. THIS IS THE IMPORTANCE OF VOTING.

would receive and vote our official ballot by mail. I am grateful that my parents instilled in us the importance of voting. Educate yourselves about the issues that will be on the ballot. Contact the Elections Department or the Recorder’s Office for information. Attend candidate’s forums and listen to the candidates platform and their experience. Read your sample ballot that give you an explanation of the referendums or issues that will be on the ballot. Read it and vote on your sample ballot. Use your sample ballot as your “personal” ballot. Take it with you if you planfacebook.com/bordereco to vote at an early voting site or at the polling place and just copy how you Twitter.com/bordereco voted on your sample ballot unto the “official ballot”. InWest Santa CountyAZwe have 118 Elis Cruz Street, Nogales, 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030 23,304 registered voters but we usually have a low voter turnout. We can change these statistics if we would vote. What I find amazing is that most of the elderly voters always make sure they vote.

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118 West Elis Street, Nogales, AZ 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030

118 West Elis Street, Nogales, AZ 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030

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2743 N. Grand Avenue Nogales, AZ 85621

Like Insurance us Providing and Financial Services Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 FollowMusSANCHEZ-LEY, Agent DANIELLE 230 W Mariposa Road Suite C20 Nogales, AZ 85621-1023 facebook.com/bordereco dani.sanchez-ley.st2i@statefarm.com Twitter.com/bordereco 118 West Elis Street, Nogales, AZ 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030

Phone: (520) 281-9759 www.bordereco.com Mobile: (520) 841-1648 Fax: (520) 761-3818

2012 Border Echo

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2012 SANTA CRUZ COUNTY POLLING PLACES FOLLOWING ARE THE POLLING PLACES FOR THE 2012 ELECTIONS: We are here to serve you.

“YOU’RE AMONG FRIENDS”

Precinct name/number, Polling Place Location Precinct name: Nogales 1, Mary Welty School 1050 W. Cimarron Street, Nogales Precinct name: Nogales 2, V. F. W. Hall 653 N. Grand Ave., Nogales Precinct name: Nogales 3, Knights of Columbus Hall 727 N. Perkins Ave., Nogales Precinct name: Nogales 4, Knights of Columbus Hall 727 N. Perkins Ave., Nogales Precinct name: Coronado 5, St. Andrew's Church Hall 969 W.Country Club Dr., Nogales Precinct name: Elgin 6, Elgin Community Hall 475 Elgin Road, Elgin Precinct name: Rio Rico 7, Christus Rex Lutheran Church 282 Rio Rico Drive, Rio Rico Precinct name: Nogales 8, Challenger School Challenger School Precinct name: Nogales 9, Abundant Life - Assembly of God Church Abundant Life - Assembly of God Church Precinct name: Nogales 10, Mi Casa RV Park 2901 N. Grand Avenue, Nogales Precinct name: Tubac 11, Santa Cruz County North Facility 50 Bridge Road, Tubac Precinct name/number, Polling Place Location Precinct name: Nogales 2, V. F. W. Hall 653 N. Grand Ave., Nogales Precinct name: Santa Cruz 13, Nogales Suburban Fire Station A 558 Highway 82, Nogales Precinct name: Patagonia 14, Cady Hall 346 Duquesne Ave., Patagonia Precinct name: Sonoita 15, Sonoita Firehouse Hwy 82/Hwy 83, Sonoita Precinct name: Nogales 16, Wade Carpenter School 595 W. Kino Street, Nogales Precinct name: Calabasas 17, Rio Rico Fire Station 957 Calle Calabasas, Rio Rico Precinct name: Nogales 18, Abundant Life - Assembly of God Church 1380 E. Patagonia Hwy., Nogales Precinct name: Baca 19, Coatimundi Middle School 490 Avenida Coatimundi, Rio Rico Precinct name: Nogales 20, V. F. W. Hall 653 N. Grand Ave., Nogales Precinct name: Peck Canyon 21, Tubac-Peck Canyon Fire Station 1360 W. Frontage Rd., Rio Rico Precinct name: Portero 22, Mi Casa RV Park 2901 N. Grand Avenue, Nogales Precinct name: Mountain 23, Cady Hall 346 Duquesne Ave., Patagonia Precinct name: Lake Patagonia 24, Cady Hall 346 Duquesne Ave., Patagonia


2012 SANTA CRUZ COUNTY POSITION DESCRIPTIONS BY CELEST LOPEZ

Assessor: The Assessor is responsible for locating, identifying and appraising all property subject to ad valorem taxes. The full cash value, set by the Assessor, must reflect current market values of the property. The Assessor's Office notifies property owners of values and processes petitions for review of property valuations. A complete and certified assessment roll is prepared by the Assessor and is provided annually to the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. The Assessor also prepares a final valuation report so that taxing jurisdictions can establish budgets and set tax rates. The Assessor's Office is responsible for setting up the new tax area codes and taxing authorities based on annexations, electorate-approved. The Assessor's Office is headed by officials elected by the popular vote of the registered voters in Santa Cruz County for a term of four years. As per the Arizona Revised Statutes, the office operates independently of the Board of Supervisors, although the Board does retain authority over fiscal matters of the office and must approve the yearly budget and expenditures. County Attorney: The county attorney prosecutes all felony and juvenile offenses that occur in county. They provide legal advice to County Board of Supervisors and all county departments. The county attorney represents our school districts within the county. They also provide legal services for mental health, commitments, uncontested adoptions and guardians. Recorder: The Recorder keeps any important documents, records, surveys, and maps. They assign registration records to the proper place in which prepares the voter list for candidates and political parties. The recorder also prepares voter rosters for voting polls. Sheriff: The sheriff’s duty is to protect and serve our residents of Santa Cruz County. The sheriff provides a safe environment through vigilance, crime prevention programs, and partnerships with other law enforcement agencies. Treasurer: The Treasurer administrates and controls the money and securities. They are the tax administrators and they supervise the county bank

accounts. They also manage debt and the registration of warrents. Superior Court Judge (Division 2): The superior court judge does many different things. They do things such as reading documents on pleading and motions to a certain issue. They advise attorneys, juries, litigants, and court personnel about conduct, issues, and proceedings. Councilmen: The councilmen represent the district of the city. Some of their duties involve in determining city government and administration policies. They adopt budgets and legislation and also discuss city business. They meet on a regular basis and make decisions on administration policy and issues. County Supervisor: The Board of Supervisors is the governing body of Santa Cruz County. Their duties, by state law, are both legislative and executive. They are responsible for the overall management of the County government operations. All department budgets, whether directed by an elected or appointed official, are set by the Board. A tax rate for all taxing entities in our County is set by and adopted by the Board of Supervisors. All purchases and sales of county property, construction of county facilities, awards of bids for services and supplies and the appointments of all county personnel are but a few duties that fall within the responsibility of the Board of Supervisors. The three Board members are elected to a four-year term by the electors of their respective supervisory districts. The current Board of Supervisors maintains an open office policy and encourages public comment, suggestions, inquiries and attendance at all Board meetings. The Clerk of the Board takes minutes of all Board meetings. The Board of Supervisors must take all official actions during an open public meeting after being properly noticed on the agenda for the Board of Supervisors action. They hold regular Board meetings every Wednesday at 9:30 am unless otherwise posted. The agenda for each meeting is posted on the bulletin board at the Santa Cruz County Complex, located at 2150 N. Congress Drive.

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IS IT IMPORTANT FOR YOUTHS TO VOTE? BY CELEST LOPEZ

From a general youth’s view, we see it as unimportant for 18 year olds to vote. “I don’t think it’s important for young people to vote because people only care for mature audiences, not what the kids think,” says Ricky Mejia, a 16-year-old student. We tend to think that nobody will listen to our opinions because we’re young and seem to not care about political affairs. It’s important to see that youth’s votes do count and they do matter. Young adults are the future of the world and getting involved with the community that you live in can change the world, not just your city or town. Youths can change who wins what positions in politics, therefore changing the whole way the city or country is being managed. 17-year-old Claudia Felton says it’s important for youths to vote because

“It can affect their life. If we don’t like something that the government is doing, we need to change it so we won’t complain about it later. ” Claudia Felton will be 18 by the time to voting comes around and she plans to vote this year. Young adults are known for

being very opinionated. This can actually be seen as a very good thing. The more opinions, the more views, the more thinking our people have to do. I think that it’s very important to see young people vote. I see it as changing our world a little bit at a time. One step is all you need to start to change the way society can see us as politically engaged. “Yes, I believe it is important for youth to vote because we are the future of America and we should have a say in what is happening,” says former Company Commander of the JROTC program of Rio Rico High School, Erick Quijada. Most of the time it’s often seen as a hard process to be able to vote. It’s actually a lot simpler than you think. All you have to do is register to vote and drive to the polling place to go cast your vote. It’s as simple as that. As a 16-year-old girl, I can see the way our society changes and the

way society thinks about youths voting. Most of the time the subject isn’t even mentioned because more than likely it’s not a supported matter. I feel strongly about youths voting because what we do affects our future completely. It’s a great gift to be able to vote when you’re 18 because in other countries youths are fighting and even dying for this right. I feel that we tend to take this gift for granted when we shouldn’t. All in all it’s very important for youths to vote. As they say, “the children are our future” and no doubt that our future has to care about the political affairs because a democracy wouldn’t work without the people, mainly the youth, being involved. Care about your country and vote for the future. (Editor’s Note: Lopez is a Nogales High School student and an intern writer at Border Eco Magazine.)


AZ TAX CREDIT: GIVING CHOICE BY SR. BARBARA L. MONSEGUR, CFMM, PH.D.

For most American families choosing where their children will attend school is determined by searching for residential locations with access to good public schools. “But, poor and minority families in inner cities and rural areas do not have such choices, despite their desire for a good education for their children” (Scott, 2005, p. vii). Is school choice the answer for these families? Today’s public policy alternatives that provide school choice options can be traced back to 1955 and 1962, when Nobel Laureate economists Milton Friedman, proposed universal choice through vouchers, so that competition would invigorate the delivery of K-12 education services (Merrifield, 2001, p. 4). In 1990, school choice took a substantial step forward with the creation of the first publicly financed urban school choice program with the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program ("Alliance for School Choice", 2007). Since then opportunities have expanded, with parents now able to select from a range of public and private school choice options. One of the policy alternatives for public school choice plans in Nogales is Charter Schools. These schools receive a specified sum of funding for each student from their local school district or state. They are released from compliance with many local and state regulations,

provided that they adhere to their declared charter (Levin, 2002, p. 159). Public policy alternatives also provide school choice plans that allow students to attend private church-related and non-church-related schools. One type of school choice plan currently in place in Arizona is tax credits. Tax credit contributions are private and voluntary, similar to federal deduction for charitable giving (Lips, 2001). State tax credit programs provide an option for parents of low-income public school students to choose where their children are educated. Often these students are from “poor-performing” school districts. The program in Arizona is a scholarship tax credit. Through this program taxdeductible contributions are collected from individuals and/or corporations, the revenues of which fund scholarship-granting organizations. These organizations then award scholarships to children to cover the cost of private school tuition. Two such organizations in Arizona are the School Tuition Organization (STO), and the Catholic Tuition Support Organization (CTSO). Typically laws require that eligible families meet certain income criteria as well as guidelines established by individual grant giving organizations. Florida, Pennsylvania and Arizona all have this type of tax credit program in place. An area of concern over the advantages and disadvantage of school choice policy alternatives has to do with the fiscal impact of such

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policy. This area has actually become one of the most important political issues in the school choice debate. A recent study (Aud, 2007) that looked at 18 voucher and taxcredit scholarship programs across the country found that together, these programs had saved state and federal governments a total of about $444 million from 1990 to 2006 (p. 5). Arizona was one of the tax-credit scholarship programs in the study. Currently, private elementary and middle schools in Arizona have tuition rates that are about half the average public school per-pupil expenditure of $7,816 (Murray & Groen, 2005, p. 3). By freeing up educational funds from state budgets, students within both the private and public school systems benefit. For more information on Tax Credits go to www.lcsnogales.org or call (520) 287-5659, ext. 2227.

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Has anyone ever seen an overweight centenarian? When it comes to living longer and healthier skinny wins. According to some nutritionists, the best food we can eat has its MOLECULAR STRUCTURE intact. In English, that means food that hasn't been heated above 105°. So we’re talking about RAW food. According to raw food researchers, the day Prometheus gave mankind fire, the human race began a downward spiral into disease and a shortened life span. Cooking food destroys the life force and enzymes. Cooking alters or destroys vitamins and minerals necessary for health and longevity. Eat as many RAW nuts as you please, and you won't gain weight. Roast those same nuts, and you'll pack on the pounds. The simple act of cooking food alters its molecular composition. It becomes UNNATURAL. Our bodies then treat this altered food like a toxic, a foreign substance. Notice how sleepy and tired you feel after eating a large cooked a meal. A simple blood test would show an elevated white cell count. This is usually a signal that the body is fighting off infection. In this case, it’s not infection but stress placed on our digestive tract. The natural enzymes are destroyed by cooking and the food becomes indigestible. To digest the meal, enzymes are mobilized from other parts of the body, causing a partial shutdown in those areas. You feel sleepy, tired, like you were fighting off the flu. These same symptoms do not occur with raw food. All life is dependent on that thin layer of soil that covers the earth. Without plants, human- kind ceases to exist. Everything we eat originates from the soil. The hamburger you just ate was grazing in a pasture just a few weeks ago. There is growing agreement that

as we eat more and more cooked, processed foods, we are becoming sicker and sicker as a nation. There are medical clinics around the world that treat terminally ill patients with a raw food diet. Many of these terminal patients experience amazing recoveries. Dr. Gabriel Cousens’ remarkable book, “Conscious Eating”, is a revelation on the subject and a highly recommended read for those interested in maximizing health and longevity. He recommends a diet consisting of 80% RAW food. His rejuvenation Center, The Tree of Life, located just around the corner in Patagonia, serves fresh picked, organic, world-class raw food in its dining room. People travel there from around the world to regain health from”incurable” conditions. Another recommended read is David Wolfe's “Nature’s First Law: The Raw Food Diet.” Wolfe gives examples of sick children restored to health within a couple of weeks simply by being placed on a diet of FRESH MADE fruit juice. Fresh made. Not out of a bottle or can! I myself enjoy the Food Network. I love watching chefs prepare unusual dishes. I've come to realize however it's not so much the food that interests me, it's the flavor. Commercially grown fruits and vegetables have no flavor. To me, they taste like Styrofoam. Try an organic apple or pear. The taste will amaze you. I started my transition years ago by changing my breakfast routine. I make a smoothie from nuts, seeds, organic fruits, some honey. My first meal of the day is 100% raw. Lunch, most days is a piece of organic fruit and a handful of raw nuts. Now that's what I call “fast food.” Dinner always includes a raw veggie salad, but being Italian, I'm still 20% addicted to pasta and other ethnic delights. Read the books. Make some changes. You'll experience energy you never thought possible and, just maybe, a body that doesn’t “complain” as much. Stay well, Dr. Bill Ardito – Sunshine Dentistry AZ For information please visit 855 W. Bell Road, Suite 600, Nogales, AZ or call (520) 761-1600 or visit online at www.SunshineDentistryAZ.com


OBAMA EVENT HELD

FUNDRAISER FOR CONGRESSMAN GRIJALVA

PHOTOS | DANIEL PADILLA

Supporters for President Obama hosted an event that was held at Casa Mia Restuarant to support and raise funds for President Obama’s re-election campaign.

Services Provided:

PHOTOS | EDGARDO MUNOZ

A fundraiser event for Congressman Grijalva was held on June 14, 2012 at the Parra Law Offices in Downtown Nogales. The event featured was catered by Nonna Vivi Pizzeria and included music and entertainment. The event featured speeches from local community leaders and concluded with a special address to the public from Congressman Grijalva. The event was organized by Luis Fernando Parra, Cecilia Parra, Linda Rushton, Eduardo Robinson, Rudy Molera, Gaston &Claudia Bachelier, Ed Delci, Jorge Sanchez, Joe Diaz, David Ramirez Matus and Edgardo Munoz.

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In print, online or on the go, Border Eco keeps you connected to what’s happening in your community

www.bordereco.com 118 West Elis Street, Nogales, AZ 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030

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(520) 281-2387 / 1780 N Mastick Way Suite F / Nogales, AZ 85621-1013 www.lawyerstitlearizona.com / aramirez@ltic.com

facebook.com/bordereco 2012 Border Echo 11 Twitter.com/bordereco 118 West Elis Street, Nogales, AZ 85621 Office: (520) 223-8030


2012 ELECTIONS

SCC ASSESSOR

G. ALFONSO OCHOA G. Alfonso Ochoa is in the running for Santa Cruz County Assessor. He is a native of Nogales, Arizona and a graduate of Nogales High School. Ochoa holds a degree from Glendale and Phoenix Community College for Construction Technology and Architectural Engineering. He also has earned a diploma in Architectural Drafting and Design from the Arizona Automotive/Drafting Institute. Ochoa owns and operates his own real estate tax and environmental consulting company for the past twelve years. Along with managing his own business, he is also the general manager of AC’s Truck Stop. Ochoa has been employed at the Maricopa’s County Assessor’s office for 17 and a half years as a litigation appraiser. Ochoa is a member of Rio Rico’s Rotary and Nogales’ Elk’s Lodge. He has been volunteering at Red Cross South Arizona Chapter in SCC since 2006 and is also a part of the Community Emergency Response team. He has a vast experience working with the public on property characteristics, value, ownership, legal descriptions, exemption practices and environmental properties. If elected for Assessor, he will assure fair rights and equitable values to property owners in SCC, accurately place all new construction on the roll in a timely manner and keep property owners informed.

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2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SHERIFF

ANTONIO ‘TONY’ ESTRADA ntonio “Tony” Estrada is in the running for reelection for Santa Cruz County Sheriff. He Acurrently holds the position and has provided 19 years of service as sheriff to the county. He has more than 40 years of law enforcement experience within Santa Cruz County. Estrada has a proven record of integrity and commitment and is dedicated to all the residents of Santa Cruz County. He is an active participant in numerous civic and community organizations. Organizations, clubs and agencies throughout the state seek his participation and support. For more information please visit www.tonyestradaforsheriff.us or at www.facebook.com/re-electsherifftonyestrada

40 years of law enforcement experience within Santa Cruz County. Estrada has a proven record of integrity and commitment and is dedicated to all the residents of Santa Cruz County

DON’T GAMBLE WITH PUBLIC SAFETY

Re-elect

SHERIFF The Right Choice! DEMOCRAT P A I D

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Santa Cruz County Adult Education

Fall courses will start August 1st

S E R V I C E S AVA I L A B L E

EARN YOUR G.E.D. OR LEARN ENGLISH, AT N O C O S T T O Y O U !

G E D CL AS S S CHE DUL E 8am-10am

4pm-6pm

Santa Cruz County Adult Education is

Santa Cruz County Adult Education

10am-12pm

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now enrolling for all GED and English

tiene inscripciones abiertas para cla-

classes! Call today to find out how you

ses de GED e Inglés! ¡Llame hoy para

can take GED Test Prep Classes

informarse!

HO RA RI O S de CL AS SE S d e I NG LÉ S 8am-10am

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English Language Learners Classes at

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no cost to you! We provide educational

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- 4 days a week (Monday - Thursday)

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ñados para ayudar a alcanzar sus me-

is located next to Alexander’s on Morley

tas y planear la siguiente etapa de su

Avenue! Don’t delay, call or stop by

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today!

Nuestra oficina principal está ubicada

O F FI CE I NF O RM A T I O N - 610 N. Morley Ave., Nogales, AZ 85621 - Tel. 520 . 375 . 8025

al lado de Alexander’s en la avenida

- Fax 520 . 281 . 1166

Morley! ¡No se demore, llame o visitenos hoy!

Santa Cruz County

W W W . S A N T A C R U Z O N E S T O P.ORG

Adult Educ ation The Santa Cruz County One-Stop Career Center is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.


2012 ELECTIONS

SCC TREASURER

ELIZABETH "LIZ" GUTFAHR E

lizabeth “Liz” Gutfahr is running for the position of Santa Cruz County Treasurer. Gutfahr was born and raised in Nogales, Arizona and graduated from Nogales High School in 1979. She has worked for Santa Cruz Title Company and Rio Rico Properties, Inc. She has been with Rio Rico Properties for thirty years and currently holds the position of Manager of Land Development and Assistant in Accounting. Gutfahr is very involved with the community. She held a position at the Santa Cruz Valley School District #35 (SCVUSD #35) School Board; she co-founded and is president of the Rio Rico Women’s Association. She currently serves on the Council and building committee for Most Holy Nativity Catholic Church in Rio Rico. Liz's motivation to seek office is that she would like the opportunity in this challenging and important role as County Treasurer to serve the people of Santa Cruz County to the highest standard of her ability. She believes her experience, qualifications, skills, and knowledge from her current job of over thirty years gives her an excellent opportunity to lead this office and meet the responsibilities of County Treasurer.

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Liz is honest and a dedicated leader who will commit to work very hard to implement improvements in the Treasurer's Office. She will focus on efficiency, effectiveness, and take the job serious


THE ORIGINS OF THE REPUBLICANS’ ELEPHANT AND DEMOCRATS’ DONKEY CONTRIBUTED

Just in case you were wondering – From From William Safire’s New Language of Politics, Revised edition, Collier Books, New York, 1972, via freerepublic.com: The symbol of the party (the elephant) was born in the imagination of cartoonist Thomas Nast and first appeared in Harper’s Weekly on November 7, 1874 An 1860 issue of Railsplitter and an 1872 cartoon in Harper’s Weekly connected elephants with Republicans, but it was Nast who provided the party with its symbol. Oddly, two unconnected events led to the birth of the Republican Elephant. James Gordon

Bennett’s New York Herald raised the cry of “Caesarism” in connection with the possibility of a thirdterm try for President Ulysses S. Grant. The issue was taken up by the Democratic politicians in 1874, halfway through Grant’s second term and just before the midterm elections, and helped disaffect Republican voters. While the illustrated journals were depicting Grant wearing a crown, the Herald involved itself in another circulation-builder in an entirely different, nonpolitical area. This was the Central Park Menagerie Scare of 1874, a delightful hoax perpetrated by the Herald. They ran a story, totally untrue, that the animals in the zoo had broken loose and were roam-

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ing the wilds of New York’s Central Park in search of prey. Cartoonist Thomas Nast took the two examples of the Herald enterprise and put them together in a cartoon for Harper’s Weekly. He showed an ass (symbolizing the Herald) wearing a lion’s skin (the scary prospect of Caesarism) frightening away the animals in the forest (Central Park). The caption quoted a familiar fable: “An ass having put on a lion’s skin roamed about in the forest and amused himself by frightening all the foolish animals he met within his wanderings.” One of the foolish animals in the cartoon was an elephant, representing the Republican vote – not the party, the Republican vote –

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which was being frightened away from its normal ties by the phony scare of Caesarism. In a subsequent cartoon on November 21, 1874, after the election in which the Republicans did badly, Nast followed up the idea by showing the elephant in a trap, illustrating the way the Republican vote had been decoyed from its normal allegiance. Other cartoonists picked up the symbol, and the elephant soon ceased to be the vote and became the party itself: the jackass, now referred to as the donkey, made a natural transition from representing the Herald to representing the Democratic party that had frightened the elephant.


2012 ELECTIONS

SCC ASSESSOR

FELIPE A.

FUENTES, JR F

elipe A. Fuentes, Jr. is running for re-election for the position of Santa County Assessor. He

held the position for the past fourteen years and has been a public servant of Santa Cruz

County for the past thirty-two years. Fuentes’ education ranges from Architectural Drafting

and Design, Real Estate Appraiser and Public Policy and Management. Fuentes is a native of Nogales and even though he has had the opportunity to reside and work in other places, he has never considered anyplace other than Nogales his home. Fuentes is a member of the Nogales Lions Club, volunteers his time and animals to the Promotoras de Salud for public events, volunteers as a basketball coach for youth in the Nogales and Rio Rico areas and is a sponsor for various charities and organizations in the community. Felipe A. Fuentes is running for re-election because he believes that working with honesty, dedication and fairness is what politicians are gladly to disburse and he’d be honored and proud to continue serving his hometown community.

Fuentes is running for re-election because he believes that working with honesty, dedication and fairness is what politicians are gladly to disburse and he’d be honored and proud to continue serving his hometown community

Support Your Local Candidate!

t c e l e e R

Felipe

FUENTES Jr. “We, the Assessor’s Office and I will continue working for you with Honesty, Dedication and Fairness”

Santa Cruz County Assessor

Your best choice on Tuesday, August 28, 2012

• Currently serving as Santa Cruz County Assessor since 1998 • Named President for the Association of Assessing Officers of the State of Arizona • Named Secretary / Treasurer for the Association of Assessing Officers of the State of Arizona • Employed by the Santa Cruz County Assessors Office for 32 years; 14 years SCC Assessor 18 years as Certified Appraiser; (6 years as Chief Appraiser; 3 years as Chief Deputy Assessor)

“32 years experience working for the community” • Certified in Public Policy and Management from the University of Arizona in 2002 • Served as Planning & Zoning Director / Building Official for the City of Nogales • Certified by (IAAO) International Association of Assessing Officers since 1980 • Certified as Real Estate Appraiser by the Arizona Department of Revenue since 1980 • Member of the Arizona Department of Revenue for the New Replacement Cost Manual • Certified Mobile Home Appraiser; Land Appraiser; Residential Appraiser, Commercial Property • Appraiser by the Department of Revenue • Certified by (AAI) Arizona Automotive Institution by the Architectural Drafting Division in 1979

PAID FOR BY THE COMMITTEE TO RE-ELECT FELIPE FUENTES JR. FOR SANTA CRUZ COUNTY ASSESOR

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DIFFERENCES BETWEEN REPUBLICANS & DEMOCRATS CONTRIBUTED Core Beliefs Republicans believe that each person is responsible for his or her own place in society. Government should enable each person the ability to secure the benefits of society for themselves, their families and for those who are unable to care for themselves. The Republican philosophy is based on limiting the intervention of government as a catalyst of individual prosperity. Government should only intervene in specific cases where society cannot effectively act at the individual level. With the core belief that individual destiny should be in the individual’s hands, governmental power and resources should be kept close to the people, through their state and community leaders, and not centralized in distant federal government agencies. Democrats believe it is the responsibility of government to care for all individuals, even if it means giving up some individual rights and/or subordinating enterprise and initiative. Democrat Party administrations have pushed for the centralization of power in Washington D.C., with only secondary con-

sideration for the rights of both individuals and communities. Democrats have favored federal-level interventions that replace community-based solutions to community problems. These tactics have created several federal regulations and controls that are often in the hands of unelected bureaucrats, causing a severe erosion of local authority. The Economy Republicans believe free enterprise has brought economic growth and innovations that have made this country great. Government should help stimulate a business environment where people are free to use their talents. Democrats believe that the economy is too complicated for individuals to navigate alone. They believe that business decisions should be guided by government officials and in the best interest of labor unions. Taxes and Government Spending Republicans work tirelessly to cut government spending and to eliminate government waste. Republicans believe individuals should control both their own and their government’s pocketbook – the people should authorize all tax increases.

Democrats believe that government knows what is best for individuals. They argue that federal bureaucrats better understand the needs of a community than a locally elected council and the federal government should define the tax burden necessary to meet its obligations, because this is too complicated for individuals to understand. National Defense Republicans believe in a strong national defense. Republicans know that defending our nation against its enemies must be a fundamental commitment of the federal government and this requires the besttrained, best-equipped and most effective military in the world. With America as the world’s only superpower, Republicans believe that true security comes from the strength of character to act collaboratively, when possible, and alone when necessary. After the tragedy of 9-11, America must be ready to fight terrorism abroad in order to prevent it at home. In the past 10 years, Democrats have advocated for scaling down our military and reducing the money spent on military intelligence. Democrats be-

lieve that true security comes from negotiations with foreign nations, even if they harbor or have financial ties to terrorist groups. Democrats believe that we must ask other nations for permission before we act to protect our own security. Education Republicans believe all students, regardless of race or socio-economic background, should become proficient in both reading and math. While it is desirable that children learn more than one language, mastery of the English language will allow our children to be competitive at the university level. Republicans also believe that schools should be held accountable for student progress through testing, which can be used to identify individual childrens’ needs. These reports, at both the student and school level, should be provided to the parents to ensure accountability. Democrats believe that tests burden teachers and waste classroom instruction time. They also believe children should be forced to stay in schools that fail to teach the basic skills. Democrats argue that literacy should be left for unions to define rather than local PTAs or other parent groups.


2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SUPERVISOR #1

MANUEL ‘MANNY’ RUIZ Manuel “Manny” Ruiz, 56, is a lifelong member of the community along with his loving wife and two children. He has succeeded in his education and has numerous occupational experiences. Ruiz has received various awards and has been recognized for many achievements and continues to be involved with his community. Ruiz has also had a great deal of technical training and is bilingual and biliterate. Ruiz is a graduate of Nogales High School (NHS). After his attendance at NHS, he then proceeded to attend the University of Arizona. In 2006, Ruiz received an associate’s degree from Cochise College. In 2008,

he furthered his education by attending Arizona State University and earned his Certified Public Manager Certificate. In 2009 he attended the County leadership Institute along with other elected officials throughout the country. As part of his continuing education, Ruiz has received numerous technical training which includes instruction in safety training and handling hazardous materials. In November of 1992, Ruiz attained his First Responder Operation Certificate. Along with his education, he has distinctive professional experiences. Ruiz is currently the Manager of United Church Village, a retire-

ment community for very low income elderly citizens. He was previously self-employed in the construction field from 1995 to 1998 and from 1993 to 1995 he served as the Public Works Director of the City of Nogales, as well as the safety director and coordinator for the Americans with Disabilities Act. Ruiz is a man that likes to be involved with his community. In 2001, he was elected to the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors District 1 which is the position he currently holds and is seeking to be re-elected. From 1991-2009 he served as member of the Nogales Unified School District No.1 Gov-

erning Board. Ruiz served as President of the Arizona’s School Board Association and as a chairman of the Pacific Region for the National School Boards Association. If re-elected, Ruiz will continue the outstanding work he has done for his many years of service to the community of Santa Cruz County and the residents of District No.1.

On August 28 Don’t forget to VOTE and RE-ELECT Manuel “Manny” Ruiz Supervisor District No. 1

Manuel

” y n n a M “ Ruiz On August 28, 2012 I ask for your continued support in serving our community as Santa Cruz County Supervisor District 1.

Thank you in advance for your vote and support. PAID BY THE COMMITTEE TO REELECT MANUEL “MANNY” RUIZ FOR SUPERVISOR DISTRICT #1

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As an individual, Molera has devoted countless hours to helping out SCC youth programs, organized neighborhood clean-ups and revived the Chula Vista Wash Project

2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SUPERVISOR #2

RUDY ‘BUGS’

MOLERA udy “Bugs” Molera is currently one of the three supervisors for the Santa RCruz Country Board of Supervisors and is in running for re-election for Supervisor of District #2. Molera was born and raised in Nogales, Arizona and lives in lives in Rio Rico. As an individual, Molera has devoted countless hours to helping out Santa Cruz County youth programs, organized neighborhood clean-ups, revived the Chula Vista Wash Project and voiced an opposition to the Liberty Water rate increase for Rio Rico residents. Molera is also the chairman of the Southern Arizona Resource Advisory Committee, and vice-chairman of the Southeastern Arizona Government Organization. As part of the board, Molera has helped complete the $58 million Sheriff’s Detention and Courts Facilities under budget and ahead of schedule. He’s also secured loans for two flood control projects. Molera has helped save the county around three million dollars and reduce property taxes 6% over the last four years.

Rudy “BUGS” R eElect

SUPERVISOR DISTRICT 2 P A I D

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2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SHERIFF

EDDIE ROSAS Eddie Rosas is running for the position of Santa Cruz County Sheriff. He was born and raised in Santa Cruz County and has thirty years of experience working in law enforcement and as a security specialist. He has served as a police officer, detective, sergeant, lieutenant and an agent. Rosas even served as the Nogales Police Department Chief of Police between 1992 and 1993. If Eddie Rosas were to be elected as the Santa Cruz County Sheriff, he would have a lot of goals to fulfill. He wants to create neighborhood watch programs, revitalize department reserve programs and wants to re-establish law enforcement partnerships. Rosas wants to provide new, fresh innovative ideas and wants to help build services and careers.

Rosas wants to create neighborhood watch programs, revitalize department reserve programs and wants to re-establish law enforcement partnerships

EDDIE ROSAS JR 4 SANTA CRUZ COUNTY

SHERIFF VOTE NOVEMBER 6, 2012

TOGETHER WE SHALL MAKE THE CHANGE P A I D

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2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SUPERVISOR #2

HECTOR GERARDO ector Gerardo is running for Santa Cruz County Supervisor. He was born and raised in Nogales, Arizona. He is a graduate of Nogales HHigh School where he played football and track & field. Gerardo attended the University of Arizona where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. He first worked as an assembly engineer with the Hughes Aircraft company in Tucson, Arizona. He was then offered an engineering position by The Chamberlain Group, a maquiladora located in Nogales, AZ.. Gerardo worked with The Chamberlain Group for sixteen years. For fifteen of those sixteen years he held the position of engineering supervisor/manager. In 2006, Gerardo in partnership with two other engineers formed SC3 Engineering, a Rio Rico based small company that offers civil engineering and light construction services. Gerardo is currently the board chair of the Young Audiences in Santa Cruz County, a local non-profit organization that is nationally affiliated. This organization promotes education through the arts and brings many resident artists to the local schools. For the past seven years, Gerardo has volunteered for several positions in the organizing committee for the local American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. Hector Gerardo is committed to work full time as County Supervisor. As a small business owner coupled with his professional experience, he is aware of the importance of establishing sound budgets and prioritizing expenses that make the most impact. He is committed to revitalizing the economy and employment by creating plans for making this community “business friendly”. If you want more information on Hector Gerardo, please email hectorgerardo4supervisor2@hotmail.com

A New Vision For Santa Cruz County ou unty

VOTE

Hector ”Gera”

GERARDO County Supervisor Districtt 2 hectorgerardo4supervisor2@hotmail.com om m P A I D

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2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SUPERVISOR #3

LEE JONES Lee Jones is running for Santa Cruz County Supervisor District #3. Jones was born in Douglas, Arizona in 1963 and was raised with border blood. Jones has lived in Sierra Vista and Phoenix. He attended Cochise College and the University of Arizona. Jones obtained his insurance license at the age of 18, built his own business in 1984 and later moved down to Santa Cruz County. Jones is currently employed at NFP insurance brokers as a commercial insurance executive. He is also the treasurer of the Rio Rico Little League, a member of both the Nogales and Rio Rico Chamber of Commerce, member of the Fresh Produce Association of the Americas and the Rio Rico All Sports Booster Club. There’s no doubt that Lee Montgomery Jones is a concerned businessman and citizen of SCC. He has envisioned a bright future for the citizens of the county. Jones describes his reason for running for Santa Cruz County Supervisor District #3 as helping with the potential growth that Nogales has as a thriving border community. Jones seeks office to improce the standard of living and economic opportunities, for all residents of Santa Cruz County. Emphasis on fiscal accountability and public service. Provide improved recreation and cultural opportunities for county residents.

“The reason why I have been seeking election is because their have been numerous occasions where the county has not handled itself in a business oriented manner, I want to contribute to the solution by bringing my business experience and professionalism to the job.”

Nuestro estado necesita personas con valores como Rosanna Gabaldón, para que nos represente dignamente ante la Cámara de Representantes del Estado. Rosanna Gabaldón fue recientemente Miembro del Consejo de Sahuarita y participa actualmente en organizaciones como: First Things First - South Pima Regional Council, Green Valley Sahuarita Community Food Bank, Friends of the Green Valley Library, Southeast AZ Citizen Advisory Council of the U.S. International Boundary and Water Commission.

Rosanna

www.votegabaldon.com

N

uestro estado de Arizona necesita personas que resuelvan problemas reales que afectan a nuestra comunidad, tales como los actuales desafíos que enfrenta la educación de nuestros hijos y el desaceleramiento económico de nuestro estado.

AGOSTO 28

n ó d l a b Ga Arizona State House

of Representatives

Legislative District 2

Luchando por nuestros valores... • Liderazgo • Experiencia • Sentido Común

Rosanna Gabaldón cuenta con la experiencia, liderazgo, sentido común; pero sobre todo valores humanos y es nuestra mejor opción para este 28 de Agosto.

Unete y vota por Rosanna Gabaldón para Arizona State House of Representatives. P A I D

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Paid for by Elect Gabaldón Committee For State House of Representatives LD2

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2012 ELECTIONS

SCC SUPERVISOR #2

MIGUEL ‘MIKE’ MELENDEZ M ike Melendez is in the running for Santa Cruz Supervisor (District #2). He was born in Nogales, Sonora in 1961 and became a naturalized U.S. Citizen in 1989. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the Instituto Tecnológico de Nogales in 1987. Melendez has been a member of the Rotary Club Nogales South since 1990 and has been appointed president of the club twice. Melendez is an active member of the community and has been for the past 15 years. He’s the owner of Bazar de Mexico, a large retail and wholesale store of Mexican craft and furniture. If Melendez is elected for Supervisor of District #2, he would propose conciliating communication between municipality and county, putting pedestrian sidewalks and public lighting in District #2, completing the Chula Vista Bridge and beautifying District #2. For more information, please visit 491 N. Grand Ave, Nogales Az., 85621 or call (520) 313-5085.

SEXTING AND THE AFTERMATH BY CELEST LOPEZ

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On Thursday, June 28, 2012 the Mexican General Consulate held a meeting about sexting and it’s consequences, which was hosted by Santa Cruz County Attorney George Silva. What is Sexting? Sexting is best defined as the act of sending any type of sexual content through technology. The most common technology used to sext are cell phones. Arizona law states that it is illegal for minors to send, display, or forward any type of sexual content. If you are a minor at the age of 14, the county attorney could choose to file adult charges in adult court. If you are charged as an adult, you could be sentenced to prison for 3 to 12 and a half years. If you are 15 or younger you could be

sentenced to 10 to 24 years. George Silva gave some safety tips for the public: 1. Don’t take pictures that you wouldn’t want everyone to see 2. Don’t forward any sexting content 3. Don’t keep pictures on your phone or any device if you receive them because you could then be guilty of sexting 4. Also, report any suspicion or evidence of sexting, even if you’re not sure if the individual is a minor. Minors are very familiar to these types of offences. It’s important to keep your body safe. Be careful with what you send because once it sends to one person, the whole world can see it through the internet. Privacy is a fading privilege, protect it by protecting what you receive and send through the technology we have today.


PHOTOS | EDGARDO MUNOZ

Despite the rainy weather on the 4th of July, people around Nogales, RIo Rico, Patagonia & Tubac came out to partake in Independence Day celebrations.

FOURTH OF JULY IN SANTA CRUZ COUNTY

2012 Border Echo 25


FREE DENTAL CHECKUPS FOR KIDS AT MARIPOSA BY HEATHER DODGE

The Mariposa Community Health Center is offering free dental checkups for children of Santa Cruz County residents at their Nogales and Rio Rico locations start-

26 Border Echo 2012

ing June 27. The special summer dental program runs until August 3. “The idea is to encourage good dental habits in our community’s children from an early age,” said Dr. John Betz, Director of MCHC Dentistry, “because taking

care of their teeth from the start will help prevent cavities and serious dental problems from happening later on.” The free checkups include complete dental exam, full-mouth X-rays and consultation, along with crayons and a coloring book that teaches kids all about teeth and how to keep them clean and healthy. Children will also receive a free bagful of oral hygiene products to help them continue taking care of their teeth every day. Additionally, to get the word out to the community, Mariposa has placed display racks with free G•U•M Crayola toothbrushes in reception areas of their Nogales campus in the main, Sierra and WIC buildings on N. Mastick Way, in the Rio Rico building on Circulo Mercado, and at the Family Health Center in Patagonia on Taylor Street. Parents are advised to pick

them up while they last and make a free dental appointment for their children soon. “We planned this dental program for the summer, when kids are out of school and moms or other family members can bring them to the dentist,” Dr. Betz explained. “For many, this will be a first time experience. And we want that experience to be positive and happy for all kids, from as young as age one up through age twenty. It’s never too soon or too late to start good dental habits and support them with regular checkups.” Appointments can be made by calling 281-1550. Mariposa’s dental clinics are located at 1852 N. Mastick Way in Nogales and 1103 Circulo Mercado in Rio Rico. Hours at both locations are 7 am – 4:30 pm Monday through Thursday, 7 am – noon Friday and closed for lunch from 1 – 2 pm.


YOUTH ATTEND LEADERSHIP CAMP BY CELEST LOPEZ

Me to We is a summer youth program that was held on June 24th to the 30th. It helps the youth become better leaders. Each camp has a set of leadership facilitators, which are the teachers for the teenagers. They teach them how to publicly speak, become politically engaged and overall, become a better person for their community. This year’s Me to We camp was held in Windsong Ranch, which is only a few minutes away from Patagonia Lake State Park. It gives teenagers a chance to learn about how to make the world a better place by changing the way they’re involved. “The part I really liked was that I got to meet new people, and the facilitators were really nice,” sais Karina Castro, one of this year’s camp members. This year the Santa Cruz County One Stop sponsored students to attend part of this years leadership programming. For more information about the exceptional services available at the One Stop please visit 610 N. Morley Avenue. Nogales, AZ 85621 or call (520) 375-7670.

ONE STOP CAREER FAIR

ADULT EDUCATION GRADUATION BY CELEST LOPEZ

On June 29, 2012 the Santa Cruz County One Stop held their Adult Education Graduation at Kasa Mia Restuarant in Nogales to celebrate the adults who finished their educational courses. Five students received their High School Diploma Equivalence (GED) in this year’s class, while 21 other students are entering a high level of basic education and other 52 students are going into a high English level.

Nogales Chiropractic

& Sports Rehabilitation Center

Monday Friday: 8:30am to 5:30pm

Dr. Yvette D. Braun - Calixtro CERTIFIED CHIROPRACTIC SPORTS PHYSICIAN

• Laser Therapy • Custom orthotic fitting (support shoes) • Auto accidents covered • Work injuries covered

cepted Insurance assignments accepted Family plans New Sports injuries patients are seen Cold laser therapy promptly. ly. Massage therapy Se habla español. (by appointment only) • X-ray on site

• • • • •

1821 N. Mastick Way Ste 1 / Nogales, AZ • 85621

Phone: (520) 281-1300 Fax 281-4185 PHOTO | EDGARDO MUNOZ

The Santa Cruz County One Stop hosted a Career Fair recently to promote employment.

www.nogaleschiropractor.com / nchirocenter@hotmail.com

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HORNE


SHERIFF

Border Eco Issue 13  

Santa Cruz County and City of Nogales number 1 magazine.

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