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Mackenzie Mock’s Portfolio


Mackenzie Mock 2147 Santa Antilles Rd Orlando, FL 32806 mackenziemock18@gmail.com (407) 267-7005 May 23, 2013 Mike James Sports Topic Editor Los Angeles Times 202 W First St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 Dear Mr. James: Perhaps the Los Angeles Times is looking for a young mind who works well in group settings, can manage her time and is knowledgeable about sports. If this is the kind of person you are searching for, then please accept the accompanying resume for your review and consideration for the summer internships you offer in which these qualities will be valued and help your staff. As a staffer on my high school newspaper, I continuously wrote and peer edited stories, researched, photographed events and designed pages. In using InDesign and Photoshop I have become comfortable with these applications and feel that I can use both effectively. Being my first year on staff, I brought new ideas to the table, a fresh style of writing and a creative mind. Working with 25 other members on staff has taught me patience, focus and how to work well in group settings. Creatively, I enjoy writing pieces that come together in the paper and are bursting with knowledge. As a focused person, I would be a good fit for this internship because I always meet deadline and turn in my best work. Never do I slack during class, and I always pay attention to small details. Your focused attitude would give me a chance to soak up knowledge and learn things that cannot simply be taught in a classroom. Although the accompanying resume provides adequate background information, I think a personal interview would better show you what I can do and how I do it. I would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you at a convenient time. Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Respectfully yours,

Mackenzie Mock Enclosed: resume


Mackenzie Mock 2147 Santa Antilles Rd Orlando, FL 32806 mackenziemock18@gmail.com (407) 267-7005 OBJECTIVE To expand my knowledge of the everyday life at a publishing company and to seek knowledge of how to improve my writing. EDUCATION • Completed one year at William R. Boone High School • Graduation date: May 2015 • G.P.A.: 3.28 RELEVANT HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES English 1 Honors, English 2 Honors, Journalism 1 EXPERIENCE • Newspaper Staff Member, Hi-Lights Aug 2012 - present. Experience taking photos, designing pages, tweeting at sporting events, working on the web, interviewing, peer editing and writing. • Babysitting The summer of 2012 on Mondays and Wednesdays for the Reeves family. Experience taking care of children, doing housework and cooking meals. • Working at Palmer’s Garden & Goods The summer of 2012 on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Experience assisting customers, unloading deliveries, completing installations, working the cash register and taking care of plants. HONORS, AWARDS, AND MEMBERSHIPS • Awarded Rookie of the Year for the 2012 William R. Boone High School Varsity water polo team. • Awarded MVP of the 2011 10th grade and under Southeast Zone water polo team. • A member of the FHSAA District runner-up 2013 water polo team at William R. Boone High School. ACTIVITIES • Varsity water polo team, William R. Boone High School (2012-2103) • Varsity swimming team, William R. Boone High School (2011-2013) • Club water polo team for Central Florida Sun (2009-2013) • Club water polo team for Ransom Raiders (2012-2013) • 10th grade and under water polo team for Olympic Development Program (2011-2012) REFERENCES Rosalie Creighton- Water polo and swimming coach at William R. Boone High School (321) 277-2974 Renee Burke- Hi-Lights newspaper adviser (407) 443-8451


Self analytical evaluation I got into journalism because I love to write. I’ve always gotten better grades in English than I have in math or science. I can sit and write a five paragraph essay with no problem, but if you ask me to find the lengths of a triangle’s sides or talk about the Cell Theory, I will cringe in reluctance. My eighth grade English teacher helped me develop my love of writing by giving my class an assignment to write autobiographies. While writing mine, I learned how writing makes me feel. It lets me get all my feelings out and talk about things that I normally wouldn’t. I think writing saved me in a way because when my mom when through her sickness, I had no one to talk to, so I just wrote. I kept a journal and wrote down all my feelings and thoughts about what was going on. To be able to release all those emotions in a healthy way helped me to work through the situation. Throughout this year, I have learned life skills that I will carry with me in the future, including time management, cooperation and flexibility. Through ad sales, I learned that having connections will get you far. My godparents are business owners, so I was able to sell one ad to them in exchange for free babysitting. I learned that deadlines can be chaotic, and at some times, a little scary, especially through our last issue. But if you use your class time wisely and focus on what you have to do, you can meet deadline every time. Even though all the rules we must follow make publishing the paper harder, they’re what make it special. If writing a story was easy, then everyone could do it. Everything having to be a pica away from each other, the headline having to be noun, verb and direct object and not being able to just make up a good quote when you need one makes you work harder, which in the end makes you more proud of what you have accomplished. At the beginning of the year, I had problems working with Adobe Photoshop, Bridge or InDesign. I was clueless as to what batch renaming was, how to COB a photo and what to do when your body copy isn’t justified. However, through each issue, I learned new things about each program that helped me further my writing, designing and photography skills. I became proficient in all three applications, and I now feel confident in using them on my own. Furthermore, I learned that without teamwork there wouldn’t be a paper. We all are responsible for our own stories, but if someone needs help, you must be willing to do whatever you can to assist him because it isn’t a matter of just his story. Any one person’s struggles affect the whole paper. If one person doesn’t do his or her part, other people suffer. For example, when another staffer didn’t finish his story for the first deadline, mine got pulled because they were interrelated. Mrs. Burke published both our stories the next month, but I was sad that I didn’t have any of my writing in the first issue. I struggled this year with dedication. Even though I met deadline the majority of issues and did all of my work, I still feel as though I could have been a part of the staff more. I chose water polo as my number one priority because I was committed to it first and I plan on playing in college. Because of this, I missed important staff activities including the Reservation Run, pumpkin carving and camp. I went to Green Up Boone for only an hour because I had an important game. I still contributed my funds and time the best I could, but I wish I had done a better job of dedicating myself to the staff. Next year, I hope to manage my time better and to be able to balance water polo and newspaper because I am starting to enjoy both equally. This class has been valuable to me because it has taught me skills I can use for the rest of my life. In college, I’ll have to write essays, and in the business world, I will have to send emails and letters to coworkers, bosses and clients. The grammar, spelling and word choice I have learned have


Self analytical evaluation made my writing better and will set me apart from others who have not been as lucky as me to take this course. In my life, I will need to be able to manage my time, work well with others and be dedicated to the things I do. Taking this class has helped me with all these things and has prepared me for the real world. Even if I do not ever write another newspaper story after I leave high school, I will take the skills I have learned and carry them with me for the rest of my life.


reflection 1 My best story this year was the Edgewater vs. Boone football spread. It was a creative way to cover the same game that happens every year, and it not only incorporated our students, but students from another school as well. Both teams thoroughly enjoyed the spread, and it won an award. The spread was more of a lineup than a story. It was a DPS that included five Edgewater football players on the left and five Boone football players on the right, each posed with either a helmet on or with a ball. They were cobbed and layered over each other. A statistic box was below each player and included his grade, number, weight, height and extra stats about his season. A timeline ran across the bottom of the page including the score of every game Edgewater and Boone have played against each other, and quote boxes from the coaches were in the upper right and left corners. This spread was difficult to complete because I had to take pictures of both sets of players, interview each coach, find stats from each team’s season and find the score of each game ever played between the two teams. On top of all of that, I had to design the spread and put everything on the page. My first draft only included the stats from Boone, Ziglar’s interview, the timeline information and my headline and subhead because I hadn’t had the opportunity to take pictures of either team’s players or visit Edgewater. Eventually, I finished everything, but it was a process. I took pictures of the Boone players, but I couldn’t get Aaron Turman, so I had to go back on another day. When I went back, my lighting on the camera was bad, so he turned out looking like a white blob. Mrs. Burke had to go during sixth period one day and take the picture herself. The first time I went to Edgewater, no one was on the field, and when I found the team, the coach told me I had mixed up the days. I was supposed to come the day before. The players and coach waited for me for an hour after practice. I rescheduled, and the next time I went back, the quarterback was sick, and I still didn’t get the statistics. But I took the photos and interviewed the coach. I asked another staffer to upload the pictures, but she did it incorrectly, and I lost all the photos. So I went back for a third time and took the pictures again; thankfully, this time the quarterback was there, and all of the players were very cooperative and patient. My pictures uploaded correctly, and I was able to place everything on the page. Throughout the process, I learned how to create a timeline, COB and make a gill clear. I also learned that communication is key; football players are good models, and you never know who you’ll meet on an interview and what that can lead to. I am most proud of this story because it took so much time and effort. When I opened the paper and saw the final product, I felt overwhelmed with happiness because I had done it all by myself. There isn’t one thing about the spread that I like the most. I think everything looks good, and it all fit together very nicely. The timeline fits across the bottoms of both pages, the quote boxes are symmetrical, the players are all stacked neatly and posed creatively and the green football field in the background ties it together. I also am very happy with the school’s reaction to it. Students held up a copy of the Boone part of the spread on either side of coach Ziglar as he gave his speech after the Senior Snake on the day of the game.


First Draft


Final Story


Reflection 2 I think my story about deep sea fishermen, Sam Furukawa and Robert Houston, still needs work. It started off being about a student who competitively deep sea fishes and wins competitions and tournaments. I was going to design an infographic of a fishing pole, place a photo depicting where the student fishes and put in photos of fish he has caught and any medals or trophies he has received. My angle was going to be about how unique this student’s hobby is and how good he is at it. I was also going to include how his dad taught him to fish and what everything is like from the father’s perspective. However, I didn’t have a lot of background knowledge on the student, and his interview was very short. He also didn’t have any pictures of himself, and I could not get in contact with his father, so I broadened the story and included a teacher who deep sea fishes for fun with his family. His interview took a while to get, and even though he promised me pictures by a certain date, it took weeks to get them. I used a photo of the teacher and his children fishing, put a pulled quote of the student where the infographic was originally supposed to go and lengthened my story so I wouldn’t need an extra picture. I also added a fast facts about fishing and another piece of secondary coverage about deep sea fishing tournaments coming up. My final product was very different than the original plan. While writing the story, I learned that you can’t always depend on other people to help you out, and if someone doesn’t want to talk to you, you need to find someone else with whom to speak to. I also learned how quickly and easily a story can be changed throughout the writing process. Lastly, I learned that even if you choose a story that you necessarily don’t know about, you should still try your best because any effort is better than none. To further improve this piece, I would make sure I interviewed the student’s father and one of the teacher’s kids. Also, I would put an action shot on the page, like one of the student reeling in a fish or the teacher helping his kids fish, instead of just a posed one. Lastly, I would get pictures of the student’s awards and design the infographic. I am not neither ashamed nor proud of this piece. I realize it could’ve been a lot better and was not at my standard of writing, but I feel I did the best that I could with what I had. I am glad it was published, but I wish I had had more time and more information to create it the way I had originally planned.


First Draft


FINAL STORY 9

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights featurestories ANNUAL AWARDS NIGHT

SOFTBALL UPDATE

The annual award ceremony is on May 21 at 6 p.m. in the Boone auditorium. Starting now, seniors must begin to inform the College and Career Center of their college choice. For seniors who are going into the military, attending a technical school or who have received scholarships, there is a separate sheet available.

The softball team will play against Freedom High School at home at 7 p.m. Overall, the team has 53 runs, .0341 base percentage, 0.908 fielding percentage and have earned a run average of the pitching staff 2.21.

ßhealthbenefits

fishing Fishing is considered a low-stress, low-impact activity.

benefits to the heart: Deep-sea and big bass fishing gives strenuous workout when reeling in and keeps one’s heart rate elevated.

the brain: “Unplugging” from daily stresses can let one’s brain recharge and gain better focus.

photo courtesy/RICHARD HOUSTON

BIG CATCH. On a family trip to West Palm Beach, Richard Houston and daughter Molly hold a 25-35 pound mahi-mahi. “It’s great being around nature; to me it’s a hunter gather thing. It’s [also] a really good feeling when you rig up a bait and catch a really big fish, [but] it’s a real joy to see Molly and Sam catch a beautiful fish,” Houston said. The Houston family like to fish in the Indian River and Lake Monroe.

the body: Dexterity. Baiting, reeling, etc. keeps one’s fingers, shoulders and arms flexible and activates muscles.

Students, faculty deep-sea fish

Fresh air. High oxygen and low pollution is great for one’s body, especially lungs.

By MACKENZIE MOCK “Reel him in. You’ve almost got him, just reel him in!” This is a phrase a deepsea fisher would say to another while he is in the process of catching a fish. Deep-sea fishing is a hobby, but it can also be considered a sport. There are competitions and tournaments with prizes and awards, such as medals, trophies, money and gift certificates. “I feel [a sense of] achievement when I catch a fish. I’m relieved I got him,” junior Sam Furukawa said. Furukawa competitively deep -sea fishes from May thru July. He participates in tournaments, such as the Salt Water Classic every year, during this time. To prepare for his tournaments he checks the lines and gets his pole ready. He practices year round at Port Canaveral and Cocoa every other weekend from 7 a.m. to around 5 p.m. When he practices, he works on his cast and reeling in fish. “I love being out on the ocean and looking out at the water. It’s calming to just sit there and wait for a fish. You think about things that normally you don’t have time to think about,”

Vitamin D. Spending time in the sun raises levels of Vitamin D which helps protect one from health issues, such as future bone problems or heart disease.

ßcomingup Fishing for Freedom Benefits: The Wounded Warroir Project and Charlie Templeton Benefit Fund

When: March 30 Where: New Smyrna Beach Online: floridasportsman. com/tournamanetcalendar

Fathers teach kids how to fish

Elegant Gulf Front Condo on Anna Maria Island, For Leasing Details Scan this QR Code or e-mail manager@laplage10.com

Furukawa said. Furukawa has been fishing since he was 4 years old when his dad taught him. Since then, he has participated in tournaments and won the Salt Water Classic, in 2010, at 14 years old. He won first place, earning $2,000. After the Salt Water Classic, Furukawa started thinking about his future and fishing in college. “I would fish in college [on a competitive team] if I got accepted to a good enough school, like Florida State University or the University of Tennessee, I wouldn’t make a career out of it unless it was after retirement,” Furukawa said. Furukawa fishes with his dad and sister. Normally, the Furukawas compete as a team in family competitions. While his father drives the boat, Furukawa and his sister fish. “Fishing is a family thing. My dad taught me everything I know. He is an inspiration to me everyday we fish,” Furukawa said. Another person who learned how to fish from his father is economies teacher Richard Houston. His dad fished every day while Houston was growing up. He remembers fishing since he was in pre-school. When he was little he

would go out to a nearby pond with his cane pole and fish. “I love being out around nature, and salt water environments are really beautiful. It’s just a lot of fun to catch fish,” Houston said. Now that Houston has a family, he has taught his son to fish. He fishes with his children and brother in the Indian River and Lake Monroe during the winter. He has also fished in Southwest Florida in the Keys. “I get the most enjoyment now out of watching my children fish,” Houston said. While fishing is a calming sport, it can also be full of injuries. Houston knows from many encounters on the water. Several hooks have gone in his hands. One time his son hit him in the eyebrow with a lure and hook. “Fishing is normally relaxing. You feel good even if you don’t catch a fish,” Houston said. On another fishing trip with his son in the Keys, during Christmas vacation, Houston caught three tarpons and his son caught a 30 pound red fish. “Fishing has affected my life. It helps me relax and I think I’m happier because of it. I also have a better appreciation for nature,” Houston said.

We were just fishing and out of no where a shark came into the boat and hit me. He knocked my hip out of place. Sam Furukawa Junior

Andrew Hungerford 1141 S. Osceola Ave. Orlando, FL 32806 studio: 407.420.9596 ahungerford@cfl.rr.com

HUNGERFORD design hungerforddesign.com

Voted Best Wings three years in a row! Corner of Conway Rd. and Michigan St. www.wingshack.com


REFLECTION 3

This is my favorite picture I’ve taken this year. I took it on my second photo day at an athletic training meeting. Nothing exciting was going on, so I decided to take pictures of the trainers helping the incoming athletes, who were hurt. I like this picture because it shows how focused the trainer is while Anthony describes his injury to her, and how he is pointing to his wrist to show her exactly where he’s hurt. I also like that the photo shows action because the trainer has the pre wrap in her hand ready to tape his wrist. This photo has good composition such as center of visual interest. (Athletic training club meeting 3-6_Mackenzie019. jpg).


RELECTION 3 This is another one of my favorite pictures. I took it on my first photoday at the JV baseball game. I didn’t have a very good camera, so this was one of the few good shots I took. It was difficult taking pictures because of the metal fence and the quick movements of the players. I like this photo because it shows the action of the pitcher winding up to throw the ball. I love his face because it looks as if he is using all his strength for just that one pitch. I also like the fellow Boone player in the background, who is waiting for the pitch, so he can catch the ball and get the opposing player out. Whereas, the opposing player is trying to steal base and is ready to run as soon as the ball is hit, so he will be safe. This photo has good composition such as rule of thirds. ( JV baseball 3-6_Mackenzie0073.jpg).


REFLECTION 3

This last photo is another favorite picture of mine. I took this photo on my second photo day during my seventh period. I have biology with Mrs. Bortner, and one of her AP students was in her classroom working on a lab she had been doing. I really like this picture because of all the colors in it, such as the student’s bright colored shirt and the pink plants. Even though I kept walking around the room taking pictures, she was never disturbed and kept working on her project. What I love about this photo is how the student is in focus, but the flowers in the front are not. It creates good depth of field. The bookshelves in the background filled with beakers also create leading lines. (Biology lab 3-6_Mackenzie015.jpg).


REFLECTION 4 I believe I was an asset to the 2013 Hi-Lights staff in many ways. I always focused in class and used my time wisely. I wrote my stories and interview questions at home, so I could come into class prepared and get my stuff done. Also, doing so sped up the process and helped me stay on deadline. I also helped other staffers with their stories. I conducted interviews for other people throughout the year, including two students for Ciara during the February issue, and I helped Lizzy with her track story for the May issue. Lastly, I helped Lia and Gaby while they were covering water polo. I gave them advice on who they should interview and what their angles should be, told them the official terms while they were tweeting, helped them pick pictures and interviewed Mrs. Creighton for both of them. Whenever I peer edit, I make sure to give constructive criticism and write comments that will help the other staffers make their stories better. When proofing pages, I read every story carefully and ask questions if I’m unsure on anything, so I know that I can correct any mistakes made. In class, I am attentive and do my work. I try not to disrupt the class or distract others from working. I am committed to this staff 100 percent and believe that I have shown my dedication throughout the year. I have never missed a workday, not even for my best friend’s grandfather’s funeral or when I had three important games and my coach was counting on me to be there. If I ever am behind on deadline or need to work on something, I will come after school. At the beginning of the year, I was out of school for about a week and a half, but I still kept up with my story by emailing Mrs. Burke and my editors, dropping off my stories at school and picking them up to fix edits. I hope throughout the next two years I can continue to show my dedication and commitment to staff, as well as my love for journalism.


REFLECTION 5 One of the hardships I faced this year was learning how to work InDesign and Photoshop. I had never used either program, and before taking this class, I was technologically challenged. I didn’t know how to do something as simple as crop a photo or place an image, and I surely didn’t understand the more complicated things such as cobbing. Because of my lack of knowledge of the computer, I feel I was set back. My pages could have been more creative if I had known what to do, and I probably would’ve taken more chances with designing and secondary coverage if I could execute certain skills. I also had trouble with working the camera settings. All of my photos would turn out either too dark or too light. I never got the perfect medium. Because of my inability to adjust my lighting and other settings, there were multiple times when I took photos and they did not turn out well. For example, my first basketball game, the photos were too dark, when I took pictures of the football players they were too bright and my photos from signing day were up too close in the frame. While working through these problems, I learned that you can never be afraid to ask for help. If I hadn’t been too shy, I could’ve asked questions earlier on, and my problems would have been solved quicker. Also, I learned that the more you practice something, the better you will be at it. For my football spread, I had to do 10 cobs, and at the beginning, I had no clue what a COB even was. But by the end, I could do one in my sleep because I had practiced. The more pictures I took, the better I got at photographing. Whether I did it for my beat, a story or my photo day, taking all those pictures helped me feel more comfortable with the camera and learn the settings better. I hope these problems do not arise in the future, but if they were to, I would know what to do: ask for help. Even if I felt embarrassed or shy, I would know that asking questions and getting assistance would make things a lot easier. We have a teacher and 25 other staffers for a reason, so not everyone has to struggle on her own. Eventually, I handled these situations quite well. It just took a little time for me to not feel stupid about not knowing everything and to realize that struggling until you figure it out on your own is pointless if you have a ton of people already there to help you. After a few mistakes, I asked for help and learned what to do. The older staffers guided me through Indesign and Photoshop, and Mrs. Burke helped me with the camera settings. I could’ve handled the situation better by getting help sooner, but I’m proud that I eventually had the courage to ask questions.


REFLECTION 6 For the mid-semester exam, Mrs. Burke asked everyone what their three goals for next semester were. For my first goal, I said I wanted to get my grade up from a B to an A. I had gotten a B in the first semester because some of my stories were late, I didn’t turn in my web stories and I forgot to write my story cards a couple of times. So to bring my grade up, I made sure that I stayed on deadline every issue, wrote and posted each of my web stories and thought of creative story cards and turned them in on time. My second goal was to start taking better pictures. Many times, I had messed up the camera settings and didn’t get a good photo. To take better pictures, I asked for help. Mrs. Burke showed me how to fix and change the camera settings, especially the lighting. Emily Nusbickel helped me get good action shots at basketball games because that was her beat as well and had shot it before. Dave from Phabulous Photos also gave me advice and taught me some tricks at another basketball game and on one of my photodays. My last goal was to learn how to do more things on the computer in InDesign and Photoshop. I didn’t know how to work either program very well, and I felt that my creativity and designing were being hindered by that. While cobbing a photo or designing a page, I read through my handbook and followed each step. I also asked Mrs. Burke for help when I needed it and asked the upperclassmen to teach me how to do certain things like create a text wrap, place a photo and arrange an image. Overall, I think I fulfilled each of my goals, but I am still setting new ones for next year.


REFLECTION 6


REFLECTION 7 N9. Sports news, “Boone, Edgewater go head-to-head in anniversary game”, Friday, November 9, 2012 I would like to select this piece to represent me in the CSPA Gold Circle awards because I am very proud of the final product and would like others to see it. It was a creative way to cover an annual event that means is such an integral part of Boone’s tradition. I worked very hard on this spread, and I think it is my best piece of work this year.

N10. Sports features, “Former Brave leads Commodores”, Friday, November 9, 2012 I would like to select this piece to represent me in the CSPA Gold Circle awards because even though it was my first story and didn’t get published in the October issue, I believe Johnell’s story is truly inspiring to athletes everywhere and deserves to be shared with others. I am also very proud of my writing, and I think I did a good job of relating Johnell’s success to Coach Ziglar’s lasting legacy. N9. Sports news, “Hard hits hurt heads”, Friday, February 8, 2013 I would like to select this piece to represent me in the CSPA Gold Circle awards because I feel I did a good job of informing the readers of the dangers of concussions by giving them important information that will help them realize what precautionary measures all athletes should take.

14

Friday, November 9, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights

sports

Ziglar is a very confident coach. He has a lot of faith in the ability of those around him Doug Patterson, Athletic Director

Ziglar’s lasting legacy

nflplayers BHS 1994 Northwestern University Wide Receiver Carolina Panthers

After 23 years, coach retires

John Burden

BHS 2001 East Carolina Kicker/Punter Green Bay Packers Ryan Dougherty

BHS 2007 Duke University Offensive Tackle New England Patriots Kyle Hill

BHS 1994 Temple University Running Back Jacksonville Jaguars and Houston Texans

By CONOR CURRY “Ziglar is a very confident coach. He has a lot of faith in the ability of those around him.” said Athletic Director Doug Patterson, “He really expects to win every time he walks on the field.” Our South Orlando sports community will have a big hole to fill next year as Coach Phil Ziglar ends his 23-year career as head coach and a teacher. Ever since 1990, when Ziglar first arrived as a coach at Boone, confidence and good morals have been his main focus. More than anything else, Ziglar wants to influence students and athletes alike for the future. “[I would have to say] my favorite part of coaching here at Boone is getting to pique students’ interest in the future, and I try to do that by working life lessons into my HOPE classes. Also, I strive to impart self-discipline towards my players,” Ziglar said. Back in the 1960’s, Ziglar began his illustrious football career playing linebacker for the Braves. After graduating in 1969, he attended Tennessee Tech and Maryville, his alma mater (’73). Ziglar earned All-American honors twice while at Maryville. “I had played sports my whole life, yet I had been an average student 1987- 1989 Football’s record was 1-20

Stacey Mack

Through the years 1969

Reputation Boone and Ziglar’s reputation began became known

First year Ziglar returns to campus as head football coach

1987

1990

Legacy Ziglar ends with 133-108 career record with Boone

Progress Ziglar’s Braves lose Division 6A Championship

1993

2-8 record for Ziglar’s first season as head coach

Senior Ziglar graduates from the Reservation

drafted him into the National Football League. Throughout his career, Ziglar estimated that he has sent around 120 players to the NCAA, and including Burden, four have made it to the NFL. Besides the amount of successful players, Ziglar is focused on the lives of teens he has influenced for the future. “[Ziglar is set apart from other coaches] in his passion for teaching not only the game of football, but life for his players on and off the field. He has been known to follow former players and alumni well after graduation,” said Doug Patterson. According to Ziglar, this is not a farewell tour year. He doesn’t want to take away from this season’s players and plans to continue coaching elsewhere in the future. “Don’t get me wrong, I’ve got a lot of coaching left in me. I have a lot left to offer the kids,” Ziglar said

throughout, and I wish that had been different. However, athletics got me to where I am today,” Ziglar said. Soon after college, Ziglar played linebacker for a Canadian Football League team a two seasons From 1975 to 1989, Ziglar worked as an assistant coach at Dr. Phillips, Oak Ridge and Colonial. Then, in 1990, he returned to his former high school to take over a team with a 1-29 record in its previous three seasons. His first season the team posted 3 wins and 9 losses, a giant leap for the program. The team that year, according to Ziglar, showed confidence that they had been lacking, and succeeded because of his attention to proper discipline. “Ziglar brought with him almost an expectation of winning, and the confidence in ourselves we could win as a disciplined team,” a former player, John Burden said. From 1991-1994, Burden played wide receiver and tight end, learning and improving under the relatively new Coach Ziglar. Eventually, with Ziglar’s help, Burden went on to attend Northwestern University. “Ziglar was a big help in getting me into Northwestern. He was always responsive to college scouts and even prepared informational packets for them,” Burden said. After graduating from Northwestern, the Carolina Panthers

2007

2006

2012

Reputation Ziglar leads Braves to FHSAA State Championships

Comeback The team achieves a 6-5 their best record since 1975.

Former Brave leads Commodores Coach helps former player turn life around

ßthestats

By MACKENZIE MOCK Living independently from 11 until 15 and then being surrounded by an abusive parent is not a lifestyle kids are accustomed to, but for former graduate Johnell Thomas it was second nature. However with the support of his coaches and teammates, Thomas overcame a harsh upbringing, adversity and other obstacles. In 2004, Thomas’s ninth grade football season, he was arrested for stealing and was detained for two days. When he returned to school and practice, ready to get back on the field coach Phil Ziglar gave him the choice: football or crime. Thomas chose football and with help from Coach Ziglar he tried out for the school’s varsity football team and made it as a sophomore. He was a star in the making and Coach Ziglar knew that from the beginning. “Johnell’s work ethic was phenomenal. I’ve never seen anything like it. He was very

Number: 98 Height: 6’ Weight: 250 pounds Position: Defensive End, Captain Class: Red Shirt, Senior Major: Business Hometown: Orlando, FL

FINDING BIGFOOT

CREATIVE OUTLET

Art teacher retires in search of creature

Writer predicts outcome in America’s favor

 FEATURES, page 8

hi-lights Volume 61

BASEBALL CLASSIC

Sophomore artist gains local recognition

 FEATURES, page 5

a scholarship at Vanderbilt University. “I’m extremely blessed for what Coach Ziglar has done for me. It was never easy playing at Boone but he gave me respect for the game,” Thomas said. Thomas made the 2011 SEC Academic Honor Roll and is finishing his degree this December in Human and Organizational Development. He is also one of the six captains and the starting defensive end of the Commodore’s football team. “[Kearney] is like a second dad. He’s been there through thick and thin. I wouldn’t be where I am today without him,” Thomas said. Depending on how the season goes Thomas could be training to further his career, attending graduate school to earn his masters or joining the business world and become a working man. “It’s a dream come true [to be a Division 1 football player at Vanderbilt University]. When you’re young you dream about playing high school ball, then maybe college ball. I know it sets me up for the rest of my life and it’s given me qualities and lessons I’ll keep throughout my life,” Thomas said.

determined and wanted to succeed more than anything. I knew that even as a freshman he had great leadership qualities,” Ziglar said. Thomas’s positive attitude and determination were not the only things that set him apart from the other players. He was close to assistant coach Peter Kearney and the two shared a special bond which helped Thomas not only on the field, but off too. One evening, after finding out Thomas was homeless, Coach Kearney decided to become his legal guardian. He used a connection within child services to quicken the process and within 48 hours he was granted guardianship. He just needed Thomas’s father’s signature, which he willingly gave. “He needed structure and he needed family. I come from seven kids so he has tons of uncles and aunts who all treat him like a nephew. It’s safe to say he excelled once he came home with me,” Coach Kearney said. Ziglar and Kearney helped Johnell turn his life around after he was arrested. He graduated high school with an education and a football career that earned him the opportunity to play on

Issue 4

Florida trails 40 other states

 SPORTS, page 9

for students, by students Friday, February 8, 2013

hilights.org

the facts about

concussion- noun- Injury to the brain or spinal cord due to jarring from a blow, fall or the like.

By THOMAS EGAN Despite a steady climb in the high school graduation rate over the last decade and a jump in the last year, Florida ranked 45th in the country last year, at 74.5 percent. A recent U.S. Department of Education study shows that Florida high school students graduate on time far less than those in other states. The rate has climbed 18 percent since 2003 when it was 56.5 percent, but Florida high schools still rank among the lowest in the country. Graduation requirements vary throughout the country, so state-tostate comparisons are difficult. “Because education is not standardized throughout the 50 states, there is no standard coursework,” Principal Margaret McMillen said. “It is not a cookie-cutter education.” Florida’s graduation requirements are more rigorous than others. Students need to pass the Florida Comprehensive Reading Test and new end of course exams (EOC). However, the standardized formula for grading the states does not take these into account. Florida boasted a higher graduation rate than Alaska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Georgia. Iowa led the U.S. with an 88 percent graduation rate. The graduation rate of Florida minority students is well below average. African American students graduate on time 47 percent of the time and Hispanic students graduate on time 57 percent of the time. This statistic has

 Full story, page 4, see Graduation Rate

DISEASE

K!

BON 3.8

Boone Concussions Tally-Up

million concussions occur each year in the U.S. from sports related injuries

2012-2013 Football: Boys’ Soccer: Cheerleading: Girls’ Soccer: Wrestling:

High school

Sports prone to

CONCUSSION

nationally

Highest Incidence of Concussion

2011-2012 Football: Boy’s Basketball: Boy’s Lacrosse: Waterpolo:

#1 Soccer #2 Lacrosse Lowest:

#1 Football #2 Lacrosse Lowest:

N F L

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease caused by concussions.

9

?

Symptoms: - Memory loss - Depression

Nearly 4,000 former National Football League players are suing the NFL for denying the risks of long-term brain damage.

Concussions account for percent of high school athletic injuries. This is percent higher than a decade ago.

3.5

90 percent of confirmed cases are in retired athletes.

Kids and teens have a higher recovery time from concussions than adults.

First diagnosis: Mike Webster, former Steelers center

Baseball Cheerleading *2012- 2013: spring sports not included sources/ESPN.GO.COM, MEDSTAR HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE, PBS.ORG, SPORTSCONCUSSIONS.ORG, CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

illustration/LINDSAY ALEXANDER

Hard hits hurt heads By MACKENZIE MOCK “Hey, Jimmy got his bell rung yesterday at practice, but he’s fine to play in the game today.” Years ago, this would be a typical situation when a player from a sport got a concussion. After, the athlete would get right back up and keep playing. Sophomore, Aleczander Beshere got a concussion while scrimmaging at practice during spring football. He was out for about a month because of continuous symptoms such as headaches and dizziness. He believes there is nothing one can do to prevent getting a concussion. “I guess you can just play the sport right and don’t hit your head. If people want to hit

you, they will. The rules can’t change that,” Beshere said. Because concussions hurt the brain which cannot be seen, they can be hard to diagnose. Symptoms include headache, temporary loss of consciousness, confusion, amnesia, dizziness, nausea, slurred speech and sensitivity to light. If one is suffering from any of the above he should immediately see a doctor. It is said to heal, one should sit in a quiet, dark room and not read, text, watch TV or surf the Internet. Junior Tiffany Torres got a concussion at water polo practice last spring when one of her teammates shot, but missed the goal and the ball hit her head. She healed within a

week, but admitted it was hard to get back in shape and she fell behind in school. “It sucked because I had to miss school and it was hard to focus and think. I couldn’t practice for a week and got really slow and weak,” Torres, said. Concussions can have long term effects. They can end a professional athlete’s career such as Scott Stevens’, New Jersey Devils’ defensiveman, when he was forced to retire in November of the 2003-2004 season because of post-concussion syndrome. Junior Seau, former NFL player, killed himself last

 Full story, page 10, see Concussion

Run benefits campus, clubs

SPRINT IT. Nearing the finish line, junior Joshua Rosenfeld participates in the 2012 Reservation Run. “It was fun running with [the swim] team. We got to wear our caps, and it was a great team experience. Everybody pushed each other to do well,” Rosenfeld said. The Bravettes received a $1000 Spear-It award for having the most participants.

By OLIVIA QUATTRONE February’s annual fundraiser presents an opportunity for students and the community to raise money for athletics and have fun. Reservation Run is a 5K race that goes through the neighborhood surrounding the school. It is funded by sponsorships from local businesses such as, restaurants, hospitals and law firms, as well as participant registration. The Boone High School Athletic Association established the race in

February 2008. “The BHSAA was looking for a good, fun fundraiser that would give all [clubs and teams] an opportunity [to fundraise],” Athletic Director Doug Patterson said. In its five years on campus, Reservation Run has raised over $44,000. To be in the race, a participant pays an entry fee: $15 for untimed runners and $25 for timed runners. With the fee, participants get a shirt.

“I

don’t

care

about

my

time,

I

just run for fun,” junior Austin McFarlin, who is running for tennis and Fellowship of Christian Athletes, said.

Half of the entry fee goes to the club or team of the participant’s choice and the other half goes to BHSAA. BHSAA uses this money to improve campus

 Full story, page 4, see Reservation Run

photo/CARLY BURTON

randomfact

INDEX opinion campus & local features

Today in 1960, the first brass stars were installed in the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

10

2 4 5

special sports entertainment

6 9 12

GET INVOLVED check us out on facebook follow us on twitter @hilightsnp

SEE AND HEAR MORE go to hilights.org for photo galleries, soundslides featuring students and weekly sports’ beats

Friday, February 8, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights sports

FINANCIAL AID HELP AVAILABLE

MORNING JAVA

Valencia offers free, expert help with the Free Application for the Federal Student Aid on Feb. 18, from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on both East and West campuses. Rollins College is also offering help on Feb. 23, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Students should make sure the FAFSA is turned in at least three weeks before your chosen school’s deadline.

The drama department is selling hot chocolate, coffee and tea before school in the Kemosbe Commons on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. to 7:15 a.m. Items are $2 and proceeds benefit the drama department.

#thetest

Concussions cause kids chaos  Concussion from, page 1

Sample concussion test question: This measures visual working memory and processing speed. The athlete is shown an image of X’s and O’s. Three are illuminated. Then a blank screen is shown as a distractor; then the screen with the X’s and O’s is shown again. The athlete clicks the X’s and O’s he thinks were illuminated. He gets a score based on accuracy and quickness. If an athlete gets a concussion, he retakes the test to see if his answers match.

year at age 43. The National Institutes of Health discovered this month that Seau had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a de-generative brain disease caused by repeated concussions that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss or cause one to become clinically depressed and even suicidal. However, there are 1.6 to 3.8 million sports related concussions per year in the United States, according to the The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because of the increase of recorded concussions in high school and college sports, coaches, trainers, players and doctors are taking this injury much more seriously. There has also been an increase in professional sports. The NFL has had 159 concussions as of Jan. 24, in the 2012-2013 season. “When I played lacrosse, getting hit was just a part of the game. It wasn’t regarded as such a major issue. But since I’ve started coaching, everyone has been more careful, which is a good thing,” head lacrosse coach Elliot Whitton said. Coaches today are doing everything they can to prevent and protect their players from concussions. They talk about safe-hitting, don’t encourage pure violence and always make a player sit

out if he has been hit hard in the head or anywhere else. Furthermore, the NCAA is partnering with 11 sports leagues, equipment manufacturers and safety organizations to help limit concussions in youth football. The partnership will provide helmets and replace them for under privileged kids and will also educate kids on safe hitting. Athletic trainers are also doing their part. Sarah Coelho, athletic trainer, treats about 8 concussions every football season, two every soccer season and a couple occasionally, in any other sport throughout the year. To determine if a kid has a concussion Coelho sees how he was hurt, does a symptoms checklist and performs an impact test. The impact test is composed of 6 modules, each of which test a certain part of the brain, and can be performed by a doctor or an athletic trainer. Depending on what the athlete scores on the test, Coelho will refer him to see a doctor or require him to sit out of his designated sport until his symptoms are gone. “I know what it feels like to have a concussion. I played basketball and in one game I went up for a rebound and hit the floor really hard. I felt dizzy, but kept playing. I shouldn’t have done that because it probably made it worse,” Coelho said. In Orange County, schools are

illustration/MCTCAMPUS

required to give teams, such as football, lacrosse and water polo, free baseline tests before their seasons start to see if a player has a concussion and also for future knowledge if a player were to get one. But all concussions cannot be prevented. There is not a way to save oneself from getting hit in the head.

Participating in contact sports can put one at risk no matter what he does. There are rules to help prevent concussions; such as, hitting regulations in football and lacrosse, but they still happen. The next time one hears “Oh, Jimmy got his bell rung!” he should immediately tell Jimmy to go to the doctor.

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Design


Sports 16

sports hi-lights

Friday, May 17, 2013 hilights.org

GRADUATION PRACTICE

SPRING FOOTBALL

Graduation practice will be held on Tuesday, May 28th at 11 am at the Amway Center. Students may park in the GEICO Parking Garage. Details about the graduation ceremony will be given here. The practice will only be two hours, so everyone needs to be on time.

The annual spring football game will be on May 24th against DeLand at 7 p.m. on our home field. This will be Coach Johnson’s and the 2013 Varsity football team’s first game. Come out to support the Braves!

When Piglet hits flyballs Strong hitter, Bo Piglet, leads the team this season. By MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. amcokqmdcoqskmsqkmskmvkm Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the for large parties who do not mind the

photo/MACKENZIE MOCK

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling who and what is happening in the photo and do not begin with a name. “I am a really good quotable quote that Burke will love to read,” Burke said. I am something that cannot be seen in the photo, preferably a stat. one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the

place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the kvqs[vsovnw[onv w n v wnv sdnvjqnwdvi jwnvij ivniverijfroijosdqkvcjo A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restauclfgmboskgnbpkngbfnrant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is

entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mindcvqv qssncsjnisnckasnckasnvkasndvkasnvda sndvasndvkasndvknsadkvnaskdvnaksv askmcdoks hentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the

L ß who’s hotwho’s not

HOT Yu Darvish

NOT

HOT

NOT

Cole Hamels

St. Louis Cardinals

LA Dodgers

With a 6-1 record Darvish has the league’s lowest hits per nine innings (5.13) and the best strike out rate (13.67 K/9); he has fanned 80 in eight starts.

With a 1-6 record and 4.61 ERA Hamels has been consistently giving runs. He has a 47 SO and 1.29 WHIP. He has 49 hits, 29 runs and 9 home runs.

With a 20-11 record and six straight wins the Cardinals are the most victories (13) of any club in MLB. Lance Lynn is 5-0 with 39 strikeouts in 36 innings.

The team holds a 15-21 record with only two wins in May, They are 28th in runs (127) . Matt Kemp had one home run and 14 RBIs this season.

This season will a fun one. We’re ready to show everyone how hard we’ve trained and hopefully make it to States. John Doe Pitcher


DPS 6

Friday, May 17, 2012 hilights.org

By MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with

a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. kvsnvovomwocmqwcmmcp mcmcmcmmcdkkw With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as

Ă&#x;fastfacts He saved Pixar He was Disney’s largest shareholder He was a vegetarian He drove without a license plate for years He patented the glass staircase in the Apple Store

hi-lights specialfeature

‘Jobs juggles gadgets

specialfeature By MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that

hi-lights

Steve Jobs is such a visionary. I love all his Apple products. Jane Doe, senior

Friday, May 17, 2012 hilights.org

SUMMER SCHOOL

CAPS & GOWNS

Registration for summer school has begun. Students may earn up to one credit by attending both nine day sessions. The schedule for summer school is as follows: Session One (nine days) June 12, 2013- June 25, 2013, Session Two (nine days) July 26, 2013- July 17, 2013. See your counselor for further questions.

Caps and gowns will be given out during lunch on Friday, May 17th, in the courtyard. If you are a senior who still has not purchased a cap/gown, this is another chance to do so. The price for the cap/ gown is $65. This will be a cash or money order only- made out to Herff Jones.

conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large By MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place BY MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the By ANNA MARIE BORIA A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as

7

By MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in k With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every

corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the eeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind t If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the he

By MACKENZIE MOCK A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a

password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the irit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the irit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the irit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place.


Clips-

WRITING


Sports, page 14, Nov. 9, 2012 14

Friday, November 9, 2012 hilights.org

sports nflplayers BHS 1994 Northwestern University Wide Receiver Carolina Panthers John Burden

BHS 2001 East Carolina Kicker/Punter Green Bay Packers Ryan Dougherty

BHS 2007 Duke University Offensive Tackle New England Patriots Kyle Hill

BHS 1994 Temple University Running Back Jacksonville Jaguars and Houston Texans Stacey Mack

Through the years 1969 Senior Ziglar graduates from the Reservation

hi-lights

Ziglar is a very confident coach. He has a lot of faith in the ability of those around him Doug Patterson, Athletic Director

Ziglar’s lasting legacy After 23 years, coach retires By CONOR CURRY “Ziglar is a very confident coach. He has a lot of faith in the ability of those around him.” said Athletic Director Doug Patterson, “He really expects to win every time he walks on the field.” Our South Orlando sports community will have a big hole to fill next year as Coach Phil Ziglar ends his 23-year career as head coach and a teacher. Ever since 1990, when Ziglar first arrived as a coach at Boone, confidence and good morals have been his main focus. More than anything else, Ziglar wants to influence students and athletes alike for the future. “[I would have to say] my favorite part of coaching here at Boone is getting to pique students’ interest in the future, and I try to do that by working life lessons into my HOPE classes. Also, I strive to impart self-discipline towards my players,” Ziglar said. Back in the 1960’s, Ziglar began his illustrious football career playing linebacker for the Braves. After graduating in 1969, he attended Tennessee Tech and Maryville, his alma mater (’73). Ziglar earned All-American honors twice while at Maryville. “I had played sports my whole life, yet I had been an average student 1987- 1989 Football’s record was 1-20

1987

First year Ziglar returns to campus as head football coach

1990

throughout, and I wish that had been different. However, athletics got me to where I am today,” Ziglar said. Soon after college, Ziglar played linebacker for a Canadian Football League team a two seasons From 1975 to 1989, Ziglar worked as an assistant coach at Dr. Phillips, Oak Ridge and Colonial. Then, in 1990, he returned to his former high school to take over a team with a 1-29 record in its previous three seasons. His first season the team posted 3 wins and 9 losses, a giant leap for the program. The team that year, according to Ziglar, showed confidence that they had been lacking, and succeeded because of his attention to proper discipline. “Ziglar brought with him almost an expectation of winning, and the confidence in ourselves we could win as a disciplined team,” a former player, John Burden said. From 1991-1994, Burden played wide receiver and tight end, learning and improving under the relatively new Coach Ziglar. Eventually, with Ziglar’s help, Burden went on to attend Northwestern University. “Ziglar was a big help in getting me into Northwestern. He was always responsive to college scouts and even prepared informational packets for them,” Burden said. After graduating from Northwestern, the Carolina Panthers Reputation Boone and Ziglar’s reputation began became known

Number: 98 Height: 6’ Weight: 250 pounds Position: Defensive End, Captain Class: Red Shirt, Senior Major: Business Hometown: Orlando, FL

Legacy Ziglar ends with 133-108 career record with Boone

Progress Ziglar’s Braves lose Division 6A Championship

1993

2006

2007

2012

THIS ONE Former Brave leads Commodores

2-8 record for Ziglar’s first season as head coach

Comeback The team achieves a 6-5 their best record since 1975.

Coach helps former player turn life around

ßthestats

drafted him into the National Football League. Throughout his career, Ziglar estimated that he has sent around 120 players to the NCAA, and including Burden, four have made it to the NFL. Besides the amount of successful players, Ziglar is focused on the lives of teens he has influenced for the future. “[Ziglar is set apart from other coaches] in his passion for teaching not only the game of football, but life for his players on and off the field. He has been known to follow former players and alumni well graduation,” said after Doug Patterson. According to Ziglar, this is not a farewell tour year. He doesn’t want to take away from this season’s players and plans to continue coaching elsewhere in the future. “Don’t get me wrong, I’ve got a lot of coaching left in me. I have a lot left to offer the kids,” Ziglar said

By MACKENZIE MOCK Living independently from 11 until 15 and then being surrounded by an abusive parent is not a lifestyle kids are accustomed to, but for former graduate Johnell Thomas it was second nature. However with the support of his coaches and teammates, Thomas overcame a harsh upbringing, adversity and other obstacles. In 2004, Thomas’s ninth grade football season, he was arrested for stealing and was detained for two days. When he returned to school and practice, ready to get back on the field coach Phil Ziglar gave him the choice: football or crime. Thomas chose football and with help from Coach Ziglar he tried out for the school’s varsity football team and made it as a sophomore. He was a star in the making and Coach Ziglar knew that from the beginning. “Johnell’s work ethic was phenomenal. I’ve never seen anything like it. He was very

What’s mine- writing, caption, headline

Reputation Ziglar leads Braves to FHSAA State Championships

determined and wanted to succeed more than anything. I knew that even as a freshman he had great leadership qualities,” Ziglar said. Thomas’s positive attitude and determination were not the only things that set him apart from the other players. He was close to assistant coach Peter Kearney and the two shared a special bond which helped Thomas not only on the field, but off too. One evening, after finding out Thomas was homeless, Coach Kearney decided to become his legal guardian. He used a connection within child services to quicken the process and within 48 hours he was granted guardianship. He just needed Thomas’s father’s signature, which he willingly gave. “He needed structure and he needed family. I come from seven kids so he has tons of uncles and aunts who all treat him like a nephew. It’s safe to say he excelled once he came home with me,” Coach Kearney said. Ziglar and Kearney helped Johnell turn his life around after he was arrested. He graduated high school with an education and a football career that earned him the opportunity to play on

a scholarship at Vanderbilt University. “I’m extremely blessed for what Coach Ziglar has done for me. It was never easy playing at Boone but he gave me respect for the game,” Thomas said. Thomas made the 2011 SEC Academic Honor Roll and is finishing his degree this December in Human and Organizational Development. He is also one of the six captains and the starting defensive end of the Commodore’s football team. “[Kearney] is like a second dad. He’s been there through thick and thin. I wouldn’t be where I am today without him,” Thomas said. Depending on how the season goes Thomas could be training to further his career, attending graduate school to earn his masters or joining the business world and become a working man. “It’s a dream come true [to be a Division 1 football player at Vanderbilt University]. When you’re young you dream about playing high school ball, then maybe college ball. I know it sets me up for the rest of my life and it’s given me qualities and lessons I’ll keep throughout my life,” Thomas said.


Sports, page 12, Dec. 14, 2012 12

sports hi-lights

Friday, December 14, 2012 hilights.org

SOFTBALL LOOKS FOR TALENT

GIRLS WANT DISTRICTS

Softball tryouts are Jan. 7-Jan. 9 on the softball field from 3 p.m.-5:30 p.m. There is also pre-season conditioning on the field Dec. 18 and Dec. 20.

Girls’ weight-lifting has started off shaky with a loss at home against Freedom and University. The Lady Braves look to head to the sub district meet at Freedom Jan. 9.

Leadership on, off the court Girls’ varsity shows what it means to be a team

photo/MEGHAN COTTON

FREE THROW. After being fouled, sophomore Cassandra Ketchum prepares to shoot a free throw. “I have been really excited with how I have been doing this season. I have been achieving my goals so far,” Ketchum said. The team is 9-2 so far this season.

By MEGHAN COTTON Demonstrating leadership on and off the court, seniors Celeste Martin and Bailey Florin lead the girls’ varsity basketball team. Florin, who has committed to the University of North Florida with a full-ride scholarship, has been playing basketball since she was 5-years-old. “You can tell she works hard, and she doesn’t like to lose. She definitely stood up to the plate to lead the team,” freshman Madison Gonzalez said. Florin expects to play out her four years at UNF. After that, she has no intention to continue playing. “[Bailey] is going to be very successful. She has the mechanics and fundamentals to be successful in her post-secondary athletic career,” coach Jerry Williams said. Florin and Martin are the team’s only two seniors. They work together as captains to focus the girls and bring

them closer as a team. “We both want to be serious, but fun at the same time. We feed off each other’s energy,” Martin said. Martin, who has been playing since she was 6-years-old, has no intent to play basketball in college. She has decided to focus on her education to become a teacher. Florin and Martin were welcoming and encouraging to the four freshmen who made the team. “We help them stay positive when it gets hard,” Florin said. With a 9-2 record and half the season left, the team continues to prepare for the upcoming games. “We want to be able to grow and contend [and] try to win districts against the number one team, Dr. Phillips,” Florin said. Last season, the girls lost to Dr. Phillips, 76-35, in the district finals. They finished the season with an 18-10 overall record. “[I want] to give back my experience to a group of girls who have the passion and hunger to be successful in the

Rimmer chooses Stanford Top recruit commits to nationally ranked university By MACKENZIE MOCK After years of dreaming of playing college basketball, senior Robert “Schuyler” Rimmer signed with one of the most demanding academic and athletic schools in the country, Stanford University. Ever since he was young, Rimmer hoped to play collegiate basketball. Rimmer started taking basketball more seriously in middle school, but did not realize he could compete with the players in college until he began playing in high school and realized no other local team had a kid as tall as 6’9”. He made sure he did everything possible to make his dreams come true. He dedicated himself to the sport, played on travel teams and quit all other sports, like volleyball and soccer, to put his main focus on basketball. “Playing basketball in college was just an idea when I was in middle school, but once I got to high school it became a reality. My first offer was from Dartmouth when I was in eighth grade. After that, the offers just started

coming,” Rimmer said. Rimmer received offers from the University of Central Florida, Tennessee Tech and Virginia Tech University, but he did not understand what he wanted out of a school until his sophomore year. Rimmer has been captain since his junior year. Rimmer says playing for Boone has prepared him for college ball. “The team would be a lot different without Schuyler. I have played with him for all three years on varsity. I think the game would get a lot harder,” junior team member Barry Taylor said. Rimmer’s first verbal commitment was to the University of Florida, but soon after, he de-committed from the school and looked at other offers. “I think there was just some stuff left out that Schuyler didn’t know about Florida. Stanford is a great decision for him though because he knows he’ll get to play a lot and he loves the guys in California,” Taylor said. After de-committing from Florida, Rimmer looked at the offers and narrowed his decision to four schools: University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, University of Southern

California and Stanford University. To help with his decision, Rimmer took official visits with his parents to each of the schools. The family said all of them went well. While at the schools, he tried to envision himself there for the next four years of his life. “The whole recruiting process was exhausting. Each visit was like 48 hours of subtle sales pitches. One of the coaches told us, ‘If you don’t have a good time, someone didn’t do their job right’,” Rimmer’s mother, Elizabeth Rimmer said. In the end, Rimmer chose Stanford, which is sixth academically in the nation, feeling it was the best overall school. I chose where I felt the most comfortable and where I was going to do the best. Plus the coaching staff there has the best plan for me. It focuses on my height and works around my strengths,” Rimmer said. Rimmer, his family, friends and his coach and teammates all agreed Stanford was the right choice for him. “I think Schuyler will fit into the system very well. He will be successful due to their system fitting his strengths,” head coach Gregory Shirley said.

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What’s mine- writing, caption, headline

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game,” first season head coach Jerry Williams said. That hunger and determination shows in the girls’ play. On Dec. 1, in the game against Lake Nona, the game was tied after three quarters. With Florin’s 20 points pacing the team, they took control to defeat the Lions, 40-34. Florin also demonstrated leadership earlier in the season home opener against the West Orange Warriors. After falling behind 12 points, Florin had a late run and scored 28 points. The Warriors lost the battle, 48-47. “It is nice to have the younger girls look up to you. It is a lot on your shoulders but you know other people are relying on it so you pull through it,” Florin said. The girls encourage each other throughout the season. They do not direct negative comments towards one another. They remain positive even through the games they lost. “I feel like I bring a positive energy to everything so we have brighter spirits when we play,” Martin said.

THIS ONE

photo/EMILY NUSBICKEL

FIGHT FOR IT. In anticipation of catching the ball, Rimmer jumps to snag it . “Everyone wants to be state champs, but I don’t want to be superstitious about it,” Rimmer said. The team is 4-2 so far this season.

h


Sports, page 1, Feb. 8, 2013 FINDING BIGFOOT

CREATIVE OUTLET

Art teacher retires in search of creature

 FEATURES, page 5

Volume 61  Issue 4

Florida trails 40 other states

 Full story, page 4, see Graduation Rate

Writer predicts outcome in America’s favor

 FEATURES, page 8

hi-lights By THOMAS EGAN Despite a steady climb in the high school graduation rate over the last decade and a jump in the last year, Florida ranked 45th in the country last year, at 74.5 percent. A recent U.S. Department of Education study shows that Florida high school students graduate on time far less than those in other states. The rate has climbed 18 percent since 2003 when it was 56.5 percent, but Florida high schools still rank among the lowest in the country. Graduation requirements vary throughout the country, so state-tostate comparisons are difficult. “Because education is not standardized throughout the 50 states, there is no standard coursework,” Principal Margaret McMillen said. “It is not a cookie-cutter education.” Florida’s graduation requirements are more rigorous than others. Students need to pass the Florida Comprehensive Reading Test and new end of course exams (EOC). However, the standardized formula for grading the states does not take these into account. Florida boasted a higher graduation rate than Alaska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Georgia. Iowa led the U.S. with an 88 percent graduation rate. The graduation rate of Florida minority students is well below average. African American students graduate on time 47 percent of the time and Hispanic students graduate on time 57 percent of the time. This statistic has

BASEBALL CLASSIC

Sophomore artist gains local recognition

 SPORTS, page 9

THIS ONE

for students, by students Friday, February 8, 2013  hilights.org

the facts about

concussion- noun- Injury to the brain or spinal cord due to jarring from a blow, fall or the like.

! NK

BO

3.8

Boone Concussions Tally-Up

million concussions occur each year in the U.S. from sports related injuries

2012-2013 Football: Boys’ Soccer: Cheerleading: Girls’ Soccer: Wrestling:

High school

Sports prone to

CONCUSSION

nationally

Highest Incidence of Concussion

2011-2012 Football: Boy’s Basketball: Boy’s Lacrosse: Waterpolo:

#1 Soccer #2 Lacrosse Lowest: Cheerleading

#1 Football #2 Lacrosse Lowest: Baseball

DISEASE

N F L

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease caused by concussions. Symptoms: - Memory loss - Depression

Nearly 4,000 former National Football League players are suing the NFL for denying the risks of long-term brain damage.

Concussions account for percent of high school athletic injuries. This is percent higher than a decade ago.

9

?

3.5

90

percent of confirmed cases are in retired athletes. First diagnosis: Mike Webster, former Steelers center

Kids and teens have a higher recovery time from concussions than adults.

*2012- 2013: spring sports not included sources/ESPN.GO.COM, MEDSTAR HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE, PBS.ORG, SPORTSCONCUSSIONS.ORG, CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

illustration/LINDSAY ALEXANDER

Hard hits hurt heads By MACKENZIE MOCK “Hey, Jimmy got his bell rung yesterday at practice, but he’s fine to play in the game today.” Years ago, this would be a typical situation when a player from a sport got a concussion. After, the athlete would get right back up and keep playing. Sophomore, Aleczander Beshere got a concussion while scrimmaging at practice during spring football. He was out for about a month because of continuous symptoms such as headaches and dizziness. He believes there is nothing one can do to prevent getting a concussion. “I guess you can just play the sport right and don’t hit your head. If people want to hit

you, they will. The rules can’t change that,” Beshere said. Because concussions hurt the brain which cannot be seen, they can be hard to diagnose. Symptoms include headache, temporary loss of consciousness, confusion, amnesia, dizziness, nausea, slurred speech and sensitivity to light. If one is suffering from any of the above he should immediately see a doctor. It is said to heal, one should sit in a quiet, dark room and not read, text, watch TV or surf the Internet. Junior Tiffany Torres got a concussion at water polo practice last spring when one of her teammates shot, but missed the goal and the ball hit her head. She healed within a

week, but admitted it was hard to get back in shape and she fell behind in school. “It sucked because I had to miss school and it was hard to focus and think. I couldn’t practice for a week and got really slow and weak,” Torres, said. Concussions can have long term effects. They can end a professional athlete’s career such as Scott Stevens’, New Jersey Devils’ defensiveman, when he was forced to retire in November of the 2003-2004 season because of post-concussion syndrome. Junior Seau, former NFL player, killed himself last

 Full story, page 10, see Concussion

Run benefits campus, clubs

SPRINT IT. Nearing the finish line, junior Joshua Rosenfeld participates in the 2012 Reservation Run. “It was fun running with [the swim] team. We got to wear our caps, and it was a great team experience. Everybody pushed each other to do well,” Rosenfeld said. The Bravettes received a $1000 Spear-It award for having the most participants.

By OLIVIA QUATTRONE February’s annual fundraiser presents an opportunity for students and the community to raise money for athletics and have fun. Reservation Run is a 5K race that goes through the neighborhood surrounding the school. It is funded by sponsorships from local businesses such as, restaurants, hospitals and law firms, as well as participant registration. The Boone High School Athletic Association established the race in

February 2008. “The BHSAA was looking for a good, fun fundraiser that would give all [clubs and teams] an opportunity [to fundraise],” Athletic Director Doug Patterson said. In its five years on campus, Reservation Run has raised over $44,000. To be in the race, a participant pays an entry fee: $15 for untimed runners and $25 for timed runners. With the fee, participants get a shirt.

“I don’t care about my time, I

just run for fun,” junior Austin McFarlin, who is running for tennis and Fellowship of Christian Athletes, said.

Half of the entry fee goes to the club or team of the participant’s choice and the other half goes to BHSAA. BHSAA uses this money to improve campus

 Full story, page 4, see Reservation Run

photo/CARLY BURTON

randomfact Today in 1960, the first brass stars were installed in the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

INDEX opinion campus & local features

2 4 5

special sports entertainment

What’s mine- writing, headline

6 9 12

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Sports, page 10, Feb. 8, 2013 10

Friday, February 8, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights sports

FINANCIAL AID HELP AVAILABLE

MORNING JAVA

Valencia offers free, expert help with the Free Application for the Federal Student Aid on Feb. 18, from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on both East and West campuses. Rollins College is also offering help on Feb. 23, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Students should make sure the FAFSA is turned in at least three weeks before your chosen school’s deadline.

The drama department is selling hot chocolate, coffee and tea before school in the Kemosbe Commons on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 a.m. to 7:15 a.m. Items are $2 and proceeds benefit the drama department.

#thetest

Concussions cause kids chaos  Concussion from, page 1

Sample concussion test question: This measures visual working memory and processing speed. The athlete is shown an image of X’s and O’s. Three are illuminated. Then a blank screen is shown as a distractor; then the screen with the X’s and O’s is shown again. The athlete clicks the X’s and O’s he thinks were illuminated. He gets a score based on accuracy and quickness. If an athlete gets a concussion, he retakes the test to see if his answers match.

year at age 43. The National Institutes of Health discovered this month that Seau had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a de-generative brain disease caused by repeated concussions that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss or cause one to become clinically depressed and even suicidal. However, there are 1.6 to 3.8 million sports related concussions per year in the United States, according to the The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because of the increase of recorded concussions in high school and college sports, coaches, trainers, players and doctors are taking this injury much more seriously. There has also been an increase in professional sports. The NFL has had 159 concussions as of Jan. 24, in the 2012-2013 season. “When I played lacrosse, getting hit was just a part of the game. It wasn’t regarded as such a major issue. But since I’ve started coaching, everyone has been more careful, which is a good thing,” head lacrosse coach Elliot Whitton said. Coaches today are doing everything they can to prevent and protect their players from concussions. They talk about safe-hitting, don’t encourage pure violence and always make a player sit

out if he has been hit hard in the head or anywhere else. Furthermore, the NCAA is partnering with 11 sports leagues, equipment manufacturers and safety organizations to help limit concussions in youth football. The partnership will provide helmets and replace them for under privileged kids and will also educate kids on safe hitting. Athletic trainers are also doing their part. Sarah Coelho, athletic trainer, treats about 8 concussions every football season, two every soccer season and a couple occasionally, in any other sport throughout the year. To determine if a kid has a concussion Coelho sees how he was hurt, does a symptoms checklist and performs an impact test. The impact test is composed of 6 modules, each of which test a certain part of the brain, and can be performed by a doctor or an athletic trainer. Depending on what the athlete scores on the test, Coelho will refer him to see a doctor or require him to sit out of his designated sport until his symptoms are gone. “I know what it feels like to have a concussion. I played basketball and in one game I went up for a rebound and hit the floor really hard. I felt dizzy, but kept playing. I shouldn’t have done that because it probably made it worse,” Coelho said. In Orange County, schools are

illustration/MCTCAMPUS

required to give teams, such as football, lacrosse and water polo, free baseline tests before their seasons start to see if a player has a concussion and also for future knowledge if a player were to get one. But all concussions cannot be prevented. There is not a way to save oneself from getting hit in the head.

Participating in contact sports can put one at risk no matter what he does. There are rules to help prevent concussions; such as, hitting regulations in football and lacrosse, but they still happen. The next time one hears “Oh, Jimmy got his bell rung!” he should immediately tell Jimmy to go to the doctor.

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Features, page 9, Mar. 15, 2013 9

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights featurestories ANNUAL AWARDS NIGHT

SOFTBALL UPDATE

The annual award ceremony is on May 21 at 6 p.m. in the Boone auditorium. Starting now, seniors must begin to inform the College and Career Center of their college choice. For seniors who are going into the military, attending a technical school or who have received scholarships, there is a separate sheet available.

The softball team will play against Freedom High School at home at 7 p.m. Overall, the team has 53 runs, .0341 base percentage, 0.908 fielding percentage and have earned a run average of the pitching staff 2.21.

ßhealthbenefits

fishing Fishing is considered a low-stress, low-impact activity.

benefits to the heart: Deep-sea and big bass fishing gives strenuous workout when reeling in and keeps one’s heart rate elevated.

the brain: “Unplugging” from daily stresses can let one’s brain recharge and gain better focus.

photo courtesy/RICHARD HOUSTON

BIG CATCH. On a family trip to West Palm Beach, Richard Houston and daughter Molly hold a 25-35 pound mahi-mahi. “It’s great being around nature; to me it’s a hunter gather thing. It’s [also] a really good feeling when you rig up a bait and catch a really big fish, [but] it’s a real joy to see Molly and Sam catch a beautiful fish,” Houston said. The Houston family like to fish in the Indian River and Lake Monroe.

the body: Dexterity. Baiting, reeling, etc. keeps one’s fingers, shoulders and arms flexible and activates muscles.

Students, faculty deep-sea fish

Fresh air. High oxygen and low pollution is great for one’s body, especially lungs.

By MACKENZIE MOCK “Reel him in. You’ve almost got him, just reel him in!” This is a phrase a deepsea fisher would say to another while he is in the process of catching a fish. Deep-sea fishing is a hobby, but it can also be considered a sport. There are competitions and tournaments with prizes and awards, such as medals, trophies, money and gift certificates. “I feel [a sense of] achievement when I catch a fish. I’m relieved I got him,” junior Sam Furukawa said. Furukawa competitively deep -sea fishes from May thru July. He participates in tournaments, such as the Salt Water Classic every year, during this time. To prepare for his tournaments he checks the lines and gets his pole ready. He practices year round at Port Canaveral and Cocoa every other weekend from 7 a.m. to around 5 p.m. When he practices, he works on his cast and reeling in fish. “I love being out on the ocean and looking out at the water. It’s calming to just sit there and wait for a fish. You think about things that normally you don’t have time to think about,”

Vitamin D. Spending time in the sun raises levels of Vitamin D which helps protect one from health issues, such as future bone problems or heart disease.

ßcomingup Fishing for Freedom Benefits: The Wounded Warroir Project and Charlie Templeton Benefit Fund

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Fathers teach kids how to fish

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Furukawa said. Furukawa has been fishing since he was 4 years old when his dad taught him. Since then, he has participated in tournaments and won the Salt Water Classic, in 2010, at 14 years old. He won first place, earning $2,000. After the Salt Water Classic, Furukawa started thinking about his future and fishing in college. “I would fish in college [on a competitive team] if I got accepted to a good enough school, like Florida State University or the University of Tennessee, I wouldn’t make a career out of it unless it was after retirement,” Furukawa said. Furukawa fishes with his dad and sister. Normally, the Furukawas compete as a team in family competitions. While his father drives the boat, Furukawa and his sister fish. “Fishing is a family thing. My dad taught me everything I know. He is an inspiration to me everyday we fish,” Furukawa said. Another person who learned how to fish from his father is economies teacher Richard Houston. His dad fished every day while Houston was growing up. He remembers fishing since he was in pre-school. When he was little he

would go out to a nearby pond with his cane pole and fish. “I love being out around nature, and salt water environments are really beautiful. It’s just a lot of fun to catch fish,” Houston said. Now that Houston has a family, he has taught his son to fish. He fishes with his children and brother in the Indian River and Lake Monroe during the winter. He has also fished in Southwest Florida in the Keys. “I get the most enjoyment now out of watching my children fish,” Houston said. While fishing is a calming sport, it can also be full of injuries. Houston knows from many encounters on the water. Several hooks have gone in his hands. One time his son hit him in the eyebrow with a lure and hook. “Fishing is normally relaxing. You feel good even if you don’t catch a fish,” Houston said. On another fishing trip with his son in the Keys, during Christmas vacation, Houston caught three tarpons and his son caught a 30 pound red fish. “Fishing has affected my life. It helps me relax and I think I’m happier because of it. I also have a better appreciation for nature,” Houston said.

We were just fishing and out of no where a shark came into the boat and hit me. He knocked my hip out of place. Sam Furukawa Junior

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What’s mine- writing, caption, headline, alternative coverage


C/L, page 1, May 10, 2013 ZOMBIE SURVIVAL

WHEN I WAS...

Surviving encounters with the living dead

Four teachers talk about their interesting pasts

[ENTERTAINMENT, page 24

[FEATURES, page 7

Volume 61 ß Issue 6

THIS ONE

for students, by students Friday, may 10, 2013 ß hilights.org

Step-up takes wrong turn

I’m a better person [because of Boone]. I have grown a lot. As a teacher, I feel like I learn everyday whether it is from around me or students I teach. Sarah Kittrell digital design teacher

motherly figure ends teaching career After teaching multiple technology classes, Kittrell retires By BRIDGETTE NORRIS With a welcoming smile, a plentiful amount of wisdom and school spirit, Mama K is ending her 44 year teaching career. Digital design teacher and senior class sponsor Sarah Kittrell got her nickname, Mama K, because of her nurturing personality. “Mrs. Kittrell is not just a teacher. I think of her as a mother figure. She makes me want to be like her and I hope when I’m older, I’m like her. She goes above and beyond because she isn’t just here to teach academics but to teach life lessons. It comes naturally for her,” Senior Class vice president Elaina Carrion said. When she sponsored yearbook, her students gave her a “world’s greatest mother” trophy. Rather than being offended, like other faculty members were at the time, Kittrell embraced it. She said it was a sweet and endearing thing. “It doesn’t offend me when students call me mother. Sometimes it is easier to talk to someone not at home. I often tell students I can listen; I don’t have to respond,” Kittrell said. Because of her relationship with her students, they are willing to talk to her and go out of their way to help her. “She is very laid back and appreciative. I’ve helped at the blood drives in an attempt to make them successful and run smoothly and ultimately make them easier for her,” senior Justin Bullock said. Bullock also feels, she is not a bell to bell teacher, she tries to form relationships with her students. A number

photo/BRIDGETTE NORRIS

IN CLASS LAUGHS. In Sarah Kittrell’s Digital Design 3 class, she helps a student. “As a teacher, I learn something new everyday. It’s always interesting to see how students grow throughout the years,” Kittrell said. Kittrell has been teaching Digital Design for 21 years.

[ Full story, page 5, see Kittrell

New technology benefits 96 classrooms By OLIVIA QUATTRONE After a week of online voting from the school community, State Farm Insurance Company granted the school a $100,000 check as part of the Celebrate My Drive contest. “I thought [winning the contest] was really great because it gave us an opportunity to update our classrooms,” psychology teacher Robin King said. With the goal of updating technology, Principal Margaret McMillen encouraged students, faculty and the community to vote daily. Choosing from teachers’ technology wish lists,

ßrandomfact Months beginning on Sunday always have a Friday the 13th.

Track teams suffer injuries [ SPORTS, page 6

hi-lights

Margaret mcmillen

RUNNERS END SEASON

INDEX opinion campus & local features

2 3 5

special sports entertainment

McMillen decided that mounted projectors were what was most needed in classrooms. “A lot of different people wanted a lot of different things; but we finally decided on this all across the board purchase that would benefit all classes and students,” McMillen said. The school purchased and installed 96 new projectors in every classroom that did not have a mounted projector. This new projector was especially helpful in King’s classroom,

[ Full story, page 3, see Grants 12 11 20

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By mACKENZIE mOCK As soon as the seniors leave, the juniors are the big men on campus. They receive senior privileges, rights and rules. Even though they are technically still juniors, they are expected to step up and fill the new leadership role. “It is like passing the torch. One class has left and another class is beginning. It is time for the juniors to step up and become the leaders of the school and continue the tradition,” teacher Sarah Kittrell said. Senior Step-up Day is a national school “holiday.” The day after the seniors leave campus, the juniors celebrate their new power. They meet somewhere early in the morning and paint their cars with words like seniors or Class of 2014. They make tee shirts or wear matching outfits to show they are the new seniors. The juniors will then drive into school together and honk their horns as they claim their new parking spots in the senior lot. Teachers usually brush off the students’ tardiness and everyone moves on with the day. Mrs. Barrett, the junior class sponsor, started the tradition of giving juniors a quick treat in the morning before their classes started. She would provide cake or ice cream sandwiches in the junior/senior cafeteria, which the juniors would have had all to themselves and could enjoy before they started their first day as “seniors.” “It is a cute idea, but a lot of people do not know about it,” Kittrell said. This is all sanctioned by the school, the pranking however is not. Around 15 years ago, the seniors became fed up with the juniors attitude and decided to show them that they needed to step up and act like they were in charge, so they started playing harmless pranks and jokes on the juniors such as toilet papering their houses or forking their yards. “Ah senior step up. What I remember is we would get juniors who thought they were hot stuff, and we wanted to teach them a lesson that they are in charge now and they need to step it up. We would just toilet paper people’s houses and cars, nothing too extreme,” graduate Justin Kane said. In the past couple of years the pranks and jokes have spread to the

[ Full story, page 4, see Step-Up

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STUDENT OBLIGATIONS

LEGEND YEARBOOK ‘BEST OF SHOW’

Parents did you know that you can check your Brave’s Destiny Profile from home? You can see the library book and textbooks checked out to your Brave. You can also view any outstanding financial obligations. Go to http://destiny.ocps.net. Find and click on Boone High School. Click on login button, top right corner. Username: Student number and Password: eight digit birth day.

Congratulations to the Legend Yearbook. They placed sixth in the largest yearbook category of National Scholastic Press Association’s Best of Show in San Francisco; this is their highest Best of Show Ranking.

KTD Kids These Days

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Kids painted chrome AH: This is my last column I will write for the newspaper. I’m ashamed that it’s with you, but I guess I’ll take what I’ve got and go out with a small bang. SH: You sure know how to make a guy feel special. Since this is it for you, what do you want to write about? AH: I want to talk about abortion and flag burning. Let’s tackle those subjects right now. SH: I’m going to go out on a limb and say Mrs. Burke won’t approve of that idea, so let’s talk about the future. AH: FFFFUUUUUTTTTTUUUUURRRREEEEE Everything will be chrome. Even the plants. SH: SpongeBob is the voice of a generation. Speaking of generations (#cheesytransitions), how do you think our generation will do when we are the ones in charge? AH: I think our generation will kick some butt and take no names. Parents say we are entitled because we will do anything to get what we want; I don’t think that is always a bad thing. I think want for everything we want will drive us to succeed in the world. SH: The adult generation says that kids are not mentally or physically prepared to lead this country. But at some point the adult generation were kids and there was an adult generation that critiqued their every move. AH: I think the generation before the generation before us, told the generation directly before us that they were entitled and wouldn’t make it in the “real world.” That is the same generation that tells our generation that we will not make it in life. I feel like when we get older we will say the same thing to the generation that will succeed our generation and they will tell the next generation and so on and so forth. SH: It’s like the circle of life… but with responsibility… and it doesn’t really go in a circular formation. It is more like a line that starts on one point and goes in the same direction with seemingly no end in sight. But “never-ending line ray of responsibility” does not have a nice ring to it, so let’s just go with circle of life. AH: We could compromise on the issue. It could be a downward spiral that goes in a downward circular descent. SH: Maybe not downward because that would imply a worsening condition of each generation’s intelligence. Maybe it could be a lateral spiral, like a screw laying on its side, but that would imply the circle would end. AH: What are you even saying right now? SH: I’m getting lost in my own thoughts. AH: That’s because of the amount of polyester and spandex you currently wear. SH: These shorts are a gift from the heavens. You are just jealous you do not possess this clothing masterpiece. AH: Like a hallmark angel? Or like Supernatural angels where they go around stealing souls and whatnot? SH: Na, like one of those angels from Doctor Who. I haven’t closed my eyes for three days... AH: As fun as a Doctor Who based conversation would be, we should probably get back on the initial topic. SH: Our generation has been branded with some very unflattering concepts (YOLO, Swag, and something called Dance Moms), but those who support these concepts are the vocal minority messing life up for everyone else. There is a prominent silent majority that is masked and oppressed. These are kids who study, read for fun and watch Nat. Geo. AH: No one wants to admit they are wrong. They would much rather accentuate the negatives to prove their point, than acknowledge the uplifting truth; the fact that, not all kids are like this. We speak for that majority. I’m not trying to say we are perfect people, but we look around us and just voice what we see. We try to bring these problems to light so maybe one day, we can like, fix the like, problem, sooooo like, ya. Problems are like, not good.

Seniors tease juniors [ Step-Up from, page 1 entire student body. Seniors are pranking freshmen and juniors are pranking sophomores, which is not its original intention. “Unfortunately, this night was usually a chance for the junior girls to write horrible things on the sophomore girls’ lawns/sidewalks. Or even worse vandalize the cars in the driveway. Pretty much always sparked by jealousy,” Class of 2007 graduate Casey Shea said. Moriah Perkins had her house toilet papered three times last year as only a freshman. She had moved to Orlando from Mississippi at the beginning of the year and did not know many of the seniors. So when she woke up the next day to find her house covered in toilet paper she was shocked. “[The underclassmen] are friends with older classmates now. It all depends on groups,” sophomore Moriah Perkins said. The pranks have also become more damaging and destructive. Kids have cracked concrete driveways, put bricks through sunroofs and keyed cars, which are criminal acts. These damaging pranks have gotten police involved and also left an unworthy reputation on campus. “It is good if it is just toilet papering. [But] messing with houses and cars gets the cops involved and the school has to deal with it which is bad,” senior Dylan Dragon said. School resource officer Scott Daniels has not been personally involved in any

photo/MORIAH PERKINS

TOILET PAPER TRAGEDY. Even though she was a freshman and technically should not have been involved, Moriah Perkins’s house was toilet papered three times last year. “The seniors take pride in what they do and the pranks they pull. It is a big deal to be a senior,” Perkins said. More freshmen and sophomores were affected by Senior Step-up last year than juniors. of the punishments given to students during Senior Step-up, but he has heard about the pranks and jokes pulled. “Recently, parents have been good at controlling the situations and they just want things fixed. It opens up a whole new potential though because you are running from a scene which if you are caught can get you in trouble as well,” Daniels said. Anytime one damages someone

else’s property, he is charged with destruction of property. One can be charged with a felony depending on the value of the object damaged. He can be arrested or given a fine. “It is not necessary. It is something that once might have been a joke and is now used as a way to be vindictive and to be a dig at someone. [Students] do not know when to stop,” Daniels said.

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ORCHESTRA CONCERT

MISS AN EPISODE?

The beginning and advanced Orchestra classes will perform on May 23, at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. Admission is free.

If students have missed an episode of BCC, they can go to hilights.org to catch up. Past episodes can be viewed here.

IT 

In the Zone

Chase Gardner, sports editor

ITZ honors sports, athletes The ITZ season is coming to an end and it’s been a great year for sports and athletes on campus. These are some of the best and worst events. Best game: Is there any question on this one? It’s a no brainer; the Edgewater versus Boone football game was down to the wire and worthy of SportsCenter coverage. The Braves clipped the Eagles wings with Austin Jones’s last second field goal making the score 13-12. Former Raven’s kicker Billy Cundiff could learn a lot of things from Jones about not choking. Questionable move: I’ll catch a lot of slack for this, but the winner of this award is Aaron Turman’s signing to the University of Georgia. You know what Georgia has a lot of? Quality running backs. I can see the benefits of going to an SEC team, you’ll probably get a ring, but is it worth anything if you’ve been riding the pine all four years? Wouldn’t it be better to go to Miami or Notre Dame and start by junior year? The coaching may give him a kick into overdrive, but then again, it might not. Turman has ability, no denying that, his running style resembles Adrian Peterson, but signing to a school where he won’t get to show this ability wasn’t the best decision. Athlete of the year (female): There aren’t many people that can frustrate other athletes like sophomore Chase Cassady does. I’ve had the privilege to watch her pitch and her pitches could make Mike Trout swing and miss. She’s led the varsity softball team since her freshman year and only shows signs of improving. She boasts a phenomenal earned run average of 1.75 and nine wins. She’s fanned over 120 batters this season and had a batting average against of .163. Forget David Price, give this girl a Cy Young. Athlete of the year (male): The winner of this award plays possibly the hardest sport in the world and makes it look like a walk in the park. Cassady made players frustrated, but Jaun Caceres makes players look like fools. While the soccer season wasn’t as fruitful as the team would have hoped, Caceras still put up great numbers scoring 20 goals, averaging 1.25 a game. He’s a brilliant striker who can get past the defenders with ease and can turn a bad angle into a highlight goal. It’s for this reason, that he takes this award. It wasn’t easy to pick the winners, but there was something that set these athletes apart from the competition and that’s why they take the titles. Stay safe in the off-season and ITZ will see you in the fall.

THIS ONE

Johnson changes the game New coach prepares for the regular season By mACKENZIE mOCK With a new coach and focus, the football team is preparing for its preseason game against DeLand. Coach and physical education teacher, Andy Johnson played at North Dakota University from 1993-1996. He has coached at district rival Freedom High School since 2002. He was assistant coach for three years until he became head coach in 2006. The players began conditioning for a month by lifting weights and running. The first official day of practice was May 1 to prepare for the pre-season game against DeLand on May 24. “[My personal goal for pre-season] is to get stronger and to beat DeLand,” freshman Nathan Haskins said. The team was excited to get back on the field and to start playing again. Their goal for preseason is to defeat DeLand and show field is what they everyone what ran with Turman. is coming in the “It is important regular season. with this situation H o w e v e r , It is an honor to be the especially. It the players have first group of guys to play for Johnson at allows players other worries. Boone because he is to make an The freshmen and a very knowledgeable impression on sophomores who coach about the me. It lets me see were on junior game. who is a viable varsity earlier in Dalton Adams, sophomore option for varsity the year are trying and who still to prove they are needs work. It is varsity material. important for 9, “I am excited 10 and 11th graders,” Johnson said. and can’t wait. The first day of pads will Pre-season is important because it be good and getting to hit will be fun. gives the players more time to work I want to prove to the coach that I am with their specialized coach and to see good enough,” Haskins said. what the season will be like without Incoming seniors, like James graduating seniors quarterback Blake Veguilla and Deion Thomas, are more Williams, punter John Townsend and concerned with life after high school running back Aaron Turman. Because and are doing everything they can to they can no longer practice with the grab college scouts’ attention and earn seniors, they are already adjusting to scholarships. the new team. “I want to get about two touchdowns The players feel confident with the and over 100 yards in the pre-season spread offense and passing the ball game. That will get colleges to notice around. me,” Thomas said. “I am not worried about it, I never Spring football is important because am. It is just a part of the process and it lets the players know where they being a new coach. I just need new are, what they need to improve on and leaders to step up,” Johnson said. shows them how they compare and if Spring football also determines how they can compete with other schools. much playing time, what position and Since there is a new coaching staff, which team a player will make. the players and coaches have been “[Spring football] has a big part. If getting to know each other, a new you do well, you will make varsity and offense has been put into effect and probably start. Also, you could outplay Johnson has seen what he has to work a guy and steal his position,” Thomas with for next season. said. “We get to learn new plays and Spring football differs more than the see how the spread offense runs. We regular season because it is more of a ran I-formation last year with Ziglar learning process. It also focuses less on because it is simpler and we had Aaron game planning and more on scheme and Turman to run the ball,” Thomas said. helps the coach determine how skilled Johnson has been running a spread underclassmen are. offense which involves five wide “We only play one game instead of receivers and a shotgun quarterback. nine. The coaches are a lot looser and laid This offense involves more passing and back. [During the pre-season,] you are running instead of just carrying the just getting to know your teammates,” ball right up the middle of the field. sophomore middle linebacker Quentin Carrying the ball up the middle of the

quoteme

photo/MACKENZIE MOCK

Davis said. To prepare for the regular season, the team will participate in spring football and in summer workout. The summer practice schedule is: Monday through Friday from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., June through August. About two weeks before school starts, the team will start two-a-days. Summer workouts give Johnson a chance to ensure the players will be 100 percent committed to the team. “I am trying to change the culture of football,” Johnson said.

CHOP & BLOCK. As the defensive line coach holds a dummy, junior Tarik Darden chops and blocks it. “We are working hard every day as a team. We are going 120 percent every snap,” Darden said. The team plays DeLand first, ranked 19th in BHSN’S Central Florida spring football top 20 poll.

ßquestionanswer Andy Johnson, head football coach What made you want to start coaching? I respected all of my coaches growing up. I saw the impact they had on my friends and I and I wanted to do the same thing. How has football impacted or changed your life? It has given me a lot of opportunities like to go to college and further my career. Without football I might not have had the same opportunities. What is your favorite part of football? The competition and team camaraderie. Why did you choose to coach at Boone? I saw the job was open and was excited for the opportunity because of all of the tradition here and the sense of community. Describe what your plans and goals are for next year. I want to win districts and to make a play-off run. We should be in a position to win every game. Describe the ability of the team this year. A lot of quality depth on offensive and defensive lines. We have young skill positions. Coach Ziglar’s spot is a big one to fill. How do you plan on doing so? I’m not here to replace him. I’m here to coach the team and be me. I don’t know how to be anyone but me. How has the campus treated you so far? Very good. Everybody has made me feel at home. Describe what it feels like to be the new coach. Wonderful.

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Hilights.org, Mar. 19, 2013 Italio ignites taste buds BY MACKENZIE MOCK Opening on March 6, Italio brought a line of eager customers out the door and around the corner. The modern Italian kitchen offered one free entree per person with complimentary toppings or sauces.

PRICELESS PIADINA. The piadina with shrimp, alfredo sauce, cheese and mushrooms hits the spot ($8.98). photo/MACKENZIE MOCK

With a spin off of Chipotle, Italio is a create your own meal restaurant. One waits in line to place his order where employees at different stations fulfill one’s request, then pays the cashier. Diners can eat in or take out. While waiting in line for almost two hours was no fun, it was understandable since it was opening night of a restaurant with free food. Luckily, the food is worth the wait.

From a choice of pasta and salad bowls one chooses a type of meat like chicken, steak or shrimp, a sauce and an array of toppings to the piadina, which is like a wrap with meat and veggies, cheese and sauce. Plus all three meats are affordable, ranging from $6.78 to $8.98 depending on the meat chosen. There is also a kid’s menu which includes spaghetti and meatballs, chicken alfredo, and a create your own small salad or pasta bowl. One would spend no more than $5 on any kid’s meal including a small fountain drink. Unique sides include, an Italio stick with a choice of cheese, pepperoni or basil pesto ($1.98) and calamari misto, which is calamari with hot cherry peppers and served with lemon-herb vinaigrette ($4.98). There are also side salads ($3.98) and tomato basil or Italian wedding soup ($3.98). Delicious cannoli chips with sweet cream and chocolate chips are available for dessert ($2.98). The restaurant itself is modern. With the line of people wrapping around the tables and silver lights hanging from the ceiling, an unbeatable ambiance fills the room. The decor is quite similar to Chipotle’s with metallic tables and chairs and wooden booths. Overall, Italio’s is the new place to eat. With inexpensive, delicious, quality food one must try. The Dish Rating: 4 out of 5 stars. Location: 276 S. Orange Ave., Orlando, FL 32789


Hilights.org, Mar. 19, 2013 Online: http://italiokitchen.com Hours: Monday–Friday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Price: $3-$10 Payment: cash, credit or debit Beverages: Coke products, Italian sparkling water Daily specials: none Wheelchair access: yes Good for groups: yes Noise level: Normal chatter Contact: 407-960-1860


hilights.org, Mar. 20, 2013 Peach Valley Cafe serves perfection BY MACKENZIE MOCK Opening in January, Peach Valley Cafe brings a whole new meaning to casual dining. It’s hours are abnormal with both lunch and breakfast served until 2:30 p.m. There is indoor and outdoor seating available at wooden tables or booths. The decor is sweet and simple, like an old diner, but fancier. The service is excellent because the waiters give their customers just the right amount of attention; not too much to be a bother to them, but enough to assist when needed. The breakfast menu is diverse, ranging from big hearty meals to sweet, smaller ones. The menu includes: eggs, benedicts, omelets, breakfast sandwiches and wraps, as well as Valley Specials which include pancakes, waffles, bagels, french toast and biscuits. All Valley Specials include a side of bacon, ham, sausage or corned beef hash. Fresh fruits, nuts and chocolate chips may also be added to the pancakes and waffles. TASTY TOAST. The French toast at Peach Valley Cafe ($6.25) is worth every penny. photo/MACKENZIE MOCK

From the breakfast menu, the french toast ($6.25) is to die for, with texas toast dipped in homemade batter sprinkled with cinnamon and powdered sugar and served with warm syrup.

The lunch menu also has multiple options. It is split into two sections, the first being fresh soups, salads and chili, and the second is sandwiches and burgers. There are four types of wraps to choose from: the curry chicken salad wrap ($8.95), teriyaki chicken wrap ($8.95), Santa fe chicken salad wrap ($9.25)and the veggie wrap ($8.50). The salads are delicious, with fresh vegetables and fruits and perfectly cooked meat. The Favorites and Valley Classics include, blackened chicken pasta ($9.95), chicken pot pie ($8.75), shrimp and grits ($10.95) and the fresh catch of the day (market price). The chicken pot pie is full of flavor and just the right amount of spices. It tastes just like one’s mom would make it. Side options include french fries, sweet potato fries, green beans, fruit, asparagus, onion rings and coleslaw. Parslied red potatoes and vine-ripe tomatoes are also offered with no extra cost. For dessert one may choose from an array of options including, homemade peach cobbler ($3.25), Ghirardelli double dark chocolate brownie sundae ($3.95), Ghirardelli double dark chocolate brownie ($2.00) and a fresh baked gourmet cookie ($1.50). The most ordered is the brownie sundae. Overall, Peach Valley Cafe is one the best breakfast or lunch places in the Conway area. With delicious food and reasonable pricing, one must try.


hilights.org, Mar. 20, 2013 The Dish Rating: 4 out of 5 stars Location: 2849 S. Orange Ave., Suite 310, Orlando, FL 32806 Online: http://www.peachvalleyrestaurants.com/ Hours: Monday-Friday 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Price: $1.50- $11 Payment: cash, credit or debit Beverages: coffee, juice, tea, Coke products, milk Daily specials: none Wheelchair access: yes Good for groups: yes Noise level: low Contact: 407-896-4400


Hilights.org, Jan. 18, 2013 Boys defeat DP By MACKENZIE MOCK In a district game, the number four ranked boys basketball team played the number five ranked Dr. Phillips Panthers at home on Jan. 17, at 7:30 p.m. The Braves won 43-35. At the beginning of the first quarter Robert Rimmer won the tip off and then blocked a shot from the Panthers. The team started strong as Blake Sanderson and Dominique Wilson both made their three-pointers. At the end of the quarter, the boys lead 10-9. Barry Taylor Jr. dominated as he made two layups in a row and then made both of his free throws after being fouled. Robert Irwin added two points to the score, and Rimmer made one of two foul shots. At halftime the score was tied 19-19. ONE DOWN ONE TO GO. After being fouled Robert Rimmer makes both his free throws with seconds left in the fourth quarter. photo/MACKENZIEMOCK

Wilson started the third quarter scoring two points putting the team in the lead. Rimmer blocked another shot, and Taylor made two floaters and one of two free throws. The score at the end of the third quarter was 29-25.

Taylor made both free throws after drawing a charge, and again Rimmer made one of two. The two were working well together as Rimmer tipped in Taylor’s shot making the score 33-30 half way through the last quarter. Irwin and Taylor both had a fast break which put the team ahead by 37-30. Rimmer added two more blocks to the night and Taylor made six more free throws. After a close and intense game the team won 43-35. Their next game is Jan. 18, away against Timber Creek at 7:30 p.m.


Hilights.org, nov. 16, 2013 Boys beat Jones BY MACKENZIE MOCK In a preseason game against the Jones Tigers, the team recorded a win.The team started strong, but by the end of the first half Jones had caught up 29-26. Senior Blake Sanderson contributed to the lead by making two free throws with only two seconds left in the second quarter. The beginning of the third quarter held little action for both teams until senior Robert Rimmer was fouled and made both his free throws. A few minutes later he shook it up and slam dunked the ball on a foul and scored yet another free throw. Senior Robert Irwin scored a 3- pointer with 59 seconds left on the clock making the score 39-36. The Braves quickly racked up the points in the fourth quarter with Irwin scoring another two 3 pointers and Rimmer making four free throws. Rimmer also blocked two shots in a row from Jones. In the last minute of the game the Braves took a shot which Rimmer rebounded and dunked into the net. The Braves ended the game 59-41. The next game will be on Nov. 24, at Wekiva against Hagerty.

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