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W E I V E R P


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Introduction By Eldon L. “Buck ”Buckner Vice President of Big Game Records (Boone and Crockett Club)

I

n 1902 Theodore Roosevelt, Caspar Whitney and Archibald Rogers were appointed to a “Committee for Measurement of Trophies” for the purpose of establishing a uniform standard of measurement for big game of North America. In 1906, under the direction of James Hathaway Kidder, this became the “Committee on Big Game Measurements,” which published Big Game Measurements: Game Book of the Boone and Crockett Club that same year. While not a records book, per se, this rare volume prescribed and illustrated the measuring procedures for various species, which evolved into the measuring system in use today. The 13th Edition of Records of North American Big Game represents the culmination of 108 years of effort by Boone and Crockett Club to measure and keep records of North American big game. This book lists 5,690 new entries, including five new World’s Records. Credit for much of the work involved with obtaining data on these trophies must go to the 1,314 B&C Official Measurers who volunteer their valuable time scoring trophies and helping fellow hunters with their entry requirements. Readers will find a full explanation and detailed analysis of the current trophy listings in Jack Reneau’s introduction to the tabulated entries section of this book. This edition is the first to list gross scores of entries in addition to B&C official scores by which all trophies are ranked. Boone and Crockett Club was founded on the premise of wildlife conservation, and this edition includes chapters on current issues of interest to hunters.

Opposite: A page from the 1906 Club publication Big Game Measurements: Game Book of the Boone and Crockett Club. Measuring techniques have evolved since this first measurer’s manual was published.

Fair chase was and is a fundamental tenet of Boone and Crockett Club. Wayne van Zwoll is a Professional Member, well-known author of several books on hunting and firearms and has written numerous magazine columns and articles on these subjects. He does an outstanding job of discussing the factors that make hunting such a special, personally rewarding experience and why too much technology can detract from it. The Equal Access to Justice Act was enacted in 1980 to enable private citizens and small businesses to be reimbursed for litigation costs when they prevail in disputes with government agencies. Boone and Crockett Club Past President Lowell E. Baier explains how certain non-profit organizations have abused this law, collected millions of dollars of public funds, all while preventing land management agencies, such as the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service, from accomplishing their work. He goes on to discuss the recently introduced Government Litigation Savings Act, intended to correct such previous abuse, and explains why sportsmen-conservationists should be concerned. Lead in ammunition and fishing tackle has become an important issue to sportsmen and government agencies in recent years, with no acceptable resolution to perceived problems and little unbiased information available to the public. Rebecca Humphries, B&C Professional Member, teamed with B&C Professor William F. Porter at Michigan

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State University and two research assistants to prepare a summary of several studies involving the affects of lead on both human and wildlife health. Many hunters and most wildlife biologist are aware that caribou populations of all subspecies (with the possible exception of the mountain variety) have been decreasing rapidly in recent years. B&C Professional Member Shane Mahoney of Newfoundland is internationally recognized as an inspirational champion of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation. He presents an overview of Newfoundland’s research efforts to determine the causes for the diminished numbers of woodland caribou. Quality habitat produces healthy big game animals able to achieve their maximum genetic potential. The color section in this edition features North America’s big game animals in examples of quality habitat for their species. An increasingly urbanized population creates greater demands for energy and space. Coupled with a seemingly growing lack of understanding

of the connection between life and earth’s natural resources, this metamorphosis will result in even greater challenges to biologists and hunter conservationists in the future. It will require greater commitment and effective use of increased knowledge from all of us to ensure future generations the opportunity to experience the personal satisfactions of big game hunting. Eldon L. “Buck” Buckner is the current Vice President of Big Game Records and Chairman of the Boone and Crockett Club’s Records of North American Big Game Committee. First appointed an Official Measurer in 1968 while serving as a U.S. Forest Service range conservationist in Arizona, Buck has served as Judges Panel Chairman, Consultant, and Judge for Boone and Crockett Club’s Awards Programs since 1989. He is also a co-founder and member of the board of directors of the Jack O’Connor Hunting Heritage and Education Center in Lewiston, Idaho. He is also the Oregon State Director for the NRA Youth Hunter Education Challenge Program.

Opposite: Wayne van Zwoll does an outstanding job of discussing the factors that make hunting such a special, personally rewarding experience and why too much technology can detract from it. The fair chase art of hunting is studying the game and its habitat, and using that knowledge to your advantage.

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Table of Contents Records of North A merican Big Game Thirteenth Edition — 2011

Foreword by Ben B. Wallace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Introduction by Eldon L. “Buck” Buckner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Chapter 1: Newfoundland’s Woodland Caribou: Science and Management for a Declining Population by Colleen E. Soulliere and Shane Mahoney . . . . . . . . . . 3 Chapter 2: What’s Fair. And Not. Is it time to rebalance the scales tipped by ATVs, lasers, cell phones, and other “hunting” hardware? by Wayne van Zwoll . . . . . . 13 Chapter 3: Lead Ammunition Finding an Optimal Solution to a Problem with Many Dimensions by Rebecca Humphries, William F. Porter, Shawna Hanisch, and Andrea Bowling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chapter 4: Reforming the Equal Access to Justice Act The Government Litigation Savings Act of 2011 by Lowell E. Baier . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Chapter 5: General Policies of the Boone and Crockett Club’s Big Game Records Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Chapter 6: Great Wildlife Needs Great Habitat by Tony A. Schoonen and Justin E. Spring 49 Tabulations of Recorded Trophies by Jack Reneau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Black Bear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

Boundaries for Grizzly Bear and Alaska Brown Bear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

Grizzly Bear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Alaska Brown Bear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

Polar Bear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Jaguar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Cougar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

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Atlantic Walrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

Pacific Walrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

Boundaries for Elk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

American Elk – Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179

American Elk – Non-typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197

Roosevelt’s Elk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207

Tule Elk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219

Mule Deer – Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225

Mule Deer – Non-typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251


Boundaries for Blacktail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271

Columbia Blacktail Deer – Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275

Columbia Blacktail Deer – Non-typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295

Sitka Blacktail Deer – Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299

Sitka Blacktail Deer – Non-typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307

Whitetail Deer – Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311

Whitetail Deer – Non-typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387

Coues’ Whitetail Deer – Typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443

Coues’ Whitetail Deer – Non-typical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455

Canada Moose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461

Alaska-Yukon Moose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479

Shiras’ Moose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492

Boundaries for Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513

Mountain Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517

Woodland Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531

Barren Ground Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 541

Central Canada Barren Ground Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 561

Quebec-Labrador Caribou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571

Pronghorn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Bison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631

Rocky Mountain Goat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 643

Musk Ox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663

Bighorn Sheep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677

Desert Sheep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703

Dall’s Sheep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 721

Stone’s Sheep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 731

Appendix

General Measuring Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 745

Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 752

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What’s Fair. And Not. Is it time to rebalance the scales tipped by ATVs, lasers, cell phones, and other “hunting” hardware? Wayne van Zwoll (B&C Professional Member)

K

illing without intimacy is, I imagine, like donating sperm. I’ve killed from a distance and killed up close. Close is better. Especially when you get there without help. Close isn’t the same as sure (I once missed a deer at 14 feet with a rifle). But close puts you on-stage; you’re no longer hidden in the back row but have crept up under the lights, where you needn’t do anything wrong to get ejected. Just being where you are is wrong; as soon as you’re noticed, the jig is up.

Before they figured out how to hurl things, hunters and warriors were compelled to get close. The resulting dust-ups guaranteed excitement and injury. Killing from afar with rocks, spears, and boomerangs was less thrilling, but safer and easier. These devices had limited range, however, because they depended on the unassisted power of the human arm. The atlatl, the sling, and the bow added mechanical advantage. By some accounts 15,000 years old, the bow earned its place in European history at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Normans fooled their English foes with a false retreat, then drove arrows into oncoming troops to win the day. Robin Hood proved the longbow on the king’s deer. But the poachers of Sherwood Forest (hung with their bowstrings when caught) were pardoned if they agreed to join the king’s bowmen. At Crecy (1346) and Agincourt (1415), English archers trounced the French army. So effective was the bow in North America that many tribes stayed with it after the appearance of firearms. Many arrows could be loosed in the time required to re-charge a musket; bows and arrows could be fashioned in the field. “Bigfoot” Walker, the Texas Ranger who helped design Colt’s

Opposite: Satisfaction in killing depends on the effort invested in the hunt. A shot simply ends the chase.

4-pound Walker revolver, respected the Plains Indian and his bow. “[Indians] can shoot their arrows faster than you can fire a revolver, and almost with the accuracy of a rifle at the distance of 50 or 60 yards.” By the early 1800s, gunmakers had begun re-configuring the slender Kentucky rifle. They made it sturdier and gave it a bigger bore. During this transition in rifle design, General W.H. Ashley, head of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, devised the rendezvous to collect furs from trappers on the frontier. Tons of pelts funneled into St. Louis. Among the flood of Easterners pinning their fortunes to the fur trade were brothers Jacob and Samuel Hawkins. Changing their name to the original Dutch “Hawken,” they opened a St. Louis gun shop in 1822. A Hawken plains rifle typically wore double-set triggers and a slow-twist 50-caliber octagonal barrel of soft iron. Hunters claimed kills to 300 yards. Hawken rifles would survive the next great development in firearms. “Where is the military genius [to] modify the science of war as to best develop the capacities of this terrible engine—the exclusive use of which would enable any government … to rule the world?” In an appeal to the U.S. Government, Oliver Winchester so described his rimfire Henry—the Civil War phenomenon Confederate soldiers called “the rifle you loaded on Sunday and fired all week.” Repeat-

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ing rifles would change hunting as dramatically as they changed warfare.

Tipping point The middle of the 19th century saw huge advances in firearms. Many inventors chased repeating mechanisms; Christian Sharps pursued a better single-shot. Market hunter George Reighard owned two Sharps rifles, with telescopic sights. In a 1930 edition of the Kansas City Star, he told how he shot bison: “In 1872 I organized my own outfit…. I furnished the team and wagon and did the killing. (My partners) furnished the supplies and did the skinning, stretching and cooking…. “The time I made my biggest kill I lay on a slight ridge, behind a tuft of weeds 100 yards from a bunch of a thousand buffaloes that had come a long distance to a creek, had drunk their fill and then strolled out upon the prairie…. After I had killed about twenty-five my gun barrel became hot and began to expand, … so I put that gun aside and took the other. By the time that became hot … the powder smoke in front of me was so thick I could not see through it … I had to crawl backward, dragging my two guns, and work around to another position on the ridge, from which I killed fifty-four more. In one and one-half hours I had fired ninety-one shots … and had killed seventynine buffaloes….” By the early 1880s, so many bison had been killed that human scavengers would glean more than three million tons of bones from the plains. These days sportsmen wince at such carnage. It’s not what we do now. Big game and its habitat have thrived under management initiated and funded by hunters. But as the excesses of the 19th century resulted partly from the mass production of efficient firearms, so the killing of game in the 21st century is threatened by recent developments in hunting hardware. High-velocity cartridges date to the early 20th century. During the 1940s and 1950s many more

Opposite: The experience of the hunt matters more in memory than the possession of antlers.

appeared. They were paired with accurate rifles and powerful optics, extending lethal reach well beyond average hunting ranges. Some riflemen now boast of long shots as if, in hunting, marksmanship trumps woodsmanship, and owning the deadliest hardware beats both. While the notion of fair chase can hardly exclude long shooting, it does presume first-shot kills. Ethically, a shot makes the grade if it brings quick death. Clean kills follow sure shots—those you make with regularity. The less likely a center hit, the more likely a crippling hit. Distance is just one factor affecting accuracy. Your rifle and ammo and skill matter. So do your shooting position, the conditions and target angle. On a bipod or a pack prone, with no wind, you might make a 400-yard shot confidently. Offhand in a gusty breeze, 60 yards can seem very long. My standard: If on paper I could make nine hits in 10 tries, it’s a shot to take. Otherwise I decline.

Evidence to convict To most sportsmen the hunt is more than a killing exercise. It is an intense personal experience, with deep roots in tradition. It imposes physical challenge. It tests resolve and woodsmanship. It is also hard to explain to people with no connection to hunting. The uninitiated can dismiss it—or rail against it—as a display of male aggression, legalized violence, a camaraderie borrowed from cavemen. They cite not only sophisticated gear, but methods that make the chase easier and more often successful. Critics point out that hunting might qualify as food procurement, even wildlife management. “But it isn’t sport.” As commonly understood, sport is a contest that gives competitors equal chances to prevail. Rewards for the winner and consequences for the loser are the same, no matter the outcome. Hunting isn’t like that. Sometimes the animal has every advantage, and a shot is rare. Some conditions favor the hunter, and a kill is all but certain. Whether a shot happens or not, whether or not it’s a lethal hit, the hunter lives on. The game survives only when he fails. So fair chase is not always fair. At its best, hunting gives the animal more than an even chance to live. The hunter voluntarily puts himself at a disadvantage. Without a self-imposed handicap, the hunter may succeed as predator, but not as sportsman. Antlers are no prize if they come

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Whitetail Deer – Typical Antlers Odocoileus virginianus virginianus and related subspecies Story of the World’s Record

W

orking long days as a grain and cattle farmer in Biggar, Saskatchewan, Milo N. Hanson is not a man who has the time or money to hunt all over the continent, but then again he hasn’t had to go that far. Hunting on his property in 1992, Hanson ended up reaping more from his fields than the usual autumn harvest. B&C SCORE

Trophy Info

“On the night of November 22, we had fresh snow, and I called the guys to plan our hunt. The next morning, I met my neighbor John Yaroshko and we drove to meet Walter Meger and Rene Igini. When we pulled up I knew something was happening because they were excited. They said they spotted the monster buck entering a willow run and not coming out. “Rene walked the track while the rest of us surrounded the willows. I took a position that would keep the buck from running south onto nearby posted land. The buck bolted, giving me my first look at it. Believe me, my heart was pumping! We shot but missed it. “Rene stayed on its tracks, and eventually lost the buck in a maze of other deer tracks because its tracks weren’t large. Just when we were getting frustrated and ready to move on, the big buck ran out of an aspen bluff and headed into a willow run on my land. We posted ourselves around the willows, and Rene walked the buck’s tracks. The buck ran flat out about 150 yards broadside from John and me. I think we both got buck fever this time! We fired several shots but missed the racing buck. “We moved up to the next willow run, and when the buck ran out it turned straight away from me. I fired and the buck went down to its knees. ‘You got him!’ John hollered. “The buck got up and ran into a nearby as-

213-5/8 points

pen bluff. I ran up the hill to where LOCATION it disappeared, and saw it below me, Biggar, SK standing still. I aimed through my HUNTER 4-power scope and fired another shot Milo N. Hanson with my .308 Winchester Model 88 OWNER lever-action. Down it went. I saw its Milo N. Hanson head over a clump of willows. To enDATE KILLED sure it stayed down, I fired another 1993 shot and the hunt ended. “Shooting this buck gave me a feeling I will probably never experience again, even though I had no idea it would be declared the new Boone and Crockett Club World’s Record in Dallas, Texas, at the 22nd Big Game Awards Program. I had never seen a bigger buck. The buck left me shaking.” Life on the farm took a turn. Following prepreliminary measurements that put the whitetail in the running for the new World’s Record, Hanson found his home under siege from journalists, promoters, collectors, and well-wishers. After the 60-day drying period, Norm Parchewsky, Robert Allemand, and Allan Holtvogt, all Boone and Crockett official measurers, scored the buck at 213-1/8 in a scoring ceremony attended by more than 400 people. At the 22nd Big Game Awards Program, the Boone and Crockett Club Judges’ Panel declared Hanson’s buck the new World’s Record typical whitetail with a final and official score of 213-5/8 points.

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Top Ten Whitetail Deer – Typical Antlers

No. 1 – 213-5/8 points M ilo N. H anson – 1993

No. 5 – 204-2/8 points S tephen Jansen – 1967

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No. 2 – 206-1/8 points James Jordan – 1914

No. 6 – 203-3/8 points Hubert Collins – 2003

No. 7 – 202-6/8 points Bruce E wen – 1992


No. 3 – 205 points L arry W. Gibson – 1971

No. 8 – 202 points John A. Breen – 1918

No. 4 – 204-4/8 points M elvin J. Johnson – 1965

No. 9 – 201-4/8 points Wayne A. Bills – 1974

No. 10 – 201-1/8 points Bradley S. Jerman – 2004

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Whitetail Deer - Typical |

Odocoileus virginianus virginianus et al .

|M

inimum

Circumference Between Length of Burr and Number Final Gross Main Beam Inside 1st Point of Points Score Score R L Spread R L R L Locality Killed Hunter Owner 213 5 /8 223 7/8 28 4 /8 28 4 /8 27 2 /8 4 6 /8 5 8 6 Biggar, SK Milo N. Hanson 206 1 /8 209 3 /8 30 30 20 1 /8 6 2 /8 6 1 /8 5 5 Burnett Co., WI James Jordan 4 6 4 2 6 6 205 213 /8 26 /8 25 /8 24 /8 4 /8 4 /8 6 6 Randolph Co., MO Larry W. Gibson 204 4 /8 212 7/8 27 5 /8 26 6 /8 23 5 /8 6 1 /8 6 2 /8 7 6 Peoria Co., IL Melvin J. Johnson 204 2 /8 231 4 /8 26 4 /8 22 6 /8 25 1 /8 5 1 /8 5 1 /8 7 10 Beaverdam Creek, AB Stephen Jansen 203 3 /8 208 4 /8 25 7/8 27 2 /8 19 3 /8 5 7/8 5 5 /8 6 6 Sturgeon River, SK Hubert Collins 202 6 /8 216 4 /8 28 27 1 /8 21 2 /8 5 3 /8 5 3 /8 9 8 Barrier Valley, SK Bruce Ewen 202 223 3 /8 31 2 /8 31 23 5 /8 5 7/8 6 8 8 Beltrami Co., MN John A. Breen 201 4 /8 216 1 /8 27 5 /8 29 1 /8 23 5 5 /8 5 2 /8 6 6 Hamilton Co., IA Wayne A. Bills 201 1 /8 209 7/8 29 6 /8 29 24 1 /8 5 5 6 5 Warren Co., OH Bradley S. Jerman 7 2 2 5 5 7 201 217 /8 26 /8 26 /8 15 /8 4 /8 4 /8 8 6 Kittson Co., MN Wayne G. Stewart 200 3 /8 224 4 /8 28 1 /8 27 2 /8 24 7/8 4 4 /8 4 6 /8 8 9 Stevens Co., WA James Cartwright 200 2 /8 214 2 /8 26 3 /8 27 1 /8 24 5 4 7/8 6 7 Whitkow, SK Peter J. Swistun 200 2 /8 232 32 32 4 /8 28 3 /8 5 4 /8 5 3 /8 9 8 Macon Co., IL Brian S. Damery 199 5 /8 204 3 /8 30 1 /8 28 29 1 /8 5 3 /8 5 3 /8 6 6 Edmonton, AB Don McGarvey 199 4 /8 211 5 /8 27 2 /8 26 2 /8 20 5 4 /8 5 1 /8 8 5 Clark Co., MO Jeffrey A. Brunk 199 3 /8 204 7/8 27 3 /8 27 4 /8 22 3 /8 4 4 /8 4 6 /8 6 7 Missoula Co., MT Thomas H. Dellwo 2 2 7 6 1 199 /8 206 /8 28 /8 29 25 /8 5 5 /8 6 6 Lake of the Vernon Jensen Woods Co., MN 199 2 /8 203 6 /8 27 27 1 /8 21 4 /8 5 2 /8 5 5 5 Flathead Co., MT Kent Petry 199 2 /8 211 7/8 27 2 /8 27 1 /8 21 3 /8 6 5 7/8 6 7 Kansas Picked Up

Score: 170

Date Killed Rank

Milo N. Hanson Bass Pro Shops MO Show-Me Big Bucks Club Bass Pro Shops Stephen Jansen Hubert Collins Bass Pro Shops Bass Pro Shops Bass Pro Shops Bradley S. Jerman Wayne G. Stewart Bass Pro Shops Bass Pro Shops Bass Pro Shops Don McGarvey Jeffrey A. Brunk Bass Pro Shops Vernon Jensen Bass Pro Shops KS Dept. of Wildlife & Parks

1993 1914 1971

1 2 3

1965 1967 2003 1992 1918 1974 2004 1961 1992 1983 1993 1991 1969 1974 1954

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 13 15 16 17 18

1966 1999

18 18

Bradley S. Jerman

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— Received a Sagamore Hill Award


WHITETAIL DEER – TYPICAL Circumference Between Length of Burr and Number Final Gross Main Beam Inside 1st Point of Points Score Score R L Spread R L R L Locality Killed Hunter Owner 198 6 /8 203 3 /8 26 6 /8 26 6 /8 21 5 /8 4 1 /8 4 1 /8 6 5 Lewis Co., MO Daryl L. Blum 198 6 /8 215 5 /8 28 5 /8 27 1 /8 20 1 /8 4 4 /8 4 2 /8 9 8 White Co., IL Joseph B. Girten 3 4 5 4 1 6 6 198 /8 221 /8 29 /8 29 /8 18 /8 4 /8 4 /8 6 8 Allegany Co., NY Roosevelt Luckey 3 1 7 4 7 7 198 /8 220 /8 26 /8 26 19 /8 4 /8 4 /8 7 7 Muskingum Co., OH Timothy E. Reed 198 3 /8 202 4 /8 26 25 2 /8 21 7/8 4 6 /8 4 7/8 6 6 Good Spirit Lake, SK Blaine D. Kreps 198 2 /8 214 2 /8 27 5 /8 26 7/8 20 2 /8 5 5 6 8 Nemaha Co., KS Dennis P. Finger 198 1 /8 235 29 7/8 29 4 /8 19 5 /8 4 6 /8 4 7/8 9 8 Decatur Co., IA Kenneth Tilford 198 1 /8 201 4 /8 31 1 /8 30 4 /8 20 7/8 5 4 /8 5 3 /8 5 5 Greene Co., IL Charles Q. Rives 198 221 1 /8 29 2 /8 29 4 /8 20 2 /8 5 2 /8 5 1 /8 9 7 Jackson Co., MI Troy A. Stephens 197 7/8 219 27 4 /8 27 2 /8 19 4 /8 4 6 /8 4 6 /8 8 9 Assiniboine River, MB Larry H. MacDonald 197 6 /8 219 2 /8 29 2 /8 30 20 4 /8 5 6 /8 5 7/8 6 5 Wright Co., MN Curtis F. Van Lith 197 6 /8 226 30 26 7/8 18 7/8 5 7/8 6 7 10 Kenosha Co., WI Keith S. Brossard 197 5 /8 210 7/8 27 2 /8 27 5 /8 21 6 /8 5 2 /8 5 4 /8 7 8 Wood Co., WI Joe Haske 197 3 /8 213 6 /8 29 1 /8 29 7/8 21 5 1 /8 5 2 /8 9 7 Mann Lakes, AB Lawrence J. Youngman 197 2 /8 214 3 /8 25 4 /8 27 2 /8 32 5 2 /8 5 3 /8 6 7 Comanche Co., KS Picked Up 197 1 /8 231 31 29 7/8 21 2 /8 6 1 /8 6 5 /8 7 7 Macoupin Co., IL Kevin L. Naugle 196 6 /8 224 29 6 /8 29 21 5 2 /8 5 6 /8 6 8 Kane Co., IL Ray Schremp 196 4 /8 212 7/8 28 6 /8 27 5 /8 24 2 /8 4 6 /8 4 6 /8 8 6 Maverick Co., TX Tom McCulloch 4 1 4 5 5 196 /8 211 27 26 /8 22 /8 4 /8 4 /8 8 7 Des Moines Co., IA Michael R. Edle 196 3 /8 208 3 /8 28 7/8 30 5 /8 22 1 /8 6 5 /8 7 7 5 Plymouth Co., IA Picked Up 196 3 /8 201 5 /8 25 7/8 26 1 /8 23 1 /8 5 4 /8 5 4 /8 5 5 Fulton Co., IL Roger H. Mann 196 1 /8 211 4 /8 27 1 /8 26 4 /8 24 5 /8 4 6 /8 4 6 /8 8 9 McMullen Co., TX Milton P. George 195 7/8 199 6 /8 26 4 /8 27 1 /8 21 1 /8 4 1 /8 4 1 /8 6 6 Anoka Co., MN Barry Peterson 195 5 /8 208 1 /8 28 4 /8 27 6 /8 22 1 /8 5 6 /8 5 7/8 6 7 Marshall Co., MN Robert Sands 195 5 /8 212 1 /8 33 6 /8 33 1 /8 22 7/8 6 2 /8 6 1 /8 8 7 Indiana Dave Roberts 5 6 4 5 7 6 7 195 /8 212 /8 29 /8 27 /8 18 /8 4 /8 4 /8 9 8 Rock Island Co., IL Kent E. Anderson 195 4 /8 215 2 /8 25 3 /8 25 7/8 19 4 7/8 4 7/8 9 7 Porcupine Plain, SK Philip Philipowich 195 2 /8 203 1 /8 28 6 /8 28 2 /8 20 6 /8 5 1 /8 5 6 6 Pierce Co., ND Kevin L. Bruner 195 1 /8 197 3 /8 28 6 /8 28 4 /8 20 3 /8 4 7/8 5 5 5 Parke Co., IN B. Dodd Porter 195 1 /8 213 3 /8 25 6 /8 28 1 /8 19 6 /8 5 2 /8 5 2 /8 8 5 Brightsand Lake, SK Larry Pellerin 194 7/8 207 5 /8 26 7/8 27 2 /8 23 1 /8 6 1 /8 5 6 /8 7 7 Leavenworth Co., KS William R. Mikijanis 194 4 /8 207 1 /8 25 7/8 25 6 /8 18 6 /8 5 1 /8 5 2 /8 7 7 Monroe Co., IA Lloyd Goad 194 4 /8 221 4 /8 26 2 /8 26 18 7/8 5 6 /8 5 4 /8 8 9 Nipawin, SK Gerald Whitehead 194 3 /8 199 4 /8 29 1 /8 28 6 /8 23 5 /8 5 1 /8 5 1 /8 5 5 Warren Co., IA Forest H. Richardson 2 6 5 6 194 /8 203 /8 26 /8 25 21 4 /8 5 6 6 Jones Co., IA Unknown 194 2 /8 226 1 /8 30 6 /8 30 3 /8 24 7/8 5 3 /8 5 2 /8 9 7 Vigo Co., IN D. Bates & S. Winkler 194 1 /8 202 3 /8 30 30 1 /8 19 4 /8 4 6 /8 5 6 7 Dakota Co., NE E. Keith Fahrenholz 194 201 6 /8 28 4 /8 28 6 /8 22 2 /8 5 5 6 6 Kent Co., MD Kevin C. Miller 193 7/8 197 4 /8 25 2 /8 25 2 /8 21 5 /8 4 7/8 4 7/8 7 6 Van Buren Co., IA W. Eugene Zieglowsky 193 6 /8 210 2 /8 24 5 /8 24 4 /8 18 1 /8 5 5 7 7 Christopher Lake, SK Jerry Thorson 193 6 /8 205 4 /8 29 5 /8 30 23 1 /8 5 4 /8 5 4 /8 6 6 Antigonish Co., NS Kevin Boyle 193 5 /8 202 5 /8 28 5 /8 28 3 /8 23 1 /8 4 6 /8 4 7/8 6 5 Des Moines Co., IA Picked Up 4 6 5 7 4 3 193 /8 204 /8 29 29 /8 23 /8 5 /8 5 /8 6 6 Linn Co., IA Picked Up 193 3 /8 212 1 /8 25 6 /8 24 5 /8 19 1 /8 5 6 /8 5 5 /8 8 8 Witchekan Lake, SK Marcel Tetreault 193 3 /8 209 2 /8 27 7/8 29 25 4 /8 5 3 /8 5 5 /8 7 5 Franklin Co., MA Kajetan R. Sovinski 193 2 /8 206 5 /8 28 6 /8 28 6 /8 21 2 /8 4 4 /8 4 4 /8 5 7 Itasca Co., MN Picked Up 193 2 /8 201 2 /8 27 5 /8 25 6 /8 19 4 /8 5 4 /8 5 2 /8 5 5 Sanborn Co., SD Glen McClane 193 2 /8 210 6 /8 26 25 6 /8 22 2 /8 5 6 /8 5 6 /8 5 6 Aroostook Co., ME Ronnie Cox 193 2 /8 208 1 /8 28 3 /8 27 7/8 22 2 /8 5 2 /8 5 4 /8 8 6 Jackson Co., MI Craig Calderone 2 3 4 1 6 2 2 193 /8 207 /8 29 /8 29 /8 24 /8 5 /8 5 /8 7 5 Chitek Lake, SK David L. Wilson 193 202 3 /8 25 6 /8 26 25 5 3 /8 5 5 /8 6 6 South Dakota Unknown 192 7/8 204 1 /8 27 4 /8 27 2 /8 19 3 /8 4 3 /8 4 5 /8 8 9 York Co., ME Alphonse Chase 192 7/8 209 5 /8 27 7/8 28 2 /8 21 7/8 5 5 1 /8 7 8 Marshall Co., MN Richard Kasprowicz 192 7/8 202 1 /8 28 1 /8 28 1 /8 19 7/8 5 7/8 6 10 7 Williamson Co., IL A. & J. Albers 192 7/8 200 1 /8 26 6 /8 25 6 /8 18 4 /8 5 1 /8 5 1 /8 7 6 Wabatansik Creek, AB Norman Trudeau 7 1 6 7 5 4 3 192 /8 207 /8 25 /8 25 /8 18 /8 5 /8 5 /8 6 9 Makwa Lake, SK Ken Brown 192 7/8 208 2 /8 28 2 /8 28 5 /8 22 5 2 /8 5 2 /8 7 7 Mercer Co., IL Jerry W. Whitmire 192 6 /8 198 6 /8 26 27 19 2 /8 5 6 /8 5 6 /8 6 6 Washington Co., NE Robert E. Wackel 192 5 /8 199 30 30 3 /8 23 1 /8 5 1 /8 5 3 /8 5 5 Stark Co., IL Rebecca Ratay 192 5 /8 236 3 /8 30 5 /8 29 4 /8 20 1 /8 5 2 /8 5 4 /8 9 12 Pushmataha Co., OK Jason L. Boyett 192 3 /8 195 5 /8 24 1 /8 23 6 /8 17 3 /8 5 4 6 /8 6 6 Monroe Co., IN Donald L. Fritch 192 3 /8 208 3 /8 28 4 /8 28 2 /8 19 4 /8 5 7/8 5 4 /8 9 6 Monroe Co., IA Roy E. Allison 192 3 /8 199 7/8 26 7/8 26 7/8 18 5 /8 4 6 /8 5 1 /8 5 6 Jennings Co., IN Walter M. Johnson 192 3 /8 199 6 /8 28 6 /8 28 4 /8 21 5 /8 5 4 /8 5 4 /8 6 5 Clinton Co., OH Kenny Pickard 2 5 2 3 6 2 4 192 /8 211 /8 27 /8 27 /8 22 /8 4 /8 4 /8 6 7 Frio Co., TX Basil Dailey 192 2 /8 200 2 /8 28 2 /8 28 7/8 23 5 /8 5 3 /8 5 4 /8 6 5 Pope Co., MN Roger D. Syrstad 192 2 /8 194 4 /8 26 7/8 26 7/8 18 4 /8 5 4 /8 5 4 /8 5 5 Mills Co., IA John Chase 192 2 /8 204 3 /8 29 1 /8 27 7/8 21 4 /8 5 7/8 5 4 /8 6 5 Souris River, MB T.K. Patterson & D. Dickson

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213 5 /8 — 192 2 /8

Date Killed Rank

Daryl L. Blum 2002 Cabela’s, Inc. 2006 NY Dept. of Env. Cons. 1939 Timothy E. Reed 2004 Blaine D. Kreps 2005 Dennis P. Finger 1974 Bass Pro Shops 1985 Charles Q. Rives 2006 MI Whitetail 1996 Hall of Fame Mus. Bass Pro Shops 1980 Bass Pro Shops 1986 Keith S. Brossard 1999 Goldie Haske 1945 Lawrence J. Youngman 1992 H. James Reimer 1991 Bass Pro Shops 1988 Ray Schremp 2000 Thomas D. Friedkin 1963 Michael R. Edle 1989 H. James Reimer 1952 Roger H. Mann 2004 John L. Stein 1906 Barry Peterson 1995 Robert Sands 1960 Bass Pro Shops 1985 Kent E. Anderson 1999 Philip Philipowich 1985 Kevin L. Bruner 1994 B. Dodd Porter 1985 D.J. Hollinger & B. Howard 1993 William R. Mikijanis 1985 Bass Pro Shops 1962 Gerald Whitehead 1990 Bass Pro Shops 1989 Bass Pro Shops 1977 D. Bates & S. Winkler 1983 E. Keith Fahrenholz 1966 Kevin C. Miller 2002 W. Eugene Zieglowsky 1997 Jerry Thorson 1959 Bass Pro Shops 1987 Jerry A. Chubb 1962 Gary W. Bowen 1994 Marcel Tetreault 1998 Kajetan R. Sovinski 2002 Paul M. Shaw 1935 Maine Antler 1948 Shed & Wildl. Mus. Bass Pro Shops 1965 Bass Pro Shops 1986 David L. Wilson 1992 Eugene J. Lodermeier 1964 Earl Taylor 1920 T. Emanuelson & 1973 J. Kasprowicz A. & J. Albers 1991 Norman Trudeau 1992 Ken Brown 1993 Cabela’s, Inc. 2000 Robert E. Wackel 1961 Rebecca Ratay 2003 Jason L. Boyett 2007 Donald L. Fritch 1992 Roy E. Allison 1995 Walter M. Johnson 1997 Kenny Pickard 2006 John L. Stein 1903 B&C National Collection 1989 John Chase 1997 T.K. Patterson & 2002 D. Dickson

21 21 23 23 23 26 27 27 29 30 31 31 33 34 35 36 37 38 38 40 40 42 43 44 44 44 47 48 49 49 51 52 52 54 55 55 57 58 59 60 60 62 63 64 64 66 66 66 66 66 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 78 79 79 81 81 81 81 85 85 85 85

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Long considered “The Book” of big game records, Boone and Crockett

Club’s newest edition of Records of North American Big Game is the most complete big game records book cataloging the greatest big game ever taken in North America.

This volume of Records of North American Big Game is the thirteenth in a series of world renowned records books begun by the Boone and Crockett Club in 1932. The tabular listings are based on the Boone and Crockett Club’s copyrighted method of scoring. First adopted in 1950, this is the universally recognized standard for judging North American big game. Hunters, wildlife biologists, state and provincial game managers, federal wildlife officials, and anyone with a sincere interest in biological data of big game species will find this book an invaluable reference source.

Records of North American Big Game, 13th Edition features: n

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Listings of nearly 28,000 native North American big game trophies in 38 categories, with detailed measurements, location, year taken, and more — an increase of over 5,000 trophies from the previous edition. Also, B&C gross scores are included for the first time. Five new World’s Records for grizzly bear, nontypical American elk, tule elk, mountain caribou, and musk ox (tie). Over 200 field photographs, plus over 300 portrait photographs of the top-ranking trophies for each category.

Top: Paul T. Deuling’s new World’s Record mountain caribou. Above: Robert J. Evans’ awardwinning black bear scoring 22-13/16. Right: Riley F. Ottenbreit with his typical whitetail deer from Saskatchewan.

Informative chapters that every outdoorsman will enjoy including topics such as maintaining Fair Chase standards in today’s technologically advanced world, the truth about the use of lead ammunition, the science and management behind Newfoundland’s woodland caribou program, and details about abuses to the Equal Access to Justice Act by special interest $49.95 US groups, how it affects conservation, and what’s being done to fix the problem. Also included are chapters about the policies of the Club’s Big Game Records Committee and general measuring techniques. Thirty-two pages featuring stunning, color photography of big game animals by some of today’s top wildlife photographers. n

w w w. b o o n e a n d c r o c k e t t c l u b . c o m

SPORTS & RECREATION / Hunting

Records of North American Big Game, 13th Edition  

This volume of Records of North American Big Game is the thirteenth in a series of world renowned records books begun by the Boone and Crock...