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Portfolio 2013

by Kaley Gilbert


Kaley Gilbert 9333 Buttonwood Street Orlando, FL 32825 kaley.gilbert96@gmail.com (407)-496-6978 Tim Stephens Features Topic Editor Orlando Sentinel 633 N. Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32801 Dear Mr. Stephens: Perhaps the Sentinel is seeking to recruit the talent of someone who can grasp complex concepts, work independently and contribute to the success of a publication. If this is the case, then please accept the accompanying resume for your review and consideration for the features summer internship in which these strengths and diverse experience will be of value. As a staffer on my high school newspaper, I effectively managed the design of my story, researched, wrote and edited stories, and worked with fellow staffers to brainstorm ideas for the paper. With a background in writing and design, I am able to view the publication from multiple perspectives with a proven ability to maximize reader interest. As an effective problem solver with excellent communication skills, I assist others to help produce the best publication for our audience. Creatively, I enjoy brainstorming interesting story ideas that take into consideration the target audience and incorporate design trends to impact readership. As a quick learner and an effective team player, I would be the perfect candidate for your summer internship. Your organization would give me a chance to develop useful skills that will help in pursuing my long-term career goals. Although the accompanying resume illustrates my background well, I feel a personal interview would better demonstrate my knowledge and abilities. I would appreciate the opportunity to meet with you at a convenient time. Thank you for your review and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon. Respectfully yours, Kaley Gilbert Enclosed: resumĂŠ


Kaley Gilbert 9333 Buttonwood Street Orlando, FL 32825 kaley.gilbert96@gmail.com (407)-496-6978 OBJECTIVE To obtain knowledge of the day-to-day workings of a professional publication through a summer internship or part-time job. EDUCATION Completed three years at William R. Boone High School Graduation Date: May 2014 G.P.A 3.19. Top 20% of class. EXPERIENCE Newspaper Staff Member, William R. Boone High School August 2012 – present. Newspaper Staff Member. Researched information for news articles using library and Web sources. Composed and edited informational articles, columns, editorials, and advertising copy. Experience taking and editing photos, conducting interviews, and designing layouts. Proficient in Adobe InDesign CS6 and Adobe Photoshop CS6 RELEVANT HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES Freshman composition; journalism I and II; compositional law providing writing skills and critical thinking; court procedures providing writing skills and public speaking. HONORS, AWARDS, AND MEMBERSHIPS Secretary of Model United Nations 2010 – present Member of International Thespian Honor Society Troupe 1139 2010 – present Vice President of high school chapter of Best Buddies 2013 – present Witness for Mock Trial Team 2012 – present.


Self Analysis Writing is one of my greatest passions. Ever since I was little it was something I loved doing. During my freshman year many of my friends took Journalism I and I became interested in the class through them. By my sophomore year I was very excited to learn more about journalism and writing for publications. I signed up for Journalism I that year already planning to apply for Hi-Lights staff the following year. Being on staff this year I have learned so much and grown immensely as a writer, designer, and photographer. My writing is much more cohesive and I’m far better at organizing my stories and establishing a good flow. I’m also better at also a lot better at writing in an active voice, although passive voice is something I still find myself slipping into. This class has made me a far better proofreader and improved my overall syntax and grammar. Designing is something I’ve struggled with since Journalism I, but now I am much more confident in my designing abilities that and am comfortable working in InDesign and Photoshop. Photography is another area that challenged me, but this year allowed me to gain a greater experience taking and editing photos, making me a better, more confident photographer. I still need to improve on my photo composition, but at least now I have a better grasp of how to go about that. I also finally learned how to operate a camera and adjust the settings. Managing deadlines was another skill I learned this year and also working under pressure. I learned what it takes to meet deadlines: time management, focus and organization. I learned multi-tasking skills which I used when writing multiple stories and balancing my time between newspaper and other activities such as Mock Trial. Teamwork is a very important part of running a successful publication and I witnessed that first hand this year. A cooperative and dedicated staff is essential because the paper is a joint effort. Everyone on staff has to do their part to help the paper get to press. This year we had some problems with staying dedicated to the paper as a staff and it showed when the paper had to pull stories. Another skill I developed is how to be a successful advertiser. When selling ads for the paper you must speak in a polite, but affirmative way that tells the client that it is a great opportunity to advertise with Hi-Lights. This is a very valuable course to take as it has given me so many professional skills that can be used in any future career I go into. Skills such as, conducting oneself professionally and politely, maintaining deadlines, effectively working with others, keeping organized and focused, etc. These are skills that last a lifetime are applicable in any career and will help to make good first impressions.


Reflection #1 My best work for the paper this year, was my feature story on Adena Labovitz. My purpose for this story was to feature Adena and her achievement of receiving a musical scholarship. This story was very easy to write as Adena was a really passionate subject and from the first interview she gave excellent quotes, in turn giving me a solid foundation to build off. I also was much more organized in managing this story than my earlier ones in the year so the process went very smoothly. My first step in organizing the story was to look through my quotes and choose the ones I knew I was definitely going to use. After that I made sure to answer the initial who, what, where, when, why, and how of a news story. My third step was to build my story around the quotes I had, making sure everything flowed well. The piece evolved seamlessly from one editor to the next, without any major mishaps. The only problem I had with this story was getting in contact with Adena’s father for an interview. I emailed him several times, but by the time he finally answered my questions we had gone to press. Still despite that the story was a success with a clear message about pursuing one’s passion no matter how difficult the road. What I really like about this piece is the flow of the story and the ending. She gave me a great quote that I really think captured the theme of the story and wrapped everything up very well.


First Draft


Final Draft


Reflection #2

This story need work because I don’t think it has a very good flow or organization. It is also pretty dull to read. I think that what this work needs most is more information and better more personal quotes. If I had more time on this story I would get better photos and also try to find out more specific plays and wins from the people I interviewed. The hardest thing about writing this story was getting all the interviews done as it was one of the first stories that I needed to go back after initial interviews for follow-ups.


First Draft


Final Draft


Reflection #3

I am proud I took this photo because it is one of the first action shots I took that was not blurry. Action shots are always a challenge for so being able to capture a decent one made me really happy. When I was covering girls tennis for my beat, I was very nervous of whether I could get a good shot or not, but after I took this photo I gained more confidence in my photography. My nervousness and hesitation had been holding me back. This photo follows rule of thirds so it has at least one element of photo composition. My eye is drawn to the up the arm of the player to the ball so it also conveys leading lines. girlstennis_Gilbert


Reflection #3

I really like this photo because it captures an emotional moment. This woman had just been naturalized as a U.S. citizen and the joy is evident on her face. I feel very proud to have been part of the ceremony and to have captured this tender moment. This photo exhibits rule of thirds. what draws my eye to this photo is the happiness on the woman’s face. naturalization 4-11_Gilbert0058


Reflection #3

This photo may be a little biased because it is one I shot of my best friend during a photo day. However the main reason I’m proud of it is because I captured her right during a laugh so this photo has a lot of emotional appeal and is more entertaining. This photo exhibits filling the frame as a compositional element. What draws my eye to this photo is that even if one didn’t know the subject, they would still be able to identify the emotion of the photo. lunch 9-20_Gilbert002


Reflection #4 I am an asset to this staff because Hi-Lights is something I’m really proud to be a part of and I know that it is a reflection of myself so I always give it my best. I am very committed to this publication and will put in the time and effort to make sure all my work for the paper is best it can possibly be. When I fell behind deadline this year during Mock Trial I put in extra hours at home and before and after school to make sure my work got done. I have learned a lot about myself and how to keep myself focused and organized and ahead of schedule, so next year I know I can handle the deadlines and the pressure. I understand fully that being on staff and producing Hi-Lights is a joint effort and we all rely on each other. If one of us slacks, they drag everyone else and the entire paper down. I know what it takes to make the paper succeed and I enjoy working with my fellow staffers to accomplish this. I am also very creative and I can bring new story ideas and a fresh eye to the paper. I’m really excited for next year and how we can improve things further.


Reflection #5 This year my hardships were balancing newspaper and my other extracurricular activities. Especially with Mock Trial, it was hard to manage my deadlines. However, I think by the end of the year I finally found that balance and was able to meet the May deadline even with multiple stories. I learned how to stay on top of my work and also how not to procrastinate. My other problem was, even when there were things that I could get done, ahead of deadline, I wouldn’t because I’ would justify in my head “I have time, don’t worry.” That is not an effective way to conduct oneself in the slightest, but I am much more conscience of time management and being proactive. I have a better understanding of what to expect next year and know first hand how hectic things can get, but I know if I have problems arise again next year one of the most important things I can do is ask for help. I have learned not to be afraid to ask questions and overall think that I have grown from these experiences as both a writer and a person. I don’t think I handled every situation on staff the best this year, but overall I think I handled things well and proved myself in the end.


Reflection #6 My three goals at midterm were to make all future deadlines, be more organized, and to procrastinate less. I succeeded in some aspects, but did not reach all of my goals. During the February issue I had a bump in the road, and fell behind deadline in my Plaid Gig story. It was during the height of Mock Trial season when we were preparing for districts and states competition. The story was pulled from the February issue, but fortunately was printed in the March issue. As far as being more organized, I definitely feel I have grown more organized as the year has gone on, in both my time and managing my materials. I am a messy person by nature so being neat is something I have to push myself to do. Being organized really does make a world of difference though, and makes managing deadlines and life run much more smoothly I was much more organized when it came to handling the May deadline; you really had to be to manage both stories. I think my Adena story was a lot easier to write than past stories because I was more organized. I also feel like I have succeeded in procrastinating less. It is still a challenge for me as I have never been a “Type A� sort of person, but there is really no good excuse for procrastinating anyway. It only hurts in the end when you put off things to the last minute.


Reflection #7 SUPREME CASE

GAME DAY LINE-UP

Writers takes sides on Affirmative Action

SOCIAL GAP

Stats compared, predict who will win

[ EDITORIALS, page 4

The good and bad of technology compared

[ SPORTS, page 12

hi-lights Volume 61 ß Issue 2

[SPECIAL, page 10

for students, by students Friday, November 9, 2012 ß hilights.org

Perfect SAT score opens doors Megan Tracy scores school’s first 2400

By DELANEE BOGAN There are few students who take the SAT and can say they answered every question correctly. Senior Megan Tracy

is one of these students. Of the 1,647,123 students nationwide who took the SAT in 2011, 384 earned perfect score. That is roughly 0.023 percent of those who took the test. “[When I saw my tests results online] I hit the refresh button on my computer many times. I was not expecting it; I ran

to my dad and he double checked it on his phone,” Tracy said. John Tracy, Megan’s father, had a similar reaction to the results. “It was a mixture between shock and excitement, and it took a while for it to sink in. I had to look at it a couple of times before I believed it,” J. Tracy said.

Tracy prepped for the SAT by taking free practice exams online. She took practice tests on each section and wrote essays. After taking the practice tests, she reviewed everything she got incorrect and studied it. Tracy also said

[ Full story, page 9

Americans need fitness regimen Childhood obesity rates climb; military faces national security crisis By HEATHER JANAS and PAULA MORALES

photo/PAULA MORALES

MAKING STRIDES. During his Athletic Training class, senior Brandon Rhea runs the track. “I personally don’t eat healthy but I make up for it with frequent trips to 24 Hour Fitness to shoot hoops, lift weights and swim laps,” Rhea said.

America’s obesity rate is rising. Today, 149.3 million Americans ages 20 and up are overweight or obese according to an MSNBC segment titled “War on Weight” from July 10, 2012. According to retired United States Navy Rear Admiral Jamie Barnett, one in four Americans is too obese to join the military. In the MSNBC segment, Barnett said the military loses approximately $60 million on the 1200 first term enlistees who are discharged due to weight related problems. A Men’s Health article titled “The U.S. Military’s Struggle with Overweight Soldiers” published in Nov. 3 2011, says overweight soldiers are more likely to fail boot camp and contribute to 658,000 lost work days in the military a year. Boot camps for the United States Army have been extended for incoming recruits who are overweight or out of shape. The extension of training camps and the shrinking military applicant pool due to rising childhood obesity creates a potential national security threat. Jim Liston, former conditioning coach of the Los Angeles Galaxy soccer team and current conditioning coach of the professional soccer team Chivas USA, says America is becoming an unfit society. He proposes recruits be sent to a two month “mini camp” before training in actual boot camp. This would hopefully end the extension of the training, but it could also be financially costly. “Our bodies are built to move. Exercise every day. Even five minutes per day is enough,” Liston said. Liston also believes physical education classes are lacking in schools. “Physical Education in schools is disappearing. [The solution is putting] good solid physical education programs in every school. Mandate that physical education classes be taught everyday,” Liston said. The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention says 40 percent of

[ Full story, page 5

Megan Tracy

Seniors “tote” tradition Campus custom continues and changes By KALEY GILBERT What started as a friendly tradition has become a battle between classes. The totem pole tradition has been a senior custom on campus since 1999, when then senior, Daniel Graham, created a totem pole out of PVC pipe with his father. Ever since, the Senior Class Council has decorated the totem pole for its graduating class. Approximately five years ago, seniors added to the tradition. The Junior Class Council can steal the totem pole from the seniors who hide it. “Every year the tradition changes and new rules are added. I’ll hear soand-so talking about a rule, and I’m like, ‘since when did that happen?’0” Senior Class sponsor Sarah Kittrell said. The current unwritten rules of the totem pole tradition include: it cannot be stolen until after homecoming, it has to be at a student’s house that lives in the district, in an open area and it cannot be chained or locked. The totem pole is formally handed down after graduation to the rising seniors. “I think it’s a good idea that someone in district has to have it. I would hate to think that someone from Edgewater

N11. News feature: Seniors ‘tote’ tradition. Page 1, November issue. I think that this story really captures a piece of Boone and how we’re a school full of tradition. I’d like for this story to represent both myself and give a glimpse into the high school I go to.

[ Full story, page 8

Grade changes, school stays optimistic ßthegrade Boone is currently a

B

By OLIVIA QUATTRONE In the fall, high schools receive grades based on their performance. Boone consistently earns A’s and B’s; however, the Department of Education’s system for calculating grades has changed, which could effect

ßrandomfact Consecotaleophobia is the fear of chopsticks.

10

the school’s grade. Schools are evaluated on two components. The first is an assessment that evaluates FCAT test scores in reading, writing, math and science. There are a total of 800 points available for this component. The other

INDEX opinion 2 campus & local 5 features 6

special 10 sports 13 entertainment 18 restaurant review 20

evaluates advanced placement exam passing rates, graduation rates and college readiness aspects like SAT and ACT scores. There are also 800 points in this category, making the two cells of equal importance. Each of these components earns the school points.

GET INVOLVED check us out on facebook follow us on twitter @hilightsnp

Friday, may 10, 2013 hilights.org

To earn an A, a school needs at least 1,050 points. “I think we will have enough points for an A again. Our students continue

[ Full story, page 5

SEE AND HEAR MORE go to hilights.org for photo galleries, soundslides featuring students and weekly sports’ beats

featurestories hi-lights

PTSA BOOK FAIR

TRADING POST SALE

Students can pick up their summer reading lists, graduation gifts or teacher appreciation gifts at Barnes & Noble located on Colonial Dr. on May 14, from 4:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Chorus, band, drama and the cheerleaders will be performing. There will also be a Foundation Silent Auction and Boone Art Show.

The Trading Post will be holding a sale until May 17. Also, BHSAA will be sending out renewal letters for All Season Sports Passes over the summer with discount offered for student passes thru Aug. 16.

musician pursues passion By KALEY GILBERT Music is a common interest, but for senior Adena Labovitz it is more than just a hobby, more than just an inspiration; music is her passion and her way of life. Now, Labovitz has the opportunity to pursue her passion at the University of Miami’s prestigious jazz program, one of the most regarded in the country. “[When I found out I got accepted] I was trying on prom dresses and I opened my email and saw one from the University of Miami. I was crying so hard and shaking when I called my dad to tell him,” Labovitz said. Music is something Labovitz has grown up around. She plays six instruments: guitar, piano, mandolin, viola, cello and ukulele, but considers her voice a seventh instrument. Labovitz has been performing since elementary school when she would create music videos for her parents. “My dad’s a musician, so he’s the one who introduced me to music. In our old house we had a basement and my dad kept his drums down there. I loved to go downstairs and sit with him while he played,” Labovitz said. In high school, music was Labovitz’s outlet from her school work. She was

part of the chorus program all four years and is vice president of Chorus Honor Society. In addition to that, she also began taking private vocal lessons her freshman year, performed in the chorus variety show all four years, took Advanced Placement Music Theory, and she took a solo musical act to the drama district competition that received straight superiors. Despite her involvement and passion for music, the decision to pursue it professionally did not come easily. “I was back and forth for a really long time. It’s a scary thing to go after a career where there is no definite source of money. You could choose a career path where it’s definite you have money, you have a job, or you could go after your dream,” Labovitz said. At the end of her junior year, after discovering a new style of music, jazz singing, she knew it was her future path. “I realized jazz singing was something I could do forever and be poor, but perfectly content. I just really clicked with it,” Labovitz said. Once Labovitz decided she wanted to pursue music professionally, next came the daunting task of applying for college music programs. She applied to two schools of music,

hi-lights artsentertainment

Florida State’s classical program and University of Miami’s jazz and classical programs. Miami’s jazz program was her dream school. To get an audition with University of Miami’s jazz program, Labovitz sent them a song she recorded. At the audition, Labovitz felt her dream school was out of reach. “The girl that went right before me, I could hear her audition through the door. In jazz music, you have to do improvisations and she did hers on a steel drum. I didn’t even know you could bring an instrument to the audition,” Labovitz said. “Afterwards she was hugging all the judges and her parents knew them. I basically ruled myself out of the running after that.” It was times such as this when Labovitz lost faith that she turned to her friends and family for support. “There have been so many times where I want to give up, but they helped me to believe,” Labovitz said. For others struggling to follow their dreams, Labovitz encourages them to never give up and to work hard perfecting their craft. “You can’t get anywhere on just talent. You have to live it if it’s your passion,” Labovitz said.

photo/GABRIELLA FAKHOURY

ALL THAT JAZZ. Senior Adena Labovitz performs at prom along with seniors Jaclyn Thomas and Taylor Wood. “[My favorite thing about performing] is conveying a story to the audience. It’s my way of serving the community,” Labovitz said. Labovitz was one of the two acts selected to peform at prom.

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

23

MUSICIANS ENTERTAIN UNDER EVENING SKY

FINAL TRANSCRIPTS Final Transcripts need to be ordered by April 24. See Ann Cadman in College and Careers for details. Each transcript is $5.

Jazz band’s annual Jazz Under the Stars event is April 29 at 7 p.m. in the Kemosabe Commons area (weather permitting), otherwise the event will be moved indoors.

Band’s music expresses faith Christian rock band strives to make it big By KALEY GILBERT Plaid Gig might appear to be the typical garage band, but this rock band exceeds the stereotype. They are an established band at their church, The Sanctuary, and many of the members have been playing music for years prior to the band’s begininng. Plaid Gig was formed six years ago when a group of friends with a common love of music decided to jam together. Formerly a classic rock band, Plaid Gig has become more of a Christian rock band. The band stars senior Christian Bartram as lead guitarist and senior Geoffrey Gaudoin on the drums. Sophomore Megan Thomas, the band’s newest member, belts it out as lead singer and backup guitarist; bassist Ethan Scarborough is a sophomore at Circle Christian School. “We were trying to come up with the band name one day and dreaming of future gigs. Geoffrey and I were both wearing plaid shorts. We both noticed this and as a joke I suggested this [Plaid Gig]. Well, turns out everyone liked it and the name stuck,” Scarborough said. The members found there were also the stereotypical “creative differences”

that come with a mix of personalities. “[The hardest thing about being in a band is] definitely trying to get together and collaborate with all the different musicians. You have to work to get along,” Gaudoin said. Of course there are positives that come with being in a band. For Plaid Gig it’s a chance for friends to bond over music and faith. “[My favorite thing is] being able to worship God through music. Another thing was being able to form a bond with the guys and the friendship that’s come from it,” Thomas said. Though it has its disadvantages, performing live can be one of the best positives. The thrill that comes from performing is only intensified by the buzz of a live audience. “I like having people look up to me on stage and being able to give them a good show,” Bartram said. Another advantage from playing music and being in Plaid Gig, is the emotional catharsis it offers. “Actually, music is one of my emotional releases. I always went to music when I was little because I had depression issues,” Thomas said. Practicing and performing as Plaid Gig allows the band members to expand and improve their talents. “As a musician, I definitely need

to work on mastering my instrument. I’m also working on learning guitar and I’m going to try to learn piano soon,” Scarborough said. Although being in a band was a new experience for the group, many of its members were not new to music. Vocalist Megan Thomas has been singing since she was 7 years old and drummer Geoffrey Gaudoin has been playing since he was 2 years old. “I was banging on tables a lot as a kid and my parents had a friend who taught drums, so that got me into it,” Gaudoin said. Plaid Gig’s goals are to spread their name and book more gigs. Most recently, Plaid Gig took the stage at their church’s New Year’s Eve lock -in and when two of their members participated in Brave Aid. Unfortunately, Plaid Gig had to put the shows on hold because lead singer Thomas developed vocal nodules, making singing impossible. Her surgery is scheduled for March 19 and as soon as she recovers, Plaid Gig will be ready to get back to performing. “I think our goals as a band are to go as far as we can go, and bring glory to God along the way. Our major goal at the moment is to get some recording done and put out an EP,” Scarborough said.

photo courtesy/DEAN STUART PHOTOGRAPHY

ROCK OUT. Jamming out at Brave Aid, senior Christan Bartram plays a guitar solo in his act. “I’m best at playing my guitar solos. I can do some pretty neat stuff,” Bartram said. Brave Aid is an annual benefit talent show; SGA donated the proceeds to Water is Life.

N12. Personality profile: Musician pursues passion. Page 10, May issue. I’m really proud of this story because it has a really good flow and is full of great quotes. It is one of my best pieces of work this year. I had a lot of fun writing this story because Adena’s passion was infectious.

N13. General feature: Band’s music exspresses faith. Page 23, March issue. This story was really fun to write and I think it was organized very well. It is one of my best pieces this year and I’m proud of how it turned out. It took a lot of work to get the finished product.


Design 4

Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

thenews

hi-lights

This is a really good quotable quote that no one else can say and it will really make Burke happy to read. John Doe, senior staffer

photo/RENEE BURKE

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling who and what is happening in the photo and do not begin with a name. “I am a really good quotable quote that Burke will love to read,” Burke said. I am something that cannot be seen in the photo, preferably a stat.

Prom story headline This is a subhead that describes story, no period

photo/RENEE BURKE

LEAD IN. I am a present tense sentence telling who and what is happening in the photo and do not begin with a name. “I am a really good quotable quote that Burke will love to read,” Burke said. I am something that cannot be seen in the photo, preferably a stat. Velendunt modi utat explaut velestior alitaquidit, simintur, undiamus, et et laborem quataturis eum ut venderit as evelestia dios inum lat

By Kaley Gilbert A delectable aroma fills the air as one walks into the lively restaurant of napkins rain down over the customers. With authentic Greek music playing to accompany the Greek decor, one is instantly transported to Greece. Taverna Opa, located in the heart of Pointe Orlando is as much of an experience as it is a restaurant. With the electric atmosphere, Opa is the perfect place to enjoy cuisine just as tasteful as the atmosphere is entertaining. With bold and colorful plants placed around the restaurant and Greek decor in every corner, Opa succeeds in keeping the Greek experience authentic and traditional. Opa, in Greek culture, means a password that conveys the festive Greek spirit; the restaurant lives up to its name. If looking for an intimate dinner with a significant other, Opa is not the place. Its atmosphere is better suited for large parties who do not mind the Ullabo. Um imint ped que cuptatur, consed minimus venis doluptatis posa cuscimaiorro berit eossit est optatem evendig nistiusa que reic tem autem qui nonsed quis est a plist que et eos dolor sum eos sint apienist eumquas rest aliquatum sitatur aut mod milluptios accum is qui oditate dis elessedia aut adis es aboribus quiassi odiorem peliqua eperiorum et molorum quam que non cones alitiosam

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Writing

Front, page1, October 2012

ON POINTE

OPA!

Ballerina pursues professional career

MUST SEE

Taverna Opa is excellent choice for Greek dining

[ FEATURES, page 6

hi-lights Volume 61 ß Issue 1

Boys’ golf starts off with 5-1 record

[ ENTERTAINMENT, page 23

[ SPORTS, page 18

for students, by students Friday, October 5, 2012 ß hilights.org

Graduation requirements change, again

“My stomach dropped. All that was left was the feeling of not being sure of what is going to happen.” Travis Snethen senior photo/ALLIE SLOAN

FOR A GOOD CAUSE. To raise money for cancer research, Joshua Halloran shaves Brian Gardner’s head at Relay for Life.

Campus fights cancer, shows pink pride Students and teachers are affected by breast cancer By GABRIELLA FAKHOURY As sweat runs down his neck onto his pink jersey, he gazes into the stands to see his mother’s bright eyes light up with joy as she watches him play under the Friday night lights. “I knew I was playing for a good cause and I was playing for my mom. I knew I would make her proud,” senior Travis Snethen said. In seventh grade (January 2008), Snethen faced the news of his mom’s stage one breast cancer diagnoses. “My stomach dropped. All that was left was the feeling of not being sure of what is going to happen,” Snethen said. After nine months of chemotherapy, a breast mastectomy and her lungs collapsing during surgery, Snethen and his mother Deanna Snethen, looked to the positive side of her recovery and also his newfound connection to God. “It helped me grow closer to God and also helped me grow stronger as a person. I appreciate my mom much more, and I realize how strong of a person she is,” Snethen said. One in eight women is diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. That means at least one girl in each class on campus will be diagnosed with breast cancer. About 188 girls in the whole school will be diagnosed in their lifetime. The older someone is, the more likely she is to be diagnosed with breast cancer. Another risk factor is if a family bloodline has a history of cancer.

My Story

[ Full story, page 5, see Awareness

[ Full story, page 5, see Graduation

photo courtesy/TRAVIS SNETHEN

ALL FOR MOM. Before the pink and white game, Travis Snethen poses with his mom a breast cancer survivor. “I knew she was proud of us,” Snethen said.

ßOctoberevents Oct. 14

Oct. 20

Oct. 21

What: Pink Army 5K Where: Palm Coast, Florida

What: Making Strides 5K Where: Lake Eola Park

What: Susan G. Komen 5k Where: University of Central Florida

By KALEY GILBERT and JOSH HALLORAN Boone High School Athletic Association makes an appearance at every sporting event on campus, they operate The Trading Post and they advertise around the community. One might not notice them, but they are everywhere. “BHSAA is like an umbrella covering all the of Boone’s

ßrandomfact Every human spends about half an hour as a single cell.

INDEX opinion 2 campus & local 5 special 12

sports, making sure each is represented and taken care of, not only during their season but throughout the entire year,” Therese Coble, We Are Boone chairman, said. Last year BHSAA sold 480 All Sport Passes to the student body, raised over $16,000 in concessions and put on the largest fundraiser of the school year, the BHSAA 5K Reservation Run. BHSAA hopes to make sure the school’s athletic programs can perform at the top of their game with the best possible equipment.

[ Full story, page 5, see BHSAA sports entertainment features photo essay

14 22 6 24

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Presidential election sparks interest, gains appeal

$4,000 for tennis wind guards

By ANNA MARIE BORIA Every four years the world of politics is in full gear for the presidential campaign season. The Special Feature gives an insight on everything one should know to be prepared for the election on Nov. 6. With the popular vote being 51.8 percent to 48.2 percent in favor of President Barack Obama, analysts expect that this election will be a close one. Everything from getting to know the presidential candidates to a quiz to check whether one is a republican or a democrat is presented on the spread. This is in addition to information on seeing how one’s vote counts and how important Florida, being a swing state, is in the election. Check out the Special Feature on the presidential election to get a deeper look.

$13,000 on softball scoreboard

[ Full coverage, page 12, see Special Feature

For more info, scan

BHSAA helps build athletic programs’ platforms Organization helps teams compete with the proper equipment

By JORDAN KNIGHT After spending four years in high school, a student can only imagine what walking across stage and receiving a diploma would feel like. This transition signals the closing of one chapter and the start of another. Yet failing to meet graduation requirements prohibits students from reaching the goal of graduating high school. Florida graduation requirements have changed within the past year and now are different for each grade level. “We’re getting away from the FCAT and having EOC exam and an online requirement,” guidance counselor James Caperton said. The state is responsible for the requirements. Though there have been additions, guidelines for core classes (four English and math credits and three science and social studies credits)

#fastfigures $16,000 raised in concessions

SEE AND HEAR MORE go to hilights.org for photo galleries, soundslides featuring students and weekly sports’ beats


Writing

Campus and Local, page 5, October 2012

5

Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights thenews CLUB ELECTS NEW OFFICERS

STUDENTS ELECT HOMECOMING COURT

National Honor Society elected new officers on Sep. 21. All officers are seniors. The president is Christine Maloney, Vice President is Elaina Carrion; Secretary is Emily Porterfield; Treasurer is Merrie Grace Harding and the Service Chair is Jessica Kneeland.

Students of all grade levels were selected on Sept. 28 for homecoming court. Representing the senior class are Cameron McNeill, Merrie Grace Harding, Elaina Carrion, Shelbee Simmons, Sarah Berlinsky, Connor McClellan, William McMillin, Dillon Knox, Aaron Turman and John Townsend.

Sam Holleman, columnist

Boo Boo wins

However, that is not always true. On Aug. 18, 2010, her 47th birthday, Annette Montgomery learned she had stage two breast cancer. No one else in her family had ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. “Cancer makes you try not to take things for granted. It’s hard to relive it again, but when people go through chemo and need help, I try to always be there,” Montgomery, government teacher, said. With two young boys at home and a strong will to keep working, Montgomery did not let cancer stop her from achieving anything, let alone her daily routines. “It is all about setting up a plan. Without a plan it is very overwhelming; with a plan you can keep your life in

control,” Montgomery said. As of today, Montgomery has been cancer free and out of chemotherapy for 18 months. Every cancer free year lowers her chances of cancerous cells being triggered. Football’s largest fundraiser and newest tradition is the pink and white football game, which takes place on campus every other spring. The first annual game raised $18,000 two years ago. Colonial High School hosted the second pink and white game, which raised $12,000. Much like the age-old tradition of the Boone/Edgewater match up, a barrel is the trophy. The barrel is pink and white in spirit of breast cancer awareness. “The pink and white game was my wife’s idea. She believed that it would be beneficial to our kids and community,” football coach Phil Ziglar said. Ziglar’s wife works for MD Anderson, a cancer center searching for

a way to cure all types of cancer. Ziglar’s first wife passed away after her fight with lung cancer. This campus is an official Relay for Life location. Another national fundraiser is the Susan G. Komen Race for the cure. The local event is Oct. 21, at the University of Central Florida. If interested, visit www.komen.org. With a 93 percent survival rate for the first stage of breast cancer and a 15 percent survival rate for the last stage, this 5K race raises awareness for the fight against breast cancer and also celebrates the survivors. Those who lost their lives to the fight against cancer are also honored at the event. “I look at Mrs. Montgomery and others and they just keep going; they don’t let it affect their family. I am really proud of them,” Sarah Kittrell, digital design teacher, said.

The Pink and White Barrel is given to the winning team.

Annette Montgomery

State alters minimum standards [ Graduation from, page 1

ßgradebygrade All grades must complete 4 English and Math, 3 Science and Social Science, 8 Electives, 1 Art and 1 Physical Education • •

9

• • • • • •

10 11 12

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (Must pass to earn Geometry credit) Biology (Must pass to earn Biology credit) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (30% of grade) Biology (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade)

FCAT Reading and Mathematics (Must pass both sections to graduate)

and eight required electives remain unchanged. However, freshmen and sophomores must successfully complete one online class through virtual school. No specifications are given for what online class should be completed. An online class completed in grades six through eight is also acceptable. A common concern regarding the online class is a student’s access to a computer. “If I was unable to get a computer, I would go to the public library because [computers there] are available all the time,” sophomore Nicole Neal said. Florida is phasing out Florida Comprehensive Achievement Tests and replacing them with End of Course Exams. FCAT tested students grades 3 to 11 in reading, math, writing and science. In previous years, 10th grade reading and math FCAT’s had to be passed with a three or higher for graduation. Now, juniors, sophomores and freshmen must pass FCAT 2.0 Reading with a 3 or better for graduation, unless students are able to opt out with a higher ACT scores. EOCs are being administered in

Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology and U.S. History. Current freshmen and sophomores will take all four of the exams prior to graduation; juniors will take Algebra 1 and U.S. History; freshmen must pass Algebra 1, geometry and biology to graduate; sophomores must pass Algebra 1 to graduate. In addition to the new exit exams, the EOCs, except for Algebra, will also make up 30 percent of sophomores final grades. For freshmen, only the U.S. History EOC exam represents 30 percent of their grade, and for juniors, Algebra 1 and U.S. History EOC exams will represent 30 percent of their grade. Current seniors’ final exams represent 10 percent of their final grade. “The FCAT is sort of familiar to our age group, but throwing in the EOC instead is overwhelming and if you don’t do so well, you suffer huge consequences for it,” Neal said. Students who are unsure if they are on track to graduate should make an appointment to speak with their counselors or go to www.fldoe.org to check state graduation requirements for their grade level. “[If I wasn’t on track] I wouldn’t be happy with myself because all my hard work would be for nothing,” junior Clint Lyttle said.

Organization benefits campus sports [ BHSAA from, page 1 “Without BHSAA, the school’s facilities would get worn and unusable at some point,” Scott Bell, Vice President of BHSAA, said. “We try to focus on the needs of all sports and then prioritize which needs are the most.” While BHSAA strives to support athletics, it primarily focuses on the larger facility needs. For example, BHSAA purchased the new stadium scoreboard three years ago, which benefits all the sports that play there.

Last year, they also purchased a new scoreboard for softball, new mats for the cheerleaders and re-finished the gymnasium floor. “We are so grateful for BHSAA because now we have a full competition floor of a mat, when before we had seven mats that were actually wrestling,” Cindy Hutsell, cheerleading coach, said. “Now we can practice our routine without saying, ‘Let’s pretend there’s another mat right here.’ We are so blessed to have them.” With 867 entries and over $14,000 raised in the 4th Annual Reservation Run, it breaks school records for the most runners and most money

accumulated at this event. Sports teams and clubs are encouraged to partake in the run because each runner who registers under said club or sport, receives a portion of the proceeds. Bravettes earned an extra $1,000 for having the most participants. BHSAA originated with the help of the Boone Sports Legacy Board and Boone Boosters. Their mission was to improve the school’s facilities and to raise funds for athletics. They joined together to form BHSAA and together be a strong unit. If one is interested in volunteering for BHSAA he can either contact Kelly Mutters, located in the Trading Post.

Without BHSAA the school’s facilities would get worn out and unusable at some point. Scott Bell BHSAA vice president

My Story

On August 8, 2012, the world became aware of a show that is what can only be described as “the show of the century.” One may think that this is somewhat of a bold statement given we are only 12 years into the century. But TLC’s Here Comes Honey Boo Boo has reached a new level of television entertainment that cannot be considered anything other than the show of the century. This masterpiece is about a 6-year-old beauty pageant contestant Alana “Honey Boo Boo” Thompson (originally featured on TLC’s Toddlers in Tiaras) her mother, Mama; her father, Sugar Bear; and her sisters Pumpkin, Chubbs and Chickadee as they live out there compelling and fascinating lives in McIntyre, Georgia. First of all, the show has such a broad audience appeal that anyone can tune in and have a good time. This show has it all: a loving family, humor for all ages, a pig named Glitzy, and of course, farting. It is very rare that a show comes along where entire families can sit together and enjoy an hour of quality television. Furthermore, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the epitome of LOLing. From Glitzty the pig “oooo’ing” on the table to Mama farting in the title sequence, one cannot stop laughing from the beginning to the end of each episode. This show puts classics such as Cheers, M*A*S*H and Alf to shame. Finally, this show has not been ruined by Hollywood because it stays true to its core values. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo remains a spectacular show without succumbing to the pressures of Hollywood. This is what separates a mediocre show from a great one, because if a show needs to sell out to succeed, it has already failed. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the show of the century, but not because of its broad appeal, its humor or even its ability to succeed without selling out; rather because (sadly) everyone can be entertained by the show. It possesses the humor of a 4-year-old who just discovered the wonders of poop and because even Hollywood wants to avoid any association with it. It is the show of the century because August 8, 2012, is the point in time when America stooped to a new low. This sad excuse for entertainment got more views than the RNC. Somehow, listening to a 6-year-old’s concerns about Mama eating their pet pig is better television than listening to a man who could be the next leader of our country has to say. In 100 years from now, historians will look back at this point and say that this is where America lost, and Boo Boo won.

[ Awareness from, page 1

ßthebarrel

SH &Hollering Screaming

Pink, white tackles cancer


Writing

Front, page 1, November 2012

SUPREME CASE

GAME DAY LINE-UP

Writers takes sides on Affirmative Action

SOCIAL GAP

Stats compared, predict who will win

[ EDITORIALS, page 4

The good and bad of technology compared

[ SPORTS, page 12

hi-lights Volume 61 ß Issue 2

[SPECIAL, page 10

for students, by students Friday, November 9, 2012 ß hilights.org

Perfect SAT score opens doors Megan Tracy scores school’s first 2400

By DELANEE BOGAN There are few students who take the SAT and can say they answered every question correctly. Senior Megan Tracy

is one of these students. Of the 1,647,123 students nationwide who took the SAT in 2011, 384 earned perfect score. That is roughly 0.023 percent of those who took the test. “[When I saw my tests results online] I hit the refresh button on my computer many times. I was not expecting it; I ran

to my dad and he double checked it on his phone,” Tracy said. John Tracy, Megan’s father, had a similar reaction to the results. “It was a mixture between shock and excitement, and it took a while for it to sink in. I had to look at it a couple of times before I believed it,” J. Tracy said.

Tracy prepped for the SAT by taking free practice exams online. She took practice tests on each section and wrote essays. After taking the practice tests, she reviewed everything she got incorrect and studied it. Tracy also said

[ Full story, page 9

Childhood obesity rates climb; military faces national security crisis By HEATHER JANAS and PAULA MORALES

photo/PAULA MORALES

MAKING STRIDES. During his Athletic Training class, senior Brandon Rhea runs the track. “I personally don’t eat healthy but I make up for it with frequent trips to 24 Hour Fitness to shoot hoops, lift weights and swim laps,” Rhea said.

America’s obesity rate is rising. Today, 149.3 million Americans ages 20 and up are overweight or obese according to an MSNBC segment titled “War on Weight” from July 10, 2012. According to retired United States Navy Rear Admiral Jamie Barnett, one in four Americans is too obese to join the military. In the MSNBC segment, Barnett said the military loses approximately $60 million on the 1200 first term enlistees who are discharged due to weight related problems. A Men’s Health article titled “The U.S. Military’s Struggle with Overweight Soldiers” published in Nov. 3 2011, says overweight soldiers are more likely to fail boot camp and contribute to 658,000 lost work days in the military a year. Boot camps for the United States Army have been extended for incoming recruits who are overweight or out of shape. The extension of training camps and the shrinking military applicant pool due to rising childhood obesity creates a potential national security threat. Jim Liston, former conditioning coach of the Los Angeles Galaxy soccer team and current conditioning coach of the professional soccer team Chivas USA, says America is becoming an unfit society. He proposes recruits be sent to a two month “mini camp” before training in actual boot camp. This would hopefully end the extension of the training, but it could also be financially costly. “Our bodies are built to move. Exercise every day. Even five minutes per day is enough,” Liston said. Liston also believes physical education classes are lacking in schools. “Physical Education in schools is disappearing. [The solution is putting] good solid physical education programs in every school. Mandate that physical education classes be taught everyday,” Liston said. The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention says 40 percent of

[ Full story, page 5

Seniors “tote” tradition Campus custom continues and changes By KALEY GILBERT What started as a friendly tradition has become a battle between classes. The totem pole tradition has been a senior custom on campus since 1999, when then senior, Daniel Graham, created a totem pole out of PVC pipe with his father. Ever since, the Senior Class Council has decorated the totem pole for its graduating class. Approximately five years ago, seniors added to the tradition. The Junior Class Council can steal the totem pole from the seniors who hide it. “Every year the tradition changes and new rules are added. I’ll hear soand-so talking about a rule, and I’m like, ‘since when did that happen?’0” Senior Class sponsor Sarah Kittrell said. The current unwritten rules of the totem pole tradition include: it cannot be stolen until after homecoming, it has to be at a student’s house that lives in the district, in an open area and it cannot be chained or locked. The totem pole is formally handed down after graduation to the rising seniors. “I think it’s a good idea that someone in district has to have it. I would hate to think that someone from Edgewater

[ Full story, page 8

Grade changes, school stays optimistic ßthegrade Boone is currently a

B

By OLIVIA QUATTRONE In the fall, high schools receive grades based on their performance. Boone consistently earns A’s and B’s; however, the Department of Education’s system for calculating grades has changed, which could effect

ßrandomfact Consecotaleophobia is the fear of chopsticks.

INDEX opinion 2 campus & local 5 features 6

the school’s grade. Schools are evaluated on two components. The first is an assessment that evaluates FCAT test scores in reading, writing, math and science. There are a total of 800 points available for this component. The other

special 10 sports 13 entertainment 18 restaurant review 20

evaluates advanced placement exam passing rates, graduation rates and college readiness aspects like SAT and ACT scores. There are also 800 points in this category, making the two cells of equal importance. Each of these components earns the school points.

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To earn an A, a school needs at least 1,050 points. “I think we will have enough points for an A again. Our students continue

[ Full story, page 5

SEE AND HEAR MORE go to hilights.org for photo galleries, soundslides featuring students and weekly sports’ beats

My Story

Americans need fitness regimen

Megan Tracy


Writing 8

Friday, November 9, 2012 hilights.org

featurestories hi-lights

FRENCH TUTORING

A WARMER WINTER

French Honor Society is offering tutoring to any students taking French who need help with their studies. Students can have a one-on-one session with Ann Ballentine or Dr. Safia Mami. French Tutoring is available on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays in rooms 10.205 or 10.209 from 6:45 a.m. to 7:15 a.m.

There will be a winter clothing drive for the homeless from Nov. 12-16. Boone students can donate their spare winter attire in the collection box in Room 230. Items that can be donated include blankets, jackets, socks, scarves and other winter wear.

#fivetips

Avoid drinking caffeine at least two hours before going to bed or at all after lunchtime.

It is important to maintain a regular bedtime, even on the weekends. The body needs a balance between sleep time and awake time.

Avoid reading or watching TV before bed. The light and sounds make it difficult to fall asleep.

Sleep deprivation plagues students By THOMAS EGAN When thinking of major hindrances to students’ lives, one would be surprised to find lack of sleep to be a leading health concern. High school students’ time is filled with many activities, such as school, homework, sports and a social life. This leads to sleep being put on the back burner, which negatively affects a student’s performance in school, safety at the wheel and health. “If you aren’t getting enough rest, you won’t be able to think clearly and you can’t perform well on tests,” AP Psychology teacher Teresa King said. Sleep is a key element that affects one’s cognitive state and its functions. Losing sleep impairs attention, alertness, concentration, reasoning and problem solving. Sleep deprivation negatively affects learning efficiency and harms a student’s performance in school. During sleep, a person goes through a sleep cycle, which helps consolidate memories in the mind. Without going through these cycles, one can have difficulty remembering what he learned in school the day before. “I am not able to focus when I haven’t had enough sleep,” Sophomore Class president Wesley Harper said. “I believe it’s a big problem for high school students.” For high school students who are just starting to drive, sleep loss can be dangerous. Drowsiness slows reaction time just as much as drinking. Fatiguerelated accidents and crash-related deaths are most common in the 25 and under age demographic. “I always want to close my eyes or rest my head,” junior Kaley Knapp said. “[Students] can never focus because

we’re always so tired.” Sleep loss can even affect a person’s appearance and health. When the body doesn’t get enough “beauty sleep”, it releases the stress hormone cortisol. In excess amounts, cortisol breaks down skin collagen, a protein that keeps skin smooth and elastic. According to a Feb. 10, 2009 poll by the National Sleep Foundation, only 20 percent of high school students get the recommended nine hours of sleep on school nights and one in four report sleeping in class. “[After I don’t get enough sleep] I don’t really pay attention and I can’t remember anything that happens,” freshman Noah Hughes said. For teens who struggle with sleep loss, students should try to abstain from TV and other forms of entertainment in their bedroom and cutting out caffeine from their diet after lunch. Sleep is an important part of the high school stage in a person’s life. It is during deep sleep that a person’s body releases growth hormones allowing him to grow and mature. An NSF study shows that most people require at least seven to eight hours of sleep per night. If one is not getting enough sleep, he should adjust his schedule and set a regular bedtime.

According to the NSF, 28% of high school students report falling asleep in class at least once a week.

24 hour sleep deprivation = 0.1 blood alcohol level •

Avoid eating before going to sleep. A person’s last meal should be at least two hours before bed.

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A B.A.C. of 0.1 is 0.05 above the legal limit for minors to operate motor vehicles Symptoms at a B.A.C. of 0.1 include gross motor control, staggering and slurred speech

photo/JANE SIMMONS

SENIOR PRIDE. At the parade, Elizabeth Cargo, Shelbee Simmons, Emily Nusbickel, Bridgette Norris, Nichole Clayton, Alexandra Clayton and Maribeth Collins pose with the totem pole. “[The totem pole] represents our class as a whole,” Simmons said. The totem pole is a part of the Senior Class float during the homecoming parade.

Tradition unites classes [ TotemTradition from, page 1 got it,” Kittrell said.The hiding and stealing of the totem pole is a cycle. After the juniors steal it from the seniors, the seniors steal it back. Once homecoming comes all bets are off. The fight for the totem pole can get pretty competitive. “[We got it back] partly through intimidation. The juniors took it back to us after they got scared,” senior Dillon Knox said. Finding the totem pole can also be a challenge; usually it does not stay in one place for long. “If you get it, you put it in a super secretive spot. Usually only four people know. If someone finds out you have to move it fast so they lose the trail,” junior Kevin Irwin said. There are different methods for retrieving the totem pole, but all require a certain amount of stealth. “You have to be sneaky. One night we went out all dressed in black,” Moore said. But retrieving the totem pole raises certain issues as well. “We got a group of guys together.

It’s really heavy. It’s like seven feet tall and 70 pounds. You come up with a play to get it and if it doesn’t work out you run,” Irwin said. The totem pole tradition is looked forward to by both seniors and juniors. “Last year was really fun because we stole it before the class of 2012 expected us too. It was right before graduation and they were at their grad parties. It was also fun trying to hunt for it when it got stolen back,” senior Emily Porterfield said. Although not everyone is as enthusiastic about it as others. “I think the totem pole tradition is extremely overrated and not as much fun as it used to be. But it sure is nice to see it during the homecoming parade on the senior float,” senior Shelbee Simmons said. Despite differences in opinion, overall, it brings the senior and junior classes together. “It raises a lot of pride within the senior class and eventually unites the juniors and seniors as one,” Knox said. The totem tradition is a rite of passage for the juniors as they “stepup” as seniors. For the seniors it is symbolic; one of the ways they mark their final year of high school on the top of the totem pole.

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My Story and Caption

Sleep is easier when the bedroom is completely dark. This includes turning off the computer and TV.

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Features, page 8, November 2012


Writing

Sports, page 11, December 2012 Friday, December 14, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights sports

11

PUNTER INVITED TO ARMY GAME

BOYS DEFEND FOR DISTRICTS

Braves’ punter senior John Townsend will play in the annual U.S. Army All American Bowl Game. The game will air live on NBC Jan. 5. at 1 p.m..

Boys’ soccer continues to dominate on the field en route to districts by only allowing two goals in three games while putting up an astounding 19 points. The boys take on Lake Nona on Dec. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at home.

IT n

In the Zone

Chase Gardner, sports editor

Athletes earn pay

Boys hope to improve on last year’s record By CONOR CURRY According to head coach Derrick Fontaine, the biggest challenge will be nailing down technique and teaching the newer wrestlers. Last year, the varsity wrestling team put up a frustrating 2-4 record. Despite this less than stellar record, the team is optimistic for the upcoming season. “Actually, I think we’ll do pretty well this year. It’s a long season, and our guys have learning to do,” head coach Derrick Fontaine said. Some key wrestlers, according to Fontaine, are seniors Joseph Holmes, Quante Cobb and freshman Luke Magley. To prepare for the upcoming season, practices are based heavily on conditioning such as sprints and weight lifting. There is a general consensus of respect and trust in Fontaine about conditioning among all the wrestlers. “He’s everywhere; he’s in our minds. He can bring you down but then lift you right back up,” Holmes said. With a larger team, the boys will be able to fill more weight classes, a

photo/CONOR CURRY

serious problem last year. Without a wrestler in every weight class, the team was forced to forfeit matches. These forfeits caused an unbalanced record, something Fontaine strives to change. Currently, there are 57 boys taking up 14 weight classes. According to Holmes, the lack of recruitment last year was due to the coach being located off campus. Having Fontaine as a teacher on campus has

helped spread the word, and the team has more members as a result. At press date, the team lost their first match 30-40 to University on Wednesday, Dec. 5. “I know Timber Creek, Lake Nona and West Orange are good. It’s a tough district. Right now, we have to assume everyone is good,” Fontaine said. Next, the boys take on Wekiva and Evans on Dec. 13 at home at 6 p.m.

Wrastlin’. Senior captain Joseph Holmes grapples at practice. “I like to wrestle because it’s a stress reliever, it gets rid of my anger,” Holmes said. Holmes has wrestled varsity all four years.

JV Briefs: Winter sports start strong By KALEY GILBERT

Team triumphs over all With a current record of 11-0, the girls’ soccer team is on the victory path. They started strong defeating Lyman, 1-0, and have continued that success with wins. “ W e ’ v e really pulled together to make a lot more wins. We’ve become a family instead of just a team,” freshman Ciara Tobin said. Next the girls defeated Cypress Creek, East River and Lake Nona winning 8-0. At Lake Nona the girls were lead by sophomore Claire Collins who scored three goals. Sophomore Mackenzie Chambers and freshman Kristen Recker each earned two with another goal from freshman Monica Almirall. “I’m really excited about it and proud of my teammates. Since I’m goalie, I haven’t seen a lot of action during the games, but I Donald Hill, sophomore

hope it continues,” Tobin said. The girls play Winter Park away on Dec. 18.

Athletes remain optimistic despite challenges With an initial win against Apopka, 3-2, the boys’ soccer team started strong. But keeping up the wins is harder than expected. The team’s second game against Lake Highland ended in defeat, 0-2. “Our biggest challenge is keeping a consistent record of wins,” sophomore Andrew Dawson said. The boys were able to come back with a win against Edgewater, 2-1, with goals from freshman Mark Bagozzi. The next three games were losses followed by two tied games. In their next game against Colonial the boys earned two goals from freshman Phillip Crowe, ending in a win, 2-0. Currently, their record is 3-4-2. The team takes on Lake Nona at home on Dec. 18. Their season closes away with a game against Ocoee on Jan. 18.

Players keep improvements in sight In their first game, the girls’ basketball team lost to University, 29-37. However, they bounced back the second game with a win against Wekiva, 45-20. “They have a strong will to win. I’ve

seen them go down, but fight back,” head coach Jerry Williams said. The next game started out bad with a 17-2 shortage, but the girls fought hard resulting in a close loss to West Orange, 24-25. The girls’ next three games were two losses with a win against Lake Nona, 36-33. The girls were able to secure the win some with some much needed free throws. “I’m hoping to improve every single game. If it’s win or lose, [I’m hoping] we can learn from our mistakes,” sophomore Nyaliny Ruach said. They play East River away on Dec. 19.

Players start off strong, keep hopes high With a strong opening game against Lake Highland, the boys’ basketball team walked away victorious 62-52. “[I want] to have fun and win a lot of games and just be a better player,” sophomore Donald Hill said. Next, they took on Oak Ridge, winning 61-57. Their third game against West Orange was point for point, until the referee called a shooting foul on the last shot. The boys lost in a close game, 54-55. The team’s current record is 2-1. “I feel mad about it still, but I’ll get over it. It’s just one game,” Hill said. Next, the boys take on Cypress Creek away at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19. They will finish their season with an away game against Wekiva Feb. 2.

My Story and Photo

Every time the topic of professional sports is brought up, the same complaint is uttered by at least one person, “athletes are paid way too much for nothing.” Bull. Athletes get paid large sums of money because of a crucial asset that sets them apart from everyone else; they can do things other people couldn’t even imagine doing. Not just any average Joe can snag a ball in the end zone while double covered like Brandon Marshall or hit three homeruns in one game like Pablo Sandoval. It takes raw talent, persistence, dedication and years of training. Saying they don’t deserve what they get is downright ignorant. Fans watch them, fans pay them, so complaining won’t help. Athletes have a constant rain cloud over their head; it’s called contract termination. No owner wants to pay $18 million a year for someone who rides the bench due to an injury. An athlete that has to be put down will be lucky if he can recover and be resigned. Not every athlete is as lucky as Bronco’s quarterback Peyton Manning. It’s a sad truth, but it is always a possibility. Then add to the fact that the average athlete only works 10 years due to the wear and tear on the knees, back and even the brain. Sports don’t get easier with age either. The competition puts them not only through a physical, but a mental test. Players are under the microscope constantly, people analyze every little mistake they make and it can drive the players to insanity or depression. Most recently was the Jovan Belcher incident where the Chiefs’ linebacker murdered his girlfriend and killed himself. Even after they retire, high contact sports like football or boxing lead to severe brain damage. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali lives with Parkinson syndrome from the high impact hits to the head. Higher risk in the field, merits higher pay, especially if the terms affect life after the job. Yes, there will always be whiners that never stop going on about how “teachers provide futures” or “our soldiers deserve it more.” Sure, soldiers and teachers are great, they’re vital, but the pay situation all comes down to simple economics. There are a lot more soldiers and teachers than there are Lionel Messi’s. Until Mr. Porterfield can score a hat trick or pitch a perfect game, he’ll have to settle. Don’t like these athletes making millions of dollars for just “swinging a bat” or “driving a car?” Then here’s a simple solution: don’t watch it. These athletes have worked to perfect their craft to entertain and inspire youth. They work just as hard as everyone else if not harder with year long training. They earn every penny they make.

Post poor season, wrestlers attempt reversal


Writing 16

Features, page 16, March 2013 sports hi-lights

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

VARSITY BASEBALL TAKES ON BEARS

WATER POLO TAKES ON WINTER SPRINGS

The boys Varsity baseball team takes on Cypress Creek at Cypress Creek today at 4 p.m. Currently the baseball teams record is 4-5.

The boys team will play Winter Springs at home at 7 p.m. and the girls will play at 6 p.m. The boys’ record for this season is 6-4, while the girls’ record is 10-2.

Team keeps goals in sight

In the Zone

Chase Gardner, sports editor

158 stands tall Live from the Bell Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, tomorrow, the world will watch modern day gladiators go to war. I am talking, of course, about UFC 158: St. Pierre vs. Diaz. This is no doubt the biggest fighting event of the year. Georges St. Pierre defends his welterweight championship against wrestling king Nick Diaz. While I can’t give my predictions for the entire fight card, I will tell you some of them. The main card is on PayPer-View at 10 p.m., there are several preliminary bouts on FX starting at 8 p.m. The most interesting fight of the prelims is Rick Story versus Quinn Mulhern. Former EWC welterweight champ Story takes on the former King of the Cage welterweight champ, Mulhern. This will be Mulhern’s debut to the Ultimate Fighting Championship circuit. He plans to use his Brazilian JiuJitsu to take Story to the ground and finish him with his killer choke holds. This is a new level of competition for Mulhern though. Story’s wrestling ability will prove to be an extreme challenge in the transitions. Momentum is in Mulhern’s favor due to a winning streak while Story is coming off a major loss to Demian Maia. While this will be a tough bout for Mulhern, I definitely see him coming out on top after bullying Story around on the ground and ending the fight in the second round by submission via the rear naked choke. After the prelims, there’s the main card. The fight you don’t want to miss is Carlos Condit versus Rory MacDonald. These two fought each other previously at UFC 115 where Condit was able to eventually earn a Technical Knock Out with only seven seconds left in the third round. Don’t expect the same outcome this time around though, MacDonald has been on fire since that loss, going on a four fight win streak which included knocking down giants like B.J. Penn. Condit’s last fight resulted in a loss to St. Pierre so he’ll be going in cold. I expect these Muay Thai fighters to use all three rounds with the victor being MacDonald by unanimous decision. Finally the main event of the night. The Georges “Rush” St. Pierre takes on Nick “Diablo” Diaz. St. Pierre goes into this fight with an astounding 23-2 record and the deadly Kyokushin Maikan fighting style which will make him extremely dangerous in the standup and also possesses scary Muay Thai abilities which makes his knees a lethal weapon. Diaz’s strategy is simple, get him on the ground and utilize that black belt BJJ ability to get St. Pierre in some type of submission. While it is no doubt Diaz is a great fighter, there’s a reason GSP is the champ. He’s the best fighter in the sport and for that reason this fight will end in the second round with Diaz stiff on the ground while St. Pierre stands over him with the belt on his waist and another KO in the stat book. This fight card has it all: a debut of a deserving fighter, a bitter rivalry and a fight of the year main event. I can’t wait.

photo/KALEY GILBERT

SERVE’S UP. In a match against Freedom freshman Julia Bonnewitz serves to her opponent. “My goal is to do my personal best each match and to focus on my tennis and block out distractions,” Bonnewitz said. Bonnewitz won her match, 8-6.

By KALEY GILBERT Although tennis is mainly an individual sport, the girls’ tennis team still manages to maintain a sense of team spirit. This camaraderie is one of the team’s greatest strengths. During each other’s matches, they cheer from the side lines and congratulate fellow players on their wins. When someone loses a match, the girls help to encourage one another and keep each other positive. “My favorite thing about being part of the team is that we’re all very supportive of each other and we communicate well,” freshman Julia Bonnewitz, a line two player, said. They’ve used this strength to help garner wins earning a 6-3 record. The season started out rough with a loss to Lake Highland, 3-4. However, by the second game they came back with a win against University, 7-0, starting a 5-game winning streak. Parents and teammates congregate on the sidelines watching the ball bounce across the court with rapt attention. “My most exciting game was our pre-season match against Spruce Creek because I was down 2-6 and 2-5 and came back and won in a tiebreaker,” Bonnewitz said. When a player wins a match, it is

not just a win for her, it is a win for the whole team. It is something they can all celebrate. The senior members of the team especially look forward to helping teach the new players. “I’m looking forward to being a leader on the team and giving the underclassmen and helping them work towards their goals,” senior Lyndsey Boos, a line one player, said. Practices are another chance for the girls to bond. Challenging each other and prepping for games is an important part of not only team building, but also maintaining their game. One area the team needs to improve on is their doubles matches. In their matches against East River and Freedom, of the two doubles teams only Boos and Bonnewitz won their matches, 6-0 and 6-1, respectively. “I prefer playing singles because it’s harder in doubles when you have to switch sides of the court,” sophomore Mary Burkett, a line five player, said. The team looks forward to having fun and going to districts against Winter Park on April 2. Win or lose, the team strives to improve. Next they take on Edgewater on March 19. “[The girls] are gracious winners and losers. They’re all willing to give 110 percent,” coach Lisa Speer said.

ßQ&A Lyndsey Boos, senior You recently committed to FAU, what made that school stand out to you? The coach is very nice and the location; I love being in South Florida. What are you looking forward to in college tennis? Being with an amazing team who are so close together and so supportive of each other. Who is your greatest mentor as a player? Probably my coach [Vincent Michaud]. He’s very real with me and he doesn’t sugar coat it for me.

Team faces tough rival Boys’ tennis team faces Winter Park at the end of the season By OLIVIA QUATTRONE Though tennis is typically thought of as an individual sport, the boys’ tennis team sees their unity as their greatest strength. The team will need to focus on these strengths as they work to challenge their rival, Winter Park at the end of the season. The season started out with exciting games against East River (7-0) and Lake Highland (5-2). “[The game against] Lake Highland was exciting because the whole team was really enthusiastic and we pulled out some good wins,” senior Samuel Lampman said. The team won both these games. The beginning of the season had several wins, with loses faced near the middle of the season against Melbourne (3-4) and Timber Creek (2-5). All of these games lead up to the teams’ most anticipated game of the season, Winter Park. “Each match we play prepares us for Winter Park and individually, each player is training very hard on their own,” coach Lisa Speer said. While the players have to constantly train to build up their skills, they already have strength in their support for each other. Each game, the boys loudly cheer for each other and often call out encouragements to other players during their own individual matches. “We have a solid team. We push each

#fastfigures

22

Points that senior Samuel Lampman has scored this season in singles matches.

6 Number of singles matches won by junior Davis Coleman this season. photo/OLIVIA QUATTRONE

HERE YOU GO. In the game against Timber Creek, senior Remy Artavia serves the ball. “I’m athletic and have always loved to play sports. [I] train everyday to reach my goals,” Artavia said. Artivia lost his match 0-8. other hard and are supportive on and off the court,” senior Remy Artavia said. Despite strengths, the team has weaknesses. Pride is a major weakness that has plagued the team in the past. “We need to make sure the team doesn’t become too proud or too sure of themselves in the finals like we did last year,” junior Ronald Heinkel II said. The team also faces issues with conflicts on the court. On Feb. 20, Lampman, was suspended from the team indefinitely after a conflict with a coach from East River. “My greatest weakness on the court is that I let my temper get the best of

me and engage in a lot of conflicts that aren’t necessary,” Lampman said. Despite these issues, the team is preparing for future games. The team takes on Winter Park March 19. “They are better than us, but we always put up a fight. We expect to play our best and we’ll see who’s playing better that day,” Speer said. The team will then move on to play Edgewater and then to districts, where they lost to Winter Park last year. “It’s definitely going to be our most difficult game of the season, but if everyone plays their best we definitely have a shot of coming out on top,” Heinkel II said.

29 Number of points scored by freshman Nathan Fontaine this season.

7 Number of games won by the team so far this season.

5

Number of singles matches won by sophomore Thomas McDonald.

My Story, Photo, Caption and Alternative Coverage

IT 


Writing

Features, page 23, March 2013

hi-lights artsentertainment

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

23

MUSICIANS ENTERTAIN UNDER EVENING SKY

FINAL TRANSCRIPTS Final Transcripts need to be ordered by April 24. See Ann Cadman in College and Careers for details. Each transcript is $5.

Jazz band’s annual Jazz Under the Stars event is April 29 at 7 p.m. in the Kemosabe Commons area (weather permitting), otherwise the event will be moved indoors.

Band’s music expresses faith My Story and Caption

Christian rock band strives to make it big By KALEY GILBERT Plaid Gig might appear to be the typical garage band, but this rock band exceeds the stereotype. They are an established band at their church, The Sanctuary, and many of the members have been playing music for years prior to the band’s begininng. Plaid Gig was formed six years ago when a group of friends with a common love of music decided to jam together. Formerly a classic rock band, Plaid Gig has become more of a Christian rock band. The band stars senior Christian Bartram as lead guitarist and senior Geoffrey Gaudoin on the drums. Sophomore Megan Thomas, the band’s newest member, belts it out as lead singer and backup guitarist; bassist Ethan Scarborough is a sophomore at Circle Christian School. “We were trying to come up with the band name one day and dreaming of future gigs. Geoffrey and I were both wearing plaid shorts. We both noticed this and as a joke I suggested this [Plaid Gig]. Well, turns out everyone liked it and the name stuck,” Scarborough said. The members found there were also the stereotypical “creative differences”

that come with a mix of personalities. “[The hardest thing about being in a band is] definitely trying to get together and collaborate with all the different musicians. You have to work to get along,” Gaudoin said. Of course there are positives that come with being in a band. For Plaid Gig it’s a chance for friends to bond over music and faith. “[My favorite thing is] being able to worship God through music. Another thing was being able to form a bond with the guys and the friendship that’s come from it,” Thomas said. Though it has its disadvantages, performing live can be one of the best positives. The thrill that comes from performing is only intensified by the buzz of a live audience. “I like having people look up to me on stage and being able to give them a good show,” Bartram said. Another advantage from playing music and being in Plaid Gig, is the emotional catharsis it offers. “Actually, music is one of my emotional releases. I always went to music when I was little because I had depression issues,” Thomas said. Practicing and performing as Plaid Gig allows the band members to expand and improve their talents. “As a musician, I definitely need

to work on mastering my instrument. I’m also working on learning guitar and I’m going to try to learn piano soon,” Scarborough said. Although being in a band was a new experience for the group, many of its members were not new to music. Vocalist Megan Thomas has been singing since she was 7 years old and drummer Geoffrey Gaudoin has been playing since he was 2 years old. “I was banging on tables a lot as a kid and my parents had a friend who taught drums, so that got me into it,” Gaudoin said. Plaid Gig’s goals are to spread their name and book more gigs. Most recently, Plaid Gig took the stage at their church’s New Year’s Eve lock -in and when two of their members participated in Brave Aid. Unfortunately, Plaid Gig had to put the shows on hold because lead singer Thomas developed vocal nodules, making singing impossible. Her surgery is scheduled for March 19 and as soon as she recovers, Plaid Gig will be ready to get back to performing. “I think our goals as a band are to go as far as we can go, and bring glory to God along the way. Our major goal at the moment is to get some recording done and put out an EP,” Scarborough said.

photo courtesy/DEAN STUART PHOTOGRAPHY

ROCK OUT. Jamming out at Brave Aid, senior Christan Bartram plays a guitar solo in his act. “I’m best at playing my guitar solos. I can do some pretty neat stuff,” Bartram said. Brave Aid is an annual benefit talent show; SGA donated the proceeds to Water is Life.


Writing My Story and Caption

10

Features, page 10, May 2013

Friday, may 10, 2013 hilights.org

featurestories hi-lights

PTSA BOOK FAIR

TRADING POST SALE

Students can pick up their summer reading lists, graduation gifts or teacher appreciation gifts at Barnes & Noble located on Colonial Dr. on May 14, from 4:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Chorus, band, drama and the cheerleaders will be performing. There will also be a Foundation Silent Auction and Boone Art Show.

The Trading Post will be holding a sale until May 17. Also, BHSAA will be sending out renewal letters for All Season Sports Passes over the summer with discount offered for student passes thru Aug. 16.

musician pursues passion By KALEY GILBERT Music is a common interest, but for senior Adena Labovitz it is more than just a hobby, more than just an inspiration; music is her passion and her way of life. Now, Labovitz has the opportunity to pursue her passion at the University of Miami’s prestigious jazz program, one of the most regarded in the country. “[When I found out I got accepted] I was trying on prom dresses and I opened my email and saw one from the University of Miami. I was crying so hard and shaking when I called my dad to tell him,” Labovitz said. Music is something Labovitz has grown up around. She plays six instruments: guitar, piano, mandolin, viola, cello and ukulele, but considers her voice a seventh instrument. Labovitz has been performing since elementary school when she would create music videos for her parents. “My dad’s a musician, so he’s the one who introduced me to music. In our old house we had a basement and my dad kept his drums down there. I loved to go downstairs and sit with him while he played,” Labovitz said. In high school, music was Labovitz’s outlet from her school work. She was

part of the chorus program all four years and is vice president of Chorus Honor Society. In addition to that, she also began taking private vocal lessons her freshman year, performed in the chorus variety show all four years, took Advanced Placement Music Theory, and she took a solo musical act to the drama district competition that received straight superiors. Despite her involvement and passion for music, the decision to pursue it professionally did not come easily. “I was back and forth for a really long time. It’s a scary thing to go after a career where there is no definite source of money. You could choose a career path where it’s definite you have money, you have a job, or you could go after your dream,” Labovitz said. At the end of her junior year, after discovering a new style of music, jazz singing, she knew it was her future path. “I realized jazz singing was something I could do forever and be poor, but perfectly content. I just really clicked with it,” Labovitz said. Once Labovitz decided she wanted to pursue music professionally, next came the daunting task of applying for college music programs. She applied to two schools of music,

Florida State’s classical program and University of Miami’s jazz and classical programs. Miami’s jazz program was her dream school. To get an audition with University of Miami’s jazz program, Labovitz sent them a song she recorded. At the audition, Labovitz felt her dream school was out of reach. “The girl that went right before me, I could hear her audition through the door. In jazz music, you have to do improvisations and she did hers on a steel drum. I didn’t even know you could bring an instrument to the audition,” Labovitz said. “Afterwards she was hugging all the judges and her parents knew them. I basically ruled myself out of the running after that.” It was times such as this when Labovitz lost faith that she turned to her friends and family for support. “There have been so many times where I want to give up, but they helped me to believe,” Labovitz said. For others struggling to follow their dreams, Labovitz encourages them to never give up and to work hard perfecting their craft. “You can’t get anywhere on just talent. You have to live it if it’s your passion,” Labovitz said.

photo/GABRIELLA FAKHOURY

ALL THAT JAZZ. Senior Adena Labovitz performs at prom along with seniors Jaclyn Thomas and Taylor Wood. “[My favorite thing about performing] is conveying a story to the audience. It’s my way of serving the community,” Labovitz said. Labovitz was one of the two acts selected to peform at prom.


Design Features, page 10, May 2013 10

Friday, may 10, 2013 hilights.org

featurestories hi-lights

PTSA BOOK FAIR

TRADING POST SALE

Students can pick up their summer reading lists, graduation gifts or teacher appreciation gifts at Barnes & Noble located on Colonial Dr. on May 14, from 4:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Chorus, band, drama and the cheerleaders will be performing. There will also be a Foundation Silent Auction and Boone Art Show.

The Trading Post will be holding a sale until May 17. Also, BHSAA will be sending out renewal letters for All Season Sports Passes over the summer with discount offered for student passes thru Aug. 16.

My Story and Caption

musician pursues passion By KALEY GILBERT Music is a common interest, but for senior Adena Labovitz it is more than just a hobby, more than just an inspiration; music is her passion and her way of life. Now, Labovitz has the opportunity to pursue her passion at the University of Miami’s prestigious jazz program, one of the most regarded in the country. “[When I found out I got accepted] I was trying on prom dresses and I opened my email and saw one from the University of Miami. I was crying so hard and shaking when I called my dad to tell him,” Labovitz said. Music is something Labovitz has grown up around. She plays six instruments: guitar, piano, mandolin, viola, cello and ukulele, but considers her voice a seventh instrument. Labovitz has been performing since elementary school when she would create music videos for her parents. “My dad’s a musician, so he’s the one who introduced me to music. In our old house we had a basement and my dad kept his drums down there. I loved to go downstairs and sit with him while he played,” Labovitz said. In high school, music was Labovitz’s outlet from her school work. She was

part of the chorus program all four years and is vice president of Chorus Honor Society. In addition to that, she also began taking private vocal lessons her freshman year, performed in the chorus variety show all four years, took Advanced Placement Music Theory, and she took a solo musical act to the drama district competition that received straight superiors. Despite her involvement and passion for music, the decision to pursue it professionally did not come easily. “I was back and forth for a really long time. It’s a scary thing to go after a career where there is no definite source of money. You could choose a career path where it’s definite you have money, you have a job, or you could go after your dream,” Labovitz said. At the end of her junior year, after discovering a new style of music, jazz singing, she knew it was her future path. “I realized jazz singing was something I could do forever and be poor, but perfectly content. I just really clicked with it,” Labovitz said. Once Labovitz decided she wanted to pursue music professionally, next came the daunting task of applying for college music programs. She applied to two schools of music,

Florida State’s classical program and University of Miami’s jazz and classical programs. Miami’s jazz program was her dream school. To get an audition with University of Miami’s jazz program, Labovitz sent them a song she recorded. At the audition, Labovitz felt her dream school was out of reach. “The girl that went right before me, I could hear her audition through the door. In jazz music, you have to do improvisations and she did hers on a steel drum. I didn’t even know you could bring an instrument to the audition,” Labovitz said. “Afterwards she was hugging all the judges and her parents knew them. I basically ruled myself out of the running after that.” It was times such as this when Labovitz lost faith that she turned to her friends and family for support. “There have been so many times where I want to give up, but they helped me to believe,” Labovitz said. For others struggling to follow their dreams, Labovitz encourages them to never give up and to work hard perfecting their craft. “You can’t get anywhere on just talent. You have to live it if it’s your passion,” Labovitz said.

photo/GABRIELLA FAKHOURY

ALL THAT JAZZ. Senior Adena Labovitz performs at prom along with seniors Jaclyn Thomas and Taylor Wood. “[My favorite thing about performing] is conveying a story to the audience. It’s my way of serving the community,” Labovitz said. Labovitz was one of the two acts selected to peform at prom.


Photography

Sports, page 11, December 2012 Friday, December 14, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights sports

11

PUNTER INVITED TO ARMY GAME

BOYS DEFEND FOR DISTRICTS

Braves’ punter senior John Townsend will play in the annual U.S. Army All American Bowl Game. The game will air live on NBC Jan. 5. at 1 p.m..

Boys’ soccer continues to dominate on the field en route to districts by only allowing two goals in three games while putting up an astounding 19 points. The boys take on Lake Nona on Dec. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at home.

IT n

In the Zone

Chase Gardner, sports editor

Athletes earn pay

Boys hope to improve on last year’s record By CONOR CURRY According to head coach Derrick Fontaine, the biggest challenge will be nailing down technique and teaching the newer wrestlers. Last year, the varsity wrestling team put up a frustrating 2-4 record. Despite this less than stellar record, the team is optimistic for the upcoming season. “Actually, I think we’ll do pretty well this year. It’s a long season, and our guys have learning to do,” head coach Derrick Fontaine said. Some key wrestlers, according to Fontaine, are seniors Joseph Holmes, Quante Cobb and freshman Luke Magley. To prepare for the upcoming season, practices are based heavily on conditioning such as sprints and weight lifting. There is a general consensus of respect and trust in Fontaine about conditioning among all the wrestlers. “He’s everywhere; he’s in our minds. He can bring you down but then lift you right back up,” Holmes said. With a larger team, the boys will be able to fill more weight classes, a

photo/CONOR CURRY

serious problem last year. Without a wrestler in every weight class, the team was forced to forfeit matches. These forfeits caused an unbalanced record, something Fontaine strives to change. Currently, there are 57 boys taking up 14 weight classes. According to Holmes, the lack of recruitment last year was due to the coach being located off campus. Having Fontaine as a teacher on campus has

helped spread the word, and the team has more members as a result. At press date, the team lost their first match 30-40 to University on Wednesday, Dec. 5. “I know Timber Creek, Lake Nona and West Orange are good. It’s a tough district. Right now, we have to assume everyone is good,” Fontaine said. Next, the boys take on Wekiva and Evans on Dec. 13 at home at 6 p.m.

Wrastlin’. Senior captain Joseph Holmes grapples at practice. “I like to wrestle because it’s a stress reliever, it gets rid of my anger,” Holmes said. Holmes has wrestled varsity all four years.

JV Briefs: Winter sports start strong By KALEY GILBERT

Team triumphs over all With a current record of 11-0, the girls’ soccer team is on the victory path. They started strong defeating Lyman, 1-0, and have continued that success with wins. “ W e ’ v e really pulled together to make a lot more wins. We’ve become a family instead of just a team,” freshman Ciara Tobin said. Next the girls defeated Cypress Creek, East River and Lake Nona winning 8-0. At Lake Nona the girls were lead by sophomore Claire Collins who scored three goals. Sophomore Mackenzie Chambers and freshman Kristen Recker each earned two with another goal from freshman Monica Almirall. “I’m really excited about it and proud of my teammates. Since I’m goalie, I haven’t seen a lot of action during the games, but I Donald Hill, sophomore

hope it continues,” Tobin said. The girls play Winter Park away on Dec. 18.

Athletes remain optimistic despite challenges With an initial win against Apopka, 3-2, the boys’ soccer team started strong. But keeping up the wins is harder than expected. The team’s second game against Lake Highland ended in defeat, 0-2. “Our biggest challenge is keeping a consistent record of wins,” sophomore Andrew Dawson said. The boys were able to come back with a win against Edgewater, 2-1, with goals from freshman Mark Bagozzi. The next three games were losses followed by two tied games. In their next game against Colonial the boys earned two goals from freshman Phillip Crowe, ending in a win, 2-0. Currently, their record is 3-4-2. The team takes on Lake Nona at home on Dec. 18. Their season closes away with a game against Ocoee on Jan. 18.

Players keep improvements in sight In their first game, the girls’ basketball team lost to University, 29-37. However, they bounced back the second game with a win against Wekiva, 45-20. “They have a strong will to win. I’ve

seen them go down, but fight back,” head coach Jerry Williams said. The next game started out bad with a 17-2 shortage, but the girls fought hard resulting in a close loss to West Orange, 24-25. The girls’ next three games were two losses with a win against Lake Nona, 36-33. The girls were able to secure the win some with some much needed free throws. “I’m hoping to improve every single game. If it’s win or lose, [I’m hoping] we can learn from our mistakes,” sophomore Nyaliny Ruach said. They play East River away on Dec. 19.

Players start off strong, keep hopes high With a strong opening game against Lake Highland, the boys’ basketball team walked away victorious 62-52. “[I want] to have fun and win a lot of games and just be a better player,” sophomore Donald Hill said. Next, they took on Oak Ridge, winning 61-57. Their third game against West Orange was point for point, until the referee called a shooting foul on the last shot. The boys lost in a close game, 54-55. The team’s current record is 2-1. “I feel mad about it still, but I’ll get over it. It’s just one game,” Hill said. Next, the boys take on Cypress Creek away at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 19. They will finish their season with an away game against Wekiva Feb. 2.

My Photo and COB

Every time the topic of professional sports is brought up, the same complaint is uttered by at least one person, “athletes are paid way too much for nothing.” Bull. Athletes get paid large sums of money because of a crucial asset that sets them apart from everyone else; they can do things other people couldn’t even imagine doing. Not just any average Joe can snag a ball in the end zone while double covered like Brandon Marshall or hit three homeruns in one game like Pablo Sandoval. It takes raw talent, persistence, dedication and years of training. Saying they don’t deserve what they get is downright ignorant. Fans watch them, fans pay them, so complaining won’t help. Athletes have a constant rain cloud over their head; it’s called contract termination. No owner wants to pay $18 million a year for someone who rides the bench due to an injury. An athlete that has to be put down will be lucky if he can recover and be resigned. Not every athlete is as lucky as Bronco’s quarterback Peyton Manning. It’s a sad truth, but it is always a possibility. Then add to the fact that the average athlete only works 10 years due to the wear and tear on the knees, back and even the brain. Sports don’t get easier with age either. The competition puts them not only through a physical, but a mental test. Players are under the microscope constantly, people analyze every little mistake they make and it can drive the players to insanity or depression. Most recently was the Jovan Belcher incident where the Chiefs’ linebacker murdered his girlfriend and killed himself. Even after they retire, high contact sports like football or boxing lead to severe brain damage. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali lives with Parkinson syndrome from the high impact hits to the head. Higher risk in the field, merits higher pay, especially if the terms affect life after the job. Yes, there will always be whiners that never stop going on about how “teachers provide futures” or “our soldiers deserve it more.” Sure, soldiers and teachers are great, they’re vital, but the pay situation all comes down to simple economics. There are a lot more soldiers and teachers than there are Lionel Messi’s. Until Mr. Porterfield can score a hat trick or pitch a perfect game, he’ll have to settle. Don’t like these athletes making millions of dollars for just “swinging a bat” or “driving a car?” Then here’s a simple solution: don’t watch it. These athletes have worked to perfect their craft to entertain and inspire youth. They work just as hard as everyone else if not harder with year long training. They earn every penny they make.

Post poor season, wrestlers attempt reversal


Photography 16

sports hi-lights

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

VARSITY BASEBALL TAKES ON BEARS

WATER POLO TAKES ON WINTER SPRINGS

The boys Varsity baseball team takes on Cypress Creek at Cypress Creek today at 4 p.m. Currently the baseball teams record is 4-5.

The boys team will play Winter Springs at home at 7 p.m. and the girls will play at 6 p.m. The boys’ record for this season is 6-4, while the girls’ record is 10-2.

IT 

My Photo: Girls Tennis

Sports, page 16, March 2013

Team keeps goals in sight

In the Zone

Chase Gardner, sports editor

158 stands tall Live from the Bell Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, tomorrow, the world will watch modern day gladiators go to war. I am talking, of course, about UFC 158: St. Pierre vs. Diaz. This is no doubt the biggest fighting event of the year. Georges St. Pierre defends his welterweight championship against wrestling king Nick Diaz. While I can’t give my predictions for the entire fight card, I will tell you some of them. The main card is on PayPer-View at 10 p.m., there are several preliminary bouts on FX starting at 8 p.m. The most interesting fight of the prelims is Rick Story versus Quinn Mulhern. Former EWC welterweight champ Story takes on the former King of the Cage welterweight champ, Mulhern. This will be Mulhern’s debut to the Ultimate Fighting Championship circuit. He plans to use his Brazilian JiuJitsu to take Story to the ground and finish him with his killer choke holds. This is a new level of competition for Mulhern though. Story’s wrestling ability will prove to be an extreme challenge in the transitions. Momentum is in Mulhern’s favor due to a winning streak while Story is coming off a major loss to Demian Maia. While this will be a tough bout for Mulhern, I definitely see him coming out on top after bullying Story around on the ground and ending the fight in the second round by submission via the rear naked choke. After the prelims, there’s the main card. The fight you don’t want to miss is Carlos Condit versus Rory MacDonald. These two fought each other previously at UFC 115 where Condit was able to eventually earn a Technical Knock Out with only seven seconds left in the third round. Don’t expect the same outcome this time around though, MacDonald has been on fire since that loss, going on a four fight win streak which included knocking down giants like B.J. Penn. Condit’s last fight resulted in a loss to St. Pierre so he’ll be going in cold. I expect these Muay Thai fighters to use all three rounds with the victor being MacDonald by unanimous decision. Finally the main event of the night. The Georges “Rush” St. Pierre takes on Nick “Diablo” Diaz. St. Pierre goes into this fight with an astounding 23-2 record and the deadly Kyokushin Maikan fighting style which will make him extremely dangerous in the standup and also possesses scary Muay Thai abilities which makes his knees a lethal weapon. Diaz’s strategy is simple, get him on the ground and utilize that black belt BJJ ability to get St. Pierre in some type of submission. While it is no doubt Diaz is a great fighter, there’s a reason GSP is the champ. He’s the best fighter in the sport and for that reason this fight will end in the second round with Diaz stiff on the ground while St. Pierre stands over him with the belt on his waist and another KO in the stat book. This fight card has it all: a debut of a deserving fighter, a bitter rivalry and a fight of the year main event. I can’t wait.

photo/KALEY GILBERT

SERVE’S UP. In a match against Freedom freshman Julia Bonnewitz serves to her opponent. “My goal is to do my personal best each match and to focus on my tennis and block out distractions,” Bonnewitz said. Bonnewitz won her match, 8-6.

By KALEY GILBERT Although tennis is mainly an individual sport, the girls’ tennis team still manages to maintain a sense of team spirit. This camaraderie is one of the team’s greatest strengths. During each other’s matches, they cheer from the side lines and congratulate fellow players on their wins. When someone loses a match, the girls help to encourage one another and keep each other positive. “My favorite thing about being part of the team is that we’re all very supportive of each other and we communicate well,” freshman Julia Bonnewitz, a line two player, said. They’ve used this strength to help garner wins earning a 6-3 record. The season started out rough with a loss to Lake Highland, 3-4. However, by the second game they came back with a win against University, 7-0, starting a 5-game winning streak. Parents and teammates congregate on the sidelines watching the ball bounce across the court with rapt attention. “My most exciting game was our pre-season match against Spruce Creek because I was down 2-6 and 2-5 and came back and won in a tiebreaker,” Bonnewitz said. When a player wins a match, it is

not just a win for her, it is a win for the whole team. It is something they can all celebrate. The senior members of the team especially look forward to helping teach the new players. “I’m looking forward to being a leader on the team and giving the underclassmen and helping them work towards their goals,” senior Lyndsey Boos, a line one player, said. Practices are another chance for the girls to bond. Challenging each other and prepping for games is an important part of not only team building, but also maintaining their game. One area the team needs to improve on is their doubles matches. In their matches against East River and Freedom, of the two doubles teams only Boos and Bonnewitz won their matches, 6-0 and 6-1, respectively. “I prefer playing singles because it’s harder in doubles when you have to switch sides of the court,” sophomore Mary Burkett, a line five player, said. The team looks forward to having fun and going to districts against Winter Park on April 2. Win or lose, the team strives to improve. Next they take on Edgewater on March 19. “[The girls] are gracious winners and losers. They’re all willing to give 110 percent,” coach Lisa Speer said.

ßQ&A Lyndsey Boos, senior You recently committed to FAU, what made that school stand out to you? The coach is very nice and the location; I love being in South Florida. What are you looking forward to in college tennis? Being with an amazing team who are so close together and so supportive of each other. Who is your greatest mentor as a player? Probably my coach [Vincent Michaud]. He’s very real with me and he doesn’t sugar coat it for me.

Team faces tough rival Boys’ tennis team faces Winter Park at the end of the season By OLIVIA QUATTRONE Though tennis is typically thought of as an individual sport, the boys’ tennis team sees their unity as their greatest strength. The team will need to focus on these strengths as they work to challenge their rival, Winter Park at the end of the season. The season started out with exciting games against East River (7-0) and Lake Highland (5-2). “[The game against] Lake Highland was exciting because the whole team was really enthusiastic and we pulled out some good wins,” senior Samuel Lampman said. The team won both these games. The beginning of the season had several wins, with loses faced near the middle of the season against Melbourne (3-4) and Timber Creek (2-5). All of these games lead up to the teams’ most anticipated game of the season, Winter Park. “Each match we play prepares us for Winter Park and individually, each player is training very hard on their own,” coach Lisa Speer said. While the players have to constantly train to build up their skills, they already have strength in their support for each other. Each game, the boys loudly cheer for each other and often call out encouragements to other players during their own individual matches. “We have a solid team. We push each

#fastfigures

22

Points that senior Samuel Lampman has scored this season in singles matches.

6 Number of singles matches won by junior Davis Coleman this season. photo/OLIVIA QUATTRONE

HERE YOU GO. In the game against Timber Creek, senior Remy Artavia serves the ball. “I’m athletic and have always loved to play sports. [I] train everyday to reach my goals,” Artavia said. Artivia lost his match 0-8. other hard and are supportive on and off the court,” senior Remy Artavia said. Despite strengths, the team has weaknesses. Pride is a major weakness that has plagued the team in the past. “We need to make sure the team doesn’t become too proud or too sure of themselves in the finals like we did last year,” junior Ronald Heinkel II said. The team also faces issues with conflicts on the court. On Feb. 20, Lampman, was suspended from the team indefinitely after a conflict with a coach from East River. “My greatest weakness on the court is that I let my temper get the best of

me and engage in a lot of conflicts that aren’t necessary,” Lampman said. Despite these issues, the team is preparing for future games. The team takes on Winter Park March 19. “They are better than us, but we always put up a fight. We expect to play our best and we’ll see who’s playing better that day,” Speer said. The team will then move on to play Edgewater and then to districts, where they lost to Winter Park last year. “It’s definitely going to be our most difficult game of the season, but if everyone plays their best we definitely have a shot of coming out on top,” Heinkel II said.

29 Number of points scored by freshman Nathan Fontaine this season.

7 Number of games won by the team so far this season.

5

Number of singles matches won by sophomore Thomas McDonald.


Mutlimedia

October 2012


Mutlimedia

October 2012


Mutlimedia

March 2013

Kaley Gilbert Portfolio 2013  

Journalism portfolio 2013

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