Page 1

PORTFOLIO 2012 Olivia Rees


OLIVIA REES

1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com (407) 897-2044

April 17, 2012 Renee Burke Adviser William R. Boone High School 2000 S. Mills Ave. Orlando, FL 32806 Dear Mrs. Burke: It has come to my attention that the Legend yearbook is accepting applications and in need of a section editor that is able to design layouts, assist other staffers and make the book an overall successful publication. Please find enclosed my resumé for review as I feel I am able to demonstrate these qualities, making me the right person for the job. Working on the 2012 Legend yearbook has taught me many skills: how to successfully manage and meet deadlines, work with other staffers, write stories and use InDesign and Photoshop. I was able to use these skills throughout the year and incorporate them into all of my work. This experience has proven to be useful while on staff, and would be an essential asset for an editing position. Being a previous staffer, I understand the dedication involved in making the book and am well aware of the work an editor puts into each section. I strongly feel that I am able contribute the same amount of effort. I enjoy helping others as well as creating new designs and ideas that can be used in the book. Being an editor would allow me to use these skills to improve the section and help make next year’s Legend successful. After reviewing my background and the skills I have to offer, I would love the opportunity to meet with you in person. I feel you would be able to get a better idea of how I can be a good addition to next year’s editing staff. I would appreciate meeting with you at your convenience. Thank you for your consideration and I hope to hear from you soon. Respectfully yours,

Olivia Rees Enclosed: resumé


OLIVIA REES 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com (407) 897-2044 OBJECTIVE To gain experience and knowledge in the field of journalism by becoming an editor on the 2012-2013 Legend yearbook staff. EDUCATION Completed 2 years at Boone High School Graduation date: May 2014 G.P.A. 4.28 weighted EXPERIENCE -Legend Yearbook Staff Member, Boone High School (August 2011- present) Experience taking photographs, writing stories and captions, conducting interviews, meeting deadlines, and working with others. -Totem Copy Editor (2010-2011) Helped to design overall theme of magazine and edited pages. RELEVANT HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES Journalism 1, Journalism 2, English 1 honors, English 2 honors, Art 2D HONORS, AWARDS, AND MEMBERSHIPS -Boone High School Law Magnet (2010-2014) -Varsity Track and Field (2010- present) -Sophomore Class Council (2011-2012) REFERENCES -Jennalyn Patton - English 2 Honors Teacher jennalyn.patton@ocps.net 407.893.7200 ext. 6014229 -Cindy Schmidt - Law Magnet Teacher cynthia.schmidt@ocps.net 407.893.7200 ext. 6014638 -Glenn Listort - Chemistry Honors Teacher glenn.listort@ocps.net 407.893.7200 ext. 6014613


OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer

OLIVIA REES Legend Yearbook 1745 Reppard Rd. Orlando, FL 32803 407-491-3740 olivia.m.rees@gmail.com

staffer


PERSONAL ESSAY


A

fter picking my classes freshman year, the last thing I expected was for journalism to catch my attention and draw me in. I had always liked writing and figured It couldn’t hurt to give the class a try. All I can say is that looking back, being on yearbook has taught me countless skills and lessons, not only regarding journalism but also in my everyday life. I’m constantly learning from my mistakes and striving to improve everything I do. Just because not every deadline was met doesn’t mean I didn’t take something from it. Whether it was how to manage my time or stay on task, I feel like I was able to overcome any previous issues to make deadline another week. I can’t say that the journey has been easy, but it’s definitely rewarding. The dozens of hours spent all seem to pay off when you look at the book in print and know you were a part of making it. Dedicating so much time and effort to journalism gives me hope that it will play a role in my future. I enjoy writing and designing, and just because I won’t be using those skills to make a yearbook, doesn’t mean they won’t affect my life in some other way.


SELF-ANALYTICAL EVALUATION


S

eeing how fast a year goes by can be shocking, but what’s more shocking is to realize how much you can learn in 10 short months at school. Being on yearbook has taught me a multitude of skills that I know I will take with me in years to come. I’ve learned how to meet deadlines, work with others, and manage my time to help make a successful publication. Meeting deadline was the hardest skill for me to grasp, yet by the end of this year I feel like I finally have the hang of it. After the fist half of the year I understood the reasons I had trouble meeting deadline and worked to fix those problems. By managing my time, getting all my interviews done first, and writing copy at home I was able to successfully meet deadline the second half of the year. Another skill I learned was how to work well with others. I feel like this is one of the most important skills to master because you are constantly working with others when on staff. I shared two deadlines this year and each were met on time. I was able to divide the work evenly with my partners and communicate with them so we were always on the same page. The last skill I learned was how to manage my time. You have to understand the fact that class is only 49 minutes long. That means it’s essential to get everything done at school that you can’t get done at home. Once you have interviews done it’s easy to write your copy and captions at home. While all of these skills were proven useful in a yearbook setting, they can also be applied to other circumstances outside the classroom. No matter what, you are always going to have deadlines through out your life, you will always be dealing with others and it’s always better to learn to manage your time sooner than later.


REFLECTION 1


T

he page I chose as my most significant piece of work would be my deadline three profile on Willow Cheek. Although this page took a while get started, I feel like it’s the best representation of my work and turned out better than I could have hoped. The most difficult aspect about this page would have to be the fact that I didn’t know who the profile would be on for about a week into deadline. This put me behind, but with help from Channa and Kayla I was able to catch up on the grading. You can see from the first edit that the copy needed to be reworked a little. Writing copy was something I struggled with up until this deadline. Considering this page was a profile and made up of mostly copy, I figured the sooner I conquered writing stories the better. I added more quotes and details to make it interesting, and feel like the story was one of the best I have written all year. Overall I am happy with the design and think I portrayed the Willow’s talent in an original and creative way.


REFLECTION 1 first draft


REFLECTION 1 final draft


Draw a story

1

student found creative outlet through art

4 4 photo/Chantelle Cade

2

3

[1] illustrate. Cheek sketches the holiday set up in the center of the class. [2] focus. In Drawing I class, sophomore Willow Cheek draws a still life centerpiece. [3] still life. Cheek’s still life drawing of a lemon, pear and pumpkin made in oil pastels. [4] portrait. Cheek’s self portrait of herself drawn in pencil. [5] roots. Cheek’s picture of a tree, guitar, and flower representing Mother Nature.

5

Hands covered in chalk as dust flew around the classroom, sophomore Willow Cheek created her next project. In Drawing I, students contemplated the possibilities for the next art assignment they would create. From a young age, Cheek had always had an interest in the arts, specifically in drawing. “Art was always my favorite class and I’ve always done well in it since I was about 10,” Cheek said. “When I was little, my mom used to paint a lot; a lot of people in my family are artistic.” As a hobby, Cheek drew in her free time, but also at school where she utilized a class period to do just that. Artwork became another way for Cheek to express herself both at home and at school. “Drawing is probably my favorite, but I also like painting, ceramics and music,” Cheek said. “[The best thing about art is] the ability it gives you to convey emotion and symbolism through color and imagery rather than words.” Cheek displayed her thoughts through her artwork without having to write them down; it allowed her to speak volumes without saying anything. “[Art] helps me to express ideas that I can’t express in words,” Cheek said. Cheek’s preferred mediums ranged from oil pastels, watercolor, colored pencils, tempera paint, henna and chalk. Although her main focus was drawing, Cheek attempted to broaden her skills by working on different projects dealing with these mediums. “I wish I was better at watercolor, pen and ink. [They] are harder to control than other mediums,” Cheek said. “Drawing offers a lot of mediums and variety in the techniques you can use.” The average piece of art took up to two weeks to finalize, but Cheek liked to put in extra time and effort to get the result she wanted, one that she would be proud of. “I keep working on a piece until I’m satisfied. I’m always really critical [of myself and] of what I’m doing,” Cheek said. Cheek planned to keep drawing as a hobby, but was also interested in going into Advanced Placement [Studio] Art in the future. “This would be a great opportunity to get into an art school,” art teacher Nicole Moitoza said. [olivia rees]

Jordan Knight 11 Justin Knight 11 Dillon Knox 11 Sasha Koba 9 Adam Kobert 9 Alexander Kokis 11 Alan Kominowski 11 Victor Komives Prieto 9 Kiahna Konarski 11 Allison Kozy 11 Angela Krauss Coryell 11 Hannah Kreger 11 Samuel Kreger 9 Alexander Kroll 9 Allan Kroll 9 Jennifer Krueger 10

page 107 johns - krueger


REFLECTION 2


O

ne page that I feel could still use work is my deadline four labs spread. Overall, this page caused a lot of stress because of the very few pictures there actually were of labs. It was hard to find a dominant and I had to set up an experiment for the watch and learn. It would have been much easier if I asked people to take pictures of labs earlier in the year. I think it’s a perfect example why you should plan ahead because having no pictures means you can’t write any captions, and that put me behind on a lot of my work. Also, I feel like the body copy could have had a better angle. I don’t think the story is poorly written, but I know personally I could have done a better job on it. In the end I feel like the page turned out okay, but it took a while to get there and I would have definitely changed the way I handled it.


REFLECTION 2 first draft


REFLECTION 2 final draft


photos/Sarah Berlinsky

page 82 driven

“[My favorite tradition is] Polyester Paradise because it’s fun and no other schools do it,” sophomore Kasey Rogers said.

In chemistry, sophomore Alandra Kelly performs a combustion experiment to demonstrate how oxygen and heat can create water. First, she put on her lab glasses. Second, she poured a “fuel” into a water jug. Third, she lit the “fuel” in the jug on fire. The final product after the experiment was completed was leftover water in the water jug.

how to perform an experiment

WATCH&LEARN

1 2

photo/Lindsey Wilhite

3

4

[olivia rees]

page83 labs

[1] flame test. In chemistry, junior Stephen Erickson performs the flame test lab. “[I liked the flame test because] it was the first time that I used a Bunsen burner. It was cool to use flames and chemicals in school,” Erickson said. Students dipped wire into different solutions to change the flame’s color. [2] create. In AP Psychology, junior Richard Liley makes a model of a human brain. “[I like labs because] I don’t have to do busy work and there’s usually no homework involved,” Liley said. Students modeled the different parts of the brain with Play-Doh. [3] focus. Senior Rachel Peddie cuts a bottle for a biosphere lab in AP environmental science. “[Labs are helpful because] I’m not sitting in front of a teacher; I’m interacting and that helps me learn,” Peddie said. Students stacked five bottles on top of each other to create an ecosystem. [4] heads up. During a physics lab, junior David Schmidt tosses a basketball in the air. “[Labs] give us a chance to get out of our desks and change things up a little,” Schmidt said. Students found the initial and final velocity of the ball dropping.

different units, like the percent yield and mole concept lab. Students used formulas they learned in class to answer the questions. “[My favorite lab] was the percent yield lab. We did new things that we hadn’t done in other labs,” Tachon said. For the percent yield lab, chemistry students measured chemicals, then put them in an oven. After the chemicals were heated, the end result was copper that was separated from the rest of the chemicals. Labs like the percent yield required students to use math after they performed the experiment to get an answer. Dissections were cut out of the biology curriculum due to the fact that they were not included in the end of course exams, but the students still did one at the end of the year. In biology classes, students were able to observe and dissect a fetal pig. “[I think] the pig dissection [is the most popular lab] because the students remember it,” Porterfield said. “[Dissections] are good if the students know the material before they dissect. It’s pointless and a waste of money if they don’t.” Other than the labs in chemistry and biology, students also did experiments in AP Psychology, physics and anatomy classes. In AP Psychology, students performed a lab using Play-Doh. After learning the sections and what they controlled of the brain students created a model containing the different parts of the human brain. Students in anatomy were able to dissect a cow’s brain to see and understand how the nervous system works. Experiments like these were a helpful and different way for students to understand what their teachers taught. “[Labs help me understand the lesson] because sometimes it gives me a visual rather than listening to the teacher talk,” Brown said.

experiments created visual for students

photo/Christie Rieck

Gathered around the lab table, chemistry students watched in fascination as the flame in the middle changed from color to color. The flame test lab was a favorite among many chemistry classes, as it allowed students to experience different chemical reactions visually and apply the material they learned in lectures. During the flame lab, students dipped wire into various chemical solutions such as barium, copper and calcium. The different solutions would change colors when placed over the flame. “The flame lab [was my favorite] because it was really exciting and [the flame] was changing colors,” sophomore Margaret Brown said. For hands-on students, labs became a helpful way to understand what the instructor was teaching. The idea of performing an experiment rather than watching and listening to the teacher was a concept that both students and teachers felt was beneficial. “I think [labs] are a great way for students to try and solve problems on their own. [There’s a difference] between memorizing a formula and using a formula,” biology teacher Kimberly Porterfield said. Although labs could help students understand what they were learning in class, they could also easily confuse students if the procedure wasn’t performed correctly. Without clear directions, students questioned if labs were even relevant to the class. “Sometimes [labs help me understand what is going on,] but some of them don’t correspond as much to what were learning,” sophomore Taylor Tachon said. With different types of science classes offered, students performed kinds of experiments, labs and dissections throughout the year. In chemistry, students performed labs involving conversions of

photo/Christie Rieck

measure. In physical science, freshman Luis Aponte hangs a magnet over a compass. “[Labs] are more hands on than average book work,” Aponte said. “I like how it gives us more experience on a certain subject.” Students determined how the magnets affected the way the compass points. photo/Sarah Berlinsky

Labs ignite interest

photo/Olivia Rees photo/Olivia Rees

photo/Sarah Berlinsky


REFLECTION 3 picture one


T

he reason I picked this picture because I feel like it is one of the best I took all year. It was even printed as the dominant on the boys swim page. The way the boy’s arm is around his head creates a frame around his face. His other arm is stretched out straight, making a leading line across the photo. The rule of thirds makes this picture interesting because he isn’t directly in the center, he is in the lower left-hand corner. The boy fills the frame, and it looks like he is actually swimming across photo. Lastly, this picture has a creative angle because it was shot at his side when he came up to take a breath. Swimming 10-5_rees0053


REFLECTION 3 picture two


T

he reason I like this picture because I feel like it shows how competitive track meets actually are. It has a rule of thirds because both runners are not directly in the center. This photo has a good center of visual interest as well as repetition of the trees in the background. The track creates leading lines and makes it look like they are running across the photo. track 3-10_rees2312


REFLECTION 3 picture three


T

he last picture I picked is also at the boys swim meet. I like this picture because of the leading lines created by the pool lanes. The center of visual interest is not in the center, making a rule of thirds. The red and blue in the background also create repetition. Overall, I feel like this is one of the better pictures I took this year. Swimming 10-5_rees_0007


REFLECTION 4


T

his year, I feel like I was an asset to the staff because, in addition to getting my work done, I always tried to volunteer to help someone if they needed it. There were many times throughout the year when problems arouse and different editors asked people if they could help out. When Channa needed help getting head shots for quote pages, I looked up all the students classes so someone would be able to easily find them and get their pictures. Weather it was a little task, like doing a cob, or more important like helping Delaney hand out fliers to save the book, I tried my best to be available whenever times got stressful. The fact is not everything always goes the way you hope. There were times when people helped me because they saw I needed it. No matter what, I felt like the entire staff had each other’s back and I wanted to be sure I was doing my part.


REFLECTION 5


O

ne hardship I was faced with this year was deadline three when I was unsure who my profile was going to be on. After the person we originally picked refused to answer any questions and directly stated he did not wish to be In the book, I was left unsure of who we would use for about a week into deadline. I don’t think I have ever been so shocked or upset coming back from an interview. Being a new staffer, I began to get nervous while everyone started working on their deadline except for me. After sending multiple emails and even asking for help on BBC, we finally got a suggestion from an art teacher about one of their students. Although deadline three was probably the hardest to get through, it was the one I learned the most from. Unexpected things do happen and there is no way to prepare or it. Being placed in a situation like this taught me to be patient and keep my head up, because not everything always goes as smoothly as you hope. If something like this were to happen again I know I would handle it differently, but that’s only because I have learned from this experience. In the end I was happy with the final result. We ended up finding a student with an interesting story and covered it in an original way.


REFLECTION 6


I

n my mid-term, when asked my greatest weakness my immediate answer was keeping stress at a minimum. The first half of the year was back to back deadlines and at certain points, I began to feel overwhelmed managing yearbook as well as six other academic classes. I tended to focus on all the small things at one time instead of completing one task and moving to the next. After recognizing this weakness in my midterm, the second half of the year I worked to improve it. I began to plan ahead before deadline came. By making sure I had all my pictures and interviews, I was able to turn in work on time and as a result, I made all three deadlines the second half of the year. Staying organized and focusing at one thing at a time was the easiest way to not stress out and stay on task. Looking back on this weakness, I can’t help but say that I feel I was successful in improving it. The second half of the year went smoothly and I kept stress at a minimum.


REFLECTION 7


C

SPA Gold Circle: Y15. Sports Action Photo I chose to submit this picture because It was the best I took all year. It was printed as the dominant on the boys swim page and I think it has good framing and leading lines.

other likely state competitors racked up points in their events. Junior Jagger Shepherd competed in the high jump and took first at the Wildcat Open jumping 6’4”, and the Lake Highland Invite with a personal record of 6’6”. Junior Joshua Green made points in his events as well, taking second in the 110 meter hurdle at the Wildcat Open with 17.39 seconds. Long distance runner sophomore Burkhardt Helfrich was another asset. Helfrich took first in the 3200 meter at the Freshman/Sophomore Metros on March 17 with a time of 10:43.17 seconds. “I run my races and try to score points,” Helfrich said. “I feel good [about my success], but I’m not where I want to be; I Scan this code with your haven’t reached my goal for track.” smart phone for more pictures from the Winter With states on their minds, the runners Park Relays. continued to practice in preparation for the upcoming competition, hoping to improve their times and break their records. “[I hope they] get better at every track meet and go as far as we can at the state meet,” Shearouse said. “I think they have worked extremely hard and I’m proud of them.” [delaney

wantMORE?

SPA Gold Circle: Y7. Sidebar Writing I chose to submit this story on Marvin Bracy because I think it is well written and was my favorite to write all year.

take off. Junior Joshua Green runs the 110 meter hurdles at the Brian Jaeger Elite Classic. “I’ve gotten way better [at hurdles] since my freshman year. I’ve dropped a second in my hurdle time and that’s good for any athlete,” Green said. Green’s personal record is 16.30 seconds.

page 17 boys track and field

SPA Gold Circle: Y28. Student Life spread: one spread I chose to submit this spread because I think it covers all the students in a creative way. It shows their personality and has an interesting design.

Double-take Double

Benny

Borrero

There is a superstition that somewhere in the world, there is another person that looks just like you. People today know this as their doppelganger, or twin. Although some may never find their look-alike, those with celebrity doppelgangers are constantly reminded of who they resemble. [olivia rees]

Baylee Thomas,

[junior]

[sophomore]

The giggling girls approached junior Benny Borrero, boldly asking for a picture to prove to the Facebook world that they met the infamous Twilight star, Edward Cullen, played by Robert Pattinson. “Even my mom’s friends [tell me I look like him],” Borrero said. “I guess we have the same hairstyle, and sometimes people tell me I dress just like him.” The resemblance was uncanny, and Borrero was often mistaken for Cullen even in his classes. “Mrs. Tauriello called me Mr. Cullen all the time in her class,” Borrero said.

Walking along the streets of the Dominican Republic in the summer of 2011, sophomore Baylee Thomas was mistaken for celebrity singer and actress Miley Cyrus. On the mission trip, many natives noticed the resemblance, and thought she was Cyrus’ Disney character, Hannah Montana. “The little babies [in the Dominican Republic] would point at me and say ‘Hannah Montana’,” Thomas said. Others have also told Thomas she looked just like Cyrus. Besides her appearance, Thomas and Cyrus shared a similarity in voice. “We kind of sound the same, that’s why people think we [are] alike,” Thomas said.

Rebecca Gage [sophomore]

The spotlight hit sophomore Rebecca Gage as she began singing for an audience that was struck by her resemblance to singer Demi Lovato. “I think it is a compliment because she is really pretty,” Gage said. “People used to tell me I looked like her all the time; not as much anymore, but I still get it sometimes.” Being musically inclined and having an interest in writing and singing songs also paralleled Gage with Lovato’s persona, transcending the similarity.

page 30 traditional

“Braves Brawl [is my favorite tradition ] because it’s a fun competition with friends,” sophomore Amy Willsey said.

Renzo

[junior]

Ramos

Strutting down the hallway, junior Renzo Ramos was often mistaken for That 70’s Show star Fez, played by actor Wilmer Valderrama. “I do sort of resemble him. When I saw the show, I was like yeah [I look like him],” Ramos said. Not only do they look alike, but neither are from the United States. They are both Latin American, yet Ramos is from Peru, while Valderrama is of Columbian and Venezuelan descent.

[sophomore]

Gabriela Daszewska Smith

As students walked past sophomore Gabriela Daszewska Smith, they stole a second glance, making sure singer Rebecca Black wasn’t on campus. The mistake was one Daszewska Smith was used to, but not flattered with. “I think we have different faces, but we have the same hair,” Daszewska Smith said. Smith found others’ comments on the resemblance more offensive than funny, as she didn’t consider Black attractive. “They don’t mean to [be rude], but I really wish they wouldn’t tell me that,” Daszewska Smith said.

photo/Paul Rodriguez/The Orange County Register/MCT

freshman Shiloh Sencion said.

photo/Lionel Hahn/Abaca Press/MCT

arkeilpane and olivia rees]

“[The 60th year] is pretty nice and cool because it’s good to be a part of the school,”

C

photo/Summit Publicity/MCT

C

10.05 seconds and 2.2 wind assistance. His wind-legal best is 10.28. “[Bracy’s work ethic] is very intense. He completes workouts with enthusiasm and a strong will to get better each time he trains,” school coach Jerry Williams said. Although Bracy’s training schedule and workouts helped him make a record in the 100 meter dash, his favorite event was the 4x100 meter relay. “I like the 4x1 because it’s one of the most exciting events due to all of the lead changes,” Bracy said. As Bracy’s high school career came to an end, he looked toward his future: running track and playing football at Florida State University, and his ultimate goal of competing in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. Bracy qualified for the Olympic trials in Eugene, Oregon, June 23-24, where he will compete against current University of Florida running back Jeff Demps, the national high school record holder since 2008. “I’m very excited about it,” Bracy said. “I’ve always been compared to him, but this will finally settle it.”

photo/Francis Specker/Landov/MCT

strong talent brought in points, players looked towards states

page 16 fierce

At the shot of the gun, he sprang out of his block and onto the track with 100 meters to go. The fans hushed in silence as he passed his competitors at the Texas Relays meet, earning first place and breaking his personal record once again. Senior Marvin Bracy’s elite running career began sophomore year when his friends suggested he try out for the track team. Bracy, unaware of his speed at the time, decided to give it a go. “I really didn’t like the sport at all. I always heard I was fast, but not track fast,” Bracy said. Since then, Bracy’s career as a sprinter only grew. Coaches and other athletes began to notice the young runner’s talent as he repeatedly won school track races and contributed points to his team’s overall score. “I was averaging about 30 points a meet, so I was showing a lot of leadership,” Bracy said. “It’s quite an honor because I work really hard and that shows that hard work pays off.” Bracy won the U.S. Junior Championship, June 23-26, 2011, with a time of

photo/John Chapman

Boys chase state title Junior Aaron Turman clutched the baton in hand as he lunged towards his teammate, senior Marvin Bracy. After a swift hand-off, Turman slowed to a halt and Bracy sprinted down the pavement in the final 100 meters, widening the gap between his opponents for another gold finish. The boys 4x100 meter relay team took first place at the Lake Highland Invite with a time of 42.91 seconds, the Lake Brantley Invite, 42.44 seconds, as well as the Winter Park Relays, 43.88 seconds, earning points in their events and adding to the team’s overall success at each meet. At each meet, junior Devin Thomas sprinted the first 100 meters, followed by senior Corey Davis, Turman and finally anchor Bracy. This combination was a major contributing factor to their triumph as a relay team. “They have confidence in each other because they have run together for the last two years,” head coach Josh Shearouse said. “They also play other sports together, so they have a good chemistry, and they work their butts off.” Their continued success and mutual goals motivated them to strive towards a state title within their events. “Our closest opportunity to win states [is] this year,” Turman said. “It humbles you to know you can’t win every day, so you go back out there and win [when you can].” Talent ranged farther than the 4x100 team though, and

Brace yourself

photo/Dimaio/Abaca Press/MCT

4

photo/Olivia Rees

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane photo/John Chapman

2

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

1

3

photo/John Chapman

[1] thumbs up. At the Wildcat Open, junior Jagger Shepherd high jumps. “I was excited; my goal was 6’8” and [jumping 6’4”] was one step closer to getting that,” Shepherd said. Shepherd’s personal best was 6’6”. [2] mount off. At the Lake Brantley Invitational, freshman Anthony Henders prepares to vault. “Afterwards, I feel happy I cleared the height. If I don’t clear it, I get disappointed and motivated to clear it the next time,” Henders said. Henders set a personal record of 9’0”. [3] shots, shots, shots. During the Wildcat Open meet, sophomore James Chris Veguilla throws shot put. “[I like] being able to achieve my distances over the weeks and to keep getting farther and farther,” Veguilla said. Veguilla placed fourth and threw 38’2”. [4] full sprint. In the Winter Park Relays, junior Adam Laxton runs the 1600 meter medley. “If I do bad, then I let everyone else down, so there is more pressure than when you are running your own race,” Laxton said. The relay team placed fifth in the 1600 meter medley with a time of 4:04 minutes.

page 31 celebrity look-alikes


DESIGNS layout 1


Color Page

2 section here

[3] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture.

3

2

[1] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. [2] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on. “I am a really good quotable quote,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

Ratio. Nequi sequi arciet re plamus destintis ex excerum fuga. Dae. Gia quas nam, consequi tem et atem lignitia dolorum ad moluptae iusam dollabo rruptam, quis qui ut qui si duciis dolupturi

how to surf like a pro:

1

4

[4] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture. [5] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

[WATCH AND LEARN]

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

5

Voloria eat quunduscit utem et undit am que aut audis aut ad quae is aut volorum, ulparum alit dolorero dent. Cus. Ex enduciis eveliciae. Nequid eturece ritatem harum et as utae escia venihil il explaut enditiaectur re voles debis que il il magnatem voleserspita dolupidelita audandis debit, ipsae velecti nonsero quis non nam, te coribus, inulpa santibus, simusam resseque vendelisi ipsanda se lam qui dentio cus, sam, solorrum sim incto ipsam, verspe venda qui abor audit, tecto cusa autent omnienienis eum quid mod et audis rempos qui corrumqui odipsam, quos eicte volenditatia velitias aci ut mil etus, to volor sim enit, quo venet adist omnimust, quis et quae sum alibus magnis quam assimus audipsam, omnis et iditi non pligent, officie ntinvenda quam voloreicto qui dolupis comnimi nvellab idicimus est utescillis non corem quam ipis provit facius apid quasped qui cusam explige ntibusdam dolorpostion prepudicia que solor sam, inus voluptas restiis aboribus. Soloreri dolore cusandi cipicipit aut eariae ni dolut vendist odio. Itae dollo volorit eum ratem as eum rempor a et et ex et perae officia commolu ptaessinis eum quam aut qui nonseque lam quo dis inullisit volori ut que officabore nis erro cus molorum, odio blam erum renis modipsae non cor aceata veritat res volor ad quae. Et harum aditi berunte mporiaecta incturepe illiatur, nessum reruptatur as re aces diti aci consecaecto maximagnam quis quunt et quodignis sim aboria a volo officil liciis quamCipis de nistiam iditate ntest, ea estiatur? Lenditaes ressequo consequunt di bernature sanditi scipisin prescius.

page description

3

Aximus mi, tores quationseque es et eseque etusam am rerenet adis et es eum quam estint voluptat quamenim repudam, cum quunditatio est, eliquo blature voluptatus netur? Unt odior maioraerchil im ute pel magnian debitat iorrumet volorendes aditio. Aliandis eventiandi blab idit ab iliquodi sae vel eium es mi, ipsaepel id ex est, voluptatur andite sunt odiore quo est, sit velest endem earibus am fugia qui quiatum at recus, to que et ipsam quiam dus eicimendunt latquae cupta nonemos si reptur susapit ionsequasi blaut essi reptam, unt ea volore aut aut volorerios volorum rem facerro videmporit, simenduci sin nos sum alibea aut estiae. Nequatemquam rat dignam vel idi volupit latius el mil ilit laut remolor modiore rferfer uptam, ut il ipsunt officie nisiti ne ratiam voluptur sapelit od eum estota quam aperupi ssimaximin eum conse porions ecerunt fugiatque omnis ex ernatquam faccus, cumque delita consed moluptibus evenis dolor sa nis naturesequam aut officte volutae storae. Et vitiatquam, cupti volestibusam consenim volorit iundae inctem nectes pernatem explat quodit eliquibus aut omnisciis que core eumquo eniaecta dempos et perfere natus iur reicid eost liqui cus alicte estio. Itaest,Illupta vendaec ernatqui dentem fugitiatesti demquiam niet aut aut faccum que eum repe ommostibus il explate volorerEhent ratur sende non conseni hilland ererchil minto velessed que erfernatem iliquia turisim agnatibeate se ditectia duntis restruptur, conet volorenissi ute num rempor rem quam quunturi nulparis molenis nonectatur mossimet et abor aut quisquos accus, sit volupta. By Olivia Rees

subhead goes here just like this in all lower case right here

lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture.

HEADLINE RIGHT HERE

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

Color Page


DESIGNS layout 2


Color Page

2 section here

Voloria eat quunduscit utem et undit am que aut audis aut ad quae is aut volorum, ulparum alit dolorero dent. Cus. Ex enduciis eveliciae. Nequid eturece ritatem harum et as utae escia venihil il explaut enditiaectur re voles debis que il il magnatem voleserspita dolupidelita audandis debit, ipsae velecti nonsero quis non nam, te coribus, inulpa santibus, simusam resseque vendelisi ipsanda se lam qui dentio cus, sam, solorrum sim incto ipsam, verspe venda qui abor audit, tecto cusa autent omnienienis eum quid mod et audis rempos qui corrumqui odipsam, quos eicte volenditatia velitias aci ut mil etus, to volor sim enit, quo venet adist omnimust, quis et quae sum alibus magnis quam assimus audipsam, omnis et iditi non pligent, officie ntinvenda quam voloreicto qui dolupis comnimi nvellab idicimus est utescillis non corem quam ipis provit facius apid quasped qui cusam explige ntibusdam dolorpostion prepudicia que solor sam, inus voluptas restiis aboribus. Soloreri dolore cusandi cipicipit aut eariae ni dolut vendist odio. Itae dollo volorit eum ratem as eum rempor a et et ex et perae officia commolu ptaessinis eum quam aut qui nonseque lam quo dis inullisit volori ut que officabore nis erro cus molorum,

4

5

odio blam erum renis modipsae non cor aceata veritat res volor ad quae. Et harum aditi berunte mporiaecta incturepe illiatur, nessum reruptatur as re aces diti aci consecaecto maximagnam quis quunt et quodignis Dam la accum venihiciur siminih icaboremodi derspe num repe sint, ut porro modigen ihilibus dolor acculliqui doluptas velliam eligenihit lacepero ex eiuntotate dolupta porum, in ra pari dolum nonsequatur a pe omnimpo reiunt, venda nis ipiciam repudigent a sunt, quistius et fugitis reptur? Boria nam dolor simo et quatibus, sunt, odic tem fugitem. Nam facerunt molores mod moditiam rempora dolorum di as posam, am vendae natet ma suntius voluptur aped qui temo exerorio minis aliquis et asit exerum inctota si sumet ut electo testem quae. Nam, eost, conseritium idus. Int, sim quid experi re de cum quunt. Sita nis cus eat volupic temolup tatiandam senisMod quatiatiasin porae ventur molecae nihitiis quo di deliciandita dolore exerspe di te vende accatur, nobis quam labore porem iliae opti acerovid expedisqui doluptae in nonsequ isciis del mossum By Olivia Rees

subhead goes right here just like this like this

3

HEADLINE HERE

[3] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture. [4] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture. [5] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture.

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

1

page description 3

5. The Bahamas

4. New Symerna Beach

3. California

2. The Bahamas

1. New Symerna Beach

[TO P 5] summer destinations

2

[1] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture. [2] lead in. I am a present tense sentance telling what is going on in the photo. “I am a really good quotable quote about the picture,” name said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen in the picture.

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

Color Page


DEADLINE 1 celebrity look alikes


page 30 traditional

photo/Francis Specker/Landov/MCT photo/Dimaio/Abaca Press/MCT

“Braves Brawl [is my favorite tradition ] because it’s a fun competition with friends,” sophomore Amy Willsey said.

The spotlight hit sophomore Rebecca Gage as she began singing for an audience that was struck by her resemblance to singer Demi Lovato. “I think it is a compliment because she is really pretty,” Gage said. “People used to tell me I looked like her all the time; not as much anymore, but I still get it sometimes.” Being musically inclined and having an interest in writing and singing songs also paralleled Gage with Lovato’s persona, transcending the similarity.

[sophomore]

Rebecca Gage

Walking along the streets of the Dominican Republic in the summer of 2011, sophomore Baylee Thomas was mistaken for celebrity singer and actress Miley Cyrus. On the mission trip, many natives noticed the resemblance, and thought she was Cyrus’ Disney character, Hannah Montana. “The little babies [in the Dominican Republic] would point at me and say ‘Hannah Montana’,” Thomas said. Others have also told Thomas she looked just like Cyrus. Besides her appearance, Thomas and Cyrus shared a similarity in voice. “We kind of sound the same, that’s why people think we [are] alike,” Thomas said.

[sophomore]

Baylee Thomas,

There is a superstition that somewhere in the world, there is another person that looks just like you. People today know this as their doppelganger, or twin. Although some may never find their look-alike, those with celebrity doppelgangers are constantly reminded of who they resemble. [olivia rees]

Double-take Double

Ramos Strutting down the hallway, junior Renzo Ramos was often mistaken for That 70’s Show star Fez, played by actor Wilmer Valderrama. “I do sort of resemble him. When I saw the show, I was like yeah [I look like him],” Ramos said. Not only do they look alike, but neither are from the United States. They are both Latin American, yet Ramos is from Peru, while Valderrama is of Columbian and Venezuelan descent.

Renzo [junior]

[junior]

Borrero

photo/Summit Publicity/MCT

The giggling girls approached junior Benny Borrero, boldly asking for a picture to prove to the Facebook world that they met the infamous Twilight star, Edward Cullen, played by Robert Pattinson. “Even my mom’s friends [tell me I look like him],” Borrero said. “I guess we have the same hairstyle, and sometimes people tell me I dress just like him.” The resemblance was uncanny, and Borrero was often mistaken for Cullen even in his classes. “Mrs. Tauriello called me Mr. Cullen all the time in her class,” Borrero said.

page 31 celebrity look-alikes

As students walked past sophomore Gabriela Daszewska Smith, they stole a second glance, making sure singer Rebecca Black wasn’t on campus. The mistake was one Daszewska Smith was used to, but not flattered with. “I think we have different faces, but we have the same hair,” Daszewska Smith said. Smith found others’ comments on the resemblance more offensive than funny, as she didn’t consider Black attractive. “They don’t mean to [be rude], but I really wish they wouldn’t tell me that,” Daszewska Smith said.

Gabriela Daszewska Smith

[sophomore]

photo/Lionel Hahn/Abaca Press/MCT

Benny

photo/Paul Rodriguez/The Orange County Register/MCT


DEADLINE 2 boys swim


page 180 fierce

fourth 50: freestyle

third 50: breaststroke

second 50: backstroke

first 50: butterfly

P P P P

check list for 200 IM race

Check it out

1

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

2

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

[My favorite tradition] is the Rowdy Crowd; they bring such energy to sports games and different

[1] just keep swimming. At the Colonial meet, sophomore Joshua Rosenfeld swims the 100 fly. “Our team improved a lot [this season]. At the beginning, kids were goofing around and now we all know what we need to [do] to get better,” Rosenfeld said. Rosenfeld swam the 200 IM in 2:25. [2] heads up. In the 200 IM, sophomore Zane Grant swims the breast stroke. “[My favorite stroke to swim is back stroke] because I feel like I’ve really perfected it since last season. You’re also able breath the entire time you’re swimming, ” Grant said. Grant placed 16th at Districts in the 200 IM.

1

photo/Olivia Rees

events, ” sophomore Jenna Layton said

2

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

[1] fins up. At the meet against Bishop Moore, junior Thomas Egan races. “Typically when I’m swimming I try to think about who I’m going against. They say you need to focus on the clock, but I don’t follow that. I like to win,” Egan said. Egan’s swam a personal best of 1:02. [2] intense. Junior Brendan Ellixson swims the 50 backstroke in the meet against Colonial. “It’s a good race because you can either be well prepared for it or not at all,” Ellixson said. Ellixson swam the 500 free and placed 5th at Districts.

[olivia rees]

page 181 boys swim

meet ending with a final score of 82-225. “Our goal was to win districts, but Dr. Phillips had about 80 swimmers that were better than us,” junior William Stone said. Later in the season, the boys won the meet against Colonial, 140-24. William Stone, Zane Grant, Israel Miller, Brendan Ellixson and Alex Havens all won their races. “It was a confidence building meet because it showed we could race really well,” Stone said. In their second to last meet, the team fell short by seven points to Edgewater. Juniors Cayman Bryan and Brendan Ellixson led the team with winning times of 56.5 seconds in the 100 yard freestyle and 1:03.9 seconds in the 100 yard backstroke, respectively. The team finished their season with a 5-4 record, despite their loss to Timber Creek in their last meet on Oct. 12. “I constantly tell the players they have to work hard because that will make them better swimmers. You have to be able to swim hard when you’re tired, swim fast in practice and swim fast in the meet,” Creighton said.

butterfly. Before his race, senior Alex Havens warms up with the 100 fly. “Butterfly is my favorite because it’s the hardest and not a lot of people are good at it,” Havens said. Havens’ best time in the 100 fly was 60 seconds.

At the sound of the buzzer, the boys jumped off their starting blocks and dove into the water, anticipating a win against Freedom. Even though the team lacked the leadership of an older captain, many underclassmen swimmers stepped up to lead the team. “I don’t think [having mostly sophomores] has created any problems,” senior Michel Ponce said. “We will probably have a strong swim season in the next two years.” Despite the lack of upperclassman leadership, the team came out strong early in the season with a victory against Bishop Moore. Sophomores Joshua Rosenfeld and Israel Miller both won their races in the 100 butterfly and the 500 freestyle, respectively. “I feel excited [that the team is made of mostly sophomores],” head coach Rosalie Creighton said. “Hopefully the sophomores will become bigger, stronger and faster for a better team. They had to step up and be leaders. We’re still working on maturity.” The team fell short against competitor Dr. Phillips in their second meet of the season, the

boys improved without upperclass captain

Young team shows leadership

photo/Kaitlyn Dike

take a breath. Against Edgewater, sophomore Israel Miller swims the 500 free. “[When swimming], I try to think about pushing myself as far as I can go, even if I am struggling to finish,” Miller said. Miller swam the 50 free in 29.1 seconds.

photo/Dean Stewart Photography


DEADLINE 2 boys swim reference


Swim

[more coverage on pages 178-181]

photo/Olivia Rees

girls. front: Gillian Jijon, Carlyn Attaway, Mackenzie Mock, Amy Heilman, Jessica Peterson. row 2: Caroline Bosworth, Amelia Cheatham, Julia Hester, Catherine Harper, Dakota Lewis, Kristen Harding, Eleanor Clark, Talia Decant. back: Jessie Wyche, Angelica Ardines, Savannah Winship, Nichole Clayton, Abigail Shea, Alexis Mauerman, Clivette Saunders, Amanda Bhanote, Makenzie Figuerado, Gillian Parrish.

THE

YEAR IN NUMBERS girls swim [5-4] 127-40 82-203 4th 84-86 87-83 71-97 136-19 132-33 111-59 65-110

photo/Olivia Rees

Freedom Dr. Phillips Relay Meet Bishop Moore Osceola West Orange Colonial Cypress Creek Edgewater Timber Creek

boys swim [5-4] 8/31/11 9/7/11 9/10/11 9/13/11 9/15/11 9/21/11 9/28/11 9/29/11 10/5/11 10/12/11

Freedom Dr. Phillips Relay Meet Bishop Moore Osceola West Orange Colonial Cypress Creek Edgewater Timber Creek

125-43 82-225 3rd 86-83 86-83 65-105 140-24 106-60 81-89 60-110

page 204 fierce

1

2

“[My favorite Boone tradition is] going home early on Wednesdays because I get to leave the

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

[1] arms wide. In the meet against Edgewater, senior Sean Ellixson swims the 100 butterfly. “[What I like best about the butterfly] is that you have to work at it. It’s also one of the hardest strokes because you get tired easily and have to use every muscle in your body,” Ellixson said. Ellixson was one of three seniors on the team. [2] deep breath. In a battle for the lead, sophomore Catherine Harper comes up for air between strokes. “After I leave the water [in competitions], I feel like my legs are going to fall off, but I feel accomplished,” Harper said. Harper’s personal record for the 200 individual medley is 2:44 seconds.

photo/Olivia Rees

boys. front: Cayman Bryan, John Burns, Michel Ponce, Zane Grant, Israel Miller. back: Joshua Rosenfeld, Brendan Ellixson, Elijah Matthews, Sean Ellixson, William Chung, Thomas Egan, Nathaniel Pagan, Steven Espinoza.

FIRST PLACE

8/31/11 9/07/11 9/10/11 9/13/11 9/15/11 9/21/11 9/28/11 9/29/11 10/05/11 10/12/11


DEADLINE 3 profile: Willow Cheek


Draw a story

1

student found creative outlet through art

4 4 photo/Chantelle Cade

2

3

[1] illustrate. Cheek sketches the holiday set up in the center of the class. [2] focus. In Drawing I class, sophomore Willow Cheek draws a still life centerpiece. [3] still life. Cheek’s still life drawing of a lemon, pear and pumpkin made in oil pastels. [4] portrait. Cheek’s self portrait of herself drawn in pencil. [5] roots. Cheek’s picture of a tree, guitar, and flower representing Mother Nature.

5

Hands covered in chalk as dust flew around the classroom, sophomore Willow Cheek created her next project. In Drawing I, students contemplated the possibilities for the next art assignment they would create. From a young age, Cheek had always had an interest in the arts, specifically in drawing. “Art was always my favorite class and I’ve always done well in it since I was about 10,” Cheek said. “When I was little, my mom used to paint a lot; a lot of people in my family are artistic.” As a hobby, Cheek drew in her free time, but also at school where she utilized a class period to do just that. Artwork became another way for Cheek to express herself both at home and at school. “Drawing is probably my favorite, but I also like painting, ceramics and music,” Cheek said. “[The best thing about art is] the ability it gives you to convey emotion and symbolism through color and imagery rather than words.” Cheek displayed her thoughts through her artwork without having to write them down; it allowed her to speak volumes without saying anything. “[Art] helps me to express ideas that I can’t express in words,” Cheek said. Cheek’s preferred mediums ranged from oil pastels, watercolor, colored pencils, tempera paint, henna and chalk. Although her main focus was drawing, Cheek attempted to broaden her skills by working on different projects dealing with these mediums. “I wish I was better at watercolor, pen and ink. [They] are harder to control than other mediums,” Cheek said. “Drawing offers a lot of mediums and variety in the techniques you can use.” The average piece of art took up to two weeks to finalize, but Cheek liked to put in extra time and effort to get the result she wanted, one that she would be proud of. “I keep working on a piece until I’m satisfied. I’m always really critical [of myself and] of what I’m doing,” Cheek said. Cheek planned to keep drawing as a hobby, but was also interested in going into Advanced Placement [Studio] Art in the future. “This would be a great opportunity to get into an art school,” art teacher Nicole Moitoza said. [olivia rees]

Jordan Knight 11 Justin Knight 11 Dillon Knox 11 Sasha Koba 9 Adam Kobert 9 Alexander Kokis 11 Alan Kominowski 11 Victor Komives Prieto 9 Kiahna Konarski 11 Allison Kozy 11 Angela Krauss Coryell 11 Hannah Kreger 11 Samuel Kreger 9 Alexander Kroll 9 Allan Kroll 9 Jennifer Krueger 10

page 107 johns - krueger


DEADLINE 4 labs


photos/Sarah Berlinsky

page 82 driven

“[My favorite tradition is] Polyester Paradise because it’s fun and no other schools do it,” sophomore Kasey Rogers said.

In chemistry, sophomore Alandra Kelly performs a combustion experiment to demonstrate how oxygen and heat can create water. First, she put on her lab glasses. Second, she poured a “fuel” into a water jug. Third, she lit the “fuel” in the jug on fire. The final product after the experiment was completed was leftover water in the water jug.

how to perform an experiment

WATCH&LEARN

1 2

photo/Lindsey Wilhite

3

4

[olivia rees]

page83 labs

[1] flame test. In chemistry, junior Stephen Erickson performs the flame test lab. “[I liked the flame test because] it was the first time that I used a Bunsen burner. It was cool to use flames and chemicals in school,” Erickson said. Students dipped wire into different solutions to change the flame’s color. [2] create. In AP Psychology, junior Richard Liley makes a model of a human brain. “[I like labs because] I don’t have to do busy work and there’s usually no homework involved,” Liley said. Students modeled the different parts of the brain with Play-Doh. [3] focus. Senior Rachel Peddie cuts a bottle for a biosphere lab in AP environmental science. “[Labs are helpful because] I’m not sitting in front of a teacher; I’m interacting and that helps me learn,” Peddie said. Students stacked five bottles on top of each other to create an ecosystem. [4] heads up. During a physics lab, junior David Schmidt tosses a basketball in the air. “[Labs] give us a chance to get out of our desks and change things up a little,” Schmidt said. Students found the initial and final velocity of the ball dropping.

different units, like the percent yield and mole concept lab. Students used formulas they learned in class to answer the questions. “[My favorite lab] was the percent yield lab. We did new things that we hadn’t done in other labs,” Tachon said. For the percent yield lab, chemistry students measured chemicals, then put them in an oven. After the chemicals were heated, the end result was copper that was separated from the rest of the chemicals. Labs like the percent yield required students to use math after they performed the experiment to get an answer. Dissections were cut out of the biology curriculum due to the fact that they were not included in the end of course exams, but the students still did one at the end of the year. In biology classes, students were able to observe and dissect a fetal pig. “[I think] the pig dissection [is the most popular lab] because the students remember it,” Porterfield said. “[Dissections] are good if the students know the material before they dissect. It’s pointless and a waste of money if they don’t.” Other than the labs in chemistry and biology, students also did experiments in AP Psychology, physics and anatomy classes. In AP Psychology, students performed a lab using Play-Doh. After learning the sections and what they controlled of the brain students created a model containing the different parts of the human brain. Students in anatomy were able to dissect a cow’s brain to see and understand how the nervous system works. Experiments like these were a helpful and different way for students to understand what their teachers taught. “[Labs help me understand the lesson] because sometimes it gives me a visual rather than listening to the teacher talk,” Brown said.

experiments created visual for students

photo/Christie Rieck

Gathered around the lab table, chemistry students watched in fascination as the flame in the middle changed from color to color. The flame test lab was a favorite among many chemistry classes, as it allowed students to experience different chemical reactions visually and apply the material they learned in lectures. During the flame lab, students dipped wire into various chemical solutions such as barium, copper and calcium. The different solutions would change colors when placed over the flame. “The flame lab [was my favorite] because it was really exciting and [the flame] was changing colors,” sophomore Margaret Brown said. For hands-on students, labs became a helpful way to understand what the instructor was teaching. The idea of performing an experiment rather than watching and listening to the teacher was a concept that both students and teachers felt was beneficial. “I think [labs] are a great way for students to try and solve problems on their own. [There’s a difference] between memorizing a formula and using a formula,” biology teacher Kimberly Porterfield said. Although labs could help students understand what they were learning in class, they could also easily confuse students if the procedure wasn’t performed correctly. Without clear directions, students questioned if labs were even relevant to the class. “Sometimes [labs help me understand what is going on,] but some of them don’t correspond as much to what were learning,” sophomore Taylor Tachon said. With different types of science classes offered, students performed kinds of experiments, labs and dissections throughout the year. In chemistry, students performed labs involving conversions of

photo/Christie Rieck

measure. In physical science, freshman Luis Aponte hangs a magnet over a compass. “[Labs] are more hands on than average book work,” Aponte said. “I like how it gives us more experience on a certain subject.” Students determined how the magnets affected the way the compass points. photo/Sarah Berlinsky

Labs ignite interest

photo/Olivia Rees photo/Olivia Rees

photo/Sarah Berlinsky


DEADLINE 5 brave aid


2000

page 36 student life

photo/Carly Burton

3 4

The audience grew quiet and waited in anticipation for sophomore Kristian Velazquez to beat box. He took a sip of water, cleared his throat and began performing songs with his beats. “I heard my cousin and taught myself when I was 6-years-old. [When I heard my cousin] it gave me a feeling of amazement I wanted to give to other people,” Velazquez said. Coming from a family with multiple beat boxers, Velazquez learned at a young age not to show his nerves while performing in front of others. “I get nervous in front of small audiences; not as much [with] bigger [audiences]. When people go along with it and cheer, it calms me down,” Velazquez said. Velazquez beat boxed wherever he went, whether he was at home or walking through the halls on his way to class. The covers that he performed at the show included “Gold Digger” and different types of Dubstep style songs, as well as some of his own original freestyle. “I think I did pretty good [at Brave Aid]. It seems like beat boxing was new to a lot of people; something they never heard before,” Velazquez said.

HARMONY

beats make

1 3 photo/Carly Burton

“[My favorite tradition is the] powder puff football because it’s funny to watch the guys dressed up and acting like

2003

As a senior, Ericka Dunlap sang at Brave Aid. Dunlap was crowned Miss America in 2004.

PAST

blasts

FROM THE

Senior John Bulford III performed at Brave Aid. Bulford has released multiple albums and has worked with the top people in country music.

2

[1] red, white and blue. At the beginning of Brave Aid, senior Angel Lozada sings the national anthem. “I’m not nervous when performing. When I get on stage I feel in my element,” Lozada said. [2] shake your booty. In Rated Rrrr’s dance, senior May Niu sword-fights with junior Jonathan Colon-Gonzalez. “The image we wanted to generate to the audience was the same as the movie of Pirates of the Caribbean. Fighting choreography was necessary and pirates have to have swords,” Niu said. Niu choreographed the dance herself. [3] jam. In the second of his two acts, senior Tyler Colick plays the guitar. “Having previous stage performance [experience] , I wasn’t stage shy. Having two acts allowed me to participate in two completely different [things],” Colick said. Colick played over 15 instruments. [4] prancer. Sophomore Tyler Cook burlesque dances to “I’m A Good Girl.” “[My favorite part of Brave Aid was] getting to get all dressed up in nice costumes and getting to perform Burlesque,” Cook said. Cook also performed with the Bravettes.

cheerleaders,” sophomore Foster Zannini said.

As students and parents filled the auditorium and found their seats, performers calmed their nerves back stage, went over dances and fixed their costumes before Brave Aid XXVII on Jan. 27. The Student Government Association dedicated the show to Laura Grant and Eddie Culberhouse. The Always Wear Your Seatbelt Foundation received the money raised from the show in their honor. Before the show, senior Angel Lozada sang the national anthem. The night then kicked off with a video presentation by Grant and Culberhouse’s families about the importance of buckling up which reminded the audience of the tragic car accident. “[The AWYS Foundation] is important because you really should be safe on the road and the club makes sure that never happens again. It raises awareness because not everyone always thinks about putting on their seat belt,” junior Christian Drayton, who performed with Rechorded, said. Drayton and 19 other acts showcased their individual talents through choreographed dances, musical ensembles, stand-up comedy and original song performances. The performers, such as freshman Ericka Creager who sang “Beautiful” by Christina Aguilera, had

page 37 brave aid

different methods of preparing for the show. “I rehearsed every night with my sister [Katlyn Stewart] for a week [before the show],” Creager said. “I wasn’t as prepared as I should have been and got nervous at the last second.” Despite the different types of acts, the performers came together as a show. After Creager’s duet with Stewart, the band Rahman and the Noodles performed their original song “Let Go.” “I get nervous right before I go on to perform,” senior Easah Rahman said. “As the song goes on, it just becomes a jam in my practice room. Everyone else disappears except for my band.” Senior Madison Lumbert and junior Taylor Wood also sang and performed their original song, “Hemiola Heartbeats.” The night ended with Stixx, the drum line’s glow-in-the-dark performance. Through the sold-out show, SGA raised $5,550 from the ticket and custom designed T-shirt sales for the AWYS Foundation. “I think it’s great [that all the proceeds went to the AWYS Foundation]. We had so much fun doing it and all the money that went to it is great,” junior Jessica Hill said. [olivia rees and blake waranch]

talent show proceeds benefited Always Wear Your Seatbelt Foundation

AIDcharity Braves

black magic. Playing the drums, senior Geoffrey Kirchoff performs “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. “[I like] the individuality and [how] everyone brings their own personal talents to the show,” Kirchoff said. Kirchoff began playing with his friend, senior Tyler Colick, in eighth grade.

photo/Carly Burton

photo/Carly Burton photo/Blake Waranch


DEADLINE 7 boys track and field


3

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane photo/John Chapman

page 16 fierce

4

“[The 60th year] is pretty nice and cool because it’s good to be a part of the school,”

arkeilpane and olivia rees]

photo/John Chapman

other likely state competitors racked up points in their events. Junior Jagger Shepherd competed in the high jump and took first at the Wildcat Open jumping 6’4”, and the Lake Highland Invite with a personal record of 6’6”. Junior Joshua Green made points in his events as well, taking second in the 110 meter hurdle at the want MORE? Wildcat Open with 17.39 seconds. Long distance runner sophomore Burkhardt Helfrich was another asset. Helfrich took first in the 3200 meter at the Freshman/Sophomore Metros on March 17 with a time of 10:43.17 seconds. “I run my races and try to score points,” Helfrich said. “I feel good [about my success], but I’m not where I want to be; I Scan this code with your haven’t reached my goal for track.” smart phone for more pictures from the Winter With states on their minds, the runners Park Relays. continued to practice in preparation for the upcoming competition, hoping to improve their times and break their records. “[I hope they] get better at every track meet and go as far as we can at the state meet,” Shearouse said. “I think they have worked extremely hard and I’m proud of them.” [delaney

strong talent brought in points, players looked towards states

Boys chase state title

photo/Delaney Arkeilpane

Junior Aaron Turman clutched the baton in hand as he lunged towards his teammate, senior Marvin Bracy. After a swift hand-off, Turman slowed to a halt and Bracy sprinted down the pavement in the final 100 meters, widening the gap between his opponents for another gold finish. The boys 4x100 meter relay team took first place at the Lake Highland Invite with a time of 42.91 seconds, the Lake Brantley Invite, 42.44 seconds, as well as the Winter Park Relays, 43.88 seconds, earning points in their events and adding to the team’s overall success at each meet. At each meet, junior Devin Thomas sprinted the first 100 meters, followed by senior Corey Davis, Turman and finally anchor Bracy. This combination was a major contributing factor to their triumph as a relay team. “They have confidence in each other because they have run together for the last two years,” head coach Josh Shearouse said. “They also play other sports together, so they have a good chemistry, and they work their butts off.” Their continued success and mutual goals motivated them to strive towards a state title within their events. “Our closest opportunity to win states [is] this year,” Turman said. “It humbles you to know you can’t win every day, so you go back out there and win [when you can].” Talent ranged farther than the 4x100 team though, and

1

2

photo/John Chapman

[1] thumbs up. At the Wildcat Open, junior Jagger Shepherd high jumps. “I was excited; my goal was 6’8” and [jumping 6’4”] was one step closer to getting that,” Shepherd said. Shepherd’s personal best was 6’6”. [2] mount off. At the Lake Brantley Invitational, freshman Anthony Henders prepares to vault. “Afterwards, I feel happy I cleared the height. If I don’t clear it, I get disappointed and motivated to clear it the next time,” Henders said. Henders set a personal record of 9’0”. [3] shots, shots, shots. During the Wildcat Open meet, sophomore James Chris Veguilla throws shot put. “[I like] being able to achieve my distances over the weeks and to keep getting farther and farther,” Veguilla said. Veguilla placed fourth and threw 38’2”. [4] full sprint. In the Winter Park Relays, junior Adam Laxton runs the 1600 meter medley. “If I do bad, then I let everyone else down, so there is more pressure than when you are running your own race,” Laxton said. The relay team placed fifth in the 1600 meter medley with a time of 4:04 minutes.

photo/Olivia Rees

freshman Shiloh Sencion said.

At the shot of the gun, he sprang out of his block and onto the track with 100 meters to go. The fans hushed in silence as he passed his competitors at the Texas Relays meet, earning first place and breaking his personal record once again. Senior Marvin Bracy’s elite running career began sophomore year when his friends suggested he try out for the track team. Bracy, unaware of his speed at the time, decided to give it a go. “I really didn’t like the sport at all. I always heard I was fast, but not track fast,” Bracy said. Since then, Bracy’s career as a sprinter only grew. Coaches and other athletes began to notice the young runner’s talent as he repeatedly won school track races and contributed points to his team’s overall score. “I was averaging about 30 points a meet, so I was showing a lot of leadership,” Bracy said. “It’s quite an honor because I work really hard and that shows that hard work pays off.” Bracy won the U.S. Junior Championship, June 23-26, 2011, with a time of

Brace yourself

page 17 boys track and field

take off. Junior Joshua Green runs the 110 meter hurdles at the Brian Jaeger Elite Classic. “I’ve gotten way better [at hurdles] since my freshman year. I’ve dropped a second in my hurdle time and that’s good for any athlete,” Green said. Green’s personal record is 16.30 seconds.

10.05 seconds and 2.2 wind assistance. His wind-legal best is 10.28. “[Bracy’s work ethic] is very intense. He completes workouts with enthusiasm and a strong will to get better each time he trains,” school coach Jerry Williams said. Although Bracy’s training schedule and workouts helped him make a record in the 100 meter dash, his favorite event was the 4x100 meter relay. “I like the 4x1 because it’s one of the most exciting events due to all of the lead changes,” Bracy said. As Bracy’s high school career came to an end, he looked toward his future: running track and playing football at Florida State University, and his ultimate goal of competing in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. Bracy qualified for the Olympic trials in Eugene, Oregon, June 23-24, where he will compete against current University of Florida running back Jeff Demps, the national high school record holder since 2008. “I’m very excited about it,” Bracy said. “I’ve always been compared to him, but this will finally settle it.”


DEADLINE 7 boys track and field reference


Track and Field

[more coverage on pages 14-17]

photo/Kaitlyn Dike

girls varsity. front: Caroline Coleman, Margaret Dukes, Melanie Caban, Nikia Toomey. row 2: Kelsey Matteson, Justice Donald, Michelle Duncan, Kylia Tillman, Rhapsody Arias. row 3: Leah Sikes, Alexandria Meneses, Courtney Patz, Mackenzie Williamson, Olivia Rees. row 4: Kristina Ciaccio, Marie Gilles, Miranda Miller, Brandy Taylor, Alandra Kelly. back: Aaliyah Johnson, Stephanie Hunte.

THE

YEAR IN NUMBERS girls track and field

3/3/12 3/10/12 3/17/12 3/21/12 3/22/12 4/14/12

Wildcat Open Lake Highland Invite Lake Brantley Invite Winter Park Relays Fr/So Metro Metro Qualifiers Metro Finals Brian Jaegar Elite

4th 9th 5th 2nd 7th 7th 5th 12th photo/Kaitlyn Dike

2/20/12 2/24/12

THE

YEAR IN NUMBERS boys track and field

3/3/12 3/10/12 3/17/12 3/21/12 3/22/12 4/14/12

Wildcat Open Lake Highland Invite Lake Brantley Invite Winter Park Relays Fr/So Metro Metro Qualifiers Metro Finals Brian Jaegar Elite

Why do you do track and field? Athletes comment on their favorite aspects of track and field.

page 28 fierce

4th 4th 11th 3rd 2nd 6th 6th 5th

boys varsity. front: Ryan Reyes, Devin Griggs, Marvin Bracy, Desmond Holland, Bradley Hutsell, Corey Davis. row 2: Dontrayvis Wesley, Burkhardt Helfrich, Jamal Galette, Jagger Shepherd, Aaron Turman, Joshua Green, Keiton Best. row 3: William Flowers, Ryan Harding, Christopher Slason, Tyree Surrency, Robert Pell, Darrian Pennant, Tyler Chapman. row 4: Austin Kneeland, Patrick Gresosky, Brandon Reddick, Anthony Coscia, Niko Banks, Simon Tran, Richard Liley. row 5: Luke Smith, James Dawson, Shiloh Sencion, Shawn Latimer, Weang Ruach, Kerry Alce, James Chris Veguilla. back: Frank Nelson, Devin Thomas, Blake Williams, Deion Thomas, Adam Laxton, Nathaniel Reiff.

Niko Banks, junior “I like the track meets and running against other schools. You work all week and you get to see if you’re better than other teams.”

Track & Field

2/20/12 2/24/12

Michelle Duncan, junior “[I do track and field] to stay in shape for cross country. I like track because it is all different sports together at a meet. I [also] like the different workouts because it makes it interesting with all of the variety.” photo/DSP photphoto/Caroline Coleman

“[My favorite tradition is] football game day; when we get free food from cheerleaders

Olivia Rees 2012 portfolio  

sophomore portfolio