Issuu on Google+

Dedicated to Enoch Cho

Bubble Gum

It was my cousin, my sister and I. We walked out of the small deli and headed for my  cousin’s home. This was one of my few trips to visit my relatives in Korea. I could still count  my age with my fingers. Nine. It was hot and humid in the countryside and in the night if  everything was quiet, you could hear the waves nearby, but it wasn’t night right now. The  walk back was long and arduous because I remember feeling the jutting rocks digging into  the soles of my slippers. Walking on this path required concentration, because it was narrow  and was elevated above the muddy rice fields.  The next thing I knew, a commercial white­colored truck was coming our way. My  sister commanded confidently to move to the side. So as the truck passed by (I don’t know—I  think the rocks hate me), I fell into the rice fields. “Here, give me your hand,” my cousin said, and so I got pack up on the path, my  other hand holding the bag of candy high above my head, undamaged. They took it so it  wouldn’t get dirty and so I walked home, my feet making music with the semi­crusty mud.

“It’s ok. It’s ok,” my mom repeated. She wiped off a tear off my eyes. It was hot and  humid outside and I was naked standing on a tub getting bathed by mom. I was staring  hopelessly at my cousins staring through the window who were shrieking with laughter, my  green chewing gum bouncing inside their teeth. 

Joseph An


Bubble Gum