Page 1

LINDSEYWILHITE

2 1 0 2 O I L O F T R PO


R E T T E L R E V O C


4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812 lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785 April 25, 2012 Renee Burke Adviser Legend yearbook 2000 South Mills Avenue Orlando, FL 32806 Dear Mrs. Burke, My area of interest in the Legend yearbook is an editor position. It is likely that Legend is looking for someone with the capability to contribute and produce with experience and skill in design and writing, along with being a leader, for the Student Life Editor position. If so, please accept my accompanying resume for your review and consideration for the Legend yearbook Student Life Editor position in which these skills will be of value. As the Academics Editor of the yearbook, I successfully accomplished creating designs for the section, wrote and edited stories and guided staff members in my section. With previous experience in design and writing, I am able to put my creativity into the section to increase the reader’s interest. I enjoy making spreads creative and coming up with new ideas through design. After being the Academics Editor I have learned how to better manage time, I have learned design techniques and I have gained experience to apply to the Student Life section. Having gained the knowledge of what it takes to be a section editor, I think I can successfully manage and oversee the Student Life section. The accompanying resume displays my background well, but I would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you and have a personal interview at a convenient time. Thank you for your review of my resume and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Respectfully yours,

Lindsey Wilhite Enclosed: resume


RESUME


4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812 lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785 OBJECTIVE My primary objective is to obtain an editor position, bringing my many talents to work for my employer by creating an excellent section. As well as accepting any and all challenges that may arise. EDUCATION Completed three years at William R. Boone High School. Graduation date: June 2013 Weighted GPA: 3.7 EXPERIENCE/SKILLS Yearbook Staff member, William R. Boone High School • 2011-2012 : Legend yearbook Academics editor: Create layouts for section and oversee and direct staffers from initial to final product. • 2010-2011 Legend yearbook staffer: Experience taking photos; interviewing faculty, staff and students; writing body copy, captions and sidebars and designing layouts • 2009-2010 Journalism 1: Acquired basic journalism and personal skills Volunteer work- Green Up Boone (2011), American Cancer Society Relay for Life team member (2010), assisting Shenandoah Elementary School teachers (2009) RELEVANT HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES 2009-Present Journalism and Yearbook staff: 2009 Journalism 1, 2010 Journalism 2, 2011 Journalism 3 • Literature 3 honors • Technology and web design • AP Psychology HONORS, AWARDS, AND MEMBERSHIPS 2012 National Scholastic Press Association Journalism Honor Roll In recognition of academic excellence by a staff member of an NSPA member publication. Tommy Traughber ttraughber@cfl.rr.com Walter Sulvinski grunt48@cfl.rr.com Cheryl Race cheryl.race@ocps.net

REFERENCES


S D R A C S S E N I S U B


L E G END YE ARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L E G END YE ARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L E G END YE ARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L E G END YE ARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L E G END YE ARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L EGEND YEARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L EGEND YEARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L EGEND YEARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L EGEND YEARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812

L EGEND YEARBOOK Academics editor lindseywilhite@gmail.com (407) 421-1785

4316 Stonewall Drive Orlando, FL 32812


PER

I signed up for the Journalism I class not really knowing what it was. Once I started in the class I instantly loved it. The idea of a team of students putting together such great publications was so fascinating to me. Journalism is a way for me to express myself. I am so grateful to be a part of something that I love so much. Everything about Journalism is fun. I get to meet knew people, be a big part of the school and most importantly, record the schools history. Being a part of something that captures all of the schools greatest moments is so special to me. I have been in journalism for three years now. Three years is a lot of time for mistakes and achievements. I have had to overcome shyness to go on interviews and become friends with peers on staff which is something I am so glad to have yearbook for. I think that I have become more of an outgoing person. I have had to deal with people that I simply do not like. The only times I have not liked a person on staff is because they were not giving their all or working to their full capability. I find it hard to help someone when they aren’t trying their best to begin with. I think that I have shown much hard work and dedication to succeed and get where I am. I stay after school when I need to, take work home with me, get pictures or interviews for others when they can’t, and try to be a good example and leader to others. As an editor I feel I have contributed a lot to staff and the publication. I was a good leader and always helped people when they needed it. I helped create designs and ideas for the inside of the book. I think I did my part overall fairly well although there were some rough spots. I had a little of a hard time managing my time with proofs and also managing my time with my own stories and being an editor. Those were things that I had to experience to learn and I feel I am better and ready for next year. My plans for journalism are to hopefully get Student Life or People section for my senior year. That is my biggest goal regarding Journalism for now. I plan to major in Journalism or Communications in college. I would love to be on a design team for a magazine, or even write for a magazine. Once I get out and experience other things my plans may change, but I know I want to do something in the field of journalism.

SO

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AL TIC LY O N NA AT I F A LU S E L E VA

This year I have learned so much that will be of value for most of my life. I have learned that there will be people working with you that you don’t like and if it is in a job you love you just deal with it. Be their friend anyway and help them when they need it. Everything has to flow right and everyone has to do their part in a team setting. I have learned to do my part and pick up anyone else’s slack or help someone when they need it. Managing time is a key to success. I learned through experience this year that making lists and schedules is necessary to get work done. I learned that with proofs I should make a list of everything first and then do it in the order necessary to make sure it all gets achieved before deadline. I also learned how to better manage time between my deadlines and helping the staffers in my section. I had a rough time with that this year and it really should not have been that difficult. I just need to get everything done at school that can only be done at school and I can do the rest at home. I spent many days staying after school and working late nights at home. I have learned that you have to be dedicated to yearbook otherwise it won’t be the best it can be. I am very dedicated to yearbook because I love it so much. In the end I enjoyed every task I had to do although at the moment I may have thought it was difficult. I have learned to try your hardest on everything because it will all be worth it when the yearbook comes out and you get to hold it and see it all put together. If you slack in the moment because you are being lazy or you just don’t feel like doing it, you will regret it. All of the things I learned this year I will apply to next year. I can take what I have learned and apply it to my job next year to be even better. Hopefully I can make my job run a little smoother next year.


RE

FLE

I chose the design of the core classes spread for my most significant piece because I think it shows some of my best work. The purpose of the design on this page was to make people think a little different of core classes. I wanted them to stop and look at the page and be interested in it, I wanted the design to pull them in. That was the purpose for every spread but I think I achieved it best through this one. This spread changed a lot from initial to final design. In the beginning it was a multi coverage page and each core class had it’s own story. It went through many changes and in the end was one story. The page became more unified. It wasn’t that difficult to make the design once I knew exactly what I wanted on the page. There was a pictograph with rulers showing percentage of core classes students liked best. I think the rulers make the graph of percentages more interesting and I like how it matches the idea and design of the page. My favorite thing on the page is the photo of the girl raising her hand. It is half cobbed so her hand looks like its sticking out of the picture. I think it made the picture kind of come to life and added extra appeal to the page. The graduation requirements secondary coverage brings the page together and adds a sense of closure. I learned that it is easy to make a page look great once you know what the purpose of the page is and you know what is going on the page.

CT

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FIRST DRAFT

E N O N O I T C E L REF


FIRST DRAFT

E N O N O I T C E L F E R


536 students polled on Dec. 8

MATH

page 80 driven

6%

point in the right direction. While working on a lab with magnets and compasses, freshmen Angela Sanchez and Kaitlin Long analyze their observations. “I felt [the lab] was informational and it was cool to see how the compass works,” Sanchez said. photo/Sarah Berlinsky

photo/Lauren Barr

“I am a third generation Boone Brave, so I think it’s special that I get to go to the school my grandmother went to,”

play with fire. In Jillian Fazio’s class, junior Austin Fields conducts a lab involving fire. “We had to put different salts in [the flame]. It’s cool to see how the flames change colors,” Fields said. The students discovered that the flame changed color depending on what salt they used.

ENGLISH

11

SCIENCE

%

SOCIAL STUDIES

Favorite core classes 32% 29% 22%

HOPE

run, brave, run. In HOPE, freshmen Nathanial Goodwin and sophomore Jeremy DeJesus sprint around the track. “I like running the track because it keeps everyone fit,” DeJesus said.

photo/Sarah Berlinsky

sophomore Kaley Gilbert said.

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

things up

Students were familiar with the apprehension of pulling open the door to a core class and waiting eagerly for the bell to signal the end of class the minute it began. To keep students interested, teachers broke away from conventional, meticulous busy work. Despite new legislation that mandated each class have a learning goal and scale on the board, teachers maintained their originality by grabbing students’ attention with the occasional joke or funny story that helped them remember information. Dr. Terri Tachon enjoyed sharing jokes with her students like, “Why did the fraction one fifth (1/5) have to go to the psychiatrist? Because he was too tense (2/10).” “I have some really weird math jokes every once in a while because math can get boring. Some have to do with content, some don’t. [The jokes] wake students up and [keep them] paying attention,” Tachon, AP Calculus teacher, said. Tachon also conducted monthly Florida Math Competitions to keep students on their toes and out of the boredom coffin. The competitions focused on logic. “It’s a nice break to not do constant work all the time. It’s fun to do stuff out of the box instead of just standard math problems,” senior Allyse Suganuma said. Other teachers had different ways to keep students’ attention. Chemistry teacher Glenn Listort often went on interesting tangents that explained the application of chemistry as opposed to the details requiring memorization. “I tell stories; a lot of them. A lot of times they relate to the subject. I [also] hate busy work. I try to make [my lessons] relevant,” Listort said. Teachers like Tachon and Listort encouraged students to take intense classes and balance course loads while challenging themselves intellectually. “I feel that everyone should be challenged. When you’re not challenged in a class, you’re less likely to care about it and I’m all for human potential and being the best you can be,” senior Joshua Kahn said. Students looked forward to classes that had quirky teachers with unique styles and lessons. Students, like Suganuma, who reacted to teachers, didn’t drudge to and from class. “They all have their own way [of teaching]. Some kids learn differently and they’d have an insanely hard time [if all teachers were the same],” Suganuma said. [blake waranch]

unconventional lessons kept students engaged

Teachers

photo/Emily Nusbickel

Total credits

Electives

Performing Arts

HOPE

U.S. Government

Economics

U.S. History

World History

Science

Mathematics

English

page 81 core classes

2014 and beyond require: • a passing score on the 10th grade FCAT Reading of Level 3 • pass the End of Course exams for Algebra I, Biology and Geometry.

2011, 2012, and 2013 require passing scores of Level 3 on both the Reading and Math FCAT exams

Cumulative GPA of 2.0

Additional information to graduate

24

4 4 3 1 1 .5 .5 1 1 8

Graduation

requirements

pick me. Eagerly raising her hand, junior Levelle Lewis waits to be picked in Nicole Padgett’s English III honors class. “[My favorite core class is] English because we get to read stories,” Lewis said. Padgett’s English III honors class discussed the Great Gatsby.

go long. Practicing football in HOPE class, freshman Kola Katynski pulls back for the toss. “Mrs. Jeffers [is my favorite teacher because she] teaches you a lot and makes some good projects for us to do,” Katynski said. Besides playing football, students also worked out in the weight room.


RE FLE

CT

My piece of design that could still use work is the every chair spread. The spread did not change much from initial to final design. The only changes are that the picture of the table and arrangement of the stories moved around a little. I learned that it is somewhat difficult to arrange six different stories on a page and include photos. I think it is arranged the best it can be. I feel that the page is good it just looks a little boring. If I had the chance to go back and fix the design on this page I would make the table a little different. The table would only have one chair and nothing would be on top of it except for the pottery. I would also try to make the design of the headline a little more interesting. The page is good overall I just think I could have done a little better to make it not look as plain. I could have tried making the whole background a picture of the classroom and making the table and chair stand out some.

ION TW O


FIRST DRAFT

O W T N O I T C E L REF


FINAL DRAFT

O W T N O I T C E L REF


CHAIR has a story

page 68 driven

Enclosed in a space with cold tile floors, a ramble of barks and a mix of emotions, junior Madison Rodriguez volunteered with the Boone Animal Rescue Club. Rodriguez’s volunteering helped to get dogs adopted through BARC at the pound and was one of the various ways Rodriguez could express her love for animals. “I love animals because I grew up having a lot of pets,” Rodriguez said. In ceramics, Rodriguez demonstrated her love for animals by constructing a fish, to give to her sister. “I made a fish for my sister because I know she loves the water,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez expressed her affection for animals through art and more importantly through volunteering. “I volunteer with BARC and I go to PetSmart to help with the pets for adoption, [and I love the feeling] when a pet comes up to you to pet it. There’s no reason for it, but they just love you,” Rodriguez said. “It’s like a constant love.”

Fish are friends

“I love the big Edgewater football game because it brings the school together and [it’s] really fun to show my spirit,” junior

With his genuine happiness, junior Sean Sullivan created laughter in the hallways, smiles in his classes and a simple joy to all his peers. “I don’t like when people are sad; I just want everyone to be happy,” Sullivan said. Different ways Sullivan was able to boost people’s mood was through his sense of humor and his amiable personality. “My personality [makes me who I am] because I’m very easy to get along with unlike most people,” Sullivan said. He was able to feature his uniqueness and positive personality in ceramics by creating a ceramic football with a motivating quote on it. “The football I made [has a] quote that said ‘Even if you get knocked down, get back up,’” and that’s how I live my life: [by] overcoming obstacles,” Sullivan said. Sullivan stayed positive through life’s struggles by continuing to smile and knowing that life goes on. With his positivity, he expressed his refreshing life point of view. “I am more unique than anyone else. Most people want to be ordinary; I want to be extraordinary,” Sullivan said.

Don’t worry, be happy

At age four, he sat on a dusty bleacher and watched his first baseball game. From that day, junior Derek Deler immersed himself in the sport, playing for the next 12 years. “Baseball and life have a way of connecting when it comes to teaching me things. I learned patience, hard work and being focused [through baseball]. [It’s] helped me through life,” Deler said. To portray his love for baseball, he created a baseball jersey for his mother in his third period. “I made a small baseball jersey for my mom because it’s something we have in common. I worked pretty hard on it and it took a long time to make but I knew she would love it,” Deler said. Deler used baseball as a way to focus in school and prioritize his life. His passion for the sport taught him the discipline and perseverance he incorporated into various aspects of his life. “[Without baseball] I would probably be getting into trouble. Baseball holds me back from doing stupid stuff. It keeps me from doing things like drinking or smoking [and] it keeps me in check,” Deler said.

Playing on a clean field

despite the grade, the ‘cliche’, or the gender, every person who sat in that chair, had his or her own story [christie rieck]

Every

Shelby Trimble said.

With his thoughts scattered, senior Andrew Stearns joked with his neighbors about anything that would be unrelated to class. “I’m unique because my wild sense of humor, my ‘OCD-ness’ and my clammy hands,” Stearns said. Stearns’ unique character was shown through a project in his ceramics class made when they were creating and painting pots. “[My pot] is unique because I used the wax resistant technique, which no one uses and incorporated that into my design. I did that because I didn’t want my piece of work looking like anyone else’s,” Stearns said. Stearns wanted to ensure that his creation was different. While he used the wax resistant technique to let others know that he was a different and a unique type of person, Stearns also tried to make everything perfect. “[I’m a] perfectionist, I try to make it as good as I can,” Stearns said. Whether Stearns was being creative or trying to make art perfect, all that mattered was proving that he was unique and different. “My inspiration is just trying to make it as different as possible. I want people to know I’m a different type of person,” Stearns said.

Shaped from a different mold

page 69 every chair has a story

Between classes with her earbuds in her ears and her head bobbing as she unintentionally lipped the words, sophomore Jasmine Cesareo continuously listened to her iPod, which took her into a whole other world. “I love music because it’s like telling a story, but in music,” Cesareo said. Cesareo listened to pop punk music to express herself and her thoughts. By analyzing song lyrics and peoples’ emotions, she was able to find connections between the two. “I love music because I think differently than [other] people. I’m fascinated by the way people act and the way people think. You have to understand a song to find it’s meaning, like a person,” Cesareo said. The way Cesareo expressed her passion for music was by going to concerts and continuously listening to music. From this passion, Cesareo began to give herself an edgy look. “The punk artists and bands inspire me. I just love the look [of the artists] because I think it’s cool and you don’t see a lot of people dress like that,” Cesareo said. A connection between her love for punk music and her energetic lifestyle was depicted through a pendant she made in ceramics. The mix of colors she chose to paint her pendant expressed her personality as unique and edgy. “The green purple and white [colors on the pendant] are colorful and fun and the other side with yellow and grey stripes [is] edgy, like me,” Cesareo said.

All from the sound of it

Her mind bounced with different ideas, as they all slowly intertwine together and worked through her hands. Whether it was the brush in her grasp or clay between her fingers, senior Cynthia Williams reflected her identity through the art she made. “Me loving art shows people how I’m a person that loves creativity, has a huge imagination and that I really care about detail. Like my King Kong; I took it over extreme levels of my imagination which makes my creativity show to others,” Williams said. While Williams reflected her creative ability in her art classes, she also pursued art outside of school. Some types of art she created were making and designing shirts, drawing, painting, face painting and ceramics. “Making something that is out of the ordinary makes me excited because I like things different. Like making my own shirts that show what I like and what I am and drawing or painting stories on a canvas and giving it to someone,” Williams said. Whether Williams was drawing or sculpting, her love for art was all the same. “I love art because the ideas I make are mine alone and no one else can take them. [Art is] everywhere you go and it expresses who you are that others don’t know about you,” Williams said.

Sculpt your personality


E E R H T N O I T C REFLE


I am proud of this picture because it shows action and I think it captures the viewers attention. The photo shows a good center of visual interest. The boys grab your attention as soon as you see the photo, especially the one wearing the orange shirt throwing the cheese puffs. The boys fill the frame and they are positioned so that you can still see their faces. The photo shows action because the cheese puffs are in the air between the boys hand and the other boys face. I also like that it shows emotion and you can tell that they are having fun with the game.


E E R H T N O I T C E REFL


I took this photo at the pep rally and I like it because I caught him right as the textbook is about to fall off of his head. You can tell in his face that he is concentrating on balancing the textbook on his head. This photo shows action because the boy is in the middle of running and his hand is a little blurred showing that he is reaching for the book. The photo follows rule of thirds because he is mostly to the left but he slants a little to the middle. He also is a good center of visual interest. There are two people diagonally behind him, it kind of looks as if they are leading up to him. You can tell that he is ahead in the race. I like how you can see his shadow, I think it adds some interest to the photo.


E E R H T N O I T C REFLE


I really enjoy this photo of the step team at the pep rally because it captures so many good elements and aspects. The step team creates leading lines up to the main focus of the boy in the front. You can see that the team is very into the routine by their facial expressions and movement. The girl to the left has her hair flowing behind her and a few students feet are off of the ground, showing action. Also you can tell that they are in the middle of a move because of the way they are positioned. There is repetition of the students in their tee shirts and the position their body is in. The center of visual interest in this photo is clearly the boy in the front of the other students.


RE

This year I was Academic section editor and I really enjoyed it. I was an asset to this staff because I came up with ideas for my section and created the layouts. I helped guide staffers and lead them in the right direction. I was always there for the staffers and I did anything to help and guide them. I attended every editors meeting and I was always trying to do my best. I showed my commitment to the yearbook by always trying my best and doing whatever it took. I always stayed after school when I needed to. I attended many sporting and school events to take pictures. I stayed kind and calm with my staffers even when I was really stressed. I dealt with a couple people that were hard to work with and I handled it well. I never lost my patience with anyone. I always tried my hardest to put the staffers before myself and made sure they were doing good with their deadline. I was an asset because I did my job and always did what was asked of me.

FLE CT ION FO UR


RE

This year I haven’t faced too many difficult hardships, I’d say I was pretty lucky compared to the horror stories I have heard. I have faced hardships that were my own fault and others that weren’t. Two problems that were my fault deal with proofs and deadlines. I was not very organized in getting my proofs done. I ended up needing to rush through finishing because I didn’t go about it the right way. I learned that I need to make a list of what needs to be done and decide the order it needs to be done in to make sure everything will be ready for deadline. When I have to do proofs next year I will look over every proof and make a list of what needs to be done and the order it needs to be done in to make sure I am not stuck in a problem again. Once I figured out the way I should be doing the process I think I went about it well. Another problem that was my fault is not being able to get the how we use technology page done on time because I wasn’t able to get all the information I needed. The deadline had to be pushed back and ended up changing completely. It became a he said she said in-depth story. I learned that I needed to figure out a better way to manage time between my own work and editing/helping staffers in my section. I don’t think I handled it very well but once I needed to get all the statistics I did my best to find the best ones to make the page the best it could be. When this situation arises again I will know to manage my time better and get everything done at school that I can only get done at school. Everything else can be worked on at home. There were many times this year when people lost their pages on the server. That happened to staffers in my section about three or four times. Completely losing a page is horrifying but thankfully I had all the spreads saved to my flash drive. I learned that I should always have everything backed up to my flash drive because I was so thankful when I didn’t have to make everything again. One last problem I faced this year was working with difficult people. I learned that there will probably be people on staff that are difficult to work with or that I don’t like. Whether it is that they don’t make the changes you’ve asked for, they do things their own way or if they are just really hard to push in the right direction I’ve learned that I need to try my hardest to get them doing the correct thing. I think I handled most of those situations good and if the problem ever arises again I will handle it the same way by being kind and helping the most I can.

FLE

CT

ION

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RE FLE

My greatest weakness in the middle of the year was many things. I said that I needed to improve meeting deadlines, creating layouts and keeping my stress at a minimum. In my opinion I improved much in all three things. I had a difficult time keeping up with deadlines when it came to my How We Use Technology page but when the next deadline came and I did the Jobs page I feel I was much more on top of everything and organized. I made deadline and did not experience a hard time like I did previously. I needed very much so to improve on creating layouts and I did. I showed that I was improving when I made the Publications and Core Classes layouts. I looked more towards becoming inspired by something rather than just creating a layout from nothing. It is a hard task to keep stress at a minimum in yearbook for me just because I become stressed easily. Of course as the year goes on it becomes less stressful. I took my own advice and became more organized and created my own little schedule which kept me from being so stressed.

CT ION SIX


N E V E S N O I T C E L REF


Y1. Feature writing: Student Life

Jobs Teach Responsibility 038-039 I would like this piece of work to represent me because I think it shows that I am able to choose an angle and write a good story on it. My angle was on why students in high school should have jobs and I think I did a good job at getting the point across.

Y2. Sports reporting Lax to the Max 008-009

I would like this piece of work to represent me because I think it is a good showcase of my sports writing abilities. The story is about the boys lacrosse team and how they overcame injuries and are super dedicated to their sport. The story gives you information and fills you in on the season while also adding a personal feel of the players.


N E V E S N O I T C E REFL


photo/Emily Nusbickel

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane photo/Sarah Berlinsky

point in the right direction. While working on a lab with magnets and compasses, freshmen Angela Sanchez and Kaitlin Long analyze their observations. “I felt [the lab] was informational and it was cool to see how the compass works,” Sanchez said.

6% HOPE

MATH

SCIENCE

SOCIAL STUDIES

ENGLISH

11%

photo/Lauren Barr

run, brave, run. In HOPE, freshmen Nathanial Goodwin and sophomore Jeremy DeJesus sprint around the track. “I like running the track because it keeps everyone fit,” DeJesus said.

Favorite core classes 32% 29% 22%

pick me. Eagerly raising her hand, junior Levelle Lewis waits to be picked in Nicole Padgett’s English III honors class. “[My favorite core class is] English because we get to read stories,” Lewis said. Padgett’s English III honors class discussed the Great Gatsby.

536 students polled on Dec. 8

Teachers

photo/Sarah Berlinsky

play with fire. In Jillian Fazio’s class, junior Austin Fields conducts a lab involving fire. “We had to put different salts in [the flame]. It’s cool to see how the flames change colors,” Fields said. The students discovered that the flame changed color depending on what salt they used.

Graduation

requirements

things up

4 4 3 1 1 .5 .5 1 1 8

unconventional lessons kept students engaged Students were familiar with the apprehension of pulling open the door to a core class and waiting eagerly for the bell to signal the end of class the minute it began. To keep students interested, teachers broke away from conventional, meticulous busy work. Despite new legislation that mandated each class have a learning goal and scale on the board, teachers maintained their originality by grabbing students’ attention with the occasional joke or funny story that helped them remember information. Dr. Terri Tachon enjoyed sharing jokes with her students like, “Why did the fraction one fifth (1/5) have to go to the psychiatrist? Because he was too tense (2/10).” “I have some really weird math jokes every once in a while because math can get boring. Some have to do with content, some don’t. [The jokes] wake students up and [keep them] paying attention,” Tachon, AP Calculus teacher, said. Tachon also conducted monthly Florida Math Competitions to keep students on their toes and out of the boredom coffin. The competitions focused on logic. “It’s a nice break to not do constant work all the time. It’s fun to do stuff out of the box instead of just standard math problems,” senior Allyse Suganuma said. Other teachers had different ways to keep students’ attention. Chemistry teacher Glenn Listort often went on interesting tangents that explained the application of chemistry as opposed to the details requiring memorization. “I tell stories; a lot of them. A lot of times they relate to the subject. I [also] hate busy work. I try to make [my lessons] relevant,” Listort said. Teachers like Tachon and Listort encouraged students to take intense classes and balance course loads while challenging themselves intellectually. “I feel that everyone should be challenged. When you’re not challenged in a class, you’re less likely to care about it and I’m all for human potential and being the best you can be,” senior Joshua Kahn said. Students looked forward to classes that had quirky teachers with unique styles and lessons. Students, like Suganuma, who reacted to teachers, didn’t drudge to and from class. “They all have their own way [of teaching]. Some kids learn differently and they’d have an insanely hard time [if all teachers were the same],” Suganuma said. [blake waranch]

“I am a third generation Boone Brave, so I think it’s special that I get to go to the school my grandmother went to,”

edit. Newspaper Editor-In-Chief Karen Jaen grades and edits a staffer’s article in class. “I can relate to [the new staffers] because I [joined staff] as a freshman without taking journalism,” Jaen, senior, said. Along with seniors Allison Sloan and Louis Patrick, Jaen is one of the remaining four-year staffers in the publications program.

English Mathematics Science World History U.S. History Economics U.S. Government HOPE Performing Arts Electives Total credits

Additional information to graduate Cumulative GPA of 2.0 2011, 2012, and 2013 require passing scores of Level 3 on both the Reading and Math FCAT exams 2014 and beyond require: • a passing score on the 10th grade FCAT Reading of Level 3 • pass the End of Course exams for Algebra I, Biology and Geometry.

page 81 core classes

photo/Renee Burke

ultimate. While playing Ultimate Frisbee as a reward for making newspaper deadline early, senior Mark Vagelakos looks for an open teammate. “Ultimate [Frisbee] is always a ton of fun, especially because we haven’t made deadline early this year. It made me proud of myself and the staff,” Vagelakos said.

photo/Channa Harrington

2

1 photo/Allie Sloan

[1] carve away. At the staff pumpkin carving party, yearbook Editor-In-Chief Allison Sloan concentrates on her pumpkin design. “There are so many [staff events] but workdays [are my favorite] because we show we’re really a family,” Sloan, senior, said. [2] go bananas. After school, senior Christie Rieck promotes yearbook sales in the student parking lot wearing a banana suit. “[It] was the most embarrassing thing I’ve done but it was worth every second because I got people to understand what the yearbook really means,” Rieck said.

24

sophomore Kaley Gilbert said.

photo/Renee Burke

page 80 driven

go long. Practicing football in HOPE class, freshman Kola Katynski pulls back for the toss. “Mrs. Jeffers [is my favorite teacher because she] teaches you a lot and makes some good projects for us to do,” Katynski said. Besides playing football, students also worked out in the weight room.

Commonality

meet

publications students came together to reduce stress

Every day, 55 students crossed the threshold of Room 224 and traded in the stress of calculus and physics for an entirely different kind of stress: publications stress. “Sometimes, actually a lot of times, the work piles up and I want to run away to California and be a beach bum, but making my mark on a lasting piece of Boone history is such a privilege and opportunity. I could never not give 100 percent,” yearbook sports editor Caroline Coleman, senior, said. Room 224 is home to the Legend yearbook staff, Hi-Lights newspaper staff and Mass Media, which ran hilights.org, the online newspaper. With a classroom constantly filled with deadlines, stress and tension built up, students still found time to get to know each other and to build lasting friendships in and out of the classroom. “The relationships [between staffs] are awesome. In Room 224, we are all ourselves 100 percent of the time,” senior yearbook staffer Holly Smith said. Though the individual staffs spent time within their own publication and developed enduring bonds, each staff worked together and made relationships with each other. “I was afraid that when we lost our seniors [from 20102011] we’d be really cliquey, but going to [Camp Orlando: A

LINDSEY WILHITE Junior Favorite thing about yearbook? We’re like a family and everyone is your friend. Hardest part of being an editor? Managing time between my work and staffers’. How is it different than you expected? You know what to expect, but it’s different when you are actually doing it.

WANT MORE?

Journalism Jumpstart] really helped because all the barriers broke there and [now] we’re just a family,” newspaper staffer Cooper Brock, junior, said. These strong relationships brought staffers together during stressful situations. When yearbook sales were down 200 books the week before final orders were due to the publisher on Jan. 16, the publications came together and publicized the yearbook. Members of each staff posted on Facebook and Twitter, contacted other students through text messaging and commited time to hand out flyers. Because of the staffs’ ability to work together, yearbook reached its goal of selling over 1,000 books, including online sales and payment plans. “[The staffs work together] because they are trying to do the same thing: creating memories, so we have a common ground,” Smith said. Hi-Lights kept students updated on current events; hilights.org provided extra information, photos and videos; and Legend documented memories throughout the year that were frozen in time for years to come. “In the end, publications isn’t really about the production skills or the deadlines; it’s about the experience,” Brock said. [blake waranch]

Hi-Lights won its first Quill and Scroll George H. Gallup Award

ELIZABETH GORDON Sophomore Favorite thing about newspaper? The bonds that we have. Hardest part of first year on staff? Learning certain things on my own. Is it ever scary? When you see all Burke’s green pen corrections.

2010

Legend won its first Gold Crown Award

First Legend came out

2007

1953

“I think it’s interesting to be on campus for the 60th anniversary because you can see how the school has grown, but you can also

Hi-Lights went online

2001

THROUGH THE YEARS:

Scan this code with your smart phone for more coverage on publications at hilights.org.

page 67 publications

see all of its history, “ sophomore Olivia Quattrone said.

photo/Sarah Berlinsky

page 66 driven

staffs

ROOM 224

the staff

BLAKE RIOS Senior

Favorite thing about yearbook? I get the opinion of 28 girls every day. Hardest part about ads staff? When people are rude. Favorite part about working on ads? Making parents smile by doing a good job.

Labs ignite interest experiments created visual for students

how to perform an experiment

different units, like the percent yield and mole concept lab. Students used formulas they learned in class to answer the questions. “[My favorite lab] was the percent yield lab. We did new things that we hadn’t done in other labs,” Tachon said. For the percent yield lab, chemistry students measured chemicals, then put them in an oven. After the chemicals were heated, the end result was copper that was separated from the rest of the chemicals. Labs like the percent yield required students to use math after they performed the experiment to get an answer. Dissections were cut out of the biology curriculum due to the fact that they were not included in the end of course exams, but the students still did one at the end of the year. In biology classes, students were able to observe and dissect a fetal pig. “[I think] the pig dissection [is the most popular lab] because the students remember it,” Porterfield said. “[Dissections] are good if the students know the material before they dissect. It’s pointless and a waste of money if they don’t.” Other than the labs in chemistry and biology, students also did experiments in AP Psychology, physics and anatomy classes. In AP Psychology, students performed a lab using Play-Doh. After learning the sections and what they controlled of the brain students created a model containing the different parts of the human brain. Students in anatomy were able to dissect a cow’s brain to see and understand how the nervous system works. Experiments like these were a helpful and different way for students to understand what their teachers taught. “[Labs help me understand the lesson] because sometimes it gives me a visual rather than listening to the teacher talk,” Brown said.

[olivia rees]

4

photos/Sarah Berlinsky

In chemistry, sophomore Alandra Kelly performs a combustion experiment to demonstrate how oxygen and heat can create water. First, she put on her lab glasses. Second, she poured a “fuel” into a water jug. Third, she lit the “fuel” in the jug on fire. The final product after the experiment was completed was leftover water in the water jug.

page 82 driven

[1] flame test. In chemistry, junior Stephen Erickson performs the flame test lab. “[I liked the flame test because] it was the first time that I used a Bunsen burner. It was cool to use flames and chemicals in school,” Erickson said. Students dipped wire into different solutions to change the flame’s color. [2] create. In AP Psychology, junior Richard Liley makes a model of a human brain. “[I like labs because] I don’t have to do busy work and there’s usually no homework involved,” Liley said. Students modeled the different parts of the brain with Play-Doh. [3] focus. Senior Rachel Peddie cuts a bottle for a biosphere lab in AP environmental science. “[Labs are helpful because] I’m not sitting in front of a teacher; I’m interacting and that helps me learn,” Peddie said. Students stacked five bottles on top of each other to create an ecosystem. [4] heads up. During a physics lab, junior David Schmidt tosses a basketball in the air. “[Labs] give us a chance to get out of our desks and change things up a little,” Schmidt said. Students found the initial and final velocity of the ball dropping.

page83 labs

3

lunch lecture. During lunch, administrative dean Douglas Miller talks to sophomores Keiton Best and Quentin Martin. “It is important to build relationships with students so they feel comfortable to talk to me about anything they need,” Miller said. He was the 10th grade dean.

photo/Brittany Hope

photo/Brittany Hope

4

1 photo/Carly Burton

photo/Macy Dye

2

photo/Brittany Hope

“[My favorite tradition is] Polyester Paradise because it’s fun and no other schools do it,” sophomore Kasey Rogers said.

[1] pants on the ground. Between classes, assistant principal Ron Anderson explains to senior Kevin Kouyo the importance of belts. “The way a student comes to school sets the tone for that student,” Anderson said. Administration was always on the look out for dress code violations. [2] this way. After a junior assembly, assistant principal Carlota Iglesias directs students. “[Administration] is the most beautiful profession in the whole world,” Iglesias said. Iglesias became assistant principal in 2006. [3] pep talk. Athletic director Doug Patterson speaks at a senior assembly about sports. “It was always my dream to oversee the athletic program,” Patterson said. Patterson organized sports schedules for the year. [4] joke around. At lunch, administrative dean Korey Washington jokes with junior Bridgette Norris. “I am happy to have the opportunity to redirect behavior,” Washington said. He was the 11th grade dean.

Tousent is What was the most

memorablemoment of your job?

DAN MULLINS

AMANDA OVERLY

MARGARET MCMILLEN

“The outstanding school spirit and tradition.” - assistant principal

“An otter came on campus and animal control chased it all around school. It was funny how it kept escaping.” - admin. dean

“The State Championship football game. The community there supporting our school was and is a great source of pride.” - principal

page 62 driven

photo/Olivia Rees

photo/Christie Rieck

3

photo/Christie Rieck

2

photo/Lindsey Wilhite

photo/Sarah Berlinsky

1

WATCH&LEARN

photo/Olivia Rees

measure. In physical science, freshman Luis Aponte hangs a magnet over a compass. “[Labs] are more hands on than average book work,” Aponte said. “I like how it gives us more experience on a certain subject.” Students determined how the magnets affected the way the compass points.

Gathered around the lab table, chemistry students watched in fascination as the flame in the middle changed from color to color. The flame test lab was a favorite among many chemistry classes, as it allowed students to experience different chemical reactions visually and apply the material they learned in lectures. During the flame lab, students dipped wire into various chemical solutions such as barium, copper and calcium. The different solutions would change colors when placed over the flame. “The flame lab [was my favorite] because it was really exciting and [the flame] was changing colors,” sophomore Margaret Brown said. For hands-on students, labs became a helpful way to understand what the instructor was teaching. The idea of performing an experiment rather than watching and listening to the teacher was a concept that both students and teachers felt was beneficial. “I think [labs] are a great way for students to try and solve problems on their own. [There’s a difference] between memorizing a formula and using a formula,” biology teacher Kimberly Porterfield said. Although labs could help students understand what they were learning in class, they could also easily confuse students if the procedure wasn’t performed correctly. Without clear directions, students questioned if labs were even relevant to the class. “Sometimes [labs help me understand what is going on,] but some of them don’t correspond as much to what were learning,” sophomore Taylor Tachon said. With different types of science classes offered, students performed kinds of experiments, labs and dissections throughout the year. In chemistry, students performed labs involving conversions of

A new office awaited him, vacant with just a desk. ID around his neck and walkie- talkie on, assistant principal Luis Tousent prepared for the first day of his new job, a transition from middle school to high school. “I came to Boone to make it a better place,” Tousent said. “Every where you go, you either add or subtract. I strive to add.” Tousent taught math for 17 years, 13 of them being in high school. He was a dean at Conway Middle School, one of the Reservation’s feeder schools, for three years which prepared him for the larger school, allowing him to form close relationships with families before arriving. “I get close to everyone around me, and already having those students know me is great,” Tousent said. His primary responsibilities included facilities and the school website. Though he had other obligations, Tousent felt that dealing with students and building strong relationships was the most important. “I want the staff, students and community to know I am here to support and listen,” Tousent said. “I love and care about them.”

Back

“My favorite Boone tradition is Polyester Paradise because I got to hang out with my friends and not be suffocated by teachers,”

Administration generates bonds students and faculty formed positive relationships

She walked into the discipline office, where consolation greeted her. In an atmosphere expected to be uninviting, administrators provided a means of comfort, formed relationships with students and helped them through tribulations inside and outside the classroom. With these impactful bonds formed, the student lives were altered for the better. For senior Marlin Bridget, the discipline office was a place she could go to escape from a hectic day to sit and talk to administrative dean Elizabeth Smith. “I think some students don’t think I’m nice, but most believe I am honest and are comfortable to come to me,” Smith said. Bridget found Smith as an outlet, and they formed a close bond during her four years. Frequent visits that were first due to poor behavior over time turned into periodic appearances to update Smith about her life. Having this safe place helped Bridget continue her positive demeanor and do well in school. “She helped me improve into a better person,” Bridget said. “She was the only person that could calm me down and [she] was always open to talk to.” After a troublesome two years in high school, Bridget took the advice from Smith and made changes to her personal life. With Smith’s help, she ended her negative days in discipline.

freshman Emily Stearns said.

“[The] advice she gave me was to never let negative comments get to me. She told me to not talk back, be the better person and let it go. I listened,” Bridget said. “The change in my life and the advice Mrs. Smith gave me impacted my life in ways I couldn’t imagine.” Administration strove to change the lives of students not only in school, but after school as well. Extra-curricular activities gave students ways to interact with faculty. For assistant principal Carlota Iglesias, this was her outreach to students. By sponsoring The Bollywood Club, Iglesias uplifted students’ spirits. “When I go to the club meetings, she helps me by making me laugh and smile after a long, hard day at school. She keeps me upbeat,” sophomore Alexis Sheppard said. In the meetings, the students bonded through learning about culture and dance. They watched videos together, performed dances for audiences and discovered new music. Iglesias’ goal was to establish valuable relationships through Bollywood. Members grew close and created a friendly environment for students to relax. “I wanted to create something at Boone that was positive for students, not just a hard day at school,” Iglesias said. [brittany hope]

page 63 administration

Y42. Design Portfolio Teachers Spice Things Up 080-081 Commonality Unites Staffs 066-067 Labs Ignite Interest 082-083 Administration Generates Bonds 062-063

I would like these four spreads to represent me because I think they are the best designs in my section. I feel that the spreads capture the readers attention and make them want to read what the page is about. These spreads show what I am capable of designing and creating.


RE

FLE

When I look back on my portfolio from last year I think of so many things I should have done differently. Last year I waited until the last minute to actually do my portfolio which was horrible. I think I have become less of a procrastinator. Once I get assigned something or I know I have something to work on I like getting started right away. I think that I have improved a lot from last year. I pay more attention to detail now and not just the big picture because it is all the little details that make the big picture look good. I have become much better and learned more about Photoshop and InDesign therefore enabling me to create better pieces of work. My ability to design has become much better from last year through this year and I think it is noticeable through the differences in my portfolios. This years portfolio shows that I put more time and thought into it. I also feel that this years portfolio has more of a united theme than last years. My 2011 portfolio feels very plain. I feel like you can tell that there’s less and less effort put in as you get towards the end since I waited until the last minute. My designs this year are much better than last year. When I look at my designs from last year I am embarrassed because they are so bad.

CT

ION EIG HT


DESIGN


Color Page

002

“My favorite part of the year is the yearbook. It’s awesome.”

JANE DOE, 9

“My favorite part of the year is the yearbook. It’s awesome.”

JANE DOE, 9

“My favorite part of the year is the yearbook. It’s awesome.”

JANE DOE, 9

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

|

003

Sernatem dolecto etum quisten dipsunt rem illestr untiatiatius escitem repudi am que simint doles ipitatur? Solorep ercipsam arum et ut la iniae cus consequos aria consedi oruntur? Uga. Uptae re voluptatur? Ipsam, auta quamet lamus nis modit raectio rporitatem eum facepedi vellesed et esedio te eaqui volorum explatque offictur si cuptatur ate autem sa netus cum ne aut quo omnimol oriam, volorerae vent, earit hillamus, serspitiis dempore quae si vendelicti antemque est laccaborit esedigent, te quodis que eos quo et verum im quae ent venis alit, sendisiniam non num quo excernam, que volesec eptatur rate natum lani tecum, sa core culloru metur? Quisqui coris eum, sus, ut optatiaturis num intur, nim quamusae. Nem quae plit eum quidi volestibus explabo remolo que elendam, aliaest idello offici offici cum apiendunte nullici untinve nitatet voloratur arum incte moluptus sintio verum ad maiosae et, omnis et quo con cum faceatiat am consernat enda consed magnam, nobistibus, vit, ut auta peria quam quis verio tem faci doluptaquunt ea daut volore officimaxim niende cum, quiat odisciateveliqua sperund ucitiae. Et quate namus, tempore volecus. nitatet voloratur arum incte moluptus sintio verum ad maiosae et, omnis et quo con cum faceatiat am consernat enda consed magnam, nobistibus, vit, ut auta peria quam quis verio tem faci doluptaquunt ea daut volore officimaxim niende cum, quiat Ugiae volupta sa nienime nissitae volupta BY | LINDSEY WILHITE

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen. LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

|

Sernatem dolecto etum quisten dipsunt rem illestr untiatiatius escitem repudi am que simint doles ipitatur? Solorep ercipsam arum et ut la iniae cus consequos aria consedi oruntur? Uga. Uptae re voluptatur? Ipsam, auta quamet lamus nis modit raectio rporitatem eum facepedi vellesed et esedio te eaqui volorum explatque offictur si cuptatur ate autem sa netus cum ne aut quo omnimol oriam, volorerae vent, earit hillamus, serspitiis dempore quae si vendelicti antemque est laccaborit esedigent, te quodis que eos quo et verum im quae ent venis alit, sendisiniam non num quo excernam, que volesec eptatur rate natum lani tecum, sa core culloru metur? Quisqui coris eum, sus, ut optatiaturis num intur, nim quamusae. Nem quae pliquatia verum voluptas atibus eos si ad mod eum con eatur sus cum del in nonsectas ium quos et ut milluptat. Arum dolenimpos enem ab id quibus magnissi nim et reiciisciis exerspel moloraestio tentotaspel iliquatem nust, eos mossi ulles erum istiam volupta quibus comni odigenimint ma vent venis et quias eatur, quunt prem il molendam el ea conectatas maxima vellorumet facident faciur? Quibus aut as ad et eum aut excepud igenimolest, que derro doluptatur sus debis eicim volum quassi dellorrorio cullati ssimolo rerehendis expla quo consed quaestsidochv Enis mincien ditatiis nos dolo ilist, quosse voluptat erum ventotatio. Namus debit eum quidi volestibus explabo remolo que elendam, aliaest idello offici offici cum apiendunte nullici untinve nitatet ent ulpa de pliquidit, ium

sub head sub head sub head sub head sub head sub head sub

HEADLINE here

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

Color Page


DESIGN


Color Page

002

LEMONADE this is a sentence about the lemonade explaining. SWIM SUIT. This is a sentence explaining why you need a swimsuit for summer. SUNGLASSES. Sentence about why you need sunglasses for summer. WEDGES. This is why you need sunglasses in the summer. LIPSTICK. Sentence on why you need lipstick in the summer.

WHAT YOU NEED FOR:

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

Sernatem dolecto etum quisten dipsunt rem illestr untiatiatius escitem repudi am que simint doles ipitatur? Solorep ercipsam arum et ut la iniae cus consequos aria consedi oruntur? Uga. Uptae re voluptatur? Ipsam, auta quamet lamus nis modit raectio rporitatem eum facepedi vellesed et esedio te eaqui volorum explatque offictur si cuptatur ate autem sa netus cum ne aut quo omnimol oriam, volorerae vent, earit hillamus, serspitiis dempore quae si vendelicti antemque est laccaborit esedigent, te quodis que eos quo et verum im quae ent venis alit, sendisiniam non num quo excernam, que volesec eptatur rate natum lani tecum, sa core culloru metur? Quisqui coris eum, sus, ut optatiaturis num intur, nim quamusae. Nem quae pliquatia verum voluptas atibus eos si ad mod eum con eatur sus cum del in nonsectas ium quos et ut milluptat. Arum dolenimpos enem ab id quibus magnissi nim et reiciisciis exerspel moloraestio tentotaspel iliquatem nust, eos mossi ulles erum istiam volupta quibus comni odigenimint ma vent venis et quias eatur, quunt prem il molendam el ea conectatas maxima vellorumet facident faciur? Quibus aut as ad et eum aut excepud igenimolest, que derro doluptatur sus debis eicim volum quassi dellorrorio cullati ssimolo rerehendis expla quo consed quaestsidochv Enis mincien ditatiis nos dolo ilist, quosse voluptat erum ventotatio. Namus debit eum quidi volestibus explabo remolo que elendam, aliaest idello offici offici cum apiendunte nullici untinve nitatet ent ulpa de pliquidit, ium voloratur arum incte moluptus sintio verum ad maiosae et, omnis et quo con cum faceatiat am

003

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sub head sub head sub head sub head sub head sub head sub

H E A DL I N E

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling something from the photo. “I am a quotable quote,” John Doe. I am a past tense sentence telling what can’t be seen.

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

Color Page


D E A D L I N E T WO


to first

2

3

4

DRESS UP DAYS photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Christie Rieck

page 12 traditional

“[My favorite tradition] is the Senior Snake because it unifies us as a senior class,” senior Heidi Rhodes said.

[1] wizard girl. In the hallways, senior Stephanie Nebeker walks in her Harry Potter inspired dress. “I enjoyed the Harry Potter day because I felt that I was in the wizardly world and wanted to do magic,” Nebeker said. [2] crazy cat. For “Zanny Zoo Day,” senior Kara Gill dresses up as a cheetah. “I liked the dress up days because a lot of people had creative costumes,” Gill said. [3] pretty in pink. On “First Day of School in 1950,” senior Matara Francis walks to class wearing a pink poodle skirt. “When I dressed up for the ‘50’s I really got into it,” Francis said. [4] wrapped. Showing his senior pride, senior William Isaacs wears his toga. “[I wore a toga] because I’m only going to be a senior once,” Isaacs said. Seniors wore togas on “Class Color Day.”

1

[brooke dawkins and lindsey wilhite]

A semi-truck coated with orange, white and blue decorations traveled through the parade, crammed with eager students presenting an overload of school spirit. The senior float, as well as other floats, depicted the carnival and 60th year theme as well as decorations that dealt with beating the East River Falcons. “I think it turned out really well. It represented our class in the best way and incorporated the theme well,” Senior Class president Elizabeth McEwan said. Seeing the class of 2012 come together as one showing Brave pride and belief in our school [made the float special].” Three weeks filled with planning and preparing props went into the float. After Braves Brawl, senior officers, parents and council members spent time finalizing the float. “[The amount of help we had] was good. We didn’t have a lot of volunteers but we had a few really committed volunteers that helped a lot,” senior Taylor Gies said. Props on the float included a five foot center piece cake, a ferris wheel, figurines wearing birthday attire, carnival flags and carnival cutouts for the sides of the float. The Senior Class won first place, out of the 14 floats, in the homecoming parade float competition. “[The senior float] was good; it was nice and big. It was very extravagant,” junior Simon Tran said.

photo/Holly Smith

photo/Blake Waranch

along for the ride. With a tight grip on the post, sophomore Joan Marie Spinelli rides on the crew team float. “I love how everyone was spirited for Boone and everyone supports our team” Spinelli said. The crew team dressed up in circus attire for their float.

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page 13 homecoming days

[1] banner love. In the parade, freshman Melissa Dunn and junior Jennifer Dunn lead the AWYS group holding the sign. “My favorite part of the parade was knowing I was helping to raise awareness of what happened, and seeing the joy on people’s faces,” J. Dunn said. [2] sticker support. To promote their message, junior Chandler Dye hands a sticker to a little girl. “I miss Eddie everyday so I felt like being a part of this brought him a little closer to me. I wanted to show respect for Eddie and Laura,” Dye said. [3] spread the word. Items in hand, sophomore Christopher Caplan hands out stickers and tee-shirts. “[My favorite part about the parade was] having all the little kids run up to me and ask me for a sticker,” Caplan said.

AN ORANGE GUILD

3

1

photo/Blake Waranch photo/Blake Waranch

[1] hand signs. With a painted chest, junior Jonathan Oquendo walks beside the American Sign Language float. “[The parade] is important because I am deaf and I want to support ASL,” Oquendo said. [2] sombrero. Dominican Republican flag in hand, sophomore Alec Dulskis walks with the Spanish Club. “[My favorite part of the parade] was seeing all the people participate,” Dulskis said. [3] bright beads. With the varsity squad, junior Victoria Batura hands out beads to the crowd. “[The parade is important] because it shows your excitement as a school and your school spirit,” Batura said. [4] beat east river. Holding a football, freshman Mckenna Crager rides on the freshman float.

photo/Blake Waranch

students worked to build a first place float

photo/Blake Rios

pep up. On the senior float, seniors John Krauss and Solomon Attaway pump up the crowd. “[The parade is important] because it shows all the creativity,” Krauss said. The senior float won first place.

photo/Blake Waranch

seniors f l o a t

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Waranch photo/Carly Burton

photo/Blake Waranch


E E R H T E N I L D A DE


60

percent of students’ surveys from a report published by the National School Board Association said they use social networking sites to talk about education topics.

page 60 driven

out of

[1] plugged in. To find an answer quickly, a student uses his cell phone. [2] look at this. While projecting a review packet from the ELMO to the white board, reading teacher Christine McCall goes over the correct answers. [3] click it. Using an ActiveExpression, junior Justin Bullock chooses an answer. [4] on fire. A student uses the kindle to read The Hunger Games.

percent of students in grades 6-12 currently use computers regularly during school.

teenagers carry a wireless device.

4

2

1

3

Here are statistics showing how technology is integrated into the classroom experience.

“[My favorite tradition at Boone is] the homecoming parade because it is fun to interact with everyone and see it,”

In the fall of 2008, ninety-seven percent of the nation’s schools had one or more instructional computers in the classroom.

percent of the nation’s schools had laptops on carts in 2008.

In the United States in 2010, 85 percent of schools had multimedia computers.

PERCENT

percent of teens say their cell phones help them in getting important information

5 85 1 4 5 58 90 97

The average number of students to a computer in the United States is 24:1. Florida has the best student to computer ratio of 9:1.

9:15

TECHNOLOGY IN CLASS

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK

photos/Lindsey WIlh ite

junior Dimitri Tsirigotis said.

he late Steve Jobs, an innovator and leader in computer technology, left a legacy behind when he died. Turns out, the man described as the mastermind behind modern technology did not believe technology could fix the education system’s problems. He could not have been more right. Technology is not the best teaching tool. Maintaining and providing equipment for faculty, staff and students is hugely expensive in comparison to supplying and keeping an inventory of textbooks. It is also a short term fix, seeing as the average textbook lasts years longer than an iPad, even with the manufacturer’s warranty. To outfit the entire faculty and staff on campus with a population of 2801 students and 180 faculty and staff is initially an exorbitant expenditure. To purchase iPads for everyone, along enough AppleCare Protection Plan coverage to last through the students’ four years of schooling, the total cost would be about $1.5 million. Even if the school purchased the less expensive, yet equally effective devices such as Amazon’s Kindle Fire and enough protection coverage to last four years, the total cost would be close to $700,000. On top of all the expensive tablets and what not, each one will need to be fitted with the appropriate tools for school; downloading upwards of three eBooks and a word processor per device, plus outfitting the school with wireless routers is a continuous spiral of costs. On top of the over-the-top price tag, it is in fact healthier to carry a textbook or two to and from classes throughout the day by fitting in needed exercise. Statistically speaking, the most infamous of walks across campus is from the 1000 building to the back portables on the other side of campus, which computes to a distance of approximately 410 yards. Assuming the student making this walk has to spend a minute getting in and out of classes and navigating hallway traffic, and spends another talking to a friend, that leaves him four minutes to get to class. To make it to class on time, he has to move at a pace of about three and a half miles per hour, the same speed as a competitive speed walker. Along with a backpack, at that rate, he is burning about 450 calories an hour. In those four minutes alone, he’s burned 30. In a society where 20 percent of adolescents ages 12 to 19 are considered obese, according to the Center for Disease Control, every calorie counts. Lastly, technology hinders brain and physical development in young children, and will be more of a hindrance rather than an advantage to young students. Sitting a young child of five or six in front of a computer screen or iPad and telling him to learn his ABCs is not going to be effective. According to Science Daily, nine out of 10 children under the age of two watch television regularly, and this statistic only increases as the children age. Also, a study of 1,300 children conducted by the author Dr. Dimitri A. Christakis, MD and colleagues in 2004, found a modest association between TV viewing before the age of three and attention problems at the age of seven, after a wide range of other factors were ruled out. These problems only progressed as the child aged into adolescence. The society surrounding students that wander the halls of high schools is reliant on technology, telecommunications and applied sciences of all kinds and varieties, but electronics are not the best way to learn. Steve Jobs emphasized one major point in his battle against an unplugged classroom:

T

page 61 face off: technology in classrooms

s kids grow up, they no longer obsess over finishing a Rubix cube or playing with Rockem Sockem Robots, or the ever frustrating, ball and cup. This is the digital age, where children grow up with ear buds in their ears and thousands of games and books available with the tap of a finger. In these modern times, jobs have become more reliant on technology. Doctors now use computers to store medical files instead of rows of filing cabinets. Police officers are using Global Positioning Systems to decrease their response time to crime locations. New careers are being created based entirely on new technology, such as a social media editor, which is a person responsible for coordinating social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) in correlation with the company’s news. From creating applications for the Apple app store and Android market, to personalizing a cloud (a virtual one, not the big white fluffy thing in the sky) for a business upon request. To prepare kids for a growing job industry reliant on applied sciences and telecommunications, schools should implement more technology into America’s education system. Furthermore, the school system needs to take advantage of the opportunities it can provide to its students. Newsflash: Textbooks are heavy. Fifty percent of students have a backpack that is “too heavy”. A backpack should weigh 10 to 15 percent of a student’s weight. Every 10 pounds is equivalent to 30 to 50 pounds on the spine with every step. This can lead to health problems, such as shoulder tilt, head tilt, and more importantly, scoliosis. Scoliosis is the curvature of the spine (it is what Forrest Gump had); and studies have linked overly filled backpacks to scoliosis. The Kindle weighs about six ounces, can be held in one hand and all of a student’s textbooks will fit on one. A Kindle provides easier access to student’s textbooks and does not contribute to future health problems. Some may argue that supplying every student and faculty member in the school with a tablet is too expensive. But schools all across the nation are trying to get computers in every classroom. A Kindle Fire’s starting price is $199 in comparison to the $267.45 it costs in textbooks for a sophomore (English textbook is $58, math textbook is $79.47, science textbook is $65, and social sciences textbook is $64.98). A Kindle Fire can do much more than a textbook and is easier to carry. It is more reasonable to supply every student with a Kindle Fire than supplying every student with multiple textbooks. For the sake of cost, schools should purchase a Kindle Fire (or any other tablet device) for each of their students. It provides the same options as a computer, it is cheaper, and can be carried around in a backpack. Technology is an important part of society. It is constantly changing and as it does, so should the way it is used. If schools do not constantly bring new technology into their teaching establishments, they are stripping students of future opportunities. [sam holleman]

A

no man-made object knows how to teach like a person. Nothing can instill interests in students like a teacher or question like a classmate. And nothing is the same as digging through a library book with a bit of human guidance in search of the answers of the universe. There is no replacing the classics, no matter how shiny the replacements are. [sara casler]

technology was second nature for students of this generation; below one student wanted a traditional class with printed text books and one wanted more technology in the classroom

TO USE OR NOT TO USE

TWO STUDENTS FACE OFF


R U O F E N I L D A DE


page 38 traditional

3

fingerprint please. As people walk into SeaWorld, senior Megan Bigelow watches them scan their tickets and index finger. “I’ve learned how to deal with hard situations when you need a quick answer,” Bigelow said.

“I feel great to be a part of history in the making [of the 60th year at Boone],” junior Daniel Paz said.

[1] my pleasure. Taking a customer’s order, junior Stephanie Dawson enters it into the register. “[My favorite part of my job is] seeing all the people because it shows me different personalities,” Dawson said. [2] nighty night. Dressed as a cow, senior Tyler Conrady greets customers on a family night. “It’s a great place to work; they’re good to their employees. They’re caring and generous,” Conrady said. [3] your change is. After completing an order, junior Joseph Onderick hands a customer his change. “[My favorite part of my job is] getting extra money because I don’t like asking my parents for money,” Onderick said.

1

2

STUDENTS “EAT MOR CHIKIN”

On her way to Epcot for the day, senior Sharibel Monegro received a phone call. Frantically speaking on the other line was a friend begging Monegro to cover her spot as a belly dancer at Taverna Opa for the night. After contemplating what to do, Monegro decided there was nothing to lose from the experience and took the job for the night. Little did she know, doing her friend that favor would turn into a career. “The manager asked me to come in two more times, then told me I had a job,” Monegro said. The timing was perfect for Monegro. A few weeks prior, Monegro lost her job at the Moroccan restaurant Falafel, where she was a belly dancer. Monegro was ready for her new job; she loved dancing. On occasion, Monegro opened the show by doing a solo dance around the restaurant. “[My favorite part is] getting the shy person up to dance and getting laughs out of people,” Monegro said. “I get paid to party. It’s better than having to do the same thing day by day. [At] Opa it’s never the same thing everyday.” A usual night for Monegro was dancing around the restaurant with her co-worker’s trying to get people up and dancing. On some occasions she danced for private parties. She wore a traditional Bedleh, meaning suit in Arabic, consisting of a bra, skirt and belt. This job was another step towards Monegro’s career path. She hoped to have a career in performing arts. “I want to still be in performing arts and still do dance in some form,” Monegro said. “All the different scenarios and different people you meet [prepares you for future jobs].”

Career gives photos/Lindsey Wilhite

teach

After a six hour shift at Finish Line, he stopped by the bank to deposit his check. As the bank teller handed him his deposit receipt, senior Bladimir Fabian felt a sense of accomplishment as his hours of commitment translated into hard earned cash. That was the feeling, along with responsibility, of students with jobs. “[Working has taught me about] being more responsible with money,” Fabian said. “You’re going to be responsible and you’ll have a work ethic.” As well as working three days a week at Finish Line and four days a week at Guess, Fabian attended six classes on campus, leaving after sixth period. Although he had to balance his time, Fabian enjoyed the independence that came with his jobs and not having to rely on his parents for money. “People think it’s hard [to manage time] but it’s not,” Fabian said. Students who relied on their paychecks for their expenses often had to adjust school work and social lives around their work schedule. Through early release and late arrival, students were able to better balance time. When the bell signaling sixth period sounded, senior Jarrett Stalvey also made his way home. With an hour until his shift started, Stalvey tried to squeeze in homework and a nap. He worked shifts from 2 p.m. -7 p.m. weekdays and 6 a.m.- 7 p.m. on Saturdays.

page 39 jobs

jobs prepared students for the real world “I knew I couldn’t do really hard classes and work at the same time,” Stalvey said. “It’s pretty hard [balancing social life, school and work]; I have late nights.” Stalvey used the money he made to pay for his car and spent any extra money he made to pay for social activities. “It’s teaching me responsibility at an early age,” Stalvey said. For junior Jensen Zannini, the paycheck she earned went toward her college fund. Zannini worked as a soccer referee for the Central Florida Catholic Youth League from September to November (soccer season). “I really only referee on weekends, so I don’t have to worry about homework, which I usually finish before weekends,” Zannini said. “Since I pick when I work, if I have plans for the weekend or homework I usually won’t schedule myself to referee.” Though working could be a challenge for students, it was also beneficial and gave them a taste of what the real world would be like with budgeting their time and money. “At a certain age in high school it’s good to have a job because it gives you money and teaches you responsibility and confidence,” Zannini said. [lindsey wilhite]

responsibility

JOBS

get ‘em hot. In Suessland at Islands of Adventure, senior Alexis Olijnyk gets a churro for a customer. “[My favorite part of my job is that] I get to see celebrities and sometimes meet them. Any day there could be someone famous walking around,” Olijnyk said. Islands of Adventure was her first job.


N E V E S E N I L D A DE


page 8 fierce

get it. Against the Vero Beach Indians, sophomore Bradley Connelly chases after the ball. “[I like my position] because it’s a lot of running and a lot of action. I feel energetic and amazing,” Connelly said. Connely had one ground ball in the game.

St. Thomas Aquinas and Winter Park. The boys had to be on their toes for the rest of the season as the team battled injuries and losing normal starters. “We are constantly reinventing our team. We’ve had a lot of different things happen this year and I told the kids, ‘It’s a part of life’,” head coach Elliott Whitton said. “I explained to them life isn’t predictable; nothing is ever set in stone.” Despite their losses, the team kept their confidence. Boys who wouldn’t normally have time on the field started playing more and became key players. Sophomore Kyle Irwin and junior Alan Kominowski stepped up when they were needed. “We needed to have more players step up and prove their spot on the team,” Irwin said. “As a sophomore I really never thought I’d be in the position I’m in. I wanted to prove to coach what I can do and show I deserve a spot on the team.” The team finished 10-5, wrapping up with wins over Freedom, Colonial and Hewlett. The players showed their dedication to lacrosse by incorporating it into their lifestyles even after the season ended. “It pretty much is my life. I have a sock tan most of the year. It affects who I hangout with and there’s really no down side to being in lacrosse,” Kissick said. [macy dye and lindsey wilhite] photo/Karen Jaen

“[My favorite Boone tradition is] during the national anthem when we hold our helmets up

33 is key. On the Lake Nona field, senior Andrew Elo runs the ball towards the goal in an attempt to score. “My mind is blank from all of my worries when I get in the zone [on the field],” Elo said. Elo scored three goals the entire season.

The scoreboard showed two minutes left and the intimidating tie against Timber Creek. With assistance from senior John Kissick and junior Connor McClellan, junior Joseph Onderick triumphantly scored the 10th and winning goal. “It was awesome [scoring]; kind of surreal,” Onderick said. “I was freaking out; my first time starting and I had to play a team we never beat.” With the first victory against Timber Creek since 2002, the boys gained confidence to face tough competition. The confidence initiated a winning streak as the boys shot down Lake Nona, 19-5; Vero Beach, 13-9; and University, 18-4. “It felt really good to make an accomplishment like that and start the season off with a big win,” senior Wesley Linxwiler said. However, this winning streak came to an end as the team faced hardships throughout the season. With injuries putting three players out for the season, the team temporarily faced a difficult time, losing to Lake Highland, Bishop Moore, Woodbury Forest,

team gained strength by facing challenges

LAXto the max

photo/Macy Dye

at the end [and shout Braves],” sophomore Brock Dwyer said.

blocked. In a game against Lake Highland Prep, senior Thomas McClane blocks a goal. “I feel empowered and in control of the game because I’m the last line of defense,” McClane said. McClane had 72 saves through the season.

photo/Phabulous Photos

2

1

11

“Bishop Moore because it was exciting; we lost by one goal, but it was a good game.”

WILLIAM HENDRY

11

photo/Macy Dye

page 9 boys lacrosse

“Timber Creek because it was the first big game of the season and we won; it was exciting.”

CONNOR MCCLELLAN

game?

memorable

What was your most

[1] in the air. Mid fielder Scott Slovenkay defends against Timber Creek. “I get to score and stop the opposing team,” Slovenkay, senior, said. Slovenkay scored four goals through the season. [2] cradle the ball. In a game against Lake Nona, senior Mario Muniz cradles the ball to keep it from the other team. “There’s an adrenaline rush. [My favorite part is] scoring. I feel better than the person I scored on,” Muniz said. Muniz made 43 goals this season and 388 since his freshman year, including club and high school lacrosse.

photo/Karen Jaen

photo/Dean photo/Dean Stewart Stewart Photography Photography


N E V E S E N I L D DEA


[more coverage on pages 8-9]

2

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

1

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

Boys Lacrosse

[1] ready, set, run. As freshman Conor Curry runs the ball down field, he looks to score against Vero Beach High School. “[My favorite part of lacrosse is the] fast paced nature. Other sports have too many breaks. Lacrosse is non-stop,” Curry said. Curry’s father and uncle also played lacrosse in high school and his uncle played professionally after college. [2] steady block. In a game against Lake Highland Preparatory School, freshman Joseph Kissick blocks a goal. “I love [my position]. I’m good at it and it’s exciting. My brother and I get to practice together too; he shoots and I block,” Kissick said. Kissick started playing lacrosse when he was in fourth grade as a defensive player; moved to goalie the next year.

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

junior varsity. front: Conor Curry, Tyler Tucker, Brad Daniels, Austin McFarlin, Tanner Chance, Colin Smith, Evan Pitz. row 2: coach Ian Gold, Joseph Kissick, Keaton Arkeilpane, Christopher Caplan, Parker Bell, Samuel Oswald, Brock Dwyer, Cody Tipping. back: John Friend, Eric Bergin, Graham Pittenger, John Holovach, Dylan Jackson, Noah Castello, Austin Fields, James Downing. senior Mario Muniz said.

YEAR IN NUMBERS THE

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

varsity. front: Michael Cummins, Wesley Linxwiler, John Kissick, Thomas McClane, Mario Muniz, Christopher Chavez, Charles Collins, Brett Buch, Scott Slovenkay, Joshua Rogachesky. row 2: Coach Elliott Whitton, Justin Bullock, Connor McClellan, Joseph Onderick, Tanner Barley, William McMillin, Paul Chong, Bradley Connelly, Dustin Driskell, coach William King. back: Kevin Irwin, Andrew Elo, Cole Baker, Alan Kominowski, Henry McClane, Kyle Irwin, Patrick James, Chase Arnold.

varsity lacrosse [10-5-0] 02/21/12 02/24/12 02/28/12 02/29/12 03/06/12 03/08/12 03/15/12 03/16/12 03/20/12 03/22/12 03/31/12 04/05/12 04/06/12 04/10/12 04/11/12

Timber Creek 10-9 Lake Nona 19-5 Vero Beach 13-9 University 18-4 Lake Highland 8-18 East River 21-2 Bishop Moore 7-8 Woodbury Forest 7-15 Edgewater 24-1 The First 16-4 Academy St. Thomas 5-15 Winter Park 10-11 Freedom 14-0 Colonial 26-2 Hewlett 10-9

junior varsity lacrosse [6-2-1] 02/21/12 02/24/12 02/28/12 02/29/12 03/06/12 03/08/12 03/15/12 03/22/12 04/05/12 04/06/12

Timber Creek Lake Nona Vero Beach University Lake Highland Dr. Phillips Bishop Moore The First Academy Winter Park Freedom

4-0 11-1 5-6 15-0 1-10 12-5 3-01 5-2 5-5 11-1

page 25 sports reference


DESIGNS


page 50 driven

Students squeezed into the door of the new addition on the Reservation. They waited with anticipation for the opportunity to open their very own checking account through the Central Florida Educator’s Federal Credit Union. Finance student, sophomore Daniel Hurtado was ready to help the eager customers and work in the credit union. “[The best part about working here is] it’ll give me experience with dealing with money and I’ll have experience managing money,” Hurtado, who worked during his third period, said. Within the first week, more than 30 students opened new accounts and the amount of members continued to grow rapidly. By the grand opening on Nov. 4, there were 275 new members in the branch. Students were eager to open their accounts by Sept. 16. Account’s opened by that date, received a match of any deposited monies up to $25. CFEFCU owned the credit union, but Finance Magnet students operated the facility from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Friday, with the exception of Wednesdays, when they closed at 1 p.m. due to early day. The credit union was the fourth and final CFEFCU branch to open on a Central Florida high school campus. “[The reason why we are the last to open is because] Mr. Daniel wanted to see how successful the other schools were and he didn’t want us to jump into something that wasn’t fully established,” senior Nancy Ampuero said. The bank was a convenience for the student body, and a learning opportunity for Finance Magnet students. It taught them management

photo courtesy/Jennifer Cantrell

“My favorite tradition would probably have to be the orange and white Friday’s because orange makes me look

nusbickel]

skills and provided insight into future professional settings. “I hope to go into accounting or start my own business,” Hurtado said. Workers continued to learn, despite the few setbacks they had in the beginning, like the Credit Union’s system being offline so no one was able to cash checks, deposit money or open new accounts. Overall the credit union was a successful addition, as students could conveniently access their account and deposit or withdraw money. “I don’t have to take time out of the day to drive to the other bank,” senior Gentry Bannon said. Following a four day training session over the summer, finance students learned how to do transactions, open new accounts, and transfer funds from account to account. They also learned how to work with customers and how to stay on task with their work, all of which were real-world business skills. “I’m obtaining skills that will make me more competitive in the job market,” Ampuero said. After opening an account, students could buy discounted movie tickets to AMC and Regal Theatre for $7.50 per ticket. They could also purchase American Express gift cards. Online banking made it possible for the students to keep track of how much money was in their account. “It was already a goal of mine [to go into business]; however, this experience has made me consider working in a bank through college,” Ampuero said. [stephanie nebeker and emily

bank awarded membership with matching funds

Cha-ching For Everyone

Tradition

The opening drew county and CFE officials including (fourth from left): Area Superintendent Cathy Pope, School Board member Rick Roach, Principal Margaret McMillen, finance magnet teacher Bill Daniel and CFEFCU President Joe Melbourne cutting the ribbon, Senior Vice President of Member Services and Special Projects Linh Dang, Vice President Risk Management Eddie Sanabria, Senior Vice President Information Services Kevin J. Dougherty, CFE Supervisory Committee John Harbilas, Senior Vice President General Counsel Kevin S. Miller, School Board Chairman Bill Sublette, and all of the students who operate the bank on a daily basis.

[of a new]

THE START

$25 Match The CFE Federal Credit Union matched funds for accounts, up to $25 opened by Sept. 16.

Movie Tickets $7.50 with an account

Perks of CFE Boone Branch

good,” junior Joseph Clifton said.

1

2

page 51 credit union - boone branch

senior Austin Roehm counts the money. “[I would] most definitely [recommend my friends to open an account] because everyone needs good money managing skills,” Roehm said. Roehm opened an account the first week of school. [2] helpful hand. Credit union manager, senior Brandi Recker, informs a student how to open an account. “[As the managers] we have to open the branch every morning, also do all the closing procedures and make sure everything is running,” Recker said. Recker interviewed for the position in May 2011.

[1] cash. After making a withdraw,

checks and balances. After opening for the day sophomore Chloe Beemer counts money. “[My job is important because] it gives students an opportunity to work at a financial institution. It helps kids to learn how to handle their money,” Beemer said. Beemer worked in the Credit Union everyday during second period.

photo/Emily Nusbickel

photo/Stephanie Nebeker photo/Stephanie Nebeker


DESIGNS


credit. She hoped to do the same with AP calculus BC, AP government, AP chemistry, and AP literature in her senior year. “I think [AP classes are] preparing me so well because I’m going into a science major so this will help me so much,” Swartwood said. “It’s a lot [of work], but if you time it out right, it’s not too bad.” Guidance counselors considered multiple factors such as teacher recommendations, previous AP courses and ACT scores when deciding whether to place a student in an advanced placement course. Pearson was in charge of AP courses and ultimatley chose whether or not students would be accepted into a course “I love being in charge of AP courses because I love to see students prepare for life after high school,” Pearson said. Boone began offering AP courses around 35 years ago. In the past five years, the number of students enrolled in AP courses went from approximately 400 to 800 students, and the number of courses offered increased to 23. “Students can’t just take AP classes to say that they have, they have to want it,” Pearson said. [macy dye]

12

page 52 driven

“I get really bored in regular classes. I like to be challenged in academics and AP courses allow me to do that. I also think I’ll save a lot of money in college taking the classes now.”

KENDYL STEWART

9

“I wanted to get a head start with getting college credits so I wouldn’t have to pay for it in college.”

DARWIN MOTATO

11

“So I don’t have to pay for them in college. It’ll help me get into a better college. I want to go to Rollins because it’s smaller and they have a good business program.”

DYLAN JACKSON

photo/Sehar Noor

“The mohawks [are my favorite tradition] before the Edgewater [football game] because it’s unique and cool to Boone,”

“[I took an AP class] so it would prepare me for college; so I can do well and go further with my life and in school.”

RAQUEL MANNINO

9

AP classes?

Why do you take

He stepped back from his desk and began a mental to-do-list, and organized class assignments by priority. Having taken multiple Advanced Placement classes throughout high school, junior Thomas Howard knew efficient time management and organization skills were a necessity. “[I have] about an hour or two [of homework] a night. It’s a lot of outlines and focus questions. It’s really stressful sometimes, but passing the exam makes all the work and late nights worth it,” Howard said. At the end of each school year, AP students took an exam which determined if they would receive college credit. Students must pass the exam with a three or higher, out of a score of five, for college credit. “I’d say the math, social studies and English courses have the highest success rate [when it comes to passing the exam],” guidance counselor Rosa Pearson said. Senior Olivia Swartwood hoped to enter college as a sophomore, having taken 10 AP before her senior year. She was eligible for a college credit as she passed all of her end of course exams with a three or higher, earning college

students sought college credits

Classes required ADVANCEDeffort photo/Macy Dye

senior Benjamin Griffin said.

debate. In AP Euro, sophomore Brandon Rodriguez participated in a class debate. “I’m pretty comfortable [speaking in front of others] because I’m in magnet and we do a lot of that,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez dressed up as philosopher Cesare Beccaria and discussed being against capital punishment and torture.

page 53 ap classes

by Thomas Foster

How to Read Literature Like a Professor

Recommended:

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

P P

by Kate Chopin

The Awakening

choose one of:

by Thomas Hardy

Return of the Native

by Gustave Flaubert

Madame Bovary

P P

for Advanced Placement Literature

Summer reading

“He made everything fun in a learning way. I learned a lot; he’s amazingly smart. I didn’t like history until that class,” Zayas said. His hardest AP class was physics because of the memorization required. “It was a lot of information that was hard in the beginning but then I began to understand the material,” Zayas said. The intensity of Zayas’ multiple AP classes meant he often sacrificed made sacrifices in order to finish his homework load and work at Twisty Treats. “I used to be really active and play basketball all the time but now I don’t because of school and working and trying to have time for myself,” Zayas said. Though AP courses were a major commitment, he considered them as an investment in his future. “I think they’re doing a good job [preparing me] and I’m learning a lot even though it’s stressful,” Zayas said.

FIRST Surrounded by papers in his room, senior Melquis Zayas finished all of his work with a sense of pride and accomplishment. “Everyday I have homework. A lot of my classes over-lap with their due dates which causes me to stay up late,” Zayas said. He took five AP classes his senior year. “[AP classes are] a lot of pressure because I also work. I’m so glad I have early release because it takes off some of the pressure but it’s still intense,” Zayas said. Zayas took AP classes to prepare himself for college and to boost his grade point average. “I knew I could do it,” Zayas said. “It looks good for college and I knew I’d be well prepared.” AP classes are weighted on a six point scale, more heavily than regular and honors classes. “I have to make sure [my grades] aren’t below a B because I want my grades to impact my GPA in a positive way,” Zayas said. Zayas’s favorite AP class was United States history with Mike Dorman.

come

academics

argue. For a debate in AP European History, sophomore Kevin Snavely explains an argument on the white board. “[AP Euro] is preparing me for college because I have a big work load and difficult tests. Now I know what it’s like,” Snavely said. AP Euro was Snavely’s first AP class.

test day. With questions in hand, AP Art History teacher Cheryl Race stands at the door and asks junior Chelsea Donelson test questions, denying her entrance until she answeres correctly. “It helps you study right before the test. The questions tell you if you studied or not. If you do well on the question, you do well on the test,” Donelson said. Art History was Donelson’s only AP class her junior year.

photo/Sehar Noor


DESIGNS


4

page 54 driven

students took the test in Florida in 2011.

210,000

Geometry and biology became EOC exams.

The state added two more tests to the 2011-2012 school year.

percent of students throughout the state of FLorida tested below basic on the Algebra I exam in May of 2011.

like it

don’t like it

83%

448 students polled on Nov. 9

11%

6%

don’t care

Students rank in on how they feel about the end-ofcourse exams counting for 30% of their final grade.

test or pest?

percent of students throughout the state of Florida tested proficient or better on the Algebra I exam in May of 2011.

56

of the 16 member states of the Southern Regional Education Board have end-of-course exams. Six have comprehensive exams and four have both.

T 18 W O

Florida high school students had 160 minutes to take the end-of-course exams. The test was computer based.

“[My favorite tradition at Boone is] the homecoming parade because it is fun to interact with everyone and see it,”

Twenty four states in the nation had endof-course exams that students had to pass to graduate.

24

1.5

million dollars is how much the end-of course exams would cost if they were not computer based.

The Algebra I end- of -course exam counted for 30% of a students semester grade in 2011. In 2012, it was expected to count for 30% of the overall grade for any student taking Algebra I, geometry or biology.

THIRTY PERCENT

Senate Bill 4 marked Algebra I as the first exam to be implemented over the next three years. Between 2011 and 2014, additional requirements were to be added for each incoming freshman class.

End-of-course exams are new to the state of Florida and are set to replace the FCAT. Let’s take an indepth look at this issue.

160 SIX

ONE HUNDRED SIXTY

END-OF-COURSE EXAMS

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK

4

2

3

T

each, test, quiz, repeat. Those could have been the standard classroom procedures for honors biology teacher Jamie Hoffmann. Instead, written on her board in thick, black expo marker was the complete opposite. Hoffmann assigned hands-on projects in order to get her students ready for the newly implemented biology end-of-course exam To show a humans’ effect on the environment, Hoffman developed a project of impacted model ecosystems made of grass and water in a topless two-liter bottle. She added substances such as oil and fertilizers so her students could determine what happened to them. The state testing standards she kept in a black binder on her desk confirmed that ecosystems were a major part of the biology EOC exam. “I’m trying to incorporate more problembased learning projects versus just fact recollection. It forces [my students] to apply information,” Hoffmann said. The EOC exams counted for 30 percent of a student’s semester grade in 2011. The next year, the EOC exams would be 30 percent of a student’s final grade. Algebra I became an end-of-course exam in Fall of 2010, geometry and biology in Fall of 2011. “I’m okay with it because I know that I will do everything in my power to help them succeed,” Hoffmann said. Ultimately the exams would replace the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. “I think [the exams] are harder than FCAT because FCAT was more general. The end-of-course exams are more specific so you have to know more curriculum,” sophomore Marchee Perry said about the geometry end-of-course exam she took. In 2011, 24 states had exit exams that students had to pass to graduate. In 2010, Gov. Charlie Christ made the exams mandatory under Senate Bill Four, which

stated that after 2010, core class exams such as math, science and history would be added by 2014. Legislators signed a bill stating that the class of 2016 would not have to take the FCAT, as exit exams would determine their passing status. By the 2012-2013 school year, students taking Algebra I, biology or geometry would have to score at least an achievement Level 3 to pass the course. “I think it puts a lot of pressure on students. It is a stressful situation and teachers feel that they have to teach to a test,” geometry teacher Terri Young said. According to the Center on Education Policy, the end-of-course exams were an efficient way to measure a student’s ability to comprehend a subject and provide incentives for graduating high school. “I think it is a good measuring stick, but it shouldn’t be the only deciding factor on a student’s knowledge of [a] course,” Algebra I teacher Michael Hibbard said. Sophomore Sarah Mouradian contradicted much of the student body by saying she thought the tests were beneficial and rewarding. “I think they will give some people a wake-up call who need it, some motivation, and others an opportunity to develop good study habits,” Mouradian said. Student preparation for the exams was critical as the exam could possibly determine whether one would pass or fail a class. In 2011, Florida’s Algebra I exam had an 18 percent pass rate. Fifty-six percent of students tested below basic on the exam. To ensure he was prepared, sophomore Nikolas Manolesakis studied by looking over past tests and quizzes and kept all of his work to review for his exams. “[Next] year, I may be prepared for it because I have already gotten a taste of it and I will get used to it later in my school years,” Manolesakis said. For students, the exams became common as they were incorporated into most core classes. Teachers, like Jamie Hoffmann, continued to explore creative ways to prepare students for a grade changing exam. In 2013, American history will join the EOC exam list. [chantelle cade]

high school students throughout the state of Florida made the transition from FCAT to end-of-course exams

FOR TEST SUCCESS

TEACHERS PREP STUDENTS

page 55 ID: end of course exams

[1] test it. In biology, freshmen Rachel Robinson and Cianna Piercey test an ecosystem’s PH balance. [2] lit up. For a biology lab, freshman Rosalinda Cruz illuminates an ecosystem from above. [3] high tech. On a laptop, freshmen Greysen Wolfe and Erin Strickler do research for their ecosystem project. [4] through the grass. Freshman Jared Angle studies an ecosystem to determine what substance affected it. junior Dimitri Tsirigotis said.

1

Cade photos/Chantelle


DESIGNS


page 56 grounded

take note. In his ELL class, sophomore William Lin smiles while Rosa Camacho reviews essay writing. “[I will be able to use] English [in my future job]. [I moved here] for a better living,” Lin said. Lin moved to the U.S. from China when he was nine.

[amelia cheatham]

and sophomore Arif Bepery, also attended select core classes with the rest of the student body. “[My most difficult subject is] math. I don’t understand a lot of it. I always need help. The classes are harder [here than in Bangladesh],” Bepery said. Bepery moved from Bangladesh in March 2010 because of the opportunities available in the United States. His parents stayed behind and he lived with his sister and friends. In addition, the students in DHH, TMH and ELL maintained goals like those of their peers. Bepery planned on attending college and becoming a law enforcement officer and Oquendo hoped to graduate from law school. “I [need] a good GPA and seven [years of college]. That’s going to drive me crazy, but I can do it,” Oquendo signed. Teacher Denise Scott taught the TMH students skills with professional applications. They made beds and cooked meals in their classes on campus. They also created buttons to advertise for the yearbook and the homecoming dance. “I [feel] like the students need to have all the opportunities regular students have and that the kids have a lot to offer within the community, and I want them to be good members of the community,” Scott said. Even though students in the DHH, TMH and ELL classes required unique accommodations, these needs did not define the students’ personalities or lives. “They’re just like any other class. You have the jokester and the ones that are more serious; you have the ones who are more shy. They’re very much like typical teenagers; they just have a different way of learning,” Scott said.

“[My favorite tradition is going to] football games. It shows a lot of school spirit as a school,” sophomore Adismary Salinas said.

A+ paper. After completing a class assignment, sophomore Jamie Whaley turns her work in to teacher Ron Borgon. “Mr. Borgon’s very funny and makes us laugh,” Whaley said. Whaley hoped to work in a veterinarian’s office when she grew up.

The students trudged sleepily through campus to their first period classes. They paused to joke with friends and swap books at their lockers, and they slid into class just as the tardy bell rang. Their unique needs were not apparent, even to them, until a translator materialized or the teacher began speaking a language they struggled to understand. While the students in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Trainably Mentally Handicapped and English Language Learners programs formed a minority, they strove to prove that they were the norm and not the exception. Other students noticed the differences that existed between themselves and students in separate learning programs, but the similarities were just as distinguishable. The groups shared school experiences and extra-curricular interests such as sports and clubs. “We are all Boone students. I’ve been involved in spring football [and] Brave Aid,” junior Jonathan Oquendo signed. Though it was difficult for program participants to communicate, they enjoyed interacting with other students. Some required hearing aids, while others used interpreters, writing or texting to communicate. Translators helped DHH students understand the material when their teachers did not know sign language, but students still struggled with communicating and learning efficiently in classes. “I can’t take notes, so the teacher has to print them out for me so I can pay attention to the interpreter,” Oquendo signed. All the students in the programs attended at least one class tailored to their needs. A portion of them, like Oquendo

despite their unique needs, special education participants enjoyed lives similar to those of other students

Students defy disabilities

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photos/Amelia Cheatham

strike it out. At the Best Buddies bowling event, freshman Alec Schmidt throws the ball. “My favorite part of school is that I can always trust somebody because my teachers are kind to me,” Schmidt said. Schmidt played video games in his spare time.

page 57 dhh/ell/tmh

Sophomore Vinh Tran demonstrates common American Sign Language signs that could be used to discuss the school day. Starting from the left, he signed “school,” “class,” “work” and “lunch.”

time to sign

WATCH&LEARN

box it up. Senior Heather Oliver helps SGA prepare Thanksgiving boxes for community families. “[My favorite things are] the activities we do because they are fun,” Oliver said. Oliver’s favorite part at school was seeing her teachers.

pb&j. To practice life skills, seniors Matthew Muragin and Zachariah Palmer make sandwiches for lunch. “[My favorite subject is] cooking. [I] get to eat good stuff and it is fun. [My favorite thing to make is] spaghetti,” Palmer said. The students in TMH also prepared a Thanksgiving meal in class.

photo courtesy/Denise Scott photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham


DESIGNS


page 58 academics

2011 8 GB USB flash drive, $9.99

2011 Elmo Projector, $1,352

2011 Dell Desktop, $500

Now: photo/Allie Sloan

parts and pieces. In PC Support class, sophomore Felix Lam digs through the inside of a PC. “I like this class; you can have a physical interaction with computers,” Lam said. Soon after, Lam wiped the hardrive of malware and viruses.

FLVS students worked at a personalized pace and communicated with their instructors through blogs, online chats and oral exams via the phone. Instructors used text messaging, e-mail and monthly calls to check the progress of their students and keep in contact with parents. “I think it’s important [to be proficient in technology] because it will help you understand computers better and help you with jobs later on,” McGrath said. The class of 2015 was the first required to take at least one FLVS online class in order to graduate. State law attempted to increase students’ exposure to technology to help prepare them for an increasingly technical world. “Time keeps changing and we have to keep up with technology in order to process as humans,” sophomore Antony Morata said. Students had to keep up with the pace of technology and be proficient not only in the digital design field, but others including gaming and PC Support, for future career opportunities. “Technology will continue to improve and will hopefully be used in education at a higher level. Technology will make students more efficient in the exchange for knowledge and ideas,” gaming teacher Colleen Dugan said. [taylor hall]

“My favorite tradition is the Edgewater game because it’s the rivalry game,” junior James Richardson said.

1986 1.44 MB dual sided floppy disk (3.5”), $9.89/10 pack

1994 Overhead Projector, $249

1986 Apple IIgs, $1,298

Then:

The generation of digital natives needed to be plugged in. Whether to music, their phone or the computer, they were constantly connected to technology. Classes like Gaming, Web Design and Digital Design helped satisfy this need. In Digital Design the students created book marks, fliers, newsletters and Xbox covers using the computer program Adobe InDesign 5.5. Students also created tickets for the screening of The 5th Quarter by The Always Wear Your Seatbelt and Social Justice clubs to spread awareness. Digital Design teacher Sarah Kittrell assigned the project to her students and gave the designs to sponsors, Donna Patz and Kimberly Porterfield for AWYS Club and Cynthia Schmidt for Social Justice Club to pick the winning ticket. “It’s the 21st century. We are going to get to a point where we can’t function without an iPod or computer,” Kittrell said. In gaming class students created video games such as Evil Crutches, Galactic Mail and Super Rainbow Reef. They followed coding instructions from the class textbook. “If I were ever to become a game designer, I would already be pretty familiar with how the software works,” sophomore Austin McGrath said. Technology was incorporated in to education through online classes offered by Florida Virtual School and online textbooks.

students developed digital skills

spark interest

Joshua Kahn

concentration. While changing last minute details, sophomore Jamie McMillan finishes her website. “I like the ability to be creative with the computer,” McMillan said. She used Adobe Dreamweaver to create her website.

Nicole Nuñez

Floyd Agostinelli

page 59 technology classes

As technology grew prevalent in the everyday lives of students, they learned the insides and outs of computers. Students in PC Suppor took apart the computer, learned the parts of it and then put them back together in PC Support. “Why pay Geek Squad when you could do it yourself,” senior Floyd Agostinelli said. PC Support teacher James Mitchell wiped the computer’s hard drives to remove malware and viruses. Mitchell aspired to make assignments thought-provoking to test the students’ creativity. “I want them to be creative and figure things out by themselves,” Mitchell said. Students who took a hands-on computer class, like PC Support, learned to become independent, while working to understand the mechanics of how a computer functioned. “I like computers so I wanted to see if it lived up to what it’s supposed to be,” Agostinelli said. Mitchell also taught Web Design, where students learned how to code and design websites. They used Dreamweaver to create their websites and used their textbook and notes for coding information. “I like [that] everyday we learn something we can use in life,” freshman Nicole Nuñez said.

Students discovered new INFORMATION photo/Allie Sloan photo/Taylor Hall

Classes

photo/Taylor Hall photo/Allie Sloan


DESIGNS


60

percent of students’ surveys from a report published by the National School Board Association said they use social networking sites to talk about education topics.

page 60 driven

[1] plugged in. To find an answer quickly, a student uses his cell phone. [2] look at this. While projecting a review packet from the ELMO to the white board, reading teacher Christine McCall goes over the correct answers. [3] click it. Using an ActiveExpression, junior Justin Bullock chooses an answer. [4] on fire. A student uses the kindle to read The Hunger Games.

percent of students in grades 6-12 currently use computers regularly during school.

teenagers carry a wireless device.

out of 4

2

1

3

Here are statistics showing how technology is integrated into the classroom experience.

“[My favorite tradition at Boone is] the homecoming parade because it is fun to interact with everyone and see it,”

In the fall of 2008, ninety-seven percent of the nation’s schools had one or more instructional computers in the classroom.

percent of the nation’s schools had laptops on carts in 2008.

In the United States in 2010, 85 percent of schools had multimedia computers.

PERCENT

percent of teens say their cell phones help them in getting important information

5 85 1 4 5 58 90 97

The average number of students to a computer in the United States is 24:1. Florida has the best student to computer ratio of 9:1.

9:15

TECHNOLOGY IN CLASS

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK

photos/Lindsey WIlh ite

junior Dimitri Tsirigotis said.

he late Steve Jobs, an innovator and leader in computer technology, left a legacy behind when he died. Turns out, the man described as the mastermind behind modern technology did not believe technology could fix the education system’s problems. He could not have been more right. Technology is not the best teaching tool. Maintaining and providing equipment for faculty, staff and students is hugely expensive in comparison to supplying and keeping an inventory of textbooks. It is also a short term fix, seeing as the average textbook lasts years longer than an iPad, even with the manufacturer’s warranty. To outfit the entire faculty and staff on campus with a population of 2801 students and 180 faculty and staff is initially an exorbitant expenditure. To purchase iPads for everyone, along enough AppleCare Protection Plan coverage to last through the students’ four years of schooling, the total cost would be about $1.5 million. Even if the school purchased the less expensive, yet equally effective devices such as Amazon’s Kindle Fire and enough protection coverage to last four years, the total cost would be close to $700,000. On top of all the expensive tablets and what not, each one will need to be fitted with the appropriate tools for school; downloading upwards of three eBooks and a word processor per device, plus outfitting the school with wireless routers is a continuous spiral of costs. On top of the over-the-top price tag, it is in fact healthier to carry a textbook or two to and from classes throughout the day by fitting in needed exercise. Statistically speaking, the most infamous of walks across campus is from the 1000 building to the back portables on the other side of campus, which computes to a distance of approximately 410 yards. Assuming the student making this walk has to spend a minute getting in and out of classes and navigating hallway traffic, and spends another talking to a friend, that leaves him four minutes to get to class. To make it to class on time, he has to move at a pace of about three and a half miles per hour, the same speed as a competitive speed walker. Along with a backpack, at that rate, he is burning about 450 calories an hour. In those four minutes alone, he’s burned 30. In a society where 20 percent of adolescents ages 12 to 19 are considered obese, according to the Center for Disease Control, every calorie counts. Lastly, technology hinders brain and physical development in young children, and will be more of a hindrance rather than an advantage to young students. Sitting a young child of five or six in front of a computer screen or iPad and telling him to learn his ABCs is not going to be effective. According to Science Daily, nine out of 10 children under the age of two watch television regularly, and this statistic only increases as the children age. Also, a study of 1,300 children conducted by the author Dr. Dimitri A. Christakis, MD and colleagues in 2004, found a modest association between TV viewing before the age of three and attention problems at the age of seven, after a wide range of other factors were ruled out. These problems only progressed as the child aged into adolescence. The society surrounding students that wander the halls of high schools is reliant on technology, telecommunications and applied sciences of all kinds and varieties, but electronics are not the best way to learn. Steve Jobs emphasized one major point in his battle against an unplugged classroom:

T

page 61 face off: technology in classrooms

s kids grow up, they no longer obsess over finishing a Rubix cube or playing with Rockem Sockem Robots, or the ever frustrating, ball and cup. This is the digital age, where children grow up with ear buds in their ears and thousands of games and books available with the tap of a finger. In these modern times, jobs have become more reliant on technology. Doctors now use computers to store medical files instead of rows of filing cabinets. Police officers are using Global Positioning Systems to decrease their response time to crime locations. New careers are being created based entirely on new technology, such as a social media editor, which is a person responsible for coordinating social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) in correlation with the company’s news. From creating applications for the Apple app store and Android market, to personalizing a cloud (a virtual one, not the big white fluffy thing in the sky) for a business upon request. To prepare kids for a growing job industry reliant on applied sciences and telecommunications, schools should implement more technology into America’s education system. Furthermore, the school system needs to take advantage of the opportunities it can provide to its students. Newsflash: Textbooks are heavy. Fifty percent of students have a backpack that is “too heavy”. A backpack should weigh 10 to 15 percent of a student’s weight. Every 10 pounds is equivalent to 30 to 50 pounds on the spine with every step. This can lead to health problems, such as shoulder tilt, head tilt, and more importantly, scoliosis. Scoliosis is the curvature of the spine (it is what Forrest Gump had); and studies have linked overly filled backpacks to scoliosis. The Kindle weighs about six ounces, can be held in one hand and all of a student’s textbooks will fit on one. A Kindle provides easier access to student’s textbooks and does not contribute to future health problems. Some may argue that supplying every student and faculty member in the school with a tablet is too expensive. But schools all across the nation are trying to get computers in every classroom. A Kindle Fire’s starting price is $199 in comparison to the $267.45 it costs in textbooks for a sophomore (English textbook is $58, math textbook is $79.47, science textbook is $65, and social sciences textbook is $64.98). A Kindle Fire can do much more than a textbook and is easier to carry. It is more reasonable to supply every student with a Kindle Fire than supplying every student with multiple textbooks. For the sake of cost, schools should purchase a Kindle Fire (or any other tablet device) for each of their students. It provides the same options as a computer, it is cheaper, and can be carried around in a backpack. Technology is an important part of society. It is constantly changing and as it does, so should the way it is used. If schools do not constantly bring new technology into their teaching establishments, they are stripping students of future opportunities. [sam holleman]

A

no man-made object knows how to teach like a person. Nothing can instill interests in students like a teacher or question like a classmate. And nothing is the same as digging through a library book with a bit of human guidance in search of the answers of the universe. There is no replacing the classics, no matter how shiny the replacements are. [sara casler]

technology was second nature for students of this generation; below one student wanted a traditional class with printed text books and one wanted more technology in the classroom

TO USE OR NOT TO USE

TWO STUDENTS FACE OFF


DESIGNS


3

1

“The State Championship football game. The community there supporting our school was and is a great source of pride.” - principal

MARGARET MCMILLEN

photo/Brittany Hope photo/Carly Burton

A new office awaited him, vacant with just a desk. ID around his neck and walkie- talkie on, assistant principal Luis Tousent prepared for the first day of his new job, a transition from middle school to high school. “I came to Boone to make it a better place,” Tousent said. “Every where you go, you either add or subtract. I strive to add.” Tousent taught math for 17 years, 13 of them being in high school. He was a dean at Conway Middle School, one of the Reservation’s feeder schools, for three years which prepared him for the larger school, allowing him to form close relationships with families before arriving. “I get close to everyone around me, and already having those students know me is great,” Tousent said. His primary responsibilities included facilities and the school website. Though he had other obligations, Tousent felt that dealing with students and building strong relationships was the most important. “I want the staff, students and community to know I am here to support and listen,” Tousent said. “I love and care about them.”

Tousent is

Back

4 photo/Brittany Hope

“My favorite Boone tradition is Polyester Paradise because I got to hang out with my friends and not be suffocated by teachers,”

“An otter came on campus and animal control chased it all around school. It was funny how it kept escaping.” - admin. dean

“The outstanding school spirit and tradition.” - assistant principal

page 62 driven

AMANDA OVERLY

DAN MULLINS

memorablemoment of your job?

What was the most

2

photo/Macy Dye

[1] pants on the ground. Between classes, assistant principal Ron Anderson explains to senior Kevin Kouyo the importance of belts. “The way a student comes to school sets the tone for that student,” Anderson said. Administration was always on the look out for dress code violations. [2] this way. After a junior assembly, assistant principal Carlota Iglesias directs students. “[Administration] is the most beautiful profession in the whole world,” Iglesias said. Iglesias became assistant principal in 2006. [3] pep talk. Athletic director Doug Patterson speaks at a senior assembly about sports. “It was always my dream to oversee the athletic program,” Patterson said. Patterson organized sports schedules for the year. [4] joke around. At lunch, administrative dean Korey Washington jokes with junior Bridgette Norris. “I am happy to have the opportunity to redirect behavior,” Washington said. He was the 11th grade dean.

freshman Emily Stearns said.

[brittany hope]

page 63 administration

“[The] advice she gave me was to never let negative comments get to me. She told me to not talk back, be the better person and let it go. I listened,” Bridget said. “The change in my life and the advice Mrs. Smith gave me impacted my life in ways I couldn’t imagine.” Administration strove to change the lives of students not only in school, but after school as well. Extra-curricular activities gave students ways to interact with faculty. For assistant principal Carlota Iglesias, this was her outreach to students. By sponsoring The Bollywood Club, Iglesias uplifted students’ spirits. “When I go to the club meetings, she helps me by making me laugh and smile after a long, hard day at school. She keeps me upbeat,” sophomore Alexis Sheppard said. In the meetings, the students bonded through learning about culture and dance. They watched videos together, performed dances for audiences and discovered new music. Iglesias’ goal was to establish valuable relationships through Bollywood. Members grew close and created a friendly environment for students to relax. “I wanted to create something at Boone that was positive for students, not just a hard day at school,” Iglesias said.

students and faculty formed positive relationships

She walked into the discipline office, where consolation greeted her. In an atmosphere expected to be uninviting, administrators provided a means of comfort, formed relationships with students and helped them through tribulations inside and outside the classroom. With these impactful bonds formed, the student lives were altered for the better. For senior Marlin Bridget, the discipline office was a place she could go to escape from a hectic day to sit and talk to administrative dean Elizabeth Smith. “I think some students don’t think I’m nice, but most believe I am honest and are comfortable to come to me,” Smith said. Bridget found Smith as an outlet, and they formed a close bond during her four years. Frequent visits that were first due to poor behavior over time turned into periodic appearances to update Smith about her life. Having this safe place helped Bridget continue her positive demeanor and do well in school. “She helped me improve into a better person,” Bridget said. “She was the only person that could calm me down and [she] was always open to talk to.” After a troublesome two years in high school, Bridget took the advice from Smith and made changes to her personal life. With Smith’s help, she ended her negative days in discipline.

Administration generates bonds

lunch lecture. During lunch, administrative dean Douglas Miller talks to sophomores Keiton Best and Quentin Martin. “It is important to build relationships with students so they feel comfortable to talk to me about anything they need,” Miller said. He was the 10th grade dean.

photo/Brittany Hope


DESIGNS


page 64 academics

zoom shot. Adjusting her shot, senior Karly Meyers zooms in on the sports anchor. “It feels like I’m part of something bigger,” Meyers said. “I can make something that can be shared and I get a grade for it; it’s a lot better than sitting in a classroom.” Meyers was a camera and video engineer for BBC.

get low. With his camera steady on the action, senior Christopher Holmes records the Bravettes at the pep rally. “[I like BBC because] I feel like a celebrity and that everyone knows me, though maybe everyone doesn’t,” Holmes said. Holmes recorded 30 minutes of film at the rally.

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

“[My favorite tradition is] homecoming week because it’s fun to dress up and look crazy for a week,” junior Rachel Burkett said.

ready, set, sign. Alongside interpreter David Cohen, seniors Olivia Crane and Tyler Seithel read from the teleprompter. I think it’s really great that there is an interpreter because every year we have more and more [DHH students],” Crane said. The interpreter was a new addition to BBC.

photo/Lindsey Wilhite

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

we’re live. Focused on the sports’ anchor, senior Ryan Reyes holds the boom microphone. “[My favorite part of BBC is] anchoring because I just really enjoy being on camera,” Reyes said. Reyes was on BBC for three years.

Price Check

[delaney arkeilpane]

The inexperienced crew members were unable to handle the mounting technical difficulties in the beginning of the year. This resulted in a late showing, as the first successful show aired five weeks into the school year. “When the first show went out it was a big accomplishment. They were very happy and proud, and it was a great feeling because they really worked hard,” CarreroSantana said. “I take great pride in what they do; they were very motivated to do what they needed to do.” Although the electrical equipment needed to be replaced, students found ways to work around their obstacles and circumstances. They also brought in a technician in September to rewire the studio cables. “We were happy to have [the technician] because he helped us get the show running and showed the teacher how to assemble it if we had problems again,” Cade said. Before they began to air the show, they needed to shoot more footage for introductions and clips, so they began recording around campus. They made revisions, and also implemented new ideas to enhance the variety and efficiency of the show. With suggestions from administration, they added an interpreter to their daily broadcast. Interpreter David Cohen joined the two anchors and signed the news to accommodate students in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing program. “I feel like having the interpreter is a good thing because now more people can watch the show,” Keeler said. Overcoming their obstacles, BBC was able to deliver a sufficient broadcast for the student body and fill the time frame with the resources they had. “The problem with BBC is that when we make a mistake everyone knows, and that’s what I’ve tried to tell them, but we have to keep them to a minimal if we want to survive,” Carrero-Santana said. “The pressure has been hard, but it’s also necessary to accomplish academic excellence.”

$550

camera and teleprompter

$252

television switcher

$335

$2,400

mac computer

$998

page 65 boone broadcasting company

$4,995

audio mixer

pole and boom microphone

digital portable camera

electronics and cameras, these items were necessary to broadcast a show

As students waited in their third period for Boone Broadcasting Company to begin airing, disappointment set in with the flash of the stand-by sign once again. BBC students struggled to begin broadcasting due to the technical difficulties they faced, and their limited knowledge of how to wire or hook up cameras. Students had to start from scratch as they didn’t have their server from the previous year. They lost all previous footage and had to record extensively to fill time on air. “There have been a lot of technical problems and we haven’t had the right equipment,” senior Kevin Lopes said. “I was pretty stressed because I thought we wouldn’t be able to do anything.” The inexperienced crew required the five returners to take leadership positions and guide the new members through the process of recording, editing and airing. “There are strong personalities in the classroom, and some people took charge and helped guide everyone else. For the most part I’m one of the take charge ones because I’ve been in BBC for the past three years, and I know a lot of the jobs, so I’m kind of like the director type,” senior Heather Keeler said. “Everyone was willing to take the help; it was a slow process learning, but eventually we got there.” With the entire school depending on them for breaking news and information, strong leadership was critical for the show to successfully begin airing. “[The returners] were doing everything at first, like fixing equipment, and then finally we got on board because we learned how to do it from them,” junior Chantelle Cade said. Among the new students also came a new television production teacher, Gerald Carrero-Santana. “[As a new teacher] I let everyone know that they have a friend and someone they can count on to keep the school informed and get the message out efficiently and effectively,” Carrero-Santana said. “We try to take care of our equipment as much as we can.”

BBC students overcame technical difficulties

REWIRE the system

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane


DESIGNS


page 66 driven

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WANT MORE?

“I think it’s interesting to be on campus for the 60th anniversary because you can see how the school has grown, but you can also

Favorite thing about newspaper? The bonds that we have. Hardest part of first year on staff? Learning certain things on my own. Is it ever scary? When you see all Burke’s green pen corrections.

Sophomore

ELIZABETH GORDON

Favorite thing about yearbook? We’re like a family and everyone is your friend. Hardest part of being an editor? Managing time between my work and staffers’. How is it different than you expected? You know what to expect, but it’s different when you are actually doing it.

Junior

LINDSEY WILHITE

Favorite thing about yearbook? I get the opinion of 28 girls every day. Hardest part about ads staff? When people are rude. Favorite part about working on ads? Making parents smile by doing a good job.

Senior

BLAKE RIOS

the staff

meet

2

1

photo/Channa Harrington

[1] carve away. At the staff pumpkin carving party, yearbook Editor-In-Chief Allison Sloan concentrates on her pumpkin design. “There are so many [staff events] but workdays [are my favorite] because we show we’re really a family,” Sloan, senior, said. [2] go bananas. After school, senior Christie Rieck promotes yearbook sales in the student parking lot wearing a banana suit. “[It] was the most embarrassing thing I’ve done but it was worth every second because I got people to understand what the yearbook really means,” Rieck said. photo/Renee Burke

see all of its history, “ sophomore Olivia Quattrone said.

THROUGH THE YEARS:

1953

First Legend came out

2007

Legend won its first Gold Crown Award

2001

Hi-Lights won its first Quill and Scroll George H. Gallup Award

[blake waranch]

page 67 publications

2010

Hi-Lights went online

Journalism Jumpstart] really helped because all the barriers broke there and [now] we’re just a family,” newspaper staffer Cooper Brock, junior, said. These strong relationships brought staffers together during stressful situations. When yearbook sales were down 200 books the week before final orders were due to the publisher on Jan. 16, the publications came together and publicized the yearbook. Members of each staff posted on Facebook and Twitter, contacted other students through text messaging and commited time to hand out flyers. Because of the staffs’ ability to work together, yearbook reached its goal of selling over 1,000 books, including online sales and payment plans. “[The staffs work together] because they are trying to do the same thing: creating memories, so we have a common ground,” Smith said. Hi-Lights kept students updated on current events; hilights.org provided extra information, photos and videos; and Legend documented memories throughout the year that were frozen in time for years to come. “In the end, publications isn’t really about the production skills or the deadlines; it’s about the experience,” Brock said.

publications students came together to reduce stress

Every day, 55 students crossed the threshold of Room 224 and traded in the stress of calculus and physics for an entirely different kind of stress: publications stress. “Sometimes, actually a lot of times, the work piles up and I want to run away to California and be a beach bum, but making my mark on a lasting piece of Boone history is such a privilege and opportunity. I could never not give 100 percent,” yearbook sports editor Caroline Coleman, senior, said. Room 224 is home to the Legend yearbook staff, Hi-Lights newspaper staff and Mass Media, which ran hilights.org, the online newspaper. With a classroom constantly filled with deadlines, stress and tension built up, students still found time to get to know each other and to build lasting friendships in and out of the classroom. “The relationships [between staffs] are awesome. In Room 224, we are all ourselves 100 percent of the time,” senior yearbook staffer Holly Smith said. Though the individual staffs spent time within their own publication and developed enduring bonds, each staff worked together and made relationships with each other. “I was afraid that when we lost our seniors [from 20102011] we’d be really cliquey, but going to [Camp Orlando: A

staffs

ultimate. While playing Ultimate Frisbee as a reward for making newspaper deadline early, senior Mark Vagelakos looks for an open teammate. “Ultimate [Frisbee] is always a ton of fun, especially because we haven’t made deadline early this year. It made me proud of myself and the staff,” Vagelakos said.

ROOM 224

photo/Allie Sloan

Commonality

edit. Newspaper Editor-In-Chief Karen Jaen grades and edits a staffer’s article in class. “I can relate to [the new staffers] because I [joined staff] as a freshman without taking journalism,” Jaen, senior, said. Along with seniors Allison Sloan and Louis Patrick, Jaen is one of the remaining four-year staffers in the publications program.

photo/Renee Burke


DESIGNS


CHAIR has a story

page 68 driven

Enclosed in a space with cold tile floors, a ramble of barks and a mix of emotions, junior Madison Rodriguez volunteered with the Boone Animal Rescue Club. Rodriguez’s volunteering helped to get dogs adopted through BARC at the pound and was one of the various ways Rodriguez could express her love for animals. “I love animals because I grew up having a lot of pets,” Rodriguez said. In ceramics, Rodriguez demonstrated her love for animals by constructing a fish, to give to her sister. “I made a fish for my sister because I know she loves the water,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez expressed her affection for animals through art and more importantly through volunteering. “I volunteer with BARC and I go to PetSmart to help with the pets for adoption, [and I love the feeling] when a pet comes up to you to pet it. There’s no reason for it, but they just love you,” Rodriguez said. “It’s like a constant love.”

Fish are friends

“I love the big Edgewater football game because it brings the school together and [it’s] really fun to show my spirit,” junior

With his genuine happiness, junior Sean Sullivan created laughter in the hallways, smiles in his classes and a simple joy to all his peers. “I don’t like when people are sad; I just want everyone to be happy,” Sullivan said. Different ways Sullivan was able to boost people’s mood was through his sense of humor and his amiable personality. “My personality [makes me who I am] because I’m very easy to get along with unlike most people,” Sullivan said. He was able to feature his uniqueness and positive personality in ceramics by creating a ceramic football with a motivating quote on it. “The football I made [has a] quote that said ‘Even if you get knocked down, get back up,’” and that’s how I live my life: [by] overcoming obstacles,” Sullivan said. Sullivan stayed positive through life’s struggles by continuing to smile and knowing that life goes on. With his positivity, he expressed his refreshing life point of view. “I am more unique than anyone else. Most people want to be ordinary; I want to be extraordinary,” Sullivan said.

Don’t worry, be happy

At age four, he sat on a dusty bleacher and watched his first baseball game. From that day, junior Derek Deler immersed himself in the sport, playing for the next 12 years. “Baseball and life have a way of connecting when it comes to teaching me things. I learned patience, hard work and being focused [through baseball]. [It’s] helped me through life,” Deler said. To portray his love for baseball, he created a baseball jersey for his mother in his third period. “I made a small baseball jersey for my mom because it’s something we have in common. I worked pretty hard on it and it took a long time to make but I knew she would love it,” Deler said. Deler used baseball as a way to focus in school and prioritize his life. His passion for the sport taught him the discipline and perseverance he incorporated into various aspects of his life. “[Without baseball] I would probably be getting into trouble. Baseball holds me back from doing stupid stuff. It keeps me from doing things like drinking or smoking [and] it keeps me in check,” Deler said.

Playing on a clean field

despite the grade, the ‘cliche’, or the gender, every person who sat in that chair, had his or her own story [christie rieck]

Every

Shelby Trimble said.

With his thoughts scattered, senior Andrew Stearns joked with his neighbors about anything that would be unrelated to class. “I’m unique because my wild sense of humor, my ‘OCD-ness’ and my clammy hands,” Stearns said. Stearns’ unique character was shown through a project in his ceramics class made when they were creating and painting pots. “[My pot] is unique because I used the wax resistant technique, which no one uses and incorporated that into my design. I did that because I didn’t want my piece of work looking like anyone else’s,” Stearns said. Stearns wanted to ensure that his creation was different. While he used the wax resistant technique to let others know that he was a different and a unique type of person, Stearns also tried to make everything perfect. “[I’m a] perfectionist, I try to make it as good as I can,” Stearns said. Whether Stearns was being creative or trying to make art perfect, all that mattered was proving that he was unique and different. “My inspiration is just trying to make it as different as possible. I want people to know I’m a different type of person,” Stearns said.

Shaped from a different mold Sculpt your personality

page 69 every chair has a story

Between classes with her earbuds in her ears and her head bobbing as she unintentionally lipped the words, sophomore Jasmine Cesareo continuously listened to her iPod, which took her into a whole other world. “I love music because it’s like telling a story, but in music,” Cesareo said. Cesareo listened to pop punk music to express herself and her thoughts. By analyzing song lyrics and peoples’ emotions, she was able to find connections between the two. “I love music because I think differently than [other] people. I’m fascinated by the way people act and the way people think. You have to understand a song to find it’s meaning, like a person,” Cesareo said. The way Cesareo expressed her passion for music was by going to concerts and continuously listening to music. From this passion, Cesareo began to give herself an edgy look. “The punk artists and bands inspire me. I just love the look [of the artists] because I think it’s cool and you don’t see a lot of people dress like that,” Cesareo said. A connection between her love for punk music and her energetic lifestyle was depicted through a pendant she made in ceramics. The mix of colors she chose to paint her pendant expressed her personality as unique and edgy. “The green purple and white [colors on the pendant] are colorful and fun and the other side with yellow and grey stripes [is] edgy, like me,” Cesareo said.

All from the sound of it

Her mind bounced with different ideas, as they all slowly intertwine together and worked through her hands. Whether it was the brush in her grasp or clay between her fingers, senior Cynthia Williams reflected her identity through the art she made. “Me loving art shows people how I’m a person that loves creativity, has a huge imagination and that I really care about detail. Like my King Kong; I took it over extreme levels of my imagination which makes my creativity show to others,” Williams said. While Williams reflected her creative ability in her art classes, she also pursued art outside of school. Some types of art she created were making and designing shirts, drawing, painting, face painting and ceramics. “Making something that is out of the ordinary makes me excited because I like things different. Like making my own shirts that show what I like and what I am and drawing or painting stories on a canvas and giving it to someone,” Williams said. Whether Williams was drawing or sculpting, her love for art was all the same. “I love art because the ideas I make are mine alone and no one else can take them. [Art is] everywhere you go and it expresses who you are that others don’t know about you,” Williams said.


DESIGNS


page 70 driven

“The new people I meet in magnet from other [magnet programs beside finance].”

9

BRANDON COOK

11

“Learning about all the diseases and gross things.”

BOBBI HILL

“[My favorite tradition is] going to football games because the Rowdy Crowd is fun to watch,” sophomore Olivia Rees said.

“Probably the computers [we use] because we get to learn a different way.”

KIERNAN MEHAN

10

favorite part of your program?

What is your

She slipped the thermometer under her patient’s tongue and received a grateful glance. Surrounded by monitors and smells of a hospital environment, unaccustomed students felt misplaced, but this professional atmosphere allowed Healthcare Academy students to explore careers. Students with an interest in helping others entered the Healthcare Academy by taking Health Science I. After gaining an understanding of anatomy in Health Science I, they practiced nursing skills on one another in Health Science II. They could earn a nursing assistant degree by continuing through Health Science III, and gain experience with patients at Westminster Towers and Orlando Regional Medical Center. “[My favorite part of the occupation is] just helping people. I think it is a growing experience; you’re always learning new things,” sophomore Delaney Hoevenaar said. Before they could volunteer with patients, students needed to be CPR-certified. In the facilities where they worked, students performed tasks such as bathing, feeding and dressing patients, making beds and checking vitals. The students learned the basics of health care from active professionals in the field, such as teacher Elisabeth Smith, a registered nurse with 30 years of experience. This helped students determine if they wished to pursue medicine as a career. “[These classes] give them a chance to really see what it’s like to be in a health care field and if they really like it before they go and spend all that money on college. Students that have gone into a whole bunch of health careers said that what really made a difference was the time they spent in class,” Smith said. Healthcare Academy graduates entered fields such as respiratory therapy, registered nursing and electrocardiogram technology. In addition to launching them into the medical field, being in the Healthcare Academy affected how students interacted with others. “You’re always thinking of how to help someone. [You think of] their priorities instead of your own,” senior Anna Rymer said. The Healthcare Academy prepared students with an interest in medicine for their careers. Yet even if they decided to pursue other goals, students graduated from the academy with a knowledge of medicine, practical experience and a heightened sense of compassion for those around them.

health care academy applied knowledge to future

CAREER skills

what a blast. During a fire safety unit in Health Science II, junior Kiran Shaikh learns how to operate a fire extinguisher. “[My favorite part of the lesson] was using the fire extinguisher,” Shaikh said. The Healthcare Academy students learned lessons on practical skills necessary in healthcare facilities, such as fire safety.

1

2

3

Whether they go into CJ or not, they’ll have a better understanding of how our system works,” Vernon, former police officer, said. The skills taught by the instructors gave students insight into possible career paths that included activism in the community. “A lot of the professions are about protecting and serving the people in the community. [We practice this by] teaching awareness to younger kids [through community service],” junior Christian Rydstrand, criminal justice magnet, said. Magnet teachers encouraged their students to formulate their opinions through selfevaluation, not just to accept the information to which their teachers exposed them. “I don’t see my job as teaching them what to think; hopefully just teaching them to think,” Vernon said.

page 71 health care academy/magnet

“Guilty!” The verdict resounded through the silent courtroom. Then, the officials cracked smiles and the defendant sauntered out from behind the stand, unshackled. Through experiences such as mock trials, mock crime scenes and working in the credit union, magnet students learned the basics of the law, criminal justice and finance fields. “[Magnet] helps you [get] a better understanding of the topic you’re in. It prepares you for your future,” law magnet student Alexandra Nagle, freshman, said. Admitted students prepared for their future careers by taking specialized courses. Teachers, such as criminal justice teacher David Vernon, had experience in the fields that the students wished to pursue. “I felt like I had real life experience [in law enforcement] to share and that the magnet would provide [interested] students.

students gained knowledge in finance, law and criminal jus-

ASPIRING professionals

Magnet

[compiled by amelia cheatam]

photo/Emily Nusbickel photo/Karina Flores

Students

[1] resuscitation station. In Health Science III, senior Diamond Pulgarin practices CPR. “[Healthcare Academy teaches] me to be a better person and to help others,” Pulgarin said. Pulgarin applied the knowledge she gained by helping friends and family recover from illnesses. [2] cookie monster. At the magnet holiday luncheon, parent volunteer Monica Soriano serves freshman Austin Garcia dessert. “I like law because I like arguing with people,” Garcia said. Garcia hoped to attend law school. [3] making bank. During third period in the credit union, sophomore Daniel Hurtado consults the computer. “People look up to me as a smart person since I’m in magnet. I help them with their school work if they have trouble with it,” Hurtado said. Hurtado’s favorite part was making close friends.

photo/stephanie Nebeker

photo/Alexis Martinez


DESIGNS


page 72 driven

quill and scroll. Using a quill, freshman Justin Acevedo practices calligraphy. “[The best part about working with india ink] is the way you write because it looks like a new type of writing and it looks interesting,” Acevedo said. Using calligraphy, he made a holiday card for his family.

not too heavy. In Art 2D, freshman Orion Hansen works on a shading project. “It taught me to take my time on anything I do,” Hansen said. “[My favorite project was] the shading project because it seemed simple.” He made three color circles showing light and shadows.

“[My favorite tradition at Boone is ] Polyester Paradise because I like

no blotching. Freshman Kyla Jerelds uses India Ink to practice calligraphy. “It was hard. You have to make the strokes thick and thin at points and make challenging designs,” Jerelds said. She made a Christmas card with her calligraphy skills.

perfect practice. In Ceramics II, junior Kimberly Kent practices her pottery skills on the wheel. “Centering the clay is always a challenge because I have small hands,” Kent said. She finished three projects at the time. photos/Chantelle Cade

Junior Jenna Hines said about Ceramics II class.

sophomore Adonis Henry said about his Drawing I class.

in the zone. With intense focus, sophomore Randall Glasgow glazes his clay salsa bowl. “It was fun to throw it on the wheel. It just takes time and practice to get good at it,” Glasgow said. His salsa bowl was intended as a gift.

to dance. It is fun because you get to dress up like it is the 70s,” sophomore Sami Badawi said.

in living color. In her Photo I class , junior Athena Karfitsas uses a wet paint brush to bleed the color of tissue paper onto her photo in a process of creating triptychs. “[The best part about that project was] that you could inspire the colors of your mood upon the picture,” Karfitsas said. Her picture was an advertisement from a magazine.

[chantelle cade]

page 73 visual arts

She waited anxiously in he chair hoping to be the first one out of class. Freshman Madeline Murray shuffled through the crowd of students trying to disperse at the sound of the bell. It happened every day, yet the enthusiasm to get to her 2D art class never subsided. Murray was relieved to have the class dedicated to unwinding and collecting her thoughts after four periods of core classes. “It’s like a relaxation period. You just have fun and do art. It’s like a spa for your brain,” Murray said. Core classes took over most of the day for students, so for them to have 49 minutes in the day for pure creativity was a perfect escape. Junior Luc Nguyen was able to express himself freely. “I feel comfortable in art. It makes me focus on only art. Nothing else,” Nguyen said. It helped that students had a place to relax and get away from the testing aspect of school. According to a Center for Arts Education study, at risk students cited the arts as a reason for staying in school. “[When I leave my photo class] I’m upset because I go from a fun class to something not so fun. I would stay there all day if I could and just keep growing as an artist,” junior Angela Krauss Coryell said. Ezine.com acknowledged that art relieves stress by producing endorphins in the body through the hand-eye movement and the satisfaction the activity gives. “It’s not as stressful and art is not something you study for. You just create,” sophomore Shamara Hill, Drawing I student said. Senior Colton Chamblin felt revived after his Ceramics II class. “[When I get out of that class] I feel happy and laid back because I [had] a break in my day saved for creativity,” Chamblin said. Nicole Moitoza, Drawing I and II teacher, agreed that art was a crucial need throughout schools with so many students taking Advanced Placement core classes. “It is important for students to have individual creativity. It is an outlet for students; it gives them a voice,” Moitoza said. Whether students took four AP classes or none, just like Murray, art allowed them to be more creative and extinguish core class stress. Visual arts required work, but not in a way that hindered or restricted students’ creativity. “It is like a renewal. My brain is refreshed and ready for creativity,” Murray said.

Playingwith dirt

“It’s relaxing because it allows me to calm my mind,”

“It’s a fun experience because it helps you think and show emotions through your artwork,”


DESIGNS


page 74 driven

“Not everyone is a part of it so being in it is different. You can express yourself in different ways through music.”

NICOLE AMES

9

art?

super bass. Bass players, freshmen Keith Monell and Cameron Holton, practice during class. “I go home and jam out, [my inspiration is] the band Primus” Holton said. There were two bass players in concert and beginning orchestra.

“My favorite Boone traditon is that you can get out of class [early] on Friday if you wear orange,” junior Shelby Smith said.

“If I go somewhere and see a piano, I know that I can play it. People will think that it’s cool and ask how I learned to play.”

CAMERON LEMME

12

about being in a

COOLEST part

What is the

key up. Reading the sheet music, freshman Joel Camy plays the keyboard. “My [dad] started teaching me piano before I got into keyboarding class,” Camy said. Camy improvised notes as he played.

inspire. In Keyboarding I, sophomore Charlotte Blackmon-Fite practices a song on the keyboard. “I write music at home, then come and play it here,” Blackmon-Fite said. Blackmon-Fite was inspired by her family members who all played the piano.

page 75 musical arts

teach. Michael Butler conducts his second period concert band. “Teaching music is one of the most gratifying experiences when students make incredible growth not only as musicians but also as human beings,” Butler said. Bulter has taught for six years.

[monique soriano]

“I feel really relaxed and very creative [playing the keyboard],” Machado said. “I kind of feel like a mini Beethoven.” Orchestra had four performances: Fall Concert, Winter Concert, Musical Performance Assessment and Spring Concert. At the Musical Performance Assessment, they earned 17 superior ratings. Strang felt that their greatest accomplishment was performing the difficult piece “Vilaldi Gloria” with the choir led by chorus teacher Jossi Doherty. Strang’s favorite part about being a musical arts teacher was sharing music and being able to enjoy it with his students. He hoped that in three years he would have enough students audition to enroll band students to form a permanent wind and percussion section resulting in a full symphony orchestra. “My ultimate goal is that [the students] leave with a love for music and want to stay with it for the rest of their lives,” Strang said. After each concert, his students played the Alma Mater without him. It was the student’s chance to lead. “[Strang] is a nice teacher. He shows enthusiasm and determination,” Johnson said.

practice makes perfect. In concert band class, freshman Reed Barrett plays the tuba. “[When I play I feel] proud; it’s just that one word,” Barrett said. Barrett practiced in the band room everyday after school for one hour.

After a childhood full of music, Kevin Strang, keyboarding and orchestra teacher, encouraged students to enjoy music and go beyond the technical aspects of it. Strang began formal music study in fourth grade, and further pursued his interest at the University of Miami, where he received a bachelors degree in music education, and the University of Central Florida for a masters degree in music. He started teaching musical arts in 1989 and started the Orchestra program in 2010. “I was excited,” Strang said. “It is a very big honor to start something where there was nothing.” The first year of orchestra started with one class of 23 students. In it’s second year, the program expanded into two periods, concert orchestra and beginning orchestra, with 33 students in the program. In class, students practiced and studied musical concepts and techniques. “[Orchestra] made me more articulate. It opens you up to more music and keeps me focused,” senior Christopher Johnson said. Along with orchestra, Strang also taught a Keyboarding I class. Senior Rachel Machado, who started playing the keyboard in Strang’s class, was inspired by her experience and considered a minor in keyboarding at the University of Central Florida.

teacher helped students develop a new love for music

photo/ Kayle Mierek

photo/Monique Soriano photo/Monique Soriano

Conductor presents a

photo/Lily Wyche

photo/Monique Soriano


DESIGNS


page 76 driven

wash. On a Saturday morning, head custodian Leason Beckford pressure washes the school grounds. “All of my job is hard,” Beckford said. It took Beckford eight hours to pressure wash the front of the school.

“I’m really excited [about the 60th year] because generations of my family have come here throughout the years,”

Around 5:30 a.m., custodian Nathaniel Small opened the school and the lunch ladies began preparing breakfast. By 7 a.m. the campus was bustling with students, faculty and parents entering the main office in need of assistance. Throughout the day, support staff helped the campus function. They assisted students with signing in and out of school, scheduling guidance appointments and getting forgotten lunches to them. Even though they were oftentimes referred to as the backbone of the campus, they too needed help getting items delivered and students located for parent pick-up. Each day, rather than leave early, senior Cynthia Gonzales signed in at Student Services ready to start her work as a student assistant. “I’m like a floating helper for them,” Gonzales said. “Whenever they need me I’m there ready to do whatever it is they need done.” Throughout her experience as a student assistant, Gonzales became close to one person in particular: Ann Cadman. This relationship grew when she discovered all the great things College and Career had to offer. With Cadman’s help and guidance Gonzales was on the right track to discovering her options. “Mrs. Cadman is just a really sweet lady. Last year I didn’t have time to see my counselor, but she was there to help me with all my college [search information]. She motivated me so much,” Gonzales said. “When I started helping in guidance I discovered all the opportunities they offered. You just have to go in and see.” Cadman, and other staff members, were able to help students like Gonzales, get all the information they needed, whenever they needed it. “I like to talk to students,” discipline clerk Laura Espinosa said. “A lot of these students just need someone to talk to and I like doing that.” Her efforts did not go unnoticed. Sometimes students needed someone to help calm them down, like sophomore Jovanski Dean Colon. “[Discipline clerks] get me calmed down. They lighten my mood,” Dean Colon said. “They [try to] keep me out of trouble and try to set me on the right path.” At the end of the day, the bustling lowered to a hum as the students, faculty and staff headed home. Then at 11 p.m. head custodian Leason Beckford set the alarms and locked the gates, closing another day on the Reservation. [allie sloan and monique soriano]

student assistant and guidance clerk worked together and formed bond

Staff keeps school photo/Carly Burton

3

After feeding three kids at home, the Reservation’s new food service manager, Hollie Isaac, came to campus at 5:30 a.m. to feed over 2,800 students. Her job was to provide nutritious meals for students and to effectively run a kitchen. Immediately after serving breakfast, she had to make sure enough food was ready for lunch, which oftentimes proved challenging. Some days there was a high demand for pizza and the next, students wouldn’t want any, creating shortages or surplus. She also saw a surge in the number of kids eating lunch, as the school went from 33 percent free or reduced lunch in September to 41 percent in January. “[A typical day is] not stressful,” Isaac said. “But sometimes it’s more hectic with meals that are

2

page 77 support staff

[4] research. On the computer, Frances Giessuebel helps junior Emerald Oates with her project. “When I’m here doing my job, I am here doing my job. My mind is on the school,” Giessuebel said. Giessuebel taught Spanish for 10 years before becoming a Media Specialists. [5] and don’t forget this. Guidance counselor Deborah Clary helps Armando Santin Herrera. “I solve problems and act as a customer service agent among students, parents and teachers,” Clary said. This was Clary’s last year.

4

[1] hello? In the main office, Victoria Westbrook transfers a call. “The hardest thing to do is talk to upset parents,” Westbrook said. [2] bag it. After both lunches, Jamie Hernandez replaces trash bags. “The school needs a custodian,” Hernandez said. “Without one it isn’t clean.” Hernandez chose this job because he enjoyed helping young people. [3] check in. In the attendance office, Karen Hita calls in for information on a student. “I have to keep track of students,” Hita said. Hita listened to music as she worked to stay relaxed.

more detailed.” She enjoyed interacting with the students and learning what they liked and disliked to eat by building relationships with them. “[The best part of my job was] working with the kids,” Isaac said. Isaac grew up in the area, having graduated from Oak Ridge. Then she married a chef and worked at Oak Ridge and Jones in food services. “[My favorite thing about this school is] the family atmosphere. Everyone has been very friendly,” Isaac said. Isaac also ordered food for events like the Senior and Honor breakfasts. She always helped get meals to kids in need and had no problem helping anyone else in need of help.

MEET the new cafe manager

sophomore Kendall Caldwell said.

5

1 photos/Monique Soriano


DESIGNS


page 78 academics

Used in the AST II class to work on cars.

3

“I feel honored [to be a part of the 60th year] because it is cool. ‘Go Boone’,” freshman Justin Ramirez said.

2

Used for the printing class.

cut board

carjump

Used in woodshop to put two pieces of wood together.

giant drill

Used in the culinary program to mix a variety of foods.

mixing bowl

[1] listen closely. Preparing to listen to a patient’s heartbeat, junior Sonia Grebinger checks at her own heartbeat. “It’s giving me a future. [Dual enrollment] gives me more of an opportunity to get a job. I get an early experience,” Grebinger said. Grebinger started the program in August. [2] sew nifty. Senior Naivette Henriquez sews together material. “I want to go into costume design for theatre so it helps me develop my skills,” Henriquez said. Henriquez was in the program for two years. [3] the iron chef. In the kitchen, junior Makenzie Figuerado rolls out dough. “I was interested in culinary beforehand. After I joined the culinary program I enjoyed it more and hope to continue,” Figuerado said. Figuerado hoped to become a chef.

1

Helps keep germs away from the patient’s.

germ mask

Used to hold all of the tools in the electricity field.

electricity belt

the tools students need in different courses

Necessities

photo/Stephanie Nebeker photo/Stephanie Nebeker

electrify. Focused on his project in electricity, junior Justin Wojciekofsky fixes a light switch. “The program has taught me to have a better work ethic, and it taught me how to work with others more,” Wojciekofsky said. He wanted to do this since he was a kid.

Heads resting on the window while trying to take a nap on the bus ride was a daily routine for the dual enrollment students on the way to their first class. Dual enrollment was an educational program that offered students the opportunity to get a head start in their career choice. Technical schools offered programs ranging from culinary to car mechanics. To get into the tech program, students had to meet the qualifications, like a 2.5 GPA and complete an application. The school would then look over them, conduct interviews, and accept who they thought would be successful. “I love how it’s hands on, unlike regular school. You really get to do things yourself. The faculty is great too,” senior Melanie Caban said. The schedule for the students included waiting at the bus loop at 7:15 a.m., with at least a 20 minute bus ride to get to their destination. For two hours the students learned skills they would not have been able to in a regular classroom setting. “I didn’t want as many classes and wanted to do something I enjoy. Last year I thought I learned a lot but now with the new evaluation [program] in photography, I realized there was so much more to learn,” senior Jaclyn Perry said. Students who were involved in dual enrollment for two years of high school graduated with different levels of certification depending on the course taken. This certification showed employers that they had previous experience and understood what they were doing. “I got certification for ‘portrait photography’, and

page79 dual enrollment

‘imaging specialist’. I can’t say I’m ahead but I have more knowledge going into college,” Perry said. Through the program, students received hands-on experience that would prepare them for situations in the work place. It gave them at least one year of higher education that they would have had to pursue after graduating high school. “I’ve had the plan to be a cosmetologist for a while. It’s great. Instead of having to go to school after high school, this really puts me ahead to follow the path I want to take,” Caban said. When at the different campuses, the students mingled with one another, shared interests and increased each others’ knowledge. They were able to get to know other students on a more personal level and learned about the different career choices available. “You have the opportunity to interact with more people for future business transactions. If you plan on starting your own business, you already have a bunch of people you know you could call up to help,” Perry said. Students who were involved in the dual enrollment program did not have to pay for their education outside of high school. If they had waited until after leaving high school they would have to pay for normal college fees. “I am so appreciative that the school gives us the chance to enhance our education to the next level without [fee]. Most people have to pay for a higher education but I am lucky enough to not have to. Picking to do dual enrollment was the best choice I have made,” senior Tori Polk said. [stephanie nebeker]

dual enrollment put students a step ahead in higher education

photo/Stephanie Nebeker

Begin now, benefit later

car boys. Senior Christopher Hoover learns about about the engine inside a Mustang. “[A memorable moment for me was when] I did an oil change and it spilled all over me. After that I learned what to do,” Hoover said. photo/Stephanie Nebeker

photo/Stephanie Nebeker photo/Allie Sloan


DESIGNS


536 students polled on Dec. 8

MATH

page 80 driven

6%

point in the right direction. While working on a lab with magnets and compasses, freshmen Angela Sanchez and Kaitlin Long analyze their observations. “I felt [the lab] was informational and it was cool to see how the compass works,” Sanchez said. photo/Sarah Berlinsky

photo/Lauren Barr

“I am a third generation Boone Brave, so I think it’s special that I get to go to the school my grandmother went to,”

play with fire. In Jillian Fazio’s class, junior Austin Fields conducts a lab involving fire. “We had to put different salts in [the flame]. It’s cool to see how the flames change colors,” Fields said. The students discovered that the flame changed color depending on what salt they used.

ENGLISH

11

SCIENCE

%

SOCIAL STUDIES

Favorite core classes 32% % 29 22%

HOPE

run, brave, run. In HOPE, freshmen Nathanial Goodwin and sophomore Jeremy DeJesus sprint around the track. “I like running the track because it keeps everyone fit,” DeJesus said.

photo/Sarah Berlinsky

sophomore Kaley Gilbert said.

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

things up

Students were familiar with the apprehension of pulling open the door to a core class and waiting eagerly for the bell to signal the end of class the minute it began. To keep students interested, teachers broke away from conventional, meticulous busy work. Despite new legislation that mandated each class have a learning goal and scale on the board, teachers maintained their originality by grabbing students’ attention with the occasional joke or funny story that helped them remember information. Dr. Terri Tachon enjoyed sharing jokes with her students like, “Why did the fraction one fifth (1/5) have to go to the psychiatrist? Because he was too tense (2/10).” “I have some really weird math jokes every once in a while because math can get boring. Some have to do with content, some don’t. [The jokes] wake students up and [keep them] paying attention,” Tachon, AP Calculus teacher, said. Tachon also conducted monthly Florida Math Competitions to keep students on their toes and out of the boredom coffin. The competitions focused on logic. “It’s a nice break to not do constant work all the time. It’s fun to do stuff out of the box instead of just standard math problems,” senior Allyse Suganuma said. Other teachers had different ways to keep students’ attention. Chemistry teacher Glenn Listort often went on interesting tangents that explained the application of chemistry as opposed to the details requiring memorization. “I tell stories; a lot of them. A lot of times they relate to the subject. I [also] hate busy work. I try to make [my lessons] relevant,” Listort said. Teachers like Tachon and Listort encouraged students to take intense classes and balance course loads while challenging themselves intellectually. “I feel that everyone should be challenged. When you’re not challenged in a class, you’re less likely to care about it and I’m all for human potential and being the best you can be,” senior Joshua Kahn said. Students looked forward to classes that had quirky teachers with unique styles and lessons. Students, like Suganuma, who reacted to teachers, didn’t drudge to and from class. “They all have their own way [of teaching]. Some kids learn differently and they’d have an insanely hard time [if all teachers were the same],” Suganuma said. [blake waranch]

unconventional lessons kept students engaged

Teachers

photo/Emily Nusbickel

Total credits

Electives

Performing Arts

HOPE

U.S. Government

Economics

U.S. History

World History

Science

Mathematics

English

page 81 core classes

2014 and beyond require: • a passing score on the 10th grade FCAT Reading of Level 3 • pass the End of Course exams for Algebra I, Biology and Geometry.

2011, 2012, and 2013 require passing scores of Level 3 on both the Reading and Math FCAT exams

Cumulative GPA of 2.0

Additional information to graduate

24

4 4 3 1 1 .5 .5 1 1 8

Graduation

requirements

pick me. Eagerly raising her hand, junior Levelle Lewis waits to be picked in Nicole Padgett’s English III honors class. “[My favorite core class is] English because we get to read stories,” Lewis said. Padgett’s English III honors class discussed the Great Gatsby.

go long. Practicing football in HOPE class, freshman Kola Katynski pulls back for the toss. “Mrs. Jeffers [is my favorite teacher because she] teaches you a lot and makes some good projects for us to do,” Katynski said. Besides playing football, students also worked out in the weight room.


DESIGNS


photos/Sarah Berlinsky

page 82 driven

“[My favorite tradition is] Polyester Paradise because it’s fun and no other schools do it,” sophomore Kasey Rogers said.

In chemistry, sophomore Alandra Kelly performs a combustion experiment to demonstrate how oxygen and heat can create water. First, she put on her lab glasses. Second, she poured a “fuel” into a water jug. Third, she lit the “fuel” in the jug on fire. The final product after the experiment was completed was leftover water in the water jug.

how to perform an experiment

WATCH&LEARN

1 2

photo/Lindsey Wilhite

3

4

[olivia rees]

page83 labs

[1] flame test. In chemistry, junior Stephen Erickson performs the flame test lab. “[I liked the flame test because] it was the first time that I used a Bunsen burner. It was cool to use flames and chemicals in school,” Erickson said. Students dipped wire into different solutions to change the flame’s color. [2] create. In AP Psychology, junior Richard Liley makes a model of a human brain. “[I like labs because] I don’t have to do busy work and there’s usually no homework involved,” Liley said. Students modeled the different parts of the brain with Play-Doh. [3] focus. Senior Rachel Peddie cuts a bottle for a biosphere lab in AP environmental science. “[Labs are helpful because] I’m not sitting in front of a teacher; I’m interacting and that helps me learn,” Peddie said. Students stacked five bottles on top of each other to create an ecosystem. [4] heads up. During a physics lab, junior David Schmidt tosses a basketball in the air. “[Labs] give us a chance to get out of our desks and change things up a little,” Schmidt said. Students found the initial and final velocity of the ball dropping.

different units, like the percent yield and mole concept lab. Students used formulas they learned in class to answer the questions. “[My favorite lab] was the percent yield lab. We did new things that we hadn’t done in other labs,” Tachon said. For the percent yield lab, chemistry students measured chemicals, then put them in an oven. After the chemicals were heated, the end result was copper that was separated from the rest of the chemicals. Labs like the percent yield required students to use math after they performed the experiment to get an answer. Dissections were cut out of the biology curriculum due to the fact that they were not included in the end of course exams, but the students still did one at the end of the year. In biology classes, students were able to observe and dissect a fetal pig. “[I think] the pig dissection [is the most popular lab] because the students remember it,” Porterfield said. “[Dissections] are good if the students know the material before they dissect. It’s pointless and a waste of money if they don’t.” Other than the labs in chemistry and biology, students also did experiments in AP Psychology, physics and anatomy classes. In AP Psychology, students performed a lab using Play-Doh. After learning the sections and what they controlled of the brain students created a model containing the different parts of the human brain. Students in anatomy were able to dissect a cow’s brain to see and understand how the nervous system works. Experiments like these were a helpful and different way for students to understand what their teachers taught. “[Labs help me understand the lesson] because sometimes it gives me a visual rather than listening to the teacher talk,” Brown said.

experiments created visual for students

photo/Christie Rieck

Gathered around the lab table, chemistry students watched in fascination as the flame in the middle changed from color to color. The flame test lab was a favorite among many chemistry classes, as it allowed students to experience different chemical reactions visually and apply the material they learned in lectures. During the flame lab, students dipped wire into various chemical solutions such as barium, copper and calcium. The different solutions would change colors when placed over the flame. “The flame lab [was my favorite] because it was really exciting and [the flame] was changing colors,” sophomore Margaret Brown said. For hands-on students, labs became a helpful way to understand what the instructor was teaching. The idea of performing an experiment rather than watching and listening to the teacher was a concept that both students and teachers felt was beneficial. “I think [labs] are a great way for students to try and solve problems on their own. [There’s a difference] between memorizing a formula and using a formula,” biology teacher Kimberly Porterfield said. Although labs could help students understand what they were learning in class, they could also easily confuse students if the procedure wasn’t performed correctly. Without clear directions, students questioned if labs were even relevant to the class. “Sometimes [labs help me understand what is going on,] but some of them don’t correspond as much to what were learning,” sophomore Taylor Tachon said. With different types of science classes offered, students performed kinds of experiments, labs and dissections throughout the year. In chemistry, students performed labs involving conversions of

photo/Christie Rieck

measure. In physical science, freshman Luis Aponte hangs a magnet over a compass. “[Labs] are more hands on than average book work,” Aponte said. “I like how it gives us more experience on a certain subject.” Students determined how the magnets affected the way the compass points. photo/Sarah Berlinsky

Labs ignite interest

photo/Olivia Rees photo/Olivia Rees

photo/Sarah Berlinsky


DESIGNS


page 84 driven

“It’s pretty scary because I have a thick accent, but it’s not that big of a deal.”

SENDY SIMON

12

12

“I like the bonfire because all classes get together and come out and have fun and hangout with the football team,” senior Morgan

“I don’t like speaking in front of big crowds because I get nervous and I get stuck. I don’t know what to say.”

HAYDEN HOEVENAAR

presentations?

How do you feel about

photo/Molly Wallace

speak your mind. In AP Government, senior Alanna Raffaelli participates in a class debate. “This is an activity for outspoken students, so passive or quiet classmates get talked over. It is, however, a great way to make people more outspoken in debates and sharing their opinions,” Raffaelli said. Each participant spoke for about five minutes.

entertain. Presenting in Humanities I, sophomore Pedro Jimenez plays the saxaphone. “[Presentations help students learn] by teaching you about different cultures,” Jimenez said. Jimenez entertained the class for extra credit. photo/Christie Rieck

Williams said.

students

8.7%SPEECH

SKIT 22.4%

DRESS13.9% UP 39.2%POWER POINT

15.7% POSTER

Favorite presentations

page85 presentations

It’s so boring and you don’t know if the information is valid. You know that teachers actually know what they’re saying because they went to college and got a degree in the subject,” Hall said. Aside from the feelings students got before speaking in front of a class, sometimes they felt presentations as the most rewarding way to learn new things and prepare oneself for the future. “I don’t like writing notes; I learn better visually. Sometimes it’s better to see my friends in front of the class because it’s not the same voice giving me information all the time,” junior Tylor Archer said. Students who enjoyed speaking in front of others benefited. They gained experience from practicing the vital skill. “[My favorite presentation was] when I did a speech. I got third place in county; it was really fun. I got to travel and go to other schools,” Landerer said. “[Presentations] make me a better speaker and when [people other than a teacher] are talking, I’m more attentive and I learn a lot more.” The use of public speaking helped Landerer and other students make a difference in his community, through sharing ideas and thoughts. Speaking in school helped prepare students for the future, increased self-confidence and taught students how to make their ideas interesting and profitable. “[Students] have to come up with a plan and execute it. So they learn a lot about time management and organizational skills,” Liebman said. “I think if presentations are relevant they should be in classes but not just having them to have projects.” [macy dye]

people faced their fears of public speaking

photo/Lindsey Wilhite

As she walked to the front of the classroom, her body began to tremble and she felt her knees start to buckle. “I hate talking in front of people,” senior Lindsey Hall said. “It’s scary because I feel like I never know the right thing to say or if I’m going to mess up and not only be embarrassed, but get a bad grade.” Fear of public speaking is the number one fear in America, according to Speech Topics Help. However, Florida education standards required presentations in classrooms. Teachers were encouraged to integrate presentations into their curriculi to prepare students for life after high school as public speaking skills were vital to excel in the real world. “You learn new ideas and things you didn’t know before [through presentations],” freshman Harold Landerer said. “It prepares you for the real world because you have to talk in front of people.” Sunshine State Standard LA.C.1.4.3 required teachers to teach strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening, connecting to and building on ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others. “Speaking skills are a part of our benchmarks. In the workplace most jobs consist of speaking skills and if you don’t know how to communicate your thoughts or ideas you can’t get your point across,” English teacher Stacy Liebman said. Although teachers felt it important to incorporate public speaking, some students didn’t find it necessary or helpful. “[Presentations don’t help students] because no one listens.

Talk

talk the talk. While presenting in AP European History, sophomore Elizabeth Barahona acts as a famous Austrian ruler. “It was a good experience because I got to educate everyone else about Maria Theresa,” Barahona said. Each presentation needed to be a minimum of five minutes.

psychology 101. In AP Psychology, junior Rachel Pierce discusses Ivan Pavlov’s contribution to the field. “[Presentations enhance your learning experience] because it’s something visual and less boring,” Pierce said. Pierce dressed up for extra credit.

photo/Sehar Noor


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