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[Download] The Long Season of Rain

The Long Season of Rain Helen Kim *Download PDF | ePub | DOC | audiobook | ebooks

#3064965 in Books 1997-09-28 1997-09-28Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 .71 x 4.18 x 6.89l, Binding: Mass Market Paperback256 pages | File size: 60.Mb Helen Kim : The Long Season of Rain before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Long Season of Rain: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. An interesting and successful look into another culture dealing with


universal issues.By DaveThe Long Season of Rain was a very interesting read. The 11 year old narrator, Junghee, tells the story with a clear, unsentimental voice. This is an adult as much as young adult book. The novel is an up close view of the Korean culture in the late 60's. The drama plays out in a core family of six, with an 11 year old orphan boy, and a matriarchal grandmother.As the story unfolds it shows how power is granted in this particular culture according to age, class, gender, style and physical beauty. Junghee describes the challenges and sacrifices of her mother, and herself, in accepting and living within these rigid roles given them. As the story progressed it was interesting to see how the mother and young daughter were much alike in character strength and courage.The father is an unhappy, womanizing, harsh man, who early on breaks down emotionally and admits to the family, and his mother, of being unfit as a father. It was very interesting to me how this man's breakdown and confession was left at the time with no additional comments from the narrator. The story is told in this understated style.Another example of understatement was Junghee's comments on her grandmothers character, saying she forces people to accept her gifts. That this was the grandmother's idea of generosity. It's all left at that, no further comments, no connecting of the dots.The different characters are shown as they are seen through the eyes of Junghee. They are presented by what they say and how they behave with no one stereotyped, demonized, or made a saint. This includes the narrator herself. The author paces the story in a deliberate, telling manner, bringing the reader into the world of fleshed out, three dimensional people.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. A beautifully crafted storyBy Jane LeeA beautifully crafted story...This is a book I recommend for anyone who can appreciate the unadulterated and poignant witness of an adolescent girl as she relays the vulnerable and sometimes painful aspects of childhood, society and humanity, which I believe can resonate with readers universally. As a Korean-American, I was especially moved by the complex cultural motifs that the author artfully presented between the lines, which gave me a deeper understanding of Korean familial structure and culture.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. The Deep Rooted Season of RainBy A CustomerThe Long Season of Rain by Helen Kim is an interesting book that pulls you in as you read more. It is about a family of six living in Korea with their paternal grandmother. They take in a young boy named Pyungsoo, from a friend of their grandmother's. They keep him until someone will adopt him. As they keep him they find themselves becoming attached to him. Junehee, the main character of this book, finds herself deeply attached to him, almost as if he were her brother. Junehee does not want to let the boy be adopted, but her father and grandmother think that it would be wrong to adopt him for themselves because he is not of their stock. Slowly this makes their family break apart. The book describes what happens to their family and little Pyungsoo. I would recommend this book for its excitement and its way of describing family relationships. Elements of excitement occur many times in this book. For example, when Pyungsoo was at the playground and Junehee's cousin came and pushed him off the landing of a fort. This broke Pyungsoo's arm. Also when the family goes to the beach and does not have a very restful vacation because of their father leaving to go fishing, because he and their mother had gotten into a fight. Family relationships are also some of the big happenings. The Uhnni family spits up many times because of different opinions about where Pyungsoo should go thus there is a kind of unhappy mood lingering around the home of the family. Even though this book was very entertaining and exciting it still has a few problems. One problem with this book is that it is kind of slow in scene changes. It becomes almost annoying that the main character can't stop thinking and makes the book longer than it has to be. But this book is still worth reading; the positive points of this story out weigh the negative. So go ahead and read it. When the grey Korean Changma--the rainy season--arrives, eleven-year-old Junehee resigns herself to long months cooped up with her sisters, her mother, and her grandmother. But this year, the Changma brings more than water. Orphaned by a mudslide, a young boy comes to live in Junehee's house--and stirs up long-hidden secrets in her family.For as the rain drums out its story on the sloped roofs of the village, Junehee's own family story unfolds. And Junehee soon realizes that her mother's sadness is tied to a long-standing tradition that neglects women's dreams--a tradition that Junehee hopes to break free of. . . . From Publishers WeeklyGrowing up in Korea during the '60s, four sisters are all devoted to their dutiful mother and resentful of their often absent father, but it is 11-year-old Junehee, the second oldest daughter, who is most affected by the friction between her parents and her mother's deep despair. Like her mother, Junehee feels sympathy for the boy who is brought to their house after being orphaned in a flood. Others, including Junehee's strict paternal grandmother, scorn Pyungsoo because he is from a lower class. Junehee's mother silently endures demeaning treatment and tries to ignore ridicule aimed at the child, until the day she is forbidden to adopt him. Shortly thereafter, both she and Junehee rebel against restrictions of their household and their society as their long-suppressed anger rises to the surface. Firsttime author Kim's calmly but sharply observant narrative, written from Junehee's point of view, affords insight into another culture and into the more universal circumstance of an unhappy marriage ruled by a husband. A master of understatement, Kim conveys tremendous meaning between the lines. The emotions behind day-to-day conversations, gestures and events are as unmistakable as the compassion and sensitivity of her two heroines. Ages 12-up. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.From School Library JournalGrade 7 Up-Because her father wished for a son, 10-


year-old Junehee has a boy's name. Her father, a remote, domineering man, is the catalyst for much of the sorrow in this compelling novel set in 1969 Seoul, South Korea. That year, during the changma, or rainy season, an orphan boy comes to live with Junehee's family, offering the girl a special friendship before he finally leaves to live with a family who wants him. The tenuous, then strong friendship between the two children is a counterpoint to the brutal relationship between Junehee's parents. Her mother, a contemporary woman caught in the restrictive values of a traditional family, struggles to survive. The woman's fight to hold herself and her family together are distilled through the eyes of a sensitive child. Vivid imagery captures each thoughtfully rendered character: spoiled Auntie, who wears red lipstick and shoes though they are thought immodest; Mother, who cuts her hair in a daring act of defiance; the unfaithful father, who admits, finally, that he has not been a good person. The narrative moves forward in appropriately formal diction and through the use of dialogue. The setting is well realized: the rainy season is so present that the pages are nearly damp. The themes of the value of friendship and love shine through. Despite the age of the protagonist, the book's thematic sophistication make it an outstanding choice for thoughtful YAs.Carolyn Noah, Central Mass. Regional Library System, Worcester, MACopyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.From BooklistGr. 10 and up. Like many of the Edge Books, this unforgettable novel, set in Seoul, Korea, in 1969, will appeal as much to adults as to older teens. The first-person narrative is totally true to 11-year-old Junehee's point of view, but it is her mother's story that is the core of the novel. Junehee sees what marriage means for women: Mother had to leave her own family and become a stranger in her mother-in-law's house, with no rights, no control. Mother's suffering reaches the breaking point when her domineering husband and his mother refuse to allow her to adopt an orphan child she loves. Yet the relationships are complex. Father is mean, and society gives him power, but he is weak. His mother is unfeeling to her daughter-in-law, but trying to do her best for the family. Junehee and her sisters quarrel; the oldest, bossy one is a spiteful bully; Junehee is the responsible, nurturing one, her mother's successor. At times there's just too much local color and culture; even if food means a lot, we don't have to hear about every ingredient in every meal and how they cooked it. But as in Laura Esquivel's adult novel Like Water for Chocolate (1992), the domestic details tell a heartfelt story of women in family and community. Hazel Rochman

THE-LONG-SEASON-OF-RAIN  

YA BOOKS SET IN KOREA , YA BOOKS WITH KOREAN MAIN CHARACTERS

THE-LONG-SEASON-OF-RAIN  

YA BOOKS SET IN KOREA , YA BOOKS WITH KOREAN MAIN CHARACTERS

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