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FOREWORD by Bushra Ali I still remember the war plane which flew over the horizon in my home town of Menbij1 in July 2012, landing and throwing over the heads of the innocent, awakening everybody, marking the coming of the war. This war forced us to leave Menbij for the nearest safe place. First my brother left Menbij for Europe (Norway), then my family - my father and mother and I - left for Turkey. Turkey was our shelter and our refuge. It was very safe and its people were kindly: we felt we were not so far from our home. But as the months passed, life in Turkey was not so simple as we expected. The first obstacle was Language. The smallest daily needs like how to buy our groceries, how to rent a house, how to continue our studies, how to find a job. My father had been a manager in many factories, but now he became an old man without the Turkish language. In Syria we had studied Arabic, English and French, but not Turkish. In Syria I finished my first year in faculty of education in University, but now in Turkey I would have to start from scratch. Some Turkish people seem to think the presence of Syrians in their country poses a threat to their jobs and study opportunities. This can make them quite aggressive towards us. To a degree they seem to forget why we came here in the first place. Of course not all Turkish people are like that: many are really friendly, helpful and sympathetic. Although the Turkish government requires schools and universities to integrate Syrian students, some teachers, professors and students don't accept it. They sometimes hurt the Syrian students' feelings with their glances which are enough to hurt their hearts. Even if we are refugees, we are still humans. What we refugees need is for people to accept our temporary presence in their country, and to help us to overcome the diďŹƒculties that we face after we came here because of war. I think the media can play a major role to reflect the Syrian misery and to explain to the Turkish people why we are here, and that we are ready to go back to Syria whenever the war ends. I miss my town and its streets. I miss my house and my room. I pray to God to have peace in Syria so we can all go back to our home.

Menbij is a city in the northeast of Aleppo Governorate in northern Syria, 30 kilometers west of the Euphrates. In the 2004 census by the Central Bureau of Statistics, Menbij had a population of nearly 100,000. 1

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Profile for Border_Crossings

THE PROMISED LAND: Intercultural Learning with Refugees and Migrants  

Project e-book for THE PROMISED LAND - a cross-sectoral project funded by the Erasmus + programme of the European Union. The book explores...

THE PROMISED LAND: Intercultural Learning with Refugees and Migrants  

Project e-book for THE PROMISED LAND - a cross-sectoral project funded by the Erasmus + programme of the European Union. The book explores...

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