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Delaney Arkeilpane


BUSINESS ELEMENTS BUSINESS ELEMENTS


Delaney Arkeilpane 1018 S Lake Davis Dr. Orlando, FL 32806 delaney.arkeilpane@gmail.com (407) 902-5540 April 22, 2013 Matt Garrepy Partner & Creative Director Daynerhall Marketing & Advertising 619 E. Pine St. Orlando, FL 32803 Dear Mr. Garrepy: The distinctive approach Daynerhall has applied to marketing and advertising is something I’d personally like to experience. I appreciate the capabilities of the agency you run, and I would like to apply for an internship during this upcoming summer because I believe I could contribute to your success. As the Sports Editor of my high school yearbook, I have mastered skills in Adobe Photoshop, InDesign and Dreamweaver. I have conducted interviews, taken pictures, written and edited content in my section. My previous interactions with people would make me a perfect fit for your staff because I am capable of working well with others, while managing my own deadlines. My background in these areas would apply directly to the specific guidelines for your company. I am aware that your company works to meet the client’s exact needs. After producing a yearbook I have firsthand experience with meeting the demands of the target audience. We have to consider that although it would be easier to use people two or three times throughout the book, we make a distinct effort to only picture or quote students once so that we can ensure everyone is covered somewhere in the final product. I am willing to make sacrifices to meet the overall expectations of the company, even if it means going out of my way. I appreciate your considering me for an internship, but I feel that an interview would allow me to personally express my capabilities to you directly. I have attached a detailed resume of my experience to further illustrate my qualifications. I appreciate your consideration, and I look forward to hearing back from you soon. Respectfully yours, Delaney Arkeilpane Enclosed: resume


Delaney Arkeilpane 1018 S Lake Davis Dr. Orlando, FL 32806 delaney.arkeilpane@gmail.com (407) 902-5540 OBJECTIVE To bring energy and focus to the company, while achieving a higher knowledge of business, as well as to gain stronger management and people skills. EDUCATION n Completed four years at William R. Boone High School. n Graduation date: May 29, 2013. n G.P.A. 4.06. Top 17% of class. EXPERIENCE Legend Yearbook, William R. Boone High School n Aug 2012- 2013. Sports Editor. Design layouts, meet deadlines, edit pages and help staffers. n Aug 2011- 2012. Business manager. Advertise sales, write receipts and deposits and organize sales reports. n Aug 2010- 2011. Staffer. Complete deadlines, conduct interviews, take pictures and write stories. RELEVANT HIGH SCHOOL STUDIES Journalism I, II, and III, VIII honors, Mass Media I, Web Design I and II, English I, II, and III Honors, Creative Photography I. HONORS, AWARDS AND MEMBERSHIPS National Honor Society, 2012- present, this is a highly recognized club dedicated to volunteer service and leadership around the community. National Society of High School Scholars, 2011- present, an award granted to high school students based upon outstanding grades and high academic achievement. Certified in Adobe Dreamweaver, 2011, studied Web Design and passed the test for Dreamweaver to become and Adobe Certified Associate, see attached to resume. Active volleyball team member, 2006- present, I started playing volleyball in middle school and continued to play in high school, one year junior varsity, and three at the varsity level. Named MVP my senior year. I’ve also played club and beach volleyball at Top Select for the past three years, and named MVP for my 17’s club team. Verbally committed to play at Bowling Green State University. Baby sitting, 2008- present, care for young children, prepare meals, perform arts and crafts, assist with homework, bath and get kids ready for bed. REFERENCES n Renee Burke: yearbook adviser. (407) 443-8451 n Michael Ladewski: volleyball coach. (407) 620-1423 n Catherine Wang: babysitting contact. (407) 484-4306






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ESSAYS ESSAYS


Self-Evaluation I got started in journalism my freshman year of high school with Mrs. Burke. I was involved with the yearbook when I was in seventh and eighth grade, but I really began to study it in depth once I took Journalism I and advanced onto yearbook. Another major influence in choosing this course was from a good friend of mine Emily Nusbickel. Her older sister was on the yearbook staff for three years, and seeing her accomplishments sparked my interest. Through the course of this year alone I have gained a lot of valuable knowledge. Becoming a section editor allowed me to expand my skills of actual production. I had to proof the pages and PDF them for shipment. Also I would say that I’ve managed deadlines pretty well prior to this year, but I learned how to help of staffers stay on deadline by talking to them daily about what was expect if they were in my section. Managing a section takes a lot of teamwork too. I learned that it’s not something one person can produce alone, and you sometimes have to rely on other people to produce. I also learned that other times you can’t rely on people and you have to step up, but it’s important to know the difference of when to step in. In the field of sales and advertising I personally conducted phone calls to parents in order to inform them about the yearbook sales. This taught me that you sometimes have to reach out to people in order to gain a sale. Sometimes it would be easier to brush things off and leave them the way they are, but when something needs changing it must be done. The boys volleyball page was a struggle to say the least, and without the journalism ethics instilled on our staff it could’ve remained a disaster. When a key player was expelled we had to remove him everywhere from the page, although it was aggravating to change, it taught me journalism ethics because we have to use our discretion on what should or shouldn’t be covered. Overall yearbook takes a lot of dedication. Knowing that we were producing an outstanding yearbook helped me to keep my focus and perfect my pages. This was a valuable course for me to take because it’s something that challenges me but at the same time I really enjoy it. Obviously I won’t be returning to staff next year, but the skills I have developed over my three years of staff will help me in the future. It has made me realize that I would love to pursue a career in this field and now I have the photography, design and writing skills I need.


REFLECTION ONE REFLECTION ONE Considering that I didn’t personally work on many pages this year it’s easy to say that the girls swimming page was my most significant work. I wasn’t going into my first deadline as sports editor with the intention of having my own page to complete was well. But with the complications on the staff I had to take over the page. Initially I was pretty stressed about the idea of having my own deadline while ensuring that the people in my section completed theirs. What I really feel makes this my best was the dominant alone. When I designed the page I had the idea of portraying the through the motions picture with an underwater action shot. Getting the picture was a process of trial and error, but I was extremely pleased with how well it turned out. I think part of what made it so cool was the fact that it was taken through an underwater camera so it really spiced up the page and got your attention. I felt like I was rushed on the deadline, but I made sure to focus on getting the pictures and everything else just followed easily. After we shot the dominant I was able to write body copy and go through all my editors very timely. From the first draft to the finish their were really only minor changes. I really tried to focus on getting the elements together from the start that way I wouldn’t find myself reshooting the dominant or resubmitting for body copy. With this in mind I was able to complete a noteworthy page for the book. Being that this was my first time editing page while working on my own spread I learned how to balance my time accordingly and assist the staffers in whatever ways I could.


Reflection One


photo/Nathaniel Pagan

160 sports

photo/Courtney Patz

photo/Anna Marie Boria

photo/Courtney Patz

“My favorite moment was when I finally got a 94 on my Spanish test because it was really hard,” freshman TRINITY ALEXANDER said.

“I was excited for her; she swam really well,” coach Rosalie Creighton said. “She is such a hard worker, so she deserved to swim well.” After coming out on top in the 200, Cheatham had her mind on her next event: the 500 yard freestyle. She placed second with 5:41, just a second behind junior Allison Lindsey of Winter Park, who seized first. She returned to practice that week to prepare for the district meet after her success at metros. After qualifying for regionals last year, she hoped to duplicate the performance again at districts. She placed seventh in the 200 freestyle and sixth in the 500 freestyle, ultimately qualifying her for regionals. “I feel very blessed that all of my hard work over the years is paying off, and now I’m getting to reap the benefits,” Cheatham said.

meet: metros event: 200 and 500 Freestyle

Her stomach grew weak with apprehension just visualizing the metro swim meet. Sleepless nights characterized her week leading up to metros as she anticipated what lay ahead. “I was a nervous wreck. I hate big meets so much,” junior Amelia Cheatham said. Cheatham ranked eighth for the 200 yard freestyle going into districts. She took her place on the block, steadied her mind and waited for the buzzer to sound. Diving into the water, she swam her fastest to tie her personal record of 2:08 and steal first place. “I wasn’t expecting it because I was so out of shape over the summer, so I was really pleased to know that I could get to that point again,” Cheatham said. As her time flashed on the board, her teammates and coaches met her at the edge of the pool with excitement.

w i t h AMELIA CHEATHAM

Julia Hester swims the butterfly. “[I feel] free because it’s different than walking around on land, and it makes your body calm,” Hester said. BACK IT UP. Sophomore Talia Decant does the backstroke on Sept. 12, against Freedom High School. FLIP OUT. With her hand on the edge of the pool, senior Nichole Clayton does a turn. “[Breaking a personal record is] rewarding because you realize all your practicing and all the things you didn’t really want to be doing paid off,” Clayton said.

GASP. At the district meet, sophomore Tilley Van-Dyke swims the 200 IM. FLY AWAY. Stretching her arms, junior

photo/Anna Marie Boria

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girls swim161

Scan this code with your smart phone to access more pictures from the swim meet against Lake Nona.

we got you

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

At the conclusion of the last official practice of the “I don’t feel stressed about season, just prior to the district meet, coach Rosalie swimming like I did last year,” junior Creighton gave the girls the same advice she deemed Eleanor Clark said. “I still work necessary to their yearly success. hard, but our team has bonded better “She told us ‘close your eyes and picture your start because we work together to receive from the block to every flip turn and finally being the fun stuff.” able to look up and see the time you want’ before Together the coaches incorporated districts,” junior Kristen Harding said. incentives into their practice routines in The swimmers believed Creighton’s tactics an effort to encourage the swimmers. helped them mentally prepare for the meet. “They bribe us, like they’ll say ‘alright “It makes me believe that my time is possible, if you do this set really hard [then...],’ and if and I can actually see it coming to life,” Harding we meet our goals for the week then we get said. “It kind of goes along with tapering to do something fun,” Clark said. “We have because we practice hard all season for this a stronger foundation [because of it].” one moment, knowing we’re all at our full The activities included a relay in which the potential.” coaches required the swimmers to do the dog Practices the week before districts paddle and swim freestyle backwards. consisted of tapering, a strategy in which “They had fun [with it], and it’s good to Creighton reduced the workload the do something other than [just] swimming swimmers endured to ensure the girls sometimes,” Creighton said. were at their primes for the district meet. Strategies like these prepared the team for “[Tapering] takes our mind off of success at districts. Clark qualified for regionals in [districts] to the point where we’re not the 50 freestyle, 100 freestyle, 200 medley relay and stressed anymore, so that when districts 200 freestyle relay. The other members of the relays come we are relaxed,” Harding said. were juniors Amelia Cheatham and Julia Hester and Creighton and the new assistant senior Nichole Clayton. coach, Kimberley Porterfield, “I do better personally when my mind is at ease, strove to ensure that regular season and this year I don’t feel as much pressure,” Clark said. practices and meets were enjoyable. / / /content by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

coach left players with inspiring words in the presence of district meet

ENVISIONSF I N I S H

TEAM

photo illustration/Delaney Arkeilpane and Emily Nusbickel

The night before the regional me team had et the a pasta din ner togeth er.

FLIP FRENZY. At practice, junior Catherine Harper transitions from a turn to the butterfly. “When I’m swimming, I can’t focus on anyone else, so it calms me down from a stressful day at school,” Harper said. Harper swam 1:14.91 in the 100 butterfly at the district meet on Oct. 26.

Reflection One


REFLECTION TWO REFLECTION TWO

Deadline seven was interesting to say the least. As our last deadline of the year I was starting to feel that most of the staff was checked out. And since we didn’t have proofs this made it even more stressful for me because I wanted to perfect my section. After seeing how the girls swimming page turned out I wanted to carry the same idea somewhere into the spring supplement and I thought that girls track would be the best place to try to repeat the dominant. I had the idea that we could try to dhow another through the motions on a huddle jump. Initially I designed the page much like the girls swimming page with a dominant bleeding across the entire top of the page. When we went to shoot it though the action ended up looking kind of weak across both pages. In order to fix this we decide to play with the layout and shrink the dominant to one page, add another picture and enlarge the ones we had before to fill the page. Since we were rushed on the deadline I felt like this was the best we could do with what we had. If I could improve the page I would start by re-shooting the dominant because I just don’t feel like the finished product has the wow factor I had in mind when I designed the page. Then I would play around with the layout because the cluster of photos on the opposite page take away from the dominant since they are so large. What I learned from this page is that things don’t always turn out the way you intend for them to, and when that happens you have to make some adjustments. Overall I feel like the page is decent, but if we had more time to perfect it I know it would’ve looked better.


Reflection Two


O B S TA C L E S

016 sports

Scan this code with your smart phone to access more pictures from track meets throughout the season.

As she reached the last 100 meters, freshman it doesn’t help the team get any points,” Jordan Crawford pushed herself into a sprint, sophomore Leah Sikes said. determined to finish the final leg of her race well. Although the team faced setbacks, the Throughout the season, the girls track team girls were still able to pull together to place faced adversity, such as injuries and a small roster, higher in their meets. yet it overcame these issues by encouraging one “They have all worked extremely hard another on both a team and an individual level. to compete at a high level,” head coach Josh When an athlete suffered an injury, the girls Shearouse said. did not let it break their focus on winning. In the team’s first two meets at the Wildcat “[An injury] affects [the team] a lot because Open and The First Academy Royal Open, we have to put in an alternate that we aren’t used the girls’ placed third overall, with 91.5 and 72 to,” Crawford said. “[However,] if someone’s points respectively. injured, we have to accept it and try to fit the The vaulting girls saw success at the TFA [replacement] person in the best way we can.” Royal Open where all four placed top eight, For example, at the Lake Highland Elite adding four points to the team’s overall score. Classic on March 9, senior Justice Donald “It’s been the same people [competing in pulled a hamstring and was unable to compete pole vaulting for the past three years], so we get in the 4 x 400 relay race, and senior Monique closer every year,” junior Mackenzie Williamson Soriano had to replace her at the last minute. said. “We’ve always helped each other, so [the “I freaked out. I was upset and felt group is] the best [it’s] ever been.” concerned for not only her well-being but also With encouragement and help from her fellow for the relay team,” Crawford said. vaulters, Williamson vaulted a season best of 7’6” Even with the adjustment, the relay team at the Lake Brantley Invitational on March 2. placed fifth with a time of 4:19.45. Motivation and support for one another were Since the team only had 32 girls, obstacles, key components of the team and helped the girls like injuries, impacted the individual and perform to the best of their abilities. the team, as every member’s performance “[I tell them to] keep their head up. As long as was vital for their overall placing. you gave it your best, that’s all that you can do. [I “If we have to run a race that we aren’t tell the girls to] use it as motivation for next time,” necessarily good at [because we do not have Shearouse said. / / / content by BRYNNE DAWKINS and MORGAN ROWLAND enough runners to fill the category], then

“[My favorite memory was] my first game of baseball [on] junior varsity because I was one of the few that got to play,” freshman

COVERED we got you

team members stayed motivated despite difficulties

G I R L S OUTRUN

junior Courtney Patz jumps over hurdles. “I’m still working on the techniques to do my best and eventually start placing higher up,” Patz said. Patz’s personal best in the 100-meter hurdles was 20.34 at the Lake Highland Elite Classic on March 9.

“To meet new people and [because] I’ve been throwing discus since middle school.”

WINSTON CARIAS said.

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

photo/Dean Stewart Photography photo/Brynne Dawkins

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART ABOUT COMPETING IN DISCUS?

“Seeing my opponents because it gives me a sense of accomplishment if I beat them.”

girls track and field017

“I warm up by throwing, and I listen to music to pump myself up. I also braid my hair [before I do my throw].”

HOW DO YOU PREPARE BEFORE A DISCUS EVENT?

Q & A w i t h ALEXANDRA KING, sophomore WHY DID YOU WANT TO JOIN THE TRACK TEAM?

just sayin’

Senior Justice Donald pulls ahead of her competitors. “[My favorite part of running track is] the adrenaline rush of being one of the fastest and getting first place,” Donald said. UP, UP AND AWAY. With her arm extended, junior Miranda Miller throws the shot put at the Wildcat Open on Feb. 18. “I still get nervous on whether I’ll have a great throw because everyone wants to be number one,” Miller said.

FOLLOW THE LEADER.

photo/John Chapman

TEACH ME HOW TO HURDLE. At practice,

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

Rees pole vaults. “Pole vaulting is such a complex sport, so when everything comes together, I feel really proud of myself,” Rees said. IN IT TO WIN IT. On March 2, at the Lake Brantley Invitational, sophomore Claire Collins runs the first leg of the 4 x 400 relay race. “[The best part of track] is the team because they are unbelievably fun,” Collins said. LEAP FROG. At the TFA Royal Open on Feb. 23, freshman Lauryl Oliver clears the hurdle. “Sometimes I struggled with keeping my chest down, so you just have to remember to lean forward and keep trying,” Oliver said.

GET HIGH. Throwing herself over the bar, junior Olivia

Reflection Two

photo illustration/Emily Nusbickel


REFLECTION THREE REFLECTION THREE

I like this picture because it is very different from most pictures you see of swimming. Getting to shoot pictures with the underwater camera was an experience, but I was excited with how this one turned out. I think it has a nice center of visual interest and rule of thirds.

Saved on the server under Deadline 2 > Originals > as 159-001_dom.jpg


REFLECTION THREE REFLECTION THREE

I took this picture as an aid for Emily and Amelia because they couldn’t take pictures for their page during six and seventh, the only two classes for keyboarding. I like that there is a little bit of depth of field with the keyboard. Honestly this is one of the only pictures I shot that made it in the book, so it’s not necessarily that strong, but it’s all I have.

Saved on the server under Deadline 2 > Originals > as 053-002_keyboard.jpg


REFLECTION THREE REFLECTION THREE

I shot this picture of Matt Combs during a beat at one of the volleyball games. I was getting pretty frustrated with some of the pictures I was taking. Personally I find it very hard to shoot sports, especially volleyball which seems ironic considering that I play it. Although when I took this picture I was satisfied with the rule of thirds and the action it displays.

Saved on the server under Sports > Volleyball Boys 3-19_dpain > as volleyball boys 3-19_001. jpg


REFLECTION FOUR REFLECTION FOUR

I was an asset to the staff and the 2013 edition of the Legend yearbook because I did everything I could to make our book the best. As sports editor I made sure that all of my pages were designed for the staffers in my section. By deadline seven I even designed them a week in advance of the date staffers were to begin on the pages. I made sure to do my grading me within the first 24 hours that they were given to me. I also tried to communicate with the people in my section daily during a deadline to ensure that they were clear with what was expected of them, and to assist them if they had any questions. Not only that but I also worked on some of my own pages. During deadline two I stepped up and finished the swimming page when we lost a staffer. I also offered to design the in-depth page when no one else did. Not only that but after deadline I took over sections to guarantee that the pages were perfected, and corrected them further when proofs came back. Overall I think I became a pretty big asset to the staff this year. As a senior editor of a large section of the book I felt like I had a lot of control over the final product. I also feel like I was an example to the younger staffers because I am very consistent with what I expect and I make it clear that this book is very important to me by dedicating so much of my time to it. And even if I am intimidating to some of the staffers I still feel like I was pretty approachable and willing to help when it gets down to it.


REFLECTION FIVE REFLECTION FIVE Compared to previous years, for the most part, I didn’t feel like my position on staff was too overwhelming for me this year. I liked that I could design pages instead of having to actually conduct interviews and complete the content myself. And after three years on staff I feel like I can finally say that I’ve got the system down and I can consistently meet deadlines. Although I feel that it has always been a struggle when I have to depend on other people to get things completed. Every year is challenging because we have to rely on everyone on staff at some point to produce quality work for the book. I had to count on the people in my section to finish their layouts, so that I could make sure that we were ready to ship the pages. Deadlines are by no means easy for anyone, and I realize that sometimes problems arise and people get behind. But this creates a hardship for me because ultimately I know that I will have to take over the page if they don’t complete it. I think what I struggle with the most is that if someone doesn’t perform someone else suffers from it. There is no way we can just avoid this issue because unlike most classes where you just receive your own grade for an assignment we are working to produce a book so it must get done. I guess that I learned that it’s just something you have to suck it up and get the work done. In my position this happened on a few occasions and I was expected to take over and ensure that the job was done correctly. A lot of times with group work I feel like I end up doing most of the work anyways. In truth, I would probably just do it myself if I was faced with this problem again because I have learned that you can’t always rely on other people. Overall I think I’ve handled the situation to the best of my abilities by offering as much help as I can because I hate to see that it sometimes falls on Mrs. Burke to complete.


REFLECTION SIX REFLECTION SIX

During the semester exam I was asked what my three goals were for the second semester and how I would fulfill them. The first goal I set was to complete three beats with a wrap up for the web. It was a process for me to find a time to schedule them and I was highly considering sacrificing the grade, but I managed to find the time. I made sure to tweet during the game, take pictures and submit my wrap up within the next day for all three of my beats. The second goal I set for myself was to perfect my deadline 7 layouts. I did this by designing them weeks in advance during deadline 5 when I didn’t have a deadline, so that I could give my editors enough time to grade them and fix the changes. I succeed at this because my designs were complete and on the server prior to a week before the deadline was set to begin. Lastly I wanted to make sure that I was more available to staffers. This was probably the hardest goal I set for myself because I don’t think you can judge how well I did since it’s basically an opinion. Some staffers might feel that I was an asset while other might disagree. I tried to talk to the people in my section everyday while we were on deadline and help them with their questions. I also attempted to shoot boys volleyball and girls track pictures for staffers that were struggling, but my pictures are not that good.


Reflection Seven TELL 55 44

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK

3 1 0

photo/John Woike/Hartford Courant/ MCT

photo courtesy/Robert Pell

range, senior Savannah Winship fires a vintage Thompson rifle. CRY A RIVER. A man grieves in Newtown, Conn., after Adam Lanza went on a rampage at Sandy Hook Elementary on Dec. 14, killing 26 people, including 21 children under the age of seven. SPEAK OUT. National Rifle Association vice president Wayne LaPierre conducts a news conference on Dec. 21, to address gun control.

photo/Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/MCT

Putting a numerical value on the issue of gun control

READY, AIM, FIRE. At the shooting

*statistics from TIME and dosomething.org

I feel terribly [about gun violence]. I try to empathize with the families of the victims, but there is no way I could possibly grasp the depth of their despair. I just hope that it inspires change.

VIOLENCE debate increased firearm attacks prompted public to consider tightening gun control

040 student life

percent

percent

SPARKS

THE CURVED GRIP felt cool to his touch, and the oiled metal glinted as he lifted the weapon. Within seconds, a misfired bullet torpedoed into his toddler brother’s chest. The case of Louisiana 18-year-old Terrance Varisse and the death of his younger brother, Travin, was not exceptional. Instances of gun violence resulted in over 32,163 deaths in 2011. This figure, compounded by rampage shootings in Aurora, Colo.; Newtown, Conn.; and New York, NY, sparked a debate over whether the U.S.’s firearms restrictions were too imprecise to be effective. Students and other community members remained divided over whether gun control was an unnecessary interference of constitutional rights or a crucial responsibility of lawmakers to ensure the safety of their constituents. “It’s our Second Amendment right, and we should be able to bear arms to protect ourselves and our loved ones. It shouldn’t be taken away,” senior Savannah Winship said. Pro-gun activists referenced the Second Amendment, which assured “the right of the people to keep and bear arms” as an unsuspendable and fundamental freedom. Other community members, however, felt the American public needed to behave accountably to deserve this right. “With freedom comes great responsibility. To live in such a large society, we need organization. [Events like the Newtown shooting] always make you worried that a) there are people willing to do such horrific things and [b) makes you think] ‘Have we missed identifying any potential issues?’ It’s very concerning,” school resource officer Scott Daniels said. Indisputably, the Newtown, Conn., shooting, in which Adam Lanza opened fire at Sandy Hook Elementary School on Dec. 14, killing 26, including 21 5 and 6 year olds, caused public outrage and raised the issue of violence in schools. “It was devastating news. They were a bunch of innocent kids. I just can’t fathom what would drive somebody to do something like that,” junior Kaelem Mohabir said. In response, activists proposed employing more armed guards in schools; before the shooting, only a third of U.S. did so. The Newtown attack and the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., on June 20, also brought attention to the accessibility of guns, especially to young people. Lanza, 20,

of Americans opposed stricter gun control

of Americans supported more restrictions on gun control

obtained his weapons from his mother’s locked cabinet, after slaying her prior to the school attack, and 24-year-old Aurora perpetrator James Holmes amassed weapons with little difficulty. “Guns are too common in the United States. Obviously an inanimate object cannot kill someone of its own accord. Guns do, however, facilitate the rapid and effortless killing of people. Something needs to change,” Mohabir said. Anti-firearm activists proposed more rigorous restrictions on purchases, as only two states, California and Rhode Island, mandated background checks for all gun sales. Pro-gun authorities like the National Rifle Association stated that background checks were a waste of time and would be largely ineffective, citing that less than 10 percent of firearms used in vicious crime, including burglary and homicide, came from federally-licensed dealers who required checks. Pro-gun protesters further argued that extra precautions, even the prohibition of firearms, would be ineffective in preventing mass shootings. They maintained that weapons would still be readily accessible and that the incidents were the fault of mentally-disturbed gunmen and not the firearms themselves. “Crazy people or anybody [else] are still going to be able to get a hold of guns. Guns don’t have a mind of their own. It’s the people who pick them up and fire them,” Winship said. However, to those who saw the devastating effects of gun violence first-hand, the cause of the incidents was unimportant. If they did not culminate in death, gunshot wounds could cause numerous dangerous complications, including paralysis, loss of limb and extensive internal injuries. Dr. John Promes, director of the Orlando Health trauma center, recognized the detrimental effects of firearm violence on society and hoped that a balance could be reached for the benefit of all, especially younger generations. “I see how [violence] keeps [people] from being productive members of the community, so it absolutely makes a difference to me. It’s very disturbing to me when I see a young person who has been involved in gun violence. [If firearms disappeared,] I wouldn’t have to tell any more mothers or fathers or sisters that someone died because of gun violence,” Promes said. / / / content by AMELIA CHEATHAM and EMILY NUSBICKEL

KAELEM MOHABIR -junior, discussing his views on gun violence

180,000

Every mass shooting since 1950, with the exception of one, occurred in a place where laws prohibited citizens from carrying guns.

80 SCHOOL ZONE

19 PERCENT

PERCENT OF AMERICANS SUPPORTED BACKGROUND CHECKS FOR ALL GUN SALES

30,000

54

photo/Phabulous Photos

SHOOTINGS IN GUN-FREE AREAS

OF THE PUBLIC DISAGREED WITH IMPOSING UNIVERSAL BACKGROUND CHECKS

Passed in 1995, the Federal Gun Free School Zone Act prohibited guns within 1,000 feet of primary and secondary schools.

Number of instances per year in which guns were used for selfdefense

“[I make the most of my moments by] living with no regrets,” junior ALEXANDER ROSARIO said.

“I believe people have their own motives, and they’re behind the gun. The gun doesn’t have a mind of its own. It can’t pull the trigger by itself.”

-Makenzie Figuerado, a senior who supported gun availability for the public

Average number of deaths caused by guns per year in the U.S.

will it help ?

49

Students tell whether or not tougher gun control laws would curb violence

36% YES

PERCENT

TOO NOEASY

*394 students polled Feb. 4 design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

in-depth: gun control041

SIDELINE SPIRIT. At the game against Olympia on Oct. 30, senior Rachel Neely cheers on

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ph oto /M ad iso nN ag le

OAKLEY ATTAWAY, SOPHOMORE

MEGAN CHEVALIER, SENIOR ph oto /P hab ulo us Ph oto s

DELANEY ARKEILPANE, SENIOR

THAT’S THE MONEY. Eyes on the ball, senior Megan Chevalier jumps to make contact. “My favorite part of the season was the Winter Park game [on Oct. 16] because it was senior night, and I played well,” Chevalier said. Chevalier had 162 kills during the season.

KENDALL SEXTON, SENIOR

ALEXANDRA HARVARD, SENIOR

MOST BLOCKS:

68

SENIORS

UPSUCCESS MOST DIGS:

327

MOST ACES:

59

MOST ASSISTS:

685

girls set goal of state championship

with CAROLINE JORDAN, senior

1 /// “I stand and hold the

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2

ball as I look to the other side of the court to see where I want the ball to go.”

1

When the grueling week of tryouts came to an end, 14 girls left the Wayne Rickman Gymnasium with the coveted title of “varsity volleyball player” and the same attainable goal for the season in mind. “We all just knew. We could see it in each other’s faces that we all shared the same goal: states,” junior Jenna Layton said. Coach Michael Ladewski provided encouragement and support because he knew that if the girls pushed themselves hard enough, their goal would become a reality. “I wanted to keep them focused on the goal of states. After the first practice, I assigned them some homework. I had them all go figure out their ring sizes as motivation for the goal they set,” Ladewski said. The seniors led the team to success, both statistically and emotionally. “Having eight seniors is amazing. Our captain, Delaney Arkeilpane, has really stood

illustration/Delaney Arkeilpane

BLINK of an eye

2 /// “I do my approach, and at the end of it, I toss the ball.” 3 /// “I jump and make contact with the ball.”

4 /// “I direct the ball with my hand where I want it to go on the opposite side of the court.”

we got you

out, but every senior has really stepped up to lead the team,” Ladewski said. Arkeilpane contributed to the stability of the team as they worked towards states. “Delaney was definitely the leading force this year. She has so much passion for the game, and she knows our individual strengths and weaknesses. She has so much energy, and she pumps us up,” senior Brianna Lakman said. The senior girls not only led the team but also took it upon themselves to become mentors to the underclassmen. “I know we have a big effort on them. They look up to us for sure. We always try to make them feel like one of us,” Lakman said. The underclassmen valued the leadership qualities of the seniors and hoped to someday develop the same characteristics. “They always stay positive. Even when we’re having a bad game, they motivate us to

“My favorite moment at Boone high school was downing a gallon of milk at Chugapolloza,” junior DANIEL BORRELL said.

COVERED Scan this code with your smart phone to access more pictures from the game against West Orange on Dec. 4.

girls volleyball163

PERFECT

Sneakers squeaking, and sweat streaking down acknowledged the positive effects of his face, junior Blake Sanderson sprinted toward team bonding on their season. the basket. Despite the distractions of the raucous “If you work together in a group, you crowd and the attempts of his opponents to stop can accomplish things better than [you him, he shot the three-pointer to perfection, just could] just [by] yourself,” Sanderson said. as he practiced a thousand times before. The players’ record was evidence of Though the boys basketball players valued their cooperation. They defeated Osceola, team practices, they knew their proficiency on 73-70, in the preseason and then beat the court also depended on the hours they spent Cypress Creek, 62-32; Colonial, 50-41; and practicing during the off-season. Winter Haven, 63-61. On Jan. 31, the team “You can lose your shot pretty quick if you struggled to conquer Edgewater, eventually don’t stay with it. [Year-round play] helps you emerging victorious, 67-66. stay in shape over the summer and just helps The team also traveled to Ocala you touch up on some of your skills,” senior to participate in the Kingdom of the Jeffrey Morgan said. Sun tournament Dec. 26-29, where the Of the 10 players on the team, six improved boys finished 3-1 by defeating Miami their skills through programs during the offSenior, Gainesville and Morgan County. season. These players, including Sanderson Additionally, senior Robert Rimmer received and Morgan, participated in Amateur the tournament’s “Mr. Hustle Award” for his Athletic Union club teams, to continue their three double-doubles during the competition. training during the summer and fall. These victories, however, were only possible Head coach Greg Shirley also offered the because of the sacrifices and dedication of players the opportunity to practice in the offthe players. While other student athletes season because he knew it would improve experienced the lull of relaxing off-seasons, the their skills, as well as foster camaraderie team trained year-round to perfect every layup, and stimulate better communication tip-off and pass. The effort individuals expended between players on the court. during outside league play benefited the entire “Players get more experience and team and garnered praise from fans, college exposure for colleges by being involved recruiters and the team’s own coach. year-round,” Shirley said. “[My favorite “[Our players] are willing to sacrifice part of coaching is] watching a group of individual success for the team’s success,” Shirley young men work together.” said. / / / content by AMELIA CHEATHAM and The team members also EMILY NUSBICKEL

a West Orange opponent’s efforts to block his pass. “Our Rowdy Crowd is awesome. They definitely give us an edge,” Irwin said. Irwin had 15 points and five rebounds in the game.

GARRETT FARBER

GOALS OF THE SEASON

“Average more rebounds per game, score more and be more aggressive.”

BEST ADVICE

“Work hard, and do your best every single day.”

BIGGEST INSPIRATION

“[To make the most of my moments], I try my hardest,” sophomore MYKAYLA JAMES said.

FAVORITE GAME

“Colonial, because I was able to score and I just had a good game.”

“The relationship with all the players, because you build a bond with them over the past four years. Playing with them is something I’ll miss.”

MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT

“When we went to the University of Florida camp and ended up winning the whole thing.”

166 sports

sophomore

senior

WHAT I’LL MISS

SEASON GOAL

“To win [states] and go undefeated at home.”

“My brother, because he played sports here and made it all the way to states, so he always pushes me.”

JEREMY BOUTON

SAMUEL DOSTER

senior

5, senior Robert Rimmer slam dunks the ball. “[I play basketball] because it is an escape from the pressure and stress of everyday life,” Rimmer said. Rimmer was one of two players in the history of the school to score over 1000 points during their high school basketball careers.

Y30. Sports spread: one spread

team prepared in off-season to refine skills and bond

Taylor eyes the basket in the game against West Orange. “I think we have the best student section in the state, and I like playing at home because it gives me energy to play harder,” Taylor said. Taylor had 505 points for the season.

PLAYER PROFILE

ON THE RIM. At the Winter Haven game on Jan.

This is page 162-163 in the Sports section of the book. I want this page to represent me because when I designed it I had to ensure that it had all the best elements of my section on it. Since I was on the volleyball team it was only fitting that I made it outstanding and I think they variety of elements really give it spice.

MADISON NAGLE

PRACTICE MAKES JUMP SHOT. As he leaps into the air, junior Barry

UNTOUCHABLE. Senior Robert Irwin dodges

KEEP AWAY. Searching for an open teammate to receive his pass, senior Dominique Wilson holds the ball out of Winter Haven opponent Mitch Long’s reach. “[My game strategy is] to go and stop the other team’s best player,” Wilson said. Wilson averaged 4.9 points per game.

do our best,” Layton said. “They’ve taught us not only how to be a good volleyball player but a good teammate as well.” The leadership of the seniors and the drive of the underclassmen contributed to an overall successful season for the team; however, ultimately, it was not enough to guarantee them a spot at states. During the season, the girls lost to Olympia, 1-3, but later defeated them, 3-1, in the regional quarter-finals. They beat Dr. Phillips during the season, 3-2, and in the district finals, 3-0, but fell short when they lost to them in the regional semi-finals, 1-3. “All I could ask was that my players gave 100 percent and tried their best,” Ladewski said. “This year has been my favorite team I’ve ever coached. I love seeing how the eight seniors have grown and how they have developed their leadership.” / / /content by

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

photos/Emily Nusbickel

162 sports

Y30. Sports spread: one spread

s oto Ph us ulo hab /P oto ph

her teammates from the sideline. “I encouraged the younger players and reminded the seniors that this was our last chance,” Neely said. FIGHT FOR A WIN AND A CAUSE. The team huddles up before their “Pinktober” game against Timber Creek on Oct. 11. “We all felt passionate about the cause, so we played our hardest and won,” sophomore Anna Farrell said. The girls wore pink jerseys to show their support for the fight against breast cancer. GET TIPSY. Senior Claire Lang tips the ball over the net. “[My senior year was memorable] because it was our last year playing, which motivated me to play harder,” Lang said. She finished the season with 68 kills. SUPER SERVE. In the game against Edgewater on Sept. 26, sophomore Gretchen Chevalier serves the ball into play.

ph oto /M ad iso nN ag le

Approximate number of firearms belonging to civilians in the U.S.

This is page 40-41 in the Student Life section. I’d like this piece to represent me because the in-depth design is very interesting and novel. I am the only one that can say that they designed it, and I take pride in that. I also like that my design made it into other sections and not just my own.

64%

of American households have guns

percent of Americans supported putting armed guards in all schools

MIL

Y28. Student Life spread: one spread

7 11 Points made in the

Points made in the season.

season.

SEASON GOAL

“Win [the] State Championship.”

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

GAME STRATEGY

3

Free throws made in the season.

“Just being able to share the ball and get everyone involved.”

boys basketball167

This is page 166-167 in the Sports section of the book. I like this page because I just feel like it has so much impact. I wish that all the pictures in my section showed this much action. The dominant really just demands your attention and I think the effect looks very nice. I also love all of the white space because I think it really adds to the design.


REFLECTION EIGHT REFLECTION EIGHT

My portfolio is tangible evidence of my growth in journalism this year. I have developed strong Photoshop skills, learned how to design for a section and helped produce a yearbook. Having my own section helped me to strengthen my skills in these areas. My biggest growth was defiently with design because the past two years I was working in someone else’s section. My portfolio this year illustrates how I have contributed more. This is especially evident in the clips section where you and see a decent amount of the spreads I designed. In my first portfolio I used a flower brush with a gradient. Now that I glance back over it I think it looks terrible though. Although my second time around I picked up my design a little and used some opacitys with personal pictures to illustrate my photography. As for this year I feel that my portfolio design is much more advanced, as it should be. I like that it isn’t overbearing, but it is something different and intriguing to look at. Designing with triangles is a trend right now, but I like how I was able to put my own spin on it. I think through the years my portfolios have shown a direct correlation to my growth in the class.


DESIGN DESIGN


CLIPS CLIPS


photo/Nathaniel Pagan

160 sports

photo/Courtney Patz

photo/Anna Marie Boria

photo/Courtney Patz

“My favorite moment was when I finally got a 94 on my Spanish test because it was really hard,” freshman TRINITY ALEXANDER said.

“I was excited for her; she swam really well,” coach Rosalie Creighton said. “She is such a hard worker, so she deserved to swim well.” After coming out on top in the 200, Cheatham had her mind on her next event: the 500 yard freestyle. She placed second with 5:41, just a second behind junior Allison Lindsey of Winter Park, who seized first. She returned to practice that week to prepare for the district meet after her success at metros. After qualifying for regionals last year, she hoped to duplicate the performance again at districts. She placed seventh in the 200 freestyle and sixth in the 500 freestyle, ultimately qualifying her for regionals. “I feel very blessed that all of my hard work over the years is paying off, and now I’m getting to reap the benefits,” Cheatham said.

meet: metros event: 200 and 500 Freestyle

Her stomach grew weak with apprehension just visualizing the metro swim meet. Sleepless nights characterized her week leading up to metros as she anticipated what lay ahead. “I was a nervous wreck. I hate big meets so much,” junior Amelia Cheatham said. Cheatham ranked eighth for the 200 yard freestyle going into districts. She took her place on the block, steadied her mind and waited for the buzzer to sound. Diving into the water, she swam her fastest to tie her personal record of 2:08 and steal first place. “I wasn’t expecting it because I was so out of shape over the summer, so I was really pleased to know that I could get to that point again,” Cheatham said. As her time flashed on the board, her teammates and coaches met her at the edge of the pool with excitement.

w i t h AMELIA CHEATHAM

Julia Hester swims the butterfly. “[I feel] free because it’s different than walking around on land, and it makes your body calm,” Hester said. BACK IT UP. Sophomore Talia Decant does the backstroke on Sept. 12, against Freedom High School. FLIP OUT. With her hand on the edge of the pool, senior Nichole Clayton does a turn. “[Breaking a personal record is] rewarding because you realize all your practicing and all the things you didn’t really want to be doing paid off,” Clayton said.

GASP. At the district meet, sophomore Tilley Van-Dyke swims the 200 IM. FLY AWAY. Stretching her arms, junior

photo/Anna Marie Boria

COVERED

girls swim161

Scan this code with your smart phone to access more pictures from the swim meet against Lake Nona.

we got you

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

At the conclusion of the last official practice of the “I don’t feel stressed about season, just prior to the district meet, coach Rosalie swimming like I did last year,” junior Creighton gave the girls the same advice she deemed Eleanor Clark said. “I still work necessary to their yearly success. hard, but our team has bonded better “She told us ‘close your eyes and picture your start because we work together to receive from the block to every flip turn and finally being the fun stuff.” able to look up and see the time you want’ before Together the coaches incorporated districts,” junior Kristen Harding said. incentives into their practice routines in The swimmers believed Creighton’s tactics an effort to encourage the swimmers. helped them mentally prepare for the meet. “They bribe us, like they’ll say ‘alright “It makes me believe that my time is possible, if you do this set really hard [then...],’ and if and I can actually see it coming to life,” Harding we meet our goals for the week then we get said. “It kind of goes along with tapering to do something fun,” Clark said. “We have because we practice hard all season for this a stronger foundation [because of it].” one moment, knowing we’re all at our full The activities included a relay in which the potential.” coaches required the swimmers to do the dog Practices the week before districts paddle and swim freestyle backwards. consisted of tapering, a strategy in which “They had fun [with it], and it’s good to Creighton reduced the workload the do something other than [just] swimming swimmers endured to ensure the girls sometimes,” Creighton said. were at their primes for the district meet. Strategies like these prepared the team for “[Tapering] takes our mind off of success at districts. Clark qualified for regionals in [districts] to the point where we’re not the 50 freestyle, 100 freestyle, 200 medley relay and stressed anymore, so that when districts 200 freestyle relay. The other members of the relays come we are relaxed,” Harding said. were juniors Amelia Cheatham and Julia Hester and Creighton and the new assistant senior Nichole Clayton. coach, Kimberley Porterfield, “I do better personally when my mind is at ease, strove to ensure that regular season and this year I don’t feel as much pressure,” Clark said. practices and meets were enjoyable. / / /content by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

coach left players with inspiring words in the presence of district meet

ENVISIONSF I N I S H

TEAM

photo illustration/Delaney Arkeilpane and Emily Nusbickel

The night before the regional me team had et the a pasta din ner togeth er.

FLIP FRENZY. At practice, junior Catherine Harper transitions from a turn to the butterfly. “When I’m swimming, I can’t focus on anyone else, so it calms me down from a stressful day at school,” Harper said. Harper swam 1:14.91 in the 100 butterfly at the district meet on Oct. 26.

WHATS MINE: • Story • Captions • Photography • Design • Alternative Coverage •

Writing


154 sports

b co Ja o/ ot ph

AARON TURMAN, SENIOR

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“Savor the moments, and realize that you’re never going to get high school moments back, so cherish them,” senior TRAVIS SNETHEN said.

RUN, AJ, RUN. Ball in hands, senior Aaron Turman rushes in the game against Timber Creek. “[It] feels good to play football because it’s a team sport. In order to be successful, you have to work together,” Turman said. Turman broke the school’s and metro area’s 4,000 yard rushing records, totaling 4,867 yards in his high school career.

ph ot o/ Ph ab ulo us Ph ot os

rd lla Ba

TOTAL PUNTS: 25

rd lla Ba

RETURN YARDS: 302

BLAKE ORVIS, SENIOR

Under the lights, there was a war. Its soldiers, dressed in orange and white, fought for the record, playoffs and sustained morale. With two big wins early in the season against West Orange, 37-34, and Winter Park, 44-26, the football team started strong. Yet its drive faltered when it lost three straight games against Timber Creek, 7-30; Wekiva, 28-29; and Dr. Phillips, 6-23. These losses affected the boys’ morale as they saw their once momentous season fall. “[The losses are] very disappointing because it’s [coach Phil Ziglar’s] last year. But we overcame many obstacles. We’re really close with him this season, and we wanted to finish his legacy with a winning record,” junior Quentin Martin said. The team hoped to compete in playoffs, so it could make Ziglar’s last season a winning one. Faced with adversities like injuries, illnesses and a loss against Dr.

TOTAL TACKLES: 35

DEVIN THOMAS, SENIOR

TOTAL TACKLES: 41

THOMAS BABB, SENIOR

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

football155

being upbeat before practices. Coaches [were] getting on players to get plays right, not be negative, be positive [and] to not give up,” Martin said. Their strategy of maintaining positivity and not letting the record affect them worked when the boys defeated Ocoee, 30-23; Cypress Creek, 41-22; and Edgewater, 13-12. Ultimately, these three additional wins at the end of the season showed the players they could overcome obstacles and they helped them realize how they improved as a team. “We [have to go] out there and play football and just be an athlete and not have the stress of winning,” senior Jason Fennimore said. They ended the season with a final record of 6-5. As the lights turned off there wasn’t a single soldier was on the field. But the war continued, as the soldiers readied for their next battle. / / / content by JACOB BALLARD

LIGHTS Phillips, making their record 2-4, the boys saw the opportunity of playoffs disappear. “We had a lot of players who were sick, and we let that overcome us,” wide receiver coach Richard Houston said. The team became unsatisfied with what it accomplished but regained momentum to make the rest of the season a successful one. “It was a huge goal to make playoffs. Sure we’re disappointed, yet we regrouped to make the best of the season,” Houston said. Players and coaches alike knew that if they allowed a losing record and not making playoffs to affect their performance, the season would be over. In order to maintain spirit, players sustained the hype as if they were experiencing a winning season. Players and coaches went to every practice enthusiastic and encouraged others to be excited about attending the workout. “[The team kept morale high by] always

varsity overcame low morale

RECEIVING YARDS: 102

CALVIN SMITH, JUNIOR

FRIDAY

RECEIVING YARDS: 445

DONTRAYVIS WESLEY, SENIOR

JOHN TOWNSEND, SENIOR

b co Ja o/ ot ph

season was] the last game, [against] Edgewater, because it meant so much for the seniors and coaches, and we got the barrel back,” Brock said. Brock had 38 tackles for the season. HAND OFF. In the backfield, senior Blake Williams hands the ball to running back Aaron Turman. “[What I can improve on as a quarterback is] staying composed under pressure and staying tall in the pocket,” Williams said. Williams had two pass touchdowns and ran for a touchdown in the game against Freedom on Oct. 18. GOLDEN CATCH. In warm-ups before the Winter Park game on Sept. 14, senior Fabio Hediger runs the ball down the field. “It’s great to be under the lights. It’s definitely going to be missed by us [seniors],” Hediger said. Hediger had 10 assists for the season. BRING ‘EM OUT. Before the Winter Park game, junior Tarik Darden runs through the pre-game banner with the rest of the team. “[My biggest accomplishment was] playing for coach [Phil] Ziglar because there’s no coach like him,” Darden said.

PUMPED UP KICKS. In the game against Wekiva on Sept. 28, junior Stephen Brock punts the ball. “[My favorite part of the

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Design

photo/Emily Nusbickel


“[To make the most of my moments], I try my hardest,” sophomore MYKAYLA JAMES said.

5, senior Robert Rimmer slam dunks the ball. “[I play basketball] because it is an escape from the pressure and stress of everyday life,” Rimmer said. Rimmer was one of two players in the history of the school to score over 1000 points during their high school basketball careers.

ON THE RIM. At the Winter Haven game on Jan.

KEEP AWAY. Searching for an open teammate to receive his pass, senior Dominique Wilson holds the ball out of Winter Haven opponent Mitch Long’s reach. “[My game strategy is] to go and stop the other team’s best player,” Wilson said. Wilson averaged 4.9 points per game.

Scan this code with your smart phone to access more pictures from the game against West Orange on Dec. 4.

COVERED

166 sports

we got you

“My brother, because he played sports here and made it all the way to states, so he always pushes me.”

BIGGEST INSPIRATION

“When we went to the University of Florida camp and ended up winning the whole thing.”

MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT

“To win [states] and go undefeated at home.”

SEASON GOAL

senior

GARRETT FARBER

PERFECT

season.

senior

design by DELANEY ARKEILPANE

“Win [the] State Championship.”

SEASON GOAL

“Work hard, and do your best every single day.”

BEST ADVICE

“The relationship with all the players, because you build a bond with them over the past four years. Playing with them is something I’ll miss.”

WHAT I’LL MISS

SAMUEL DOSTER

GAME STRATEGY

“Just being able to share the ball and get everyone involved.”

“Average more rebounds per game, score more and be more aggressive.”

GOALS OF THE SEASON

boys basketball167

Free throws made in the season.

3

sophomore

“Colonial, because I was able to score and I just had a good game.”

FAVORITE GAME

JEREMY BOUTON

Sneakers squeaking, and sweat streaking down acknowledged the positive effects of his face, junior Blake Sanderson sprinted toward team bonding on their season. the basket. Despite the distractions of the raucous “If you work together in a group, you crowd and the attempts of his opponents to stop can accomplish things better than [you him, he shot the three-pointer to perfection, just could] just [by] yourself,” Sanderson said. as he practiced a thousand times before. The players’ record was evidence of Though the boys basketball players valued their cooperation. They defeated Osceola, team practices, they knew their proficiency on 73-70, in the preseason and then beat the court also depended on the hours they spent Cypress Creek, 62-32; Colonial, 50-41; and practicing during the off-season. Winter Haven, 63-61. On Jan. 31, the team “You can lose your shot pretty quick if you struggled to conquer Edgewater, eventually don’t stay with it. [Year-round play] helps you emerging victorious, 67-66. stay in shape over the summer and just helps The team also traveled to Ocala you touch up on some of your skills,” senior to participate in the Kingdom of the Jeffrey Morgan said. Sun tournament Dec. 26-29, where the Of the 10 players on the team, six improved boys finished 3-1 by defeating Miami their skills through programs during the offSenior, Gainesville and Morgan County. season. These players, including Sanderson Additionally, senior Robert Rimmer received and Morgan, participated in Amateur the tournament’s “Mr. Hustle Award” for his Athletic Union club teams, to continue their three double-doubles during the competition. training during the summer and fall. These victories, however, were only possible Head coach Greg Shirley also offered the because of the sacrifices and dedication of players the opportunity to practice in the offthe players. While other student athletes season because he knew it would improve experienced the lull of relaxing off-seasons, the their skills, as well as foster camaraderie team trained year-round to perfect every layup, and stimulate better communication tip-off and pass. The effort individuals expended between players on the court. during outside league play benefited the entire “Players get more experience and team and garnered praise from fans, college exposure for colleges by being involved recruiters and the team’s own coach. year-round,” Shirley said. “[My favorite “[Our players] are willing to sacrifice part of coaching is] watching a group of individual success for the team’s success,” Shirley young men work together.” said. / / / content by AMELIA CHEATHAM and The team members also EMILY NUSBICKEL

team prepared in off-season to refine skills and bond

7 11 Points made in the Points made in the season.

PLAYER PROFILE

a West Orange opponent’s efforts to block his pass. “Our Rowdy Crowd is awesome. They definitely give us an edge,” Irwin said. Irwin had 15 points and five rebounds in the game.

UNTOUCHABLE. Senior Robert Irwin dodges

Taylor eyes the basket in the game against West Orange. “I think we have the best student section in the state, and I like playing at home because it gives me energy to play harder,” Taylor said. Taylor had 505 points for the season.

JUMP SHOT. As he leaps into the air, junior Barry

PRACTICE MAKES

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photos/Emily Nusbickel


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Photography


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Photography


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Photography


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Multimedia http://teacherpress.ocps.net/hilights/2013/03/20/boys-ace-competition/versity/


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Delaney Arkeilpane 2013