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2012 by: Christie Rieck


Christie Rieck

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

Bu

s s e n i s

s d r Ca

Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

Christie Rieck

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

LEGEND YEARBOOK

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

LEGEND YEARBOOK Index Editor

National Honor Society National Art Honor Society

4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, Florida 32812 407-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com


Christie Rieck

May 23, 2011

Christie Rieck 4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando FL, 32812 Cell: (407)-451-8313 Email: Crieck2012@hotmail.com

Angel Tommy Ortiz Youth Minister Blessed Trinity Catholic Church 4545 Anderson Road Orlando, FL 32812

r e t t e l r e v Co

Dear Angel Ortiz, I have been an avid member of our youth ministry for the past three years. I have been involved with confirmation, retreats, mission trips, peer ministry and showed my leadership abilities through being captain for last year’s peer ministry. I have heard that you are looking for a admin assistance to help you, due to your gradual enter back into the missionary. With the experience I have gained from my yearbook class such as computer programs, professional emailing, and sales, I believe I could properly fulfill the position. Also I have personal experience with our youth ministry from the 18 years attending Blessed Trinity therefore it would be a smooth transition on my hiring. Throughout our ministry I have been around to witness your daily responsibilities and I have the knowledge of knowing what you need to do to get things completed. If I were your assistant I could help you organize retreats, meetings, and contact the peer ministers, priests, the bishop and anyone else needed to be contacted. I would be capable of making your phone calls, organizing your notes, helping organize and execute fund-raisers, all to help reduce your stress level. Along with being your assistant, I could also be your treasurer. As I have attended the 2010 Chattanooga, TN, mission trip, the 2011 Atlanta, GA. mission, and the National Catholic Youth Conference in November, I have learned the process that we use to distribute and fund-raiser money. If I were your assistant and your treasurer I would be trusted to count the money after fund-raisers, calculate what money is needed, brought to the bank, cashed checks and deposit money. All in all, I believe I am qualified though my experience on yearbook staff and an avid member of our youth ministry to be your personal assistant. I hope that you consider this application and contact me when applicable. Thank you for your time. Respectfully yours,

Christie Rieck Enclosed: Resume


Christie Rieck 4910 Simmons Rd. Orlando, FL 32812 Cell: (407)-451-8313 Crieck2012@hotmail.com

Objective: My future goal is to become an aspiring business woman after majoring in business and minoring in journalism at Valencia Community College and the University of Central Florida.

e m u s e R

Education: William R. Boone High School 2008-2012 Experience: PUBLICATIONS INDEX EDITOR, William R. Boone High School 2010-2012 •Being Index editor this past year has made me become more efficient and articulate with my work by learning how to balance my time, energy and focus between my personal jobs, spreads, and stories and staffers. PEER MINISTRY- 2010-2012 •Being the girl, Co-Captain for the entire youth ministry this year has allowed me to become extremely extroverted, personable and allowed me to excel my leadership qualities. I gained these qualities through leading sessions at a retreat of 60 students, leading small groups, and being head of the remaining 19 peer ministers. Volunteer Work: •Alive in You 2010, 2011 Mission Trip I attended and worked at a week mission trip to Chattanooga TN., and Atlanta, GA. There I painted an elementary school building and cleaned and cleared the cornerstone to a 50 mile trail along the Peach Tree Creek. •SPCA Humane Society Ever since third grade I have been a certified volunteer at the SPCA Humane Society. Within those eight years I have accumulated 50 of hours cleaning, caring for, and helping adopt animals at the shelter. Activities/Awards: •Index Editor •Peer Ministry Co-Captain •National Honor Society •National Art Honor Society •Second Place Certificate for the CSPA Gold Circle contest Reference: Renee Burke: journalism adviser and Orange County Public School Teacher of the Year 2012, Renee.burke@ocps.net Angel Tommy Ortiz: You Minister at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church, AOrtiz@blessedtrinityorlando.org


Personal Essay

The past three years of my life, has consisted mostly of yearbook. Gradually this course became more and more promenade in my life. It went from a being just a class that intrigued me, to a part of my daily life, to my passion. My love for writing started in third grade when I wrote a bell work entry about my sick uncle. That entry moved not only my family but also my teacher. After she had read that, she began to read to the entire class my daily entries. Seeing that she saw talent in my writing, was what had inspired me to love the form of putting emotions, thoughts and ideas into words. But at that time I didn’t want to over analyze my third grade talent, so I begun to push writing away. But fortunate for me, my mom saw my talent still there. So she personally signed me up to take journalism one my sophomore year: then these last three years have blossomed. It has most definitely been the most stressful times of my life with deadlines, designing, helping others, getting everything done, and in the mix contributing to the entire book by creating an entire section. After the months of designing, writing and re-writing, I believe over all that I conquered what I had to get done and finished it well enough to satisfy my liking. But after yearbook, and high school, I would like to major in journalism. Seeing that my work is truly good enough by getting the second place certificate for my feature writing last year, that assured me that I really can be a decent journalist; that I shouldn’t be intimidated by the field. Therefore I hope, if not journalism, at least writing stays in my life and my future. Writing is my outlet and my one thing I feel confident in. But I will have to wait and see what God brings me too.


le val ua tio n ica lyt na lf-a Se

This year has by far been the most nerve-racking, stressful year of my life due to journalism. Not only was I a new editor that was just beginning the actual techniques of our programs, but our staff and yearbook sales were its own stress all together. Starting off with poor communication skills was a struggle I think all editors and yourself can agree on. But then once we fixed that problem, we had to focus on increasing our book sales. I believe I did everything in my personal power to sell books. Whether I was wearing a banana suit, peer pressuring kids in the hallways and my classes, texting everyone in my phonebook, and shouting in the parking lot, “buy your yearbook” I think I covered about almost every way we could advertise. Then once we reached our goal by a miracle, I had to begin the months of hard indexing, and creating the index itself. It was very time consuming, tense and pressuring. But because of all of those obstacles, I learned so much. I learned how to advertise in ways that people will listen, how to manage my time, and how to simply use Photoshop and InDesign which will highly benefit me in my future. So despite the countless hours I spent on everything in yearbook, I wouldn’t take it back for the world. I loved being not only an editor this year, but just being a part of our staff. We had a great group of people this year and once they truly gave it their all, we did an amazing job. I look forward to seeing the turnout and comments on our book and hope that people can appreciate everything that we did, as much as we do.


Reflection 1

My most significant piece of work throughout this year would be my deadline two. For deadline two I wrote a profile story about a junior model Olivia Rizor. I wrote the story explaining her life as a model and everything she has won, modeled in/ for, and the steps she takes to prepare for a job. I believe this is my most significant piece because it was such a stressful page to put together with the conflicts we had with using her pictures that once it was shipped and finished I was proud of it. It took me about till dead line day for me to find her photographer, find his number online, call him, get his approval and get an email from him approving our use of her pictures. Before hand, I couldn’t get in contact with any of her other photographers or companies that she had shot for. Therefore that led me with no pictures I was able to use. But now that I can see the page in the book and seeing how well the whole spread looks, I ended up very pleased. The body copy and my secondary coverage wasn’t too much of an issue but just overall I’m very proud that I put the page together and that the by line is mine.


2 [1] smile with your eyes. Rizor angles her face at the right degree to make her eyes speak a million words. “Even though I hated this picture it led me to get my agent,” Rizor said. [2] blend in. Wearing a natural arrangement of clothing and jewelry, Rizor poses for her photographer, Eric Sutton, who was shooting for her portfolio. “[This is] my favorite picture but taking it wasn’t so much fun because of [all the] bugs and snakes in the field,” Rizor said. [3] fierce. She encloses the door frame while posing for her photo. “This picture was really laid back and not time consuming. All I had to do was stand against the door,” Rizor said.

3

photos courtesy/ Eric Sutton

1

dream TEENAGE student discovered; hobby turned into career and passion

She stood in front of the theme designed set wearing clothes stitched to specifically fit her body. Listening to the critique of the photographer, she focused on her facial expressions, her eyes and the position of her body, hoping for the perfect picture. “No one teaches you [how to model], you just do it,” junior Olivia Rizor said. Rizor first began modeling at the age of 10 when she and her grandmother were approached in a mall by a professional photographer. The department store asked her to model sweaters. This event led Rizor to her first paid job, a show for Matrix hair products. “[Modeling] is something I feel I’m senior Rose Lopez said.

good at and I was never really good at sports or singing or cheerleading and all the stuff everyone else does for extra activities,” Rizor said. Rizor never expected modeling to lead into something serious such as her job or even a passion, but that quickly changed when Rizor’s agent discovered her. Once she had an agent, her jobs quickly enhanced. “It really depends [on how often I model]. I can have two jobs in a weekend, back to back, or a month apart. It’s really unexpected unless it’s in the ‘modeling season’ from May [through] June and December [through] January,” Rizor said. Since beginning high school, Rizor had 10 modeling jobs. She was a

runway model in Harriet’s Fashion Week charity show, as well as a contestant for Miss Florida where she competed as Miss Kissimmee. “It was awful preparing for [Miss Florida because] it killed all my free time, but the experience and competition was amazing,” Rizor said. She modeled for well-known companies such as Nike, DC Snowboarding and Juan Colon from Project Runway, along with other smaller name brands like Liz’s, Diamond and Casa Nova. “Modeling [has] opened a lot of doors for me. I like how it keeps me looking a certain way, how it’s boosted my self-esteem, and it’s something I’m good at,” Rizor said. [christie rieck]

prep-up matrix hair

Rizor made sure her hair was cleaned and prepared with quality hair products from her stylist.

gym

To keep in shape and healthy, Rizor would go to the gym everyday before a job.

acrylic nails To ensure her nails were presentable, Rizor had them done at Sunlight Nails.

red bull

To keep energized for a long day of modeling, she chose a Red Bull over coffee or soda.

page 117 rauenzahn - roche


Deadline three was honestly the hardest most frustrating deadline I have ever had in the two years I have been apart of staff. It was exceedingly difficult for me to find angles for six different people, who I have no idea who they are, and trying to connect a ceramic piece they created to a part of their life. Getting good information from people is always a hit or miss. Some people will give you great answers that will make the page so much more enticing to read, and others will give you almost nothing to work with; even if you drag it out of them. That was one of the problems with my page, three of the people gave me nearly nothing to work with while the other three gave me something more to grasp to. Then once I wrote the stories, it became a problem being able to get all of the ceramics from the people at school in at the same time. Therefore the picture I was supposed to get of the table with all the pieces on the table was nearly impossible. Some of the pieces weren’t done, some where too small, and it was really just a mess. So because of all the conflict overall I feel deadline three is a spread I think could use some more work because I don’t like the ending look of the table and ceramics. I think the page looks good in the book but I would still like to clean it up if I had the chance.

Reflection 2


CHAIR has a story

page 68 driven

Enclosed in a space with cold tile floors, a ramble of barks and a mix of emotions, junior Madison Rodriguez volunteered with the Boone Animal Rescue Club. Rodriguez’s volunteering helped to get dogs adopted through BARC at the pound and was one of the various ways Rodriguez could express her love for animals. “I love animals because I grew up having a lot of pets,” Rodriguez said. In ceramics, Rodriguez demonstrated her love for animals by constructing a fish, to give to her sister. “I made a fish for my sister because I know she loves the water,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez expressed her affection for animals through art and more importantly through volunteering. “I volunteer with BARC and I go to PetSmart to help with the pets for adoption, [and I love the feeling] when a pet comes up to you to pet it. There’s no reason for it, but they just love you,” Rodriguez said. “It’s like a constant love.”

Fish are friends

“I love the big Edgewater football game because it brings the school together and [it’s] really fun to show my spirit,” junior

With his genuine happiness, junior Sean Sullivan created laughter in the hallways, smiles in his classes and a simple joy to all his peers. “I don’t like when people are sad; I just want everyone to be happy,” Sullivan said. Different ways Sullivan was able to boost people’s mood was through his sense of humor and his amiable personality. “My personality [makes me who I am] because I’m very easy to get along with unlike most people,” Sullivan said. He was able to feature his uniqueness and positive personality in ceramics by creating a ceramic football with a motivating quote on it. “The football I made [has a] quote that said ‘Even if you get knocked down, get back up,’” and that’s how I live my life: [by] overcoming obstacles,” Sullivan said. Sullivan stayed positive through life’s struggles by continuing to smile and knowing that life goes on. With his positivity, he expressed his refreshing life point of view. “I am more unique than anyone else. Most people want to be ordinary; I want to be extraordinary,” Sullivan said.

Don’t worry, be happy

At age four, he sat on a dusty bleacher and watched his first baseball game. From that day, junior Derek Deler immersed himself in the sport, playing for the next 12 years. “Baseball and life have a way of connecting when it comes to teaching me things. I learned patience, hard work and being focused [through baseball]. [It’s] helped me through life,” Deler said. To portray his love for baseball, he created a baseball jersey for his mother in his third period. “I made a small baseball jersey for my mom because it’s something we have in common. I worked pretty hard on it and it took a long time to make but I knew she would love it,” Deler said. Deler used baseball as a way to focus in school and prioritize his life. His passion for the sport taught him the discipline and perseverance he incorporated into various aspects of his life. “[Without baseball] I would probably be getting into trouble. Baseball holds me back from doing stupid stuff. It keeps me from doing things like drinking or smoking [and] it keeps me in check,” Deler said.

Playing on a clean field

despite the grade, the ‘cliche’, or the gender, every person who sat in that chair, had his or her own story [christie rieck]

Every

Shelby Trimble said.

With his thoughts scattered, senior Andrew Stearns joked with his neighbors about anything that would be unrelated to class. “I’m unique because my wild sense of humor, my ‘OCD-ness’ and my clammy hands,” Stearns said. Stearns’ unique character was shown through a project in his ceramics class made when they were creating and painting pots. “[My pot] is unique because I used the wax resistant technique, which no one uses and incorporated that into my design. I did that because I didn’t want my piece of work looking like anyone else’s,” Stearns said. Stearns wanted to ensure that his creation was different. While he used the wax resistant technique to let others know that he was a different and a unique type of person, Stearns also tried to make everything perfect. “[I’m a] perfectionist, I try to make it as good as I can,” Stearns said. Whether Stearns was being creative or trying to make art perfect, all that mattered was proving that he was unique and different. “My inspiration is just trying to make it as different as possible. I want people to know I’m a different type of person,” Stearns said.

Shaped from a different mold Sculpt your personality

page 69 every chair has a story

Between classes with her earbuds in her ears and her head bobbing as she unintentionally lipped the words, sophomore Jasmine Cesareo continuously listened to her iPod, which took her into a whole other world. “I love music because it’s like telling a story, but in music,” Cesareo said. Cesareo listened to pop punk music to express herself and her thoughts. By analyzing song lyrics and peoples’ emotions, she was able to find connections between the two. “I love music because I think differently than [other] people. I’m fascinated by the way people act and the way people think. You have to understand a song to find it’s meaning, like a person,” Cesareo said. The way Cesareo expressed her passion for music was by going to concerts and continuously listening to music. From this passion, Cesareo began to give herself an edgy look. “The punk artists and bands inspire me. I just love the look [of the artists] because I think it’s cool and you don’t see a lot of people dress like that,” Cesareo said. A connection between her love for punk music and her energetic lifestyle was depicted through a pendant she made in ceramics. The mix of colors she chose to paint her pendant expressed her personality as unique and edgy. “The green purple and white [colors on the pendant] are colorful and fun and the other side with yellow and grey stripes [is] edgy, like me,” Cesareo said.

All from the sound of it

Her mind bounced with different ideas, as they all slowly intertwine together and worked through her hands. Whether it was the brush in her grasp or clay between her fingers, senior Cynthia Williams reflected her identity through the art she made. “Me loving art shows people how I’m a person that loves creativity, has a huge imagination and that I really care about detail. Like my King Kong; I took it over extreme levels of my imagination which makes my creativity show to others,” Williams said. While Williams reflected her creative ability in her art classes, she also pursued art outside of school. Some types of art she created were making and designing shirts, drawing, painting, face painting and ceramics. “Making something that is out of the ordinary makes me excited because I like things different. Like making my own shirts that show what I like and what I am and drawing or painting stories on a canvas and giving it to someone,” Williams said. Whether Williams was drawing or sculpting, her love for art was all the same. “I love art because the ideas I make are mine alone and no one else can take them. [Art is] everywhere you go and it expresses who you are that others don’t know about you,” Williams said.


e l f e R

3 n o i t c

This photo attracts my attention because it has a good center of visual interest, leading lines, and repetition. With the focus on the dominate girl, the lines from the surrounding Bravettes lead you to her. Also the repetition of the girls’ poses attract your attention. Bravette practise 11-28_christie020


This photo attracts my attention because of its good center of visual interest and how it uses the rule of third. I like how the focus is on the drummer and how the dominate angle of the drummer isn’t placed in the center of the picture but uses the rule of thirds. chorus concert 10-25_christie0030

This photo attracts my attention because it has a good center of visual interest and how she is framed by the other performers and the music sheets. chorus concert 10-25_christie0127


Reflection 4

I was an asset to staff and the 2012 Legend yearbook by being index editor. I took on a large responsibility this year by taking that role. I did everything I felt I could to be the best editor I could be. I helped staffers with designing, I checked all of the names throughout the books on time, made grading my first priority, and helped others when they needed help. Then I was the one to created the index design that consisted of 15 current event stories, cobbed students holding colored-in letters with the same questioned quotes as the folio, and the headline. It was a long month and a half of of me working on it with sleepless nights and hard worked days but it was all worth it. I’m honored to be the 2012 index editor and will treasure that position and memories throughout my life.


Reflction 5

I feel like our staff faced more hardships this year then we did last year. We had to double our book sales, had conflicts with lack of communication, and there was just something always going wrong. But I think the biggest hardship for me this year was personal stress level. Senior year is one of the biggest years of your young adult life. Therefore it is over-loaded with different tasks to complete. So being editor, captain of my youth ministry, and dealing with senior priorities made me more stressed out then I have ever been. It was difficult balancing all my demands and getting everything done on time. Peer ministry is a very demanding job in itself and balancing that with all of the grading was close to impossible. But eventually I was able to find that balance and finish off the year in both categories strong. So after the experiences from this year, I learned how to manage my time and still be committed to both. I stayed organize, used calenders, check-lists, and made sure I was able to get everything completed and accomplished to the best of my ability. So even though it wasn’t a pleasant experience having to deal with eye-twitching stress levels, it will be a helpful experience for my future.


Reflection 6

My greatest weakness was balancing my schedule between all my commitments. I knew that being editor, everyone will eventually have to rely on you. That you must be available for whom ever needs your assistance before you begin to work on your own tasks. And I believe overall I did a good job overcoming this obstacle of priorities and time commitments by finding a happy-medium between them all. I was able to focus on yearbook when the time was needed, such as when club proofs were in and when I created the index, yet still focus on my grades, homework, and peer ministry as well. The one time yearbook was my number one priority was when I was creating the index. I only focused on fixing it and making it the best I could for about a month. I still have more room to grow with balancing commitments and prioritizing my schedule but I have grown a lot over the past year and look forward to being challenged to excell even more.


#Y4

2 [1] smile with your eyes. Rizor angles her face at the right degree to make her eyes speak a million words. “Even though I hated this picture it led me to get my agent,” Rizor said. [2] blend in. Wearing a natural arrangement of clothing and jewelry, Rizor poses for her photographer, Eric Sutton, who was shooting for her portfolio. “[This is] my favorite picture but taking it wasn’t so much fun because of [all the] bugs and snakes in the field,” Rizor said. [3] fierce. She encloses the door frame while posing for her photo. “This picture was really laid back and not time consuming. All I had to do was stand against the door,” Rizor said.

7 n o i t c e l Ref

3

photos courtesy/ Eric Sutton

1

dream TEENAGE student discovered; hobby turned into career and passion

She stood in front of the theme designed set wearing clothes stitched to specifically fit her body. Listening to the critique of the photographer, she focused on her facial expressions, her eyes and the position of her body, hoping for the perfect picture. “No one teaches you [how to model], you just do it,” junior Olivia Rizor said. Rizor first began modeling at the age of 10 when she and her grandmother were approached in a mall by a professional photographer. The department store asked her to model sweaters. This event led Rizor to her first paid job, a show for Matrix hair products. “[Modeling] is something I feel I’m senior Rose Lopez said.

good at and I was never really good at sports or singing or cheerleading and all the stuff everyone else does for extra activities,” Rizor said. Rizor never expected modeling to lead into something serious such as her job or even a passion, but that quickly changed when Rizor’s agent discovered her. Once she had an agent, her jobs quickly enhanced. “It really depends [on how often I model]. I can have two jobs in a weekend, back to back, or a month apart. It’s really unexpected unless it’s in the ‘modeling season’ from May [through] June and December [through] January,” Rizor said. Since beginning high school, Rizor had 10 modeling jobs. She was a

runway model in Harriet’s Fashion Week charity show, as well as a contestant for Miss Florida where she competed as Miss Kissimmee. “It was awful preparing for [Miss Florida because] it killed all my free time, but the experience and competition was amazing,” Rizor said. She modeled for well-known companies such as Nike, DC Snowboarding and Juan Colon from Project Runway, along with other smaller name brands like Liz’s, Diamond and Casa Nova. “Modeling [has] opened a lot of doors for me. I like how it keeps me looking a certain way, how it’s boosted my self-esteem, and it’s something I’m good at,” Rizor said. [christie rieck]

prep-up matrix hair

Rizor made sure her hair was cleaned and prepared with quality hair products from her stylist.

gym

To keep in shape and healthy, Rizor would go to the gym everyday before a job.

acrylic nails To ensure her nails were presentable, Rizor had them done at Sunlight Nails.

red bull

To keep energized for a long day of modeling, she chose a Red Bull over coffee or soda.

page 117 rauenzahn - roche


CHAIR has a story

page 68 driven

Enclosed in a space with cold tile floors, a ramble of barks and a mix of emotions, junior Madison Rodriguez volunteered with the Boone Animal Rescue Club. Rodriguez’s volunteering helped to get dogs adopted through BARC at the pound and was one of the various ways Rodriguez could express her love for animals. “I love animals because I grew up having a lot of pets,” Rodriguez said. In ceramics, Rodriguez demonstrated her love for animals by constructing a fish, to give to her sister. “I made a fish for my sister because I know she loves the water,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez expressed her affection for animals through art and more importantly through volunteering. “I volunteer with BARC and I go to PetSmart to help with the pets for adoption, [and I love the feeling] when a pet comes up to you to pet it. There’s no reason for it, but they just love you,” Rodriguez said. “It’s like a constant love.”

Fish are friends

“I love the big Edgewater football game because it brings the school together and [it’s] really fun to show my spirit,” junior

With his genuine happiness, junior Sean Sullivan created laughter in the hallways, smiles in his classes and a simple joy to all his peers. “I don’t like when people are sad; I just want everyone to be happy,” Sullivan said. Different ways Sullivan was able to boost people’s mood was through his sense of humor and his amiable personality. “My personality [makes me who I am] because I’m very easy to get along with unlike most people,” Sullivan said. He was able to feature his uniqueness and positive personality in ceramics by creating a ceramic football with a motivating quote on it. “The football I made [has a] quote that said ‘Even if you get knocked down, get back up,’” and that’s how I live my life: [by] overcoming obstacles,” Sullivan said. Sullivan stayed positive through life’s struggles by continuing to smile and knowing that life goes on. With his positivity, he expressed his refreshing life point of view. “I am more unique than anyone else. Most people want to be ordinary; I want to be extraordinary,” Sullivan said.

Don’t worry, be happy

At age four, he sat on a dusty bleacher and watched his first baseball game. From that day, junior Derek Deler immersed himself in the sport, playing for the next 12 years. “Baseball and life have a way of connecting when it comes to teaching me things. I learned patience, hard work and being focused [through baseball]. [It’s] helped me through life,” Deler said. To portray his love for baseball, he created a baseball jersey for his mother in his third period. “I made a small baseball jersey for my mom because it’s something we have in common. I worked pretty hard on it and it took a long time to make but I knew she would love it,” Deler said. Deler used baseball as a way to focus in school and prioritize his life. His passion for the sport taught him the discipline and perseverance he incorporated into various aspects of his life. “[Without baseball] I would probably be getting into trouble. Baseball holds me back from doing stupid stuff. It keeps me from doing things like drinking or smoking [and] it keeps me in check,” Deler said.

Playing on a clean field

despite the grade, the ‘cliche’, or the gender, every person who sat in that chair, had his or her own story [christie rieck]

Every

Shelby Trimble said.

With his thoughts scattered, senior Andrew Stearns joked with his neighbors about anything that would be unrelated to class. “I’m unique because my wild sense of humor, my ‘OCD-ness’ and my clammy hands,” Stearns said. Stearns’ unique character was shown through a project in his ceramics class made when they were creating and painting pots. “[My pot] is unique because I used the wax resistant technique, which no one uses and incorporated that into my design. I did that because I didn’t want my piece of work looking like anyone else’s,” Stearns said. Stearns wanted to ensure that his creation was different. While he used the wax resistant technique to let others know that he was a different and a unique type of person, Stearns also tried to make everything perfect. “[I’m a] perfectionist, I try to make it as good as I can,” Stearns said. Whether Stearns was being creative or trying to make art perfect, all that mattered was proving that he was unique and different. “My inspiration is just trying to make it as different as possible. I want people to know I’m a different type of person,” Stearns said.

Shaped from a different mold Sculpt your personality

page 69 every chair has a story

Between classes with her earbuds in her ears and her head bobbing as she unintentionally lipped the words, sophomore Jasmine Cesareo continuously listened to her iPod, which took her into a whole other world. “I love music because it’s like telling a story, but in music,” Cesareo said. Cesareo listened to pop punk music to express herself and her thoughts. By analyzing song lyrics and peoples’ emotions, she was able to find connections between the two. “I love music because I think differently than [other] people. I’m fascinated by the way people act and the way people think. You have to understand a song to find it’s meaning, like a person,” Cesareo said. The way Cesareo expressed her passion for music was by going to concerts and continuously listening to music. From this passion, Cesareo began to give herself an edgy look. “The punk artists and bands inspire me. I just love the look [of the artists] because I think it’s cool and you don’t see a lot of people dress like that,” Cesareo said. A connection between her love for punk music and her energetic lifestyle was depicted through a pendant she made in ceramics. The mix of colors she chose to paint her pendant expressed her personality as unique and edgy. “The green purple and white [colors on the pendant] are colorful and fun and the other side with yellow and grey stripes [is] edgy, like me,” Cesareo said.

All from the sound of it

Her mind bounced with different ideas, as they all slowly intertwine together and worked through her hands. Whether it was the brush in her grasp or clay between her fingers, senior Cynthia Williams reflected her identity through the art she made. “Me loving art shows people how I’m a person that loves creativity, has a huge imagination and that I really care about detail. Like my King Kong; I took it over extreme levels of my imagination which makes my creativity show to others,” Williams said. While Williams reflected her creative ability in her art classes, she also pursued art outside of school. Some types of art she created were making and designing shirts, drawing, painting, face painting and ceramics. “Making something that is out of the ordinary makes me excited because I like things different. Like making my own shirts that show what I like and what I am and drawing or painting stories on a canvas and giving it to someone,” Williams said. Whether Williams was drawing or sculpting, her love for art was all the same. “I love art because the ideas I make are mine alone and no one else can take them. [Art is] everywhere you go and it expresses who you are that others don’t know about you,” Williams said.

#Y6

INDEX& PEDRO ANGULOONTIVEROS

12

“I like the bonfire. It’s pretty wild and the drummers [are] pretty exciting.”

AAA 282 AARON 267 Abbatello, Jacob 88 Abbatello, Marina 88 Abel, Cody 88, 201 Abelenda, Daniel 88 Abel, Tyler 88 Aboudallah, Xena 88, 258, 262 Abreu, Zaria 88 Academic Clubs 241 Acevedo, Ariel 88, 254 Acevedo, Carlos 88 Acevedo, Justin 88 Ackerman, Gabriel 293 Acord, Jack 88 Acuna, David 24, 355 Adams, Carter 129, 258, 279 Adams, Dalton 88, 201, 209 Adams, Samantha 88, 226 Administration 63 Afanador, Stephanie 88 Agostinelli, Floyd 59, 129, 263 Agosto, Jessica 88 Aguado, Paola 88 Aguilar, Cristian 136 Aguilar, Edyn 88 Aguilera, Sergio 88

Ahart, Kody 8, 129 Aikin, Jessica 88, 423 Akbarzadeh, Noah 88, 270 Akinwolere, Olusegun 88, 262, 269 Akspinosa, Christopher 265 Alas, Abraham 88 Alava, Bryant 48, 88 Alce, Kerry 88, 209 Aldana, Guillermo 88 Aleem, Tatianna 88 Alejo, Ramon 88 Alexander, Lindsay 14, 88, 249, 257, 260 Alexis Olijnyk 39 Ali, Aja 88 Alicea, Liz 88, 407 Al-khalil, Jad 88 Alkhalil, Laya 88 Allanson, Victoria 88, 233 Allen, Dominique 88 Allen, Nakeo 88, 103 Allen, Parker 88 Allen, Perry 156 Allen, Zachary 88, 201 Allen, Zoe 129, 259, 262, 355 Allman, Callie 88, 407 Allstate Paving 389 Almarode, Emily 88 Altensee, Nicholas 88 Alvarado, Enrique 88 Alvarado, Jerry 211, 355 Alvarado, Sabdie 88, 190, 210 Alvarenga, Brandon 129 Alvarez, Andrew 88 Alvarez, Bryan 88, 211 Alvarez, Carolina 88 Alvarez, Jennifer 88 Alvarez, Monica 88 Always Wear Your Seatbelt 238, 239, 250 Alwine, Sarah 129 Alzner, Savannah 16, 27, 129 American Safety Council 284 American Sign Language 250 Ames, Alexander 88, 256, 263, 273 Ames, Nicole 74 Amick, Cayla 88 Ampuero, Edward 268 Ampuero, Nancy 50, 129, 196 Amspoker, David 88, 266 Anagnostis, Sophia 88, 197, 280 Anderson, Adam 88, 201, 209 Anderson, Connor 88, 255 Anderson, Kyle 20 Anderson Moopen Orthodontics 390 Anderson, Ron 62 Angel, Cindy 88, 220 Angelo, Kelsey 88 Angelo, Kylee 88, 210 Angelo, Mark 88 Angle, Jared 55, 88 Angulo-Ontiveros, Pedro 423 Animal Medical Clinic 391 Anime 251 Ankudavicis, Kara 251 Ansell, Dana 88 Anselmo, Vinicius 129, 283 AP Classes 53 Aplin, Braxton 88, 200, 201 Aponte, Casiana 88, 272 Aponte, Luis 82 Aranda, Kiana 88 Arcara, Stephanie 88, 95 Arce, Christian 88 Archer, Cameron 88 Archer, Nicholas 88 Archer, Tylor 85 Archundia, Luz 88 Ardines, Angelica 88, 204 Areizaga, Elyssa 88 Ares, Emily 88 Areu, Natalie 89 Arias, Marissa 129 Arias, Rhapsody 89 Aristizabal, Jhoan 89 Arkeilpane, Delaney 89, 182, 202, 343 Arkeilpane, Keaton 89, 110, 201 Arndt-green, Robert 89 Arnold, Chase 129, 285 Arroyo, Cynthia 89 Arroyo Beltran, Ashley 89 Art 251 Artavia, Remy 89 Artica-Herrera, Cristian 89 Asbury, Meghan 89, 234 Ashbridge, Devon 89 Ashbridge, Mason 89 Ashmen-Wright, Suzanne 156 Askew, Jordan 129, 388 Assang, Chelsea 24, 129, 286 Atiya, Ayea 89

“Thisais “It’s lota of really fun good goingquote to theabout football thegames page that [because may or there’s] may not a lot relate of enthusiasm,” 60 years?” senior freshman Allie Jessica Greer Sloan Aikin said.

#Y23

CURRENT EVENTS

[christie rieck]

We said you were here. Now go find yourself. Atiya, Mala 89 Atkinson, Jordan 89 Attaway, Carlyn 89, 178, 204, 206 Attaway, Oakley 89, 202 Attaway, Solomon 12, 129, 287 Atwood, Emily 89, 423 Auschwitz, Emily 89, 254, 255 Ausen, Hannah 129 Avera, Brenden 89, 167, 196 Ayala, Raheem 89

CAPRIANA BENJAMIN

“It’s special [to be at Boone for it’s 60th year] because it’s such a long time for a school to be established.”

11

Baba, Arielle 89 Babb, Thomas 89, 164, 174, 200 Babcock, Matthew 89 Baca, Jacqueline 89 Bacon, Jade 150 Badawi, Sami 73 Baella, Yalina 129, 254, 256, 275 Baez, Gerald 89 Baez, Jose 89 Bahl, Jag 89 Bailey, Ashley 89, 197, 270, 276, 438 Bailey, Brianna 89 Baird, Steven 129 Baker, Cody 89, 254 Baker, Cole 89, 200 Baker, Marissa 89 Baking Braves 252 Ball, Amanda 89, 247 Ballard, Jacob 89, 93, 262, 275, 342 Ballentine, Ann 156, 258 Ballentine, David 129, 254, 256,

page 423 aaa - ballentine


Re fle

cti o

n8

From reviewing my last years portfolio I was able to compare the differences and growths of my past two years. I have grown immensely in my designing, Photoshop and InDesign skills. To express my InDesign and Photoshop enhance, last year all I used for my portfolio was textured background and a brush. This year I have used pattern backgrounds, cobs, personal photography, speed shoot, anchor points, swatches, strokes, and step and repeat. Last year I wouldn’t have known to use any of that. Now other then shown in my portfolio, having to write 13 current event stories for the yearbook expresses my writing growth and designing the entire index myself also has shown growth. Last year I felt I was good at what I was doing, but this year I feel I have grown so much and learned so many new things that I can use in my future if I go with the mass media/ journalism career choices.


If you could bring one person from the PAST to the PRESENT who would it be and why?

a e D

1 e n i l d

[ashley micks and christie rieck]

NGAN NGUYEN

TYLER MC CLINTOCK

JA QUIEL GRANT

KEISHLA GONZALEZ

ERIC GITAU

DANIEL BERNAL

SHANNON FORD

“Michael Jackson because he’s an inspiration to me with his dance which has made me want to learn breakdancing.”

“My great grandparents because they were my role models. They were always there for me.”

“Aaliyah because she was a great singer and I still listen to her music.”

“Selena Quintanilla Perez because I love her music and her stuff was amazing.”

“Martin Luther King, Jr., because he changed my people’s lives.”

“I would bring back Kurt Cobain because his music and philosophies inspired a generation.”

“My grandfather because he got me away from all the negative things in my life.”

Wesley Linxwiler Branden Lomax Matthew Long Kevin Lopes Rose Lopez

Angel Lozada Leslie Lugo Madison Lumbert Rachel Machado Alyse Machuca

Kayla Mackey Ricardo Mackey Abraham Madera Emily Madigan Lauren Main

Tanisha Mark Ashley Marrero Tyler Marshall Alexis Martinez Cornelia Martinez

page 142 unique

“[I feel] good because it’s a good school and I’m becoming part of the tradition,” senior Jaciel Perez said.


2 [1] smile with your eyes. Rizor angles her face at the right degree to make her eyes speak a million words. “Even though I hated this picture it led me to get my agent,” Rizor said. [2] blend in. Wearing a natural arrangement of clothing and jewelry, Rizor poses for her photographer, Eric Sutton, who was shooting for her portfolio. “[This is] my favorite picture but taking it wasn’t so much fun because of [all the] bugs and snakes in the field,” Rizor said. [3] fierce. She encloses the door frame while posing for her photo. “This picture was really laid back and not time consuming. All I had to do was stand against the door,” Rizor said.

a e D

2 e n i l d

3

photos courtesy/ Eric Sutton

1

dream TEENAGE student discovered; hobby turned into career and passion

She stood in front of the theme designed set wearing clothes stitched to specifically fit her body. Listening to the critique of the photographer, she focused on her facial expressions, her eyes and the position of her body, hoping for the perfect picture. “No one teaches you [how to model], you just do it,” junior Olivia Rizor said. Rizor first began modeling at the age of 10 when she and her grandmother were approached in a mall by a professional photographer. The department store asked her to model sweaters. This event led Rizor to her first paid job, a show for Matrix hair products. “[Modeling] is something I feel I’m senior Rose Lopez said.

good at and I was never really good at sports or singing or cheerleading and all the stuff everyone else does for extra activities,” Rizor said. Rizor never expected modeling to lead into something serious such as her job or even a passion, but that quickly changed when Rizor’s agent discovered her. Once she had an agent, her jobs quickly enhanced. “It really depends [on how often I model]. I can have two jobs in a weekend, back to back, or a month apart. It’s really unexpected unless it’s in the ‘modeling season’ from May [through] June and December [through] January,” Rizor said. Since beginning high school, Rizor had 10 modeling jobs. She was a

runway model in Harriet’s Fashion Week charity show, as well as a contestant for Miss Florida where she competed as Miss Kissimmee. “It was awful preparing for [Miss Florida because] it killed all my free time, but the experience and competition was amazing,” Rizor said. She modeled for well-known companies such as Nike, DC Snowboarding and Juan Colon from Project Runway, along with other smaller name brands like Liz’s, Diamond and Casa Nova. “Modeling [has] opened a lot of doors for me. I like how it keeps me looking a certain way, how it’s boosted my self-esteem, and it’s something I’m good at,” Rizor said. [christie rieck]

prep-up matrix hair

Rizor made sure her hair was cleaned and prepared with quality hair products from her stylist.

gym

To keep in shape and healthy, Rizor would go to the gym everyday before a job.

acrylic nails To ensure her nails were presentable, Rizor had them done at Sunlight Nails.

red bull

To keep energized for a long day of modeling, she chose a Red Bull over coffee or soda.

page 117 rauenzahn - roche


CHAIR has a story

page 68 driven

Enclosed in a space with cold tile floors, a ramble of barks and a mix of emotions, junior Madison Rodriguez volunteered with the Boone Animal Rescue Club. Rodriguez’s volunteering helped to get dogs adopted through BARC at the pound and was one of the various ways Rodriguez could express her love for animals. “I love animals because I grew up having a lot of pets,” Rodriguez said. In ceramics, Rodriguez demonstrated her love for animals by constructing a fish, to give to her sister. “I made a fish for my sister because I know she loves the water,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez expressed her affection for animals through art and more importantly through volunteering. “I volunteer with BARC and I go to PetSmart to help with the pets for adoption, [and I love the feeling] when a pet comes up to you to pet it. There’s no reason for it, but they just love you,” Rodriguez said. “It’s like a constant love.”

Fish are friends

“I love the big Edgewater football game because it brings the school together and [it’s] really fun to show my spirit,” junior

With his genuine happiness, junior Sean Sullivan created laughter in the hallways, smiles in his classes and a simple joy to all his peers. “I don’t like when people are sad; I just want everyone to be happy,” Sullivan said. Different ways Sullivan was able to boost people’s mood was through his sense of humor and his amiable personality. “My personality [makes me who I am] because I’m very easy to get along with unlike most people,” Sullivan said. He was able to feature his uniqueness and positive personality in ceramics by creating a ceramic football with a motivating quote on it. “The football I made [has a] quote that said ‘Even if you get knocked down, get back up,’” and that’s how I live my life: [by] overcoming obstacles,” Sullivan said. Sullivan stayed positive through life’s struggles by continuing to smile and knowing that life goes on. With his positivity, he expressed his refreshing life point of view. “I am more unique than anyone else. Most people want to be ordinary; I want to be extraordinary,” Sullivan said.

Don’t worry, be happy

At age four, he sat on a dusty bleacher and watched his first baseball game. From that day, junior Derek Deler immersed himself in the sport, playing for the next 12 years. “Baseball and life have a way of connecting when it comes to teaching me things. I learned patience, hard work and being focused [through baseball]. [It’s] helped me through life,” Deler said. To portray his love for baseball, he created a baseball jersey for his mother in his third period. “I made a small baseball jersey for my mom because it’s something we have in common. I worked pretty hard on it and it took a long time to make but I knew she would love it,” Deler said. Deler used baseball as a way to focus in school and prioritize his life. His passion for the sport taught him the discipline and perseverance he incorporated into various aspects of his life. “[Without baseball] I would probably be getting into trouble. Baseball holds me back from doing stupid stuff. It keeps me from doing things like drinking or smoking [and] it keeps me in check,” Deler said.

Playing on a clean field

despite the grade, the ‘cliche’, or the gender, every person who sat in that chair, had his or her own story [christie rieck]

Every

a e D

Shelby Trimble said.

With his thoughts scattered, senior Andrew Stearns joked with his neighbors about anything that would be unrelated to class. “I’m unique because my wild sense of humor, my ‘OCD-ness’ and my clammy hands,” Stearns said. Stearns’ unique character was shown through a project in his ceramics class made when they were creating and painting pots. “[My pot] is unique because I used the wax resistant technique, which no one uses and incorporated that into my design. I did that because I didn’t want my piece of work looking like anyone else’s,” Stearns said. Stearns wanted to ensure that his creation was different. While he used the wax resistant technique to let others know that he was a different and a unique type of person, Stearns also tried to make everything perfect. “[I’m a] perfectionist, I try to make it as good as I can,” Stearns said. Whether Stearns was being creative or trying to make art perfect, all that mattered was proving that he was unique and different. “My inspiration is just trying to make it as different as possible. I want people to know I’m a different type of person,” Stearns said.

Shaped from a different mold

3 e n i l d

Sculpt your personality

page 69 every chair has a story

Between classes with her earbuds in her ears and her head bobbing as she unintentionally lipped the words, sophomore Jasmine Cesareo continuously listened to her iPod, which took her into a whole other world. “I love music because it’s like telling a story, but in music,” Cesareo said. Cesareo listened to pop punk music to express herself and her thoughts. By analyzing song lyrics and peoples’ emotions, she was able to find connections between the two. “I love music because I think differently than [other] people. I’m fascinated by the way people act and the way people think. You have to understand a song to find it’s meaning, like a person,” Cesareo said. The way Cesareo expressed her passion for music was by going to concerts and continuously listening to music. From this passion, Cesareo began to give herself an edgy look. “The punk artists and bands inspire me. I just love the look [of the artists] because I think it’s cool and you don’t see a lot of people dress like that,” Cesareo said. A connection between her love for punk music and her energetic lifestyle was depicted through a pendant she made in ceramics. The mix of colors she chose to paint her pendant expressed her personality as unique and edgy. “The green purple and white [colors on the pendant] are colorful and fun and the other side with yellow and grey stripes [is] edgy, like me,” Cesareo said.

All from the sound of it

Her mind bounced with different ideas, as they all slowly intertwine together and worked through her hands. Whether it was the brush in her grasp or clay between her fingers, senior Cynthia Williams reflected her identity through the art she made. “Me loving art shows people how I’m a person that loves creativity, has a huge imagination and that I really care about detail. Like my King Kong; I took it over extreme levels of my imagination which makes my creativity show to others,” Williams said. While Williams reflected her creative ability in her art classes, she also pursued art outside of school. Some types of art she created were making and designing shirts, drawing, painting, face painting and ceramics. “Making something that is out of the ordinary makes me excited because I like things different. Like making my own shirts that show what I like and what I am and drawing or painting stories on a canvas and giving it to someone,” Williams said. Whether Williams was drawing or sculpting, her love for art was all the same. “I love art because the ideas I make are mine alone and no one else can take them. [Art is] everywhere you go and it expresses who you are that others don’t know about you,” Williams said.


e D / 6 e n i l d a De

s n sig



Rieck_Christie 2012 Portfolio